Tag Archives: vegan

Sesame Soba Noodles with Kale and Edamame

Super Easy Sesame Soba Noodles with Kale and Edamame

Soba noodles are quick to cook and they work well at room temperature, making them a natural choice for a quick or make-ahead vegan lunch. You could even whip up this dish before leaving the house, as it comes together in one pot in under 10 minutes. Although it includes only a few ingredients, it is very flavourful— soy sauce and sesame oil bring so much to the table.

Sesame Soba Noodles with Kale and Edamame

Sesame Soba Noodles with Kale and Edamame

Ingredients
6 oz soba noodles
1 cup frozen shelled edamame
¼ cup soy sauce
1 ½ Tbsp sesame oil
1 tsp Sriracha or other chili-garlic hot sauce (optional)
2 cups finely chopped kale

Directions
1. Boil the noodles and edamame together until both are tender, 3 to 4 minutes (double check your packages to make sure this is the correct cooking time, as there may be some variation). Drain and rinse under warm water to prevent clumping.

2. Toss the cooked noodles and edamame with soy sauce, sesame oil, hot sauce (if using), and kale. Taste and adjust the flavours.

3. Refrigerate any leftovers for up to 2 to 3 days.

The Vedan Family Cookbook by Anna Pippus coverExcerpted from The Vegan Family Cookbook by Anna Pippus. Copyright © 2021 Anna Pippus. Photography © 2021 Anna Pippus. Published by Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

The Vegan Family Cookbook, Amazon, $30

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Love this soba noodle recipe? See our guide to alternative pasta for more noodle options.

Yasaman and Samira Haj-Shafiei, co-founders of Organic Bytes

These Sisters Are Changing the Dessert Game with Their Stunning Gluten and Dairy-Free Vegan Cakes

When it comes to buying a store-bought cake, you’re usually met with two refined sugar-laden choices: chocolate or vanilla. Organic Bytes, a better-for-you cake business that offers gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan cakes that are free of refined sugars and white flours, is setting out to change that. Founded by sisters and self-taught bakers Yasaman and Samira Haj-Shafiei, Organic Bytes’ confections rely on nutrient-dense organic ingredients like organic almond, coconut and oat flours and natural sweeteners like honey, maple syrup and even sweet potato. Visually, each cake is an Instagram-worthy masterpiece: From edible flowers to elegant cashew frosting brushstrokes, the cakes are *almost* too pretty to eat.

Yasaman and Samira Haj-Shafiei, co-founders of Organic Bytes

Organic Bytes started as a pandemic side hustle. In 2020, Samira was on maternity leave from her job in chemical engineering, and Yasaman had downtime from her career in the business start-up world. Eventually, it turned into a full-time labour of love for the sisters.  “We were eating wholesome foods in every aspect of our lives, but when it came to celebrations with our families, we were still just feeding our daughters refined sugars and white flour, and we didn’t want that,” explains Yasaman. “We thought: ‘Why do we have to sacrifice that part of our lives?’ And that’s how Organic Bytes started.”

Related: This Popcorn Shop is Destigmatizing the Ex-Con Label, One Kernel at a Time

Neither Yasaman nor Samira have any specific dietary restrictions and the goal of creating better-for-you cakes was never about dieting or calorie counting. Rather, it was about putting an emphasis on wholesome foods in every aspect of their lives, including celebrations worthy of a special dessert. Aspects of their Muslim background have also been seamlessly woven into their creations: “Dates are the sweetener we use in our daily lives: they’re a sacred food in Islam because it’s what the Prophet used to break his fast. It felt natural to include dates in our cakes.”

Organic Bytes/ Edible Flower Petal Cake

Yasaman and Samira recognize that in the past, the wellness food space has lacked diversity. “Being one of the only people who looked like me in the wellness industry has actually given me the courage to keep going with Organic Bytes, because if there’s representation it encourages other people who may look like me to pursue their passion,” says Yasaman. “I thought, if we can make this work and set an example for other women, we can help diversify the image that’s out there right now.”

Related: An Afro-Caribbean Farmers’ Market is Helping Revitalize a Toronto Neighbourhood

Because the sisters rely on atypical ingredients like almond flour, arrowroot starch and flax meal, they had to develop new and sophisticated formulas for every single cake they offer. This is where Samira’s background in chemical engineering really came into play: “I was always doing testing hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and I actually look at the cakes we make as their own kinds of experiments, because the ingredients we work with are so completely different from traditional cakes that you don’t necessarily get the same results,” Samira explains.

An assortment of Organic Bytes cakes

While Samira focused on recipe development, Yasaman took charge of Organic Bytes’ brand strategy. She used her experience working with start-ups and the wellness industry to connect with women in Toronto and Calgary. Ultimately, this helped ensure their new company would meet the demands of the respective markets of each city. Like their cakes, their approach to e-commerce is a game-changer: “With a lot of traditional cake companies, you have to place an order a month in advance. With us, you can place your order two days in advance and it’ll arrive on your doorstep.”

It’s undeniable that the sister’s unconventional backgrounds have proven to be a recipe for success: their cakes have quickly become popular with influencers and families alike, with a wait-list for their creations and plans to expand the business into selling dry goods and cake mixes as well. Organic Bytes cakes are currently available to order in Toronto and Calgary, but the sister’s sites are set on more cities across Canada.

Looking for more cake inspo? See our Birthday Cake Recipes That Will Make Anyone a Dessert Person.

spicy lentil curry on a white plate with a side of pita

Easy Spicy Lentil and Vegetable Curry

Cooler temperatures call for hearty soups, stews and curries, but who says they have to be meat-based? For a vegetarian twist that’s as easy as it is satisfying, serve up a bowl of this spicy veggie lentil curry. It’s full of flavor with a dash of heat, and comes together in just 30 minutes.

spicy lentil curry on a white plate with a side of pita

Spicy Lentil Veggie Curry

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Total time: 30 minutes
Yield: serves 8-10

Ingredients:
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 medium shallot, chopped
1 tsp ground ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small scotch bonnet, or jalapeno, chopped
1 medium zucchini, chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground coriander
1 tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp sea salt
2 cups water
1 ½ cups red lentils
1 (14oz) can full fat unsweetened coconut milk
2-3 cups baby spinach, chopped
Pita, to serve

ingredients for spicy lentil curry

Directions:
1. Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté shallots, ginger, garlic and scotch bonnet until brown, about 1 minute. Add in zucchini, cumin, coriander, turmeric and salt and stir for 1 minute.

Related: Vegan West African Peanut Lentil Stew

2. Add in water, lentils and coconut milk, then stir. Cover the skillet and cook for about 12-15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3. When ready, turn the heat off, then stir in the spinach into the hot curry until withered. Serve with a side of fresh pita.

spicy lentil curry in a pan

Looking for more veggie-based dinner ideas? See our 15 Best Vegan Soup and Stew Recipes You’ll Crave All Winter.

vegan scalloped potatoes in a glass casserole dish

The Creamiest Vegan Scalloped Potatoes with Thyme Almond Crumble

These creamy, hearty potatoes topped with crispy thyme and almond crumble are sure to be the star side dish of your next holiday meal. In the past, vegans were often forgotten or completely neglected when it came to holiday dinners, but not anymore. This dairy-free take on classic scalloped potatoes leaves out the heavy cream and butter but not the classic flavour, so you can guarantee that everyone at the table will be satisfied.

vegan scalloped potatoes in a glass casserole dish

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes with Thyme Almond Crumble

Servings: 4-6
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 60 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Ingredients:
For the Scalloped Potatoes
1 cup full-fat canned coconut milk
½ cup vegetable broth
2 ½ tsp arrowroot starch or powder
Sea salt and pepper, to taste
2 pounds Yukon or russet potatoes
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
½ tsp garlic powder
½ tsp onion powder
2 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed

For the Almond Crumble
½ cup raw almonds
1 Tbsp nutritional yeast
¼ tsp sea salt
2 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed

For Garnish
Fresh thyme sprigs

ingredients for vegan scalloped potatoes on a white countertop

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F and line a 11 x 7-inch baking dish with parchment paper.

2. Place a small pot over medium heat, pour in the coconut milk, broth and arrowroot starch. Whisk to combine.

3. Simmer for 4-5 minutes, whisking often, until the sauce thickens. Add a pinch of sea salt and pepper.

4. Thinly slice the potatoes into discs and toss with extra virgin olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, and thyme.

a pot of creamy "cheese" alongside thinly sliced potatoes for vegan scalloped potatoes

5. Spread half of the potato discs in an even layer on the bottom of the pan. Pour half of the sauce on top.

6. Layer the rest of the potato discs on top, and pour over the remaining sauce.

Related: This Vegan Pumpkin Soup Has a Super-Secret Immune-Boosting Ingredient

thinly sliced potatoes in a casserole dish for vegan scalloped potatoes

7. Cover the baking dish tightly with foil and bake for 40 minutes.

8. As the potatoes bake, make the almond crumble. Pulse all crumble ingredients in a food processor until the almonds are small and crumbly. You can roughly chop by hand if you don’t have a food processor.

almond crumble in a food processor for vegan scalloped potatoes

9. After 40 minutes, take the dish out of the oven, uncover it and evenly sprinkle the almond crumble on top. Bake for an additional 20 minutes until golden brown and bubbly. Serve immediately.

Related: Vegan Grain-Free Sweet Potato Gnocchi with High-Protein Pesto

a closeup of vegan scalloped potatoes with almond crumble

Love Tamara and Sarah’s vegan scalloped potatoes? Try their vegan cornbread next!

moroccan beet salad in a blue and white patterned bowl

The Only Beet Salad Recipe You’ll Ever Need

You’ll find a version of this tangy beet salad at any Moroccan feast – and for good reason: It’s so delicious and easy! It’s one of my favourite “non-recipe” recipes and can be served as part of a holiday spread or piled into a crusty loaf with tahini or hummus for the best vegan sandwich.

This salad needs to be made in advance so the beets have time to cook, cool and marinate in the fridge to soak up all that lemony and cumin-infused flavour. A splash of maple syrup (my twin sister’s go-to secret ingredient) isn’t traditional but it lends a perfectly subtle sweetness to this classic. You can roast the beets if you like, but for this salad, I prefer the smoother texture that comes from boiling them.

Related: You Will *Heart* These Moroccan Stuffed Artichokes

moroccan beet salad in a blue and white patterned bowl

Moroccan Beet Salad

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 6 to 8

Ingredients:
6 to 8 medium beets, or 3 to 4 large ones, tops removed
1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced
3 Tbsp olive oil
Juice of 1 lemon (3 to 5 Tbsp lemon juice)
½ tsp cumin, or more, to taste
1 Tbsp of maple syrup
Salt and pepper, to taste
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley
Salt and black or white pepper

ingredients for moroccan beet salad on a marble countertop

Directions:
1. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil, add beets and simmer for 30 to 45 minutes, depending on their size. To test doneness, pierce with a paring knife, inserting about an inch into the beet or more for larger beets. The blade should go into the tender flesh easily without any resistance.

2. Remove beets from the pot and place them in a colander. Run them under cold water to cool slightly. Remove the skins with a paring knife and your fingers, they’ll slide off easily. (Tip: Wear food handling gloves for this step to prevent stains on your skin.) Cut beets into approximately 2-inch pieces.

boiled, sliced beets in a white bowl

3. In a large mixing bowl, add sliced beets, onions, olive oil, lemon, cumin, maple syrup, salt and pepper and mix.

Related: Bright and Bold Moroccan-Spiced Cauliflower Bites

ingredients for beet salad in a white bowl, ready to be tossed

4. Chill for at least 3 hours until the salad is cold and seasoning is absorbed. Readjust lemon, cumin and salt as necessary.

Related: How to Grow Fall Vegetables and What to Do With Them

tossed beet salad in a white bowl

5. Top with fresh cilantro or parsley before serving.

moroccan beet salad in a white bowl, ready to serve

Love Claire’s beet salad? Try her challah next!

vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple

Rosemary Maple Vegan Cornbread is the Perfect Sweet and Savoury Combination

Fall weather and cornbread go hand-in-hand, and this vegan recipe is sure to become your new go-to. All you need is one bowl, (yay for fewer dishes!) and ingredients you most likely already have in your pantry and fridge. With a perfect moist center and the crispiest edges, it’s the perfect vessel to lather vegan butter onto. Combining maple syrup with fragrant rosemary lends this classic recipe a punchy twist that complements its sweet and earthy flavours.

vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple

Rosemary Maple Vegan Cornbread

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cooking Time: 30-35 minutes
Total Time: 40-45 minutes
Servings: 6-8

Ingredients:
1½ cups spelt, whole wheat or all-purpose flour
1½ cups cornmeal
½ tsp sea salt
2 Tbsp baking powder
2 cups unsweetened almond milk or non-dairy milk of choice
⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
½  cup maple syrup
1 heaping Tbsp fresh rosemary or 1 tsp dried rosemary, plus 1 sprig fresh rosemary for topping (optional)
Vegan butter, to serve (optional)

ingredients for vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. In a large bowl, combine the flour, cornmeal, sea salt and baking powder and mix thoroughly.

Related: 5 Genius Ways to Use Cornbread Mix (Hint: Buttermilk Pancakes)

dry ingredients for vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple in a bowl

3. Make a little well in the center, then pour in the almond milk, olive oil and maple syrup.

4. Whisk the dry and wet ingredients together until a batter forms, then fold in the rosemary.

Related: Vegan Shepherd’s Pie with Crispy Cauliflower Crust

batter for vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple in a bowl

5. Oil a 9-inch cast iron skillet thoroughly. You can also use a brownie tin or a pie plate. Pour the batter in and top with a sprig of fresh rosemary (optional).

6. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Related: Savoury Pumpkin, Feta & Sage Muffins

batter for vegan cornbread with rosemary and maple in a cast iron skillet

7. Enjoy on its own or with vegan butter.

8. Store on the counter for 1-2 days and toast before eating. You can also store it in the fridge for up to a week and in the freezer for 2-3 months.

Love Tamara and Sarah’s vegan cornbread? Try their herby green soup next!

steamed chinese eggplant recipe on a white plate

This Silky, Tender Chinese Steamed Eggplant is Topped with Aromatics and Drizzled with Sizzling Hot Oil

Everyone needs at least one reliable and reproducible recipe for entertaining. This is mine, because it’s easy, unique, and universally pleasing. This dish can be prepared ahead of time, with ample time in the fridge to cool down. I find that eggplant can be a polarizing vegetable—some people dislike the texture, but others have no problem with it. I used to dislike eggplant until I discovered the steaming method. Eggplant is often fried with a lot of oil and ends up being too heavy for my tastes, but steamed eggplant is light and a wonderful vessel to soak up sauce. It’s a fast way to cook eggplant, and even more important, the texture transforms and becomes silky soft, tender, and creamy.

steamed chinese eggplant recipe on a white plate

Seasoned Steamed Eggplant

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 15-20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 35-40 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
2 Chinese or Japanese eggplants
2 tsp white vinegar
2 Tbsp light soy sauce
1½ tsp dark soy sauce
1 tsp black vinegar
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 tsp sesame oil
½ tsp ground white pepper
1 tsp minced fresh ginger
2 scallions, thinly sliced crosswise
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp neutral cooking oil, such as canola or grapeseed oil
2 tsp red chili oil, optional
1½ tsp toasted white sesame seeds
Handful cilantro leaves

Directions:
1. Cut off the base of each eggplant, then cut each eggplant into 3 segments. Halve each segment lengthwise so that you have 6 pieces total per eggplant.

2. Add the white vinegar to a large bowl of water. Add the eggplant pieces and let them sit in the vinegar water for 10 to 15 minutes.

3. Set a bamboo steamer over 2 inches (5 cm) of water in a wok, and bring the water to a boil over high. Place a layer of eggplant skin side down in the steamer, then pile the remaining pieces on top (see Note), working in batches if necessary.

4. Cover and steam the eggplant over high for 5 to 7 minutes, until soft and easily pierced with a chopstick. The texture should be silky soft and creamy but still firm enough to hold its shape. Set the steamed eggplant aside in a colander to cool slightly.

5. Meanwhile, mix together the light and dark soy sauces, black vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, and white pepper. Set the sauce aside.

6. When the eggplant is cool enough to handle, tear each piece lengthwise into strips about 3/8 inch (1 cm) wide. Arrange the eggplant strips on a plate. Pile the ginger, half of the scallions, and the garlic in the center of the eggplant.

7. In a small saucepan, heat the cooking oil until it bubbles when a chopstick is inserted, 2 to 3 minutes. Pour the hot oil over the aromatics. They should sizzle and release a gorgeous fragrance.

8. Drizzle the soy sauce mixture and chili oil, if using, over the egg- plant. Top with the remaining scallions, the toasted sesame seeds, and cilantro leaves. Serve immediately at room temperature.

Note: Step two is a trick to keep that gorgeous purple on the eggplant, otherwise it will turn brown. You can omit this step, though; it has no effect on the taste. When layering eggplant in the steamer, I’ve found that piling the pieces yields the best result. Place the bottom layer skin down to prevent oversteaming, then pile the other eggplant segments on, crisscrossing them to create air pock- ets so steam can reach every piece.

the cover of my shanghai by betty liu

From the book MY SHANGHAI by Betty Liu. Copyright © 2021 by Betty Liu. Published by Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. Reprinted by permissions.

MY SHANGHAI: Recipes and Stories from a City on the Water, Amazon, $41

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

The Best Non-Dairy Milks to Meet All Your Needs (From Baking to Latte Frothing)

The list of non-dairy alternatives is extensive, and no longer are the days when soy milk was your only dairy-free option. Non-dairy milk can be made from almonds, cashews, oats, hemp, rice, chickpeas and even peas! Dairy is delicious, but it can also be incredibly challenging to digest, and consuming it may conflict with your moral and environmental principles. Luckily, there are so many non-dairy alternatives out there that you won’t miss dairy at all, whether you’re vegan or intolerant to it.

three dairy free milks on a white countertop

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Calcium: Pea Milk

Pea milk is pretty new on the non-dairy alternatives scene. Soy milk used to be the dairy-free milk of choice for this category, but pea is now winning by a landslide. One cup of pea milk makes up 45% of your daily value of calcium. It actually has 50% more calcium than 2% dairy milk. It also contains 8 grams of protein per cup, which is quite hefty for a non-dairy milk.

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Baking: Almond Milk

Almond milk may be the most popular of the non-dairy alternatives, and can be found pretty much everywhere. We love it the most for baking because it cooperates nicely as a one-to-one milk substitute and is naturally sweet, so it’s fabulous for making desserts. It doesn’t have a strong flavour, so it won’t overpower any other flavours of the baked goods you’re making. You can also easily turn it into a “buttermilk” by adding a tablespoon of lemon juice to one cup of almond milk.

vegan carrot cake on a white plate
Get the recipe for The Ultimate Vegan Carrot Cake with ‘Cream Cheese’ Frosting

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Coffee or Tea: Oat Milk

Oat milk is hands down our favourite non-dairy alternative to pour into coffee or tea. It doesn’t curdle, like most non-dairy milks, and has a really smooth taste and consistency. Other milks are too thin so they immediately separate upon entering your hot beverage, making it a beige coloured piece-y mess. Oat milk has about 16-25 grams of carbohydrates per cup, depending on the brand, and because of this, it’s stable in your coffee and functions similarly to cow’s milk. The higher carb count also makes it naturally sweet and a really pleasant addition to coffee and tea.

Related: How to Make Oat Milk 5 Ways (And Why It’s the Best Non-Dairy Option)

Best Non-Dairy Milk for a Latte/Frothing: Coconut or Oat Milk

This one is a tie between a carton (not can) of coconut milk and oat milk. Both of these are also available in “barista blend” making them even better for frothing and foaming. Oat milk has a neutral and sweet taste, and contains a fibre called beta-glucan, which allows it to foam really nicely. Coconut milk, also naturally sweet, has a higher fat content that lends itself to a nice froth. Coconut also has a distinct taste that you either love or hate, so if you’re not a fan of coconut, choose oat milk instead.

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Cereal: Cashew Milk

Cashew milk is one of those versatile non-dairy alternatives that lends itself well to a variety of dishes, from smoothies to savoury cream sauces. Our favourite way to use it is to pour it over cereal, because it’s naturally creamy, subtly sweet and has a slightly thicker consistency than other nut milks, resembling cow’s milk. Nutritionally speaking, it’s almost identical to almond milk with only one gram of protein, one gram of carbs and two  grams of fat per cup.

oats, coconuts and cashews on a white countertop

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Oatmeal: Rice Milk

Rice milk is our top pick for making oatmeal into a delicious, creamy porridge. It’s thinner than many of the other non-dairy alternatives, but because it’s higher in carbohydrates, it has a really nice natural sweetness that adds wonderful flavour to the oats. Most people start cooking their oatmeal with water and then add milk for flavour and extra creaminess; since rice milk is thin and milky at the same time, it plays double duty in oatmeal.

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Pancakes: Hemp Milk

Hemp milk is the winner when it comes to making pancake batter, especially since most pancakes call for buttermilk. Hemp milk has a higher protein content than many other non-dairy alternatives, so when it’s combined with an acid, like lemon or vinegar, it helps with leavening. The higher protein content will also add moisture and tenderness while giving the batter structure. You can easily make your own hemp milk at home by blitzing up hemp seeds and water.

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Smoothies: Pea or Almond Milk

This is a toss up between pea milk and almond milk. Pea milk boasts a fair amount of protein and calcium, and since most people make smoothies to drink their nutrients, pea milk is a great addition. We also love almond milk for making smoothies. It’s a classic non-dairy alternative and it has a really neutral taste so it won’t imbue any unwanted flavours.

Related: 7 Ways to Make Your Soups Creamy Without Dairy

Best Non-Dairy Milk for Soups: Coconut Milk

Cream-based soups have a thicker and richer consistency compared to brothy ones. We’ve found the best substitute to be full-fat canned coconut milk, and have swapped it in as a dairy substitute for many of the classics, like cream of broccoli, creamy tomato and cream of mushroom. Coconut milk is higher in fat, similar to cream, so it gives the right viscous texture. It does impart a coconut flavour, which we’ve found to be a delicious addition to many of these soups.

Vegan Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk
Get the recipe for Vegan Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk

Best Tasting Non-Dairy Milk (to drink on its own): Soy Milk

Soy milk is the grandparent of non-dairy milks. About a decade ago if you didn’t drink milk, your only option was soy. Although there are many alternatives now, we find that soy is still the best to gulp down on its own. This is because it has a well-rounded flavour that isn’t too strong. It holds up well when chilled or even when heated, so whether you’re drinking it as a refreshing cold drink or as a warming hot beverage, it will perform.

Want more? See here for 12 Surprising Foods You Won’t Believe Are Dairy-Free.

apple fennel stir fry on a white plate with two forks

Apple Fennel Stir Fry is a Sophisticated Way to Eat Your Fruits and Veggies

My sister, Lynn, came up with this elegant side dish. It has become a family favourite, as it tastes fancy yet is so easy to make. It’s easy to fall in love with fennel; its crisp, crunchy texture and aromatic taste have endeared it to many culinary cultures. Fennel has the distinct ability to leave your mouth feeling fresh and has even been used for centuries as a digestive remedy. Many folks will say that it tastes like licorice crossed with celery. The slight licorice taste mellows completely when cooked. At only twenty- eight calories a cup and with good amounts of vitamins A, B and C, fennel may become your new best vegetable friend.

apple fennel stir fry on a white plate with two forks

Fennel Apple Stir Fry

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 6

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons avocado oil
4 cups sliced red or yellow onions
4 cups sliced fennel bulb (see note)
4 cups apples, sliced (about 2 large apples)
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
¼ to ½ teaspoon unrefined pink salt
2 cups fresh sprouts such as broccoli, sunflower, or alfalfa (optional)

Note: Reserve the fennel fronds and use them when making homemade broth or as a salad topper (finely chopped).

Directions:

1. In a large pot, heat the avocado oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.

2. Add the fennel, apple, Italian seasoning and salt and stir-fry until softened but still retaining a firm texture, about 10 minutes.

3. Top with sprouts (if using) and serve.

Excerpted from Becoming Sugar-Free: How to Break Up with Inflammatory Sugars and Embrace a Naturally Sweet Life by Julie Daniluk. Copyright © 2021 by Julie Daniluk. Published by Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

Becoming Sugar-Free: How to Break Up with Inflammatory Sugars and Embrace a Naturally Sweet Life, Amazon, $35.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Shot of healthy, oven-baked doughnuts

Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth With These Vegan No Sugar Do-Nuts

Fried doughnuts? Not here. These doughnuts are baked in a doughnuts mold.

Healthy vegan oven do-nuts

The Oven Do-Nuts

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 10 to 12

Ingredients:

½ cup date puree
1 small can of coconut milk
2 eggs
1 tablespoon ground nutmeg
Pinch of salt
1½ cups pastry flour

Decorations of your choice (such as unsweetened shredded coconut or chopped nuts)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. In a bowl, thoroughly combine all of the ingredients.
  3. Lightly grease the doughnut pan  — otherwise, everything will stick.
  4. Fill the doughnut cups three-quarters of the way up (the doughnuts will puff up upon baking!).
  5. Bake for about 15 minutes
  6. Let cook, then remove from the pan.
  7. If desired, decorate the doughnuts as desired, then make another batch.
  8. Enjoy!

Cover of 'Goodbye Refined Sugar'Excerpted from Goodbye Refined Sugar! by Madame Labriski. Copyright © 2021 Madame Labriski. Photography by Catherine Côté. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

Goodbye Refined Sugar!: Easy Recipes with No Added Sugar or Fat, Amazon, $20.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

a stuffed portobello mushroom on a white plate

These Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms are Jam-Packed with Sweet Potato and Black Beans for a Hearty Vegan Main

Grilled portobello mushrooms are the star of this filling vegan dish that comes together in just 30 minutes. With a nourishing filling of sweet potatoes and black beans, you’ll be hooked on the satisfying mix of textures. Plus, the salsa verde herb sauce lends a tangy hit of acidity to the dish that’ll have you scraping your plate clean.

a stuffed portobello mushroom on a white plateSweet Potato Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms with Salsa Verde

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients:
Salsa Verde:
1 cup cilantro leaves
½ cup mint leaves
1 tsp capers
Juice from 1 lime
1 tsp white wine vinegar
1½ tablespoons honey dijon mustard
2-3 mini pickles, or 1 regular sized pickle
Salt and pepper to taste

Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms:
1 large sweet potato, peeled and cubed
3 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
1 cup canned unsalted black beans, drained and rinsed
2 large portobello mushrooms, stems and gills removed
Avocado, to serve
Arugula, to serve

Mise en place for stuffed portobello mushrooms on a marble countertop

Directions:
1. In a food processor, combine all ingredients for salsa verde. Puree until smooth and set aside.

2. Preheat the oven to 425°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss sweet potatoes with olive oil, salt, and pepper to taste. Place on the baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes.

3. Once sweet potato is cooked, drain the black beans and season with salt to taste. Place sweet potato and black beans in a large bowl, then add in salsa verde and toss gently until the sweet potato and black beans are coated. Set aside and keep warm.

Related: This Easy Ethiopian Mushroom Stir-Fry Will Be Your New Fave Weeknight Meal

A mixture of sweet potato and black beans in a white bowl beside a small bowl of salsa verde for stuffed portobello mushrooms

4. Brush both sides of portobello mushrooms with olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste. Heat a grill pan over medium heat and brush the pan with olive oil. Grill for 3-4 minutes on each side.

5. To serve the portobello mushrooms, top with avocado slices and arugula, finishing off with sweet potato and black bean filling.

Related: One Humble Can of Black Beans, Six Different Meals to Remember

A stuffed portobello mushroom on a white plate

Like Valerie’s stuffed portobellos? Try her vegan steak or vegan spinach and artichoke dip next.

This Creamy Green Hummus is Made for Avocado Lovers

Combining edamame and green peas along with ripe avocado, this take on hummus is bright, fresh, and creamy!

Avo-Mame Hummus

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Blend Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 6

Ingredients:

1½ cups frozen shelled edamame, thawed (see note)
1 cup frozen green peas, thawed (see note)
1 cup cubed ripe avocado
¼-⅓ cup fresh lemon or lime juice
1 medium clove garlic (use more if desired)
1¼-1½ teaspoons sea salt
½ teaspoon ground cumin
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Few ice cubes for blending
Handful fresh basil or cilantro leaves (optional)
½ teaspoon grated lemon or lime zest

Directions:

1. In a high-speed blender (see note), combine the edamame, peas, avocado, lemon juice (starting with ¼ cup), garlic, salt (starting with 1 ¼ teaspoons), cumin, black pepper, and 2–3 ice cubes (as needed to get the puree moving, but not too much to thin out).

Related: Best Ways to Ripen Avocados

2. Puree until smooth, stopping to scrape down the blender as needed.

3. Taste and season with extra salt or lemon juice if desired. If using fresh herbs, pulse them in now, then pulse in the zest.

Related: Bright and Beautiful Beet Hummus

4. Serve or refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 2–3 days (see note).

Edamame/Green Pea Note: To thaw, put the edamame and peas in separate bowls and cover with boiling water. Do them separately, since edamame will need to soak longer (or require draining and a second soak), whereas green peas will thaw in just a minute when covered with boiling water. Drain well.

Blender Note: This hummus works best blended in a high-speed blender, because it will better pulverize the skins on the green peas. You can use a food processor for this recipe, though the hummus will not be as smooth and you may notice the flecks of green peas.

Refrigeration Note: Since this dip has a fair amount of avocado, it will oxidize some, and so the dip is best when eaten freshly made. However, you can keep it for a few days in the refrigerator in an airtight container. I prefer to use a deeper, narrower jar or container, to lessen the oxidizing. After refrigerating, you can scrape off the surface layer of the dip where it has discolored and serve the fresher layer of the dip.

Excerpted from Dreena’s Kind Kitchen: 100 Whole-Foods Vegan Recipes to Enjoy Every Day by Dreena Burton. Copyright © 2021 by Dreena Burton. Published by BenBella Books, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

Dreena’s Kind Kitchen: 100 Whole-Foods Vegan Recipes to Enjoy, Amazon, $32

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

peanut butter pie with a slice about to be served

This Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie is The Perfect Combo of Sweet and Salty

If you enjoy peanut butter cups, you’ll absolutely love this decadent and creamy pie. The best part? The recipe is super easy to make and doesn’t require any baking, so it’s perfect for those hot summer days. But instead of a traditional peanut butter pie, we’ve swapped in some healthier ingredients, like maple syrup instead of refined sugar and coconut milk instead of cream cheese, to make a dairy-free and refined sugar-free version. Using walnuts and dates to form the crust creates a subtly sweet and crumbly alternative that’s gluten- and grain-free. You’ll love the tasty indulgent combo of salty peanut butter and rich dark chocolate. Most of all, you can truly enjoy this no-bake pie knowing it’s made from good-for-you ingredients.

Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie about to be served

Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie

Prep Time: 3 hours
Servings: 8

Ingredients:

Crust:
1 ½ cups walnuts
¼ cup dates
¼ cup cacao powder or cocoa powder
2 Tbsp coconut oil
⅛ tsp sea salt

Filling:
1 ½ cups peanut butter
1 ½ cups full-fat coconut milk
¼ cup maple syrup
¼ tsp sea salt

Chocolate Topping:
½ of a 70% dark chocolate bar (40 grams)
1 Tbsp coconut oil

Ingredients for Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie in a food processor

Directions:
1. You’ll make the crust first. If the dates are dried out or a bit tough, it’s best to soak them in a bowl with warm water to soften, around 5 minutes. Drain the dates out of the water. Then combine the walnuts, dates, cacao powder, coconut oil and sea salt in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse for a minute or two until the mixture is crumbly and begins to stick together.
2. Grease a 9-inch pie dish with coconut oil. Then press the crumbled crust mixture flat across the bottom of the pie dish with your fingers so that it’s evenly spread out.

Ground crust ingredients for Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie in a pie dish

3. After rinsing out the food processor bowl, make the filling. Add the peanut butter, coconut milk, maple syrup and sea salt to the bowl and pulse several times to combine. The mixture will be thick and creamy.
4. Pour the filling over top of the crust and use a spatula to spread out evenly.
5. Place the pie into the refrigerator to chill for at least 2 hours. You can also chill the pie overnight and finish the rest of the steps the next day.

A creamy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie in a glass serving dish

6. Set up a double boiler to make the chocolate topping: Add around 1 cup of water to a small pot, and place a small stainless steel bowl over top. Place the chocolate bar and coconut oil in the bowl. Heat on the stove top, stirring the mixture as the chocolate melts. Once the chocolate is fully melted and a smooth mixture, remove from the heat.
7. Take the chilled pie out of the fridge and use a spoon to drizzle the chocolate mixture over top.
8. Place the pie back in the fridge so that the chocolate topping solidifies. This will only take about 5 minutes.
9. Slice the pie and serve! It is best served chilled. Make sure to store leftovers in the fridge.

A finished Healthy No-Bake Peanut Butter Cup Pie in a glass serving dish

Love all things peanut butter? Try these Chocolate Peanut Butter Whoopie Pies next.

keto arancini in white bowl with parsley

Try This Keto Cauliflower Arancini for a Healthy Snack

Yes, you can absolutely enjoy cheesy arancini and wine with a keto twist! Unlike traditional arancini which is often deep-fried, this arancini with a garlic butter wine sauce is a feel-good alternative packed with tons of flavour, texture and of course, good cheese. You can also easily make this vegan by swapping in vegan dairy and eggs.

keto arancini in white bowl with parsley

Keto Cauliflower Arancini

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 6-8

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp olive oil
3 cups riced cauliflower or cauliflower crumbs
2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp sea salt
1 tsp ground black pepper
1 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
⅔ cup Parmigiano Reggiano, shredded
2 egg yolks
⅓ cup almond flour
¼ coconut flour (optional)
½ cup almond flour
¼ cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
½ stick of unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ dry white wine
¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped

keto arancini ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place a saucepan over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Once the pan is hot, add in cauliflower, oregano, sea salt and pepper and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.

Related: Keto-Friendly Snacks That Are Simple to Make (and Super Satisfying)

2. Transfer cooked cauliflower into a bowl. Add mozzarella, Parmigiano, egg yolks and almond flour and mix until smooth. Now check the consistency of your batter. If your batter seems a little loose or too sticky, add in coconut flour and adjust as needed. You want to be able to form the shape of a ball without it flattening.

keto arancini ingredients in white bowl

3. Using an ice cream scoop or a ⅓ cup, scoop the batter onto the lined baking sheet until you have 6-8 medium sized balls. In a separate plate, combine almond flour and parmigiano cheese. Roll each arancini ball in the almond-cheese mixture and return to the baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 18-20 minutes. Set aside and keep warm.

4. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, add butter. Once melted, add garlic and saute for about a minute. Add wine and simmer until reduced, about 1 minute. Turn the heat off and stir in fresh parsley. Pour the garlic butter wine sauce over the keto arancini. Top with additional parsley, if desired.

keto arancini in white bowl with parsley

Like Valerie’s keto arancini? Try her air fryer corn “ribs” or healthy oven-fried chicken.

Falafel sliders on blue serving platter

Summer Feast! Baked Falafel Sliders With Tabbouleh and Tahini Sauce

You’ve probably heard of falafel before — but what about falafel sliders? They are perfectly crispy on the outside and soft and fluffy on the inside and they’re shallow fried (or even baked) to make the process easier. Serve them on flat breads with tangy tabbouleh salad and a lot of tahini sauce, and you have the perfect summer feast.

Falafel sliders on blue serving platter

Baked Falafel Sliders With Tabbouleh and Tahini

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Rest Time: 60 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 10 falafel patties

Ingredients:

Falafel
¼ yellow onion
3 large garlic cloves
1 cup dry chickpeas (approx. 2 ½ cups after soaking)
1 cup parsley, packed
¼ cup cilantro, packed
1 ½ Tbsp olive oil + ¼ cup for frying/baking
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cumin
¼ tsp black pepper

Tabbouleh
½ cup fine bulgur (can substitute with couscous)
2 cups parsley, packed
1 tomato, finely chopped
¼ cup green onions, finely chopped
¼ cup mint leaves, loosely packed
½ cup lemon juice
3 Tbsp olive oil
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp chilli powder

Tahini Sauce
½ cup tahini paste
Juice of ½ lemon
½ tsp salt

Falafel slider ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Make the falafel: add onion and garlic to a food processor and process for a minute. Next add the chickpeas, parsley, cilantro, olive oil, baking soda, salt, cumin and black pepper and process for a few minutes until well combined and the mixture holds together well.

Falafel slider mixture in food processor

2. Refrigerate for a minimum of 1 hour. Once they’ve rested, form the patties ensuring they are not too thin (approx. ½ – ¾ inch thick).

3. Shallow fry the falafel for 1 minute on each side until golden brown. You can also bake them at 400°F for 25 minutes, flip, then bake for a further 15 minutes.

Falafel sliders being baked on baking tray

4. Make the tabbouleh: soak the fine bulgur in ½ cup of hot water and cover. Let stand for a few minutes, then fluff.

Related: Healthy Middle Eastern Recipes You’ll Make on Repeat

5. Finely chop the parsley, tomato, green onions and mint. In a bowl, mix together the lemon juice, olive oil, salt and chili powder. Mix the bulgur, parsley mixture and dressing together. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

Tabouleh salad in yellow mixing bowl

6. For the tahini sauce: mix together the tahini paste, lemon juice and salt. Whisk everything using a fork continuously until you achieve a smooth consistency. The sauce may seize up when whisking, but continue to whisk until it smoothens out. Thin with a bit of water if required to achieve desired consistency.

7. Serve sliders on flat breads with tabbouleh salad and tahini sauce.

Like Amina’s falafel sliders? Try her 20-minute salmon or her Middle Eastern bulgur, pomegranate and almond salad.

Vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich on bun

This Vegan Nashville Hot Chicken Sandwich Tastes Just Like the Real Thing!

With this Can You Vegan It? recipe, I’m turning everyone’s favourite spicy chicken sandwich into a vegan-friendly dish. What makes the Nashville hot chicken sandwich unique is that it is deep-fried to maximum crispiness and then dipped in a spicy hot oil mixture. To make this easy for the home cook, I’m pan frying the sandwich twice (vs. deep-frying it). Once to cook throughout and once to coat in a mixture of spices. Instead of traditional chicken breast, this sandwich features extra-firm tofu as the protein. Be sure to press out any excess moisture from the tofu before getting started.

Vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich on bun

Vegan Nashville Hot Chicken Sandwich

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4 sandwiches

Ingredients:

1 pound extra-firm tofu, pressed
2 to 3 dashes of hot sauce
½ cup vegan egg substitute (if vegetarian, use traditional eggs)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup panko bread crumbs
Salt and pepper
½ cup canola or vegetable oil, for frying
1 Tbsp brown sugar
2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp smoked paprika
4 sesame buns
Vegan mayonnaise
Bread and butter pickles
Shredded lettuce

Vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Slice the block of tofu into 4 equally sized patties. Add a few dashes of hot sauce to the egg substitute mixture. Put the flour in it’s own bowl and the panko in it’s own bowl. Season the egg substitute mixture, as well as the flour and panko with salt and pepper to taste.

Related: You’ll Never Guess the Secret Ingredient in This Vegan Steak Recipe

2. Dip each tofu patty in the flour, followed by the egg substitute, followed by the panko bread crumbs. Set aside until ready to fry.
When ready to fry, heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Once oil is hot, cook patties for 2 minutes on each side, until crispy and golden.

Tofu for vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich being coated in panko

3. Turn heat off and whisk brown sugar, cayenne pepper, garlic powder and paprika into the pan. Fry the patties once more over low to medium heat until coated, about 15 seconds. Once you remove them from the pan, drain any excess oil onto a paper towel or two.

Vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich being cooked in pan

4. Slather buns with mayonnaise and add patty. Top with pickles and lettuce. Enjoy!

Person holding vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich

Like Marcella’s vegan Nashville hot chicken sandwich? Try her vegan egg salad recipe or her vegan eggnog.

3d printed meat on plate from Aleph Farms

Is 3D-Printed Meat the Next Big Thing? (And How It Really Tastes)

There’s a new wave of alternative meat products coming to our not-so-distant future and is likely to make up a major part of our future diets. Currently, the global market for lab-grown meats is the fastest growing segment in the food industry and is expected to reach $140 billion by 2030, according to forecasts by Blue Horizon Corp.

In 2018, Aleph Farms in Israel successfully cultivated the world’s first beef steak using 3D printing. Today, they’ve upgraded to 3D bioprinting. Unlike 3D printing that uses ink or plastic, 3D bioprinting technology is able to print actual living cells without harming the animal. Essentially, this technology is able to recreate the natural process of tissue regeneration that occurs in the animal’s body in a controlled environment. The end product is able to mimic the structure, smell, cooking behaviour and appearance of a meaty steak, right down to the blood oozing out of a juicy steak.

3d printed meat on plate from Aleph Farms

Redefine Meat is another leading meat cultivating company that uses a method of multi-material 3D printing to create alt-meats. “[The] 3D printer lays down blood, fat and protein simultaneously at a voxel-level that resembles mimicking meat of an animal,” says Daniel Dikovsky, head of technology and innovation at Redefine Meat. “This advanced capability is what allows an alternative-steak to go beyond just taste, but also replicate texture and mouthfeel.” Redefine Meat does not use any animal ingredients, but rather a proprietary blend of soy, pea protein, coconut fat, sunflower oil and a few other plant-based ingredients, so their products are vegan.

3d printed meat on plate from Redefine Meat

Now Let’s Talk Taste

Earlier this year, Redefine Meat held a blind taste test for its 3D printed meat, with over 600 participants, mostly meat eaters. The overall approval rate was over 90%, based on taste, texture and mouthfeel. When Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel, tried Aleph Farm’s steak he said: “I can’t taste the difference.”

Looking to the Future

While these are only two examples of start-ups that are experimenting in the 3D printed meat world, several other companies from around the world are diving into the cultivated meat industry, as the demand for innovative products, with less impact to the environment and harm to animals is rapidly growing.

Related: Meet the World’s First Autonomous Robotic Kitchen Assistant

Aleph Farms has partnered with Mitsubishi to sell their beef in Japan in the coming years, but they’re not in a rush to get it on the market. Japan is home to the world’s most luxurious steak, Wagyu. In other words, they’re well aware of what they’re up against. No word yet on when Aleph or Redefine Meat will hit the open market or when lab-grown meat will be available for purchase in Canada.

First photo/feature photo courtesy of Aleph Farms; second photo courtesy of Redefine Meat

Homemade Purple Japanese Ube Ice Cream in a Bowl

Flavour Trends to Watch For According to the Latest Flavour Forecast

Homemade Purple Japanese Ube Ice Cream

The 21st McCormick Flavour Forecast has released its most recent report naming what Canadians can expect next in terms of flavour.

The Flavour Forecast has been breaking down the flavours Canadians want in their food for over two decades and this round is no exception; The team behind the report includes chefs, culinary professionals, trend trackers and others in the food industry, with the goals of encouraging exploration and innovation around the world and in the kitchen.

Related: How to Properly Dispose of Cooking Oil

The research was based on a series of virtual, interactive at-home culinary experiences. The experiences spanned the previous year and were led by chefs, exploring flavours that range from nutritious to decadent, and varying in taste, colour, and texture – both in food and drink.

The 21st edition of the Flavour Forecast identified four key flavour trends based on what was most popular: Plants pushing boundaries; humble nosh; underwater, underdiscovered; and physiological eating.

Related: 5 Hot New Releases to Binge on Amazon Prime This Summer

Here is what you can expect with each:

Plants Pushing Boundaries

We know that plant-based is no longer a “trend” but a way of life for many – even those who are flexitarian, or simply looking to fold more fruits, veggies and botanicals into their diets. The people at McCormick agree. Plants are bringing indulgence, brilliant colour, hearty texture and flora-focused eating to the forefront.

Key flavours to look for:
Ube (purple yam)
Szechuan buttons (edible flower buds)
Trumpet mushrooms

Related: Allison Gibson Talks Launching Food Businesses and Reclaiming the Term “Ethnic Food”

Various spices spread across a light-surfaced table

Humble Nosh

With so many borders closed to international tourism, Canadians are wanting to venture out with their plates. Bold, niche global flavours are still front and centre on people’s minds, and on their palettes. The good news is that Canada offers no shortage of ways to satisfy these cravings.

Key flavours to look for:
Chaat masala (Indian spice blend)
Pandan kaya (Malaysian jam)
Crisped chilies

Related: Food Activist and Dietitian Rosie Mensah Looks at Nutrition Through a Social Justice Lens

A bowl of Wakame seaweed salad

Underwater, Underdiscovered

Going underwater now also means going deeper, and looking further. Plant-based is by no means exclusive to the land, and Canadians are increasingly looking for flavours and ingredients that feature both fresh and saltwater botanicals like seaweeds and even algae.

Key flavours to look for:
Dulse (red sea lettuce flakes)
Spirulina (blue-green algae)
Sea grapes (soft, green algae)

Related: This Korean Sweet and Sour Seaweed Salad is the Perfect BBQ Side Dish

Ginger and halved lemon spread on table with mint leaves

Physiological Eating

Leaning into India’s 5,000-year old tradition of Ayurveda that embraces a traditional, healthy lifestyle rooted in mind-body, harmony, growth and self-love, physiological eating also taps into the related six tastes (sweet, sour, salty, bitter, stringent, and pungent). Each offer warming and cooling benefits to help provide comfort to the physical body.

Key flavours to look for:
Coriander
Lemon
Sea salt
Cumin
Turmeric
Ginger

Photos courtesy of Getty Images.

Related: 15 Popular Foods That Grow in Very Surprising Ways

Vegan spinach dip in bowl with toasted pita chips next to it

This Yummy Vegan Spinach and Artichoke Dip is the Perfect Appetizer

You definitely won’t miss the cheese in this Can You Vegan It? spinach and artichoke dip. The traditional asiago cheese is swapped out for creamy pureed cashews and flavoured with garlic, Dijon and bell peppers. It’s a perfect crowd pleaser (and so quick to whip up!).

Vegan spinach dip in bowl with toasted pita chips next to it

Vegan Spinach and Artichoke Dip

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups unsalted roasted cashews
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, diced
½ yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 tsp garlic powder
1 ½ cups unsweetened almond milk
2 Tbsp chickpea flour
Juice of one lime
1 Tbsp whole grain Dijon mustard (optional)
2 tsp sea salt
½ tsp ground black pepper
4 cups fresh spinach
¾ cup canned artichoke hearts, drained

Vegan spinach dip ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Soak cashews in 2 cups of boiled water for about 5 minutes. Strain and set aside.

2. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Saute onion, bell pepper and garlic powder until softened and fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Turn the heat off and transfer the mixture into a blender.

Related: Party-Perfect Vegan Appetizers That Anyone Can Make

3. In the blender, also add in cashews, almond milk, chickpea flour, lime juice, Dijon, sea salt, pepper, spinach and artichokes. Pulse until semi-smooth.

Vegan spinach dip ingredients in blender

4. Transfer the puree into a 9-inch round baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown around the edges. Serve with toasted pita chips or veggies.

Vegan spinach dip in bowl with toasted pita chips next to it

Like Valerie’s vegan spinach and artichoke dip? Try her air fryer corn “ribs” (that are trending on TikTok) or her sweet chili chicken wings.

Vegan bubbat on kitchen countertop

Traditional Mennonite Bubbat Recipe Gets a Vegan Makeover

Traditional bubbat can be made with raisins, to be more of a bread you would have with tea. My brother-in-law Brian — who was raised in Regina, Saskatchewan — ate it this way. But you can also make it like this, with plant-based sausage, and serve alongside a meal. This is a great side to a hearty salad with lots of fresh veggies in it. Or for breakfast! Some traditions even put the bubbat inside of a turkey. Don’t worry too much about what it looks like, it will taste great.

Vegan bubbat on kitchen countertop

Vegan Bubbat

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Rest Time: 60 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 6-8

Ingredients:

2 cups unsweetened soy milk
1 Tbsp dry active yeast
½ cup warm water
3 Tbsp sugar
2 Tbsp plant-based butter, melted
1 Tbsp salt
3 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 package (4 links) of your choice of plant-based sausage (both Gusta and Field Roast are readily available in grocery stores)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

2. Scald soy milk and then pour it into a large mixing bowl and set aside and let it cool to a lukewarm temperature.

3. Dissolve yeast into warm water.

4. Once soy milk is at the right temperature (warm to the touch), add sugar and plant-based butter, as well as the yeast.

Related: Homemade Bread Recipes You’ll Want to Make Again and Again

5. Add salt and flour to wet ingredients. This should be a soft dough. Give it a good stir. Add a little more liquid as needed or flour, depending on how it feels. You should be able to stir the dough with a wooden spoon, but it should be tough.

6. Dice up sausage into bite-sized pieces and stir it into the dough.
Transfer it into an 8 x 8 greased baking pan.

7. Cover pan with a tea towel or a beeswax wrap and let it rise for one hour. Then bake for 45 minutes. Keep an eye on it after 35 minutes.

Vegan Mennonite Kitchen cookbook
Reprinted with permission from The Vegan Mennonite Kitchen by Jo Snyder, Pandora Press Co 2021, photo credit Sarah Pflug

Vegan Mennonite Kitchen, Pandora Press, $33.

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