Tag Archives: tuna

Not Your Average Tuna Salad: Refresh Pantry Cooking With This Oh-So Garlicky Dish

As many of us begin our venture in pantry-style cooking, two go-to canned items are always tuna and beans. But, instead of a lackluster tuna or bean salad, we paired them together and created something that’s vibrant, fresh and oh-so garlicky. You’ll already have the majority of these ingredients in your pantry or fridge, and if you’re missing something and can’t get your hands on it, swap it for what you do have, or simply leave it out. The garlic chips are really the star of this dish anyways, and every kitchen has a supply of garlic, right?

Tuna Salad With Tomatoes, Basil, Beans, Kale and Garlic Chips

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Servings: 2-3

Ingredients:

6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 can tuna, drained
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
5 cherry tomatoes, halved or ¾ cup chopped tomato
½ cup basil leaves, roughly chopped
1 small shallot or ¼ red or yellow onion, slivered
3 cups kale, chopped
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper


Directions:

1. In a skillet, heat 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil over medium. Add in the garlic slices and toss around until they become brown and crisp, this will only take a few minutes.

2. Place them on a towel to drain some of the oil and dry up. You can save the oil that’s left in the pan and use it for dressings or sauces.

Related: 3-Ingredient Salad Dressing Combos That Will Save Your Lunch and Dinner

3. Put the tuna, chickpeas, tomatoes, basil, shallots and kale into a bowl.

4. Whisk together 2 Tbsp of oil, along with the apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper and pour over the ingredients in the bowl.

5. Top with garlic chips and enjoy.

Cooking with more pantry staples lately? Try these creative canned salmon recipes and macaroni dish ideas.

The 5 Best Sustainable Seafood Options to Eat (Plus Recipes!)

Seafood is a staple in the Canadian diet, but choosing sustainable options can be confusing. According to the Ocean Wise Seafood Program, sustainable seafood is defined as farming or catching species of fish in a way that ensures their long term health and the health of the greater marine ecosystem. Right now, 85-90% of the world’s fish stocks are over-exploited, so organizations like Ocean Wise, Seafood Watch and Marine Stewardship Council are working hard to ensure we make the right choices when it comes to our seafood, not only to preserve future generations of fish, but also to protect our oceans and our health. Here, we break down the best sustainable seafood for you to buy and start cooking.

1. Arctic Char (Farmed)

Arctic char may look similar to salmon or rainbow trout with its pinky flesh, but its texture is more delicate with a milder flavour. You can cook it simply with a little lemon, salt and pepper, or get creative and smear a rich miso glaze on top. Arctic char is farmed in indoor recirculating tanks in the US, Canada and Iceland, which are considered one of the most environmentally responsible designs. This method of raising fish ensures the water is treated and filtered, decreasing the risk of pollution, and minimizing any negative impact on other aquatic habitats.


Get the recipe for Pan-Seared Arctic Char with Miso Gastrique

2. Cod (Pacific)

Cod is a buttery, delicate option that’s often touted as the “not-so-fishy” fish (so seafood skeptics may find it more palatable). Cod was a large part of Canada’s history, but unfortunately, in the 1990’s the cod industry off the shore of Newfoundland collapsed, and the stocks were depleted. Now, the best cod to buy is caught just off the coast of Alaska, using either long-line, pots or bottom-trawl methods. All of these methods impact the ocean, either by damaging the ocean floor or harvesting non-targeted fish species, but these Alaskan cod fisheries are so incredibly well-managed that they ensure regulations exist to evaluate fish stocks and reduce negative impacts to the seafloor.


Get the recipe for 30-Minute Cod with Lemony Braised Fennel

3. Albacore Tuna (B.C. & Atlantic)

It may shock you to see tuna on our list of the most sustainable seafood, but tuna that has been pole or troll caught, using lines off the coast of British Columbia and the Atlantic, are great choices. These methods reduce the rates of by-catch (unintentionally catching other species of fish), and if non-targeted fish species are caught, they can be released. Fishing this way also prevents damage to habitats, since these methods don’t touch the ocean floor. You can find albacore tuna fresh, frozen or canned. It’s most commonly known as the “white meat” tuna, and it’s the heart of a delicious tuna sandwich.


Get the recipe for Albacore Tuna Crumpwich

4. Shellfish: Clams, Mussels, Oysters, Scallops (Farmed)

Shellfish are a popular part of Canadian cuisine, from seared scallops to steamed mussels and clams to freshly shucked oysters. They’re farmed mainly in Eastern Canada and British Columbia using the off-bottom method, meaning they use floating rafts, bags or suspended ropes to raise the shellfish. Off-bottom farming doesn’t touch the ocean floor, and there is minimal by-catch, if any, so it’s incredibly sustainable. Shellfish are also known as filter feeders, because they eat particles found in the water, which actually filters and cleans it, allowing other marine life to thrive.


Get the recipe for East Coast Summer Scallops with Pea Puree 

5. Sablefish (Alaska & B.C.)

Sablefish, also known as black cod, is a true delicacy. It’s buttery, velvety, mild and oh-so delicious, and luckily, it’s also sustainable. Sablefish is most commonly found along the pacific coast, especially near British Columbia and Alaska where the stocks are healthy. These fisheries are well-managed and have strong regulations that assess stocks, fishing levels, by-catch rates and restrict gear and entry in certain areas. This ensures there is no over-fishing or depletion of non-targeted fish.


Get the recipe for Roasted Sablefish in Dashi Broth 

Fore more handy pointers, we’ve rounded up the best chef-approved tips when it comes to buying and cooking fish.

Salad Niçoise with Dijon Lemon Dressing: 1 Dish, 2 Ways

Briny and bright, this take on a classic French bistro salad is a cornucopia of flavours and colours that doesn’t require extra primping to make a big statement at the table. Here, I’ve made it the traditional way with olives, capers and good quality, oil-packed jarred tuna, and again with a filet of smoked trout, which gives it an extra layer of richness and smokiness.

It looks great neatly organized in rows, breaking up the colours by ingredient with the fish taking centre stage. No matter how you present it, it’s going to be good, so just go for it.

From the delicate and crunchy French green beans and tender potatoes, to the ping of the garlicky Dijon lemon dressing, this is one beefy (but beef-less) salad you’ve got to make.

Prep Time: 40 minutes
Assembly Time: 2 minutes
Serves: 4

888_Salad-Nicoise-Tuna

Salad Niçoise with Tuna

Ingredients:
1 jar oil-packed tuna, drained
1 lb. small potatoes, cooked until tender
2 cups French green beans, trimmed and blanched
4 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
1/2 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
½ cup Niçoise olives
3 Tbsp capers
4-5 radishes, thinly sliced
Boston lettuce leaves, rinsed and dried
Fresh dill, to taste
3-4 salt-packed anchovies (optional)

888_Salad-Nicoise_trout

Salad Niçoise with Smoked Trout

Ingredients:
1 medium filet smoked trout, chopped
1 lb. small potatoes, cooked until tender
2 cups French green beans, trimmed and blanched
4 hard-boiled eggs, halved
1/2 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
½ cup Niçoise olives
3 Tbsp capers
4-5 radishes, thinly sliced
Boston lettuce leaves, rinsed and dried
Fresh dill, to taste
3-4 salt-packed anchovies (optional)

Dijon lemon dressing (adapted from Saveur):
1 clove garlic
? cup olive oil
2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1 shallot, minced
Kosher salt & fresh cracked black pepper, to taste

888_Salad-Nicoise-with-Tuna-Olives

Directions:
1. On a cutting board, mince garlic and sprinkle with coarse salt. Using the flat side of the knife, press the garlic and salt together to form a smooth paste. Transfer to a bowl and whisk in oil, lemon juice, mustard, shallots, and salt and pepper. Set aside.
2. On a serving platter or in a large bowl, arrange the butter lettuce on the bottom and then line up ingredients neatly in rows. Drizzle with Dijon lemon dressing and more salt and pepper just before serving.

BonnieMo Bonnie Mo is a Toronto-based editor and the face behind Food Network Canada’s 1 Dish, 2 Ways column. She’s also a contributing editor over at slice.ca. For more recipe ideas, visit bonniemo.ca, or catch her on Instagram @bonniemo.