Tag Archives: tempeh

The Easy Make-Ahead Chorizo Tempeh Breakfast Wraps You’ll Love

These oh-so delicious breakfast wraps are hearty and super filling. The tempeh is seasoned with chili powder, cumin and garlic to give it a spicy, smoky flavour similar to chorizo sausage. And for my on-the-go breakfast crew, the wraps are super easy to make ahead of time.

tempeh breakfast wraps on blue countertop

Chorizo Tempeh Breakfast Wraps

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 wraps

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups peeled and cubed sweet potato (about 1 small)
½ onion, sliced
2 Tbsp vegetable oil, divided
½ tsp salt
12 oz tempeh, roughly chopped
1 red bell pepper, sliced
1 Tbsp nutritional yeast
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin
¼ tsp garlic powder
2 cups coarsely chopped kale, ribs removed
4 flour tortillas
½ cup tomato salsa

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2. Place the sweet potato, onion, 1 Tbsp of oil and salt in a large bowl; toss to coat. Spread onto the prepared baking sheet in an even layer (reserve the bowl) and bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until the onion is starting to brown.

3. Meanwhile, add the tempeh, bell pepper, remaining oil, nutritional yeast, chili powder, cumin and garlic powder to the reserved bowl; toss to coat. Add to the baking sheet and stir gently to combine. Bake for about 15 minutes, until the sweet potato is fork-tender and the tempeh is golden. Remove from the oven, add the kale and bake for 2 more minutes, until the kale is slightly wilted.

Related: Satisfying Vegan Breakfast Recipes You’ll Want Every Morning

4. Remove from the oven. Divide the mixture among the tortillas and top evenly with salsa. Roll each tortilla up from the bottom, like a burrito. Serve.

To freeze: let the filling cool completely. Assemble through step 4, but do not add salsa. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and store in the freezer for up to 3 months. To reheat from frozen in the microwave: remove plastic, then wrap tortilla in a damp paper towel. Place on a plate and microwave on high for 2 to 3 minutes, until heated through. To reheat from frozen in the oven: preheat the oven to 375°F. Remove plastic and place tortilla on a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes or until heated through.

Cover of the cookbook 'Liv B's Easy Everyday'Courtesy of Liv B’s Easy Everyday by Olivia Biermann © 2021 www.robertrose.ca. Reprinted with permission. Available where books are sold. Image credit: Ashley Lima. Image credit for author picture: Greg Bellefontaine.

 

Liv B’s Easy Everyday, Amazon, $30.

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7 Probiotic-Rich Foods You Need to Be Eating (and 3 Myths to Avoid)

Fermentation is far from a new fad, dating back to 6000 BC; and yet, it’s at the height of popularity right now. What began as a means of food preservation has turned into a nutrition phenomenon. It often begins with a few vegetables, some water and salt or a starter. Good bacteria break down sugars in the food being fermented to create lactic acid; this kills off any bad bacteria, leaving you with a tangy, sour, delicious food product that is literally bursting with nutrition. Fermentation makes food more digestible, it enhances its protein and mineral contents and it removes anti-nutrients like lectins found in grains. Most importantly, it’s rich in probiotics, which are live microorganisms that confer health benefits on the host (i.e. you). Fermentation has powerful effects on your immune system, digestive system and even your mood.

But, there’s confusion when it comes to fermentation, so here are three things to watch out for:

1. Yogurt May Not Actually Be the Best Source of Probiotics

Canadian yogurt is made with the active bacterial cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, but these are actually not considered to be probiotic by Health Canada, although they do have a range of health benefits. Look out for cultures such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus johnsonii on the ingredient list to find yogurt that is probiotic-rich.

2. Pickling and Fermenting Are Not the Same

Simply because something is pickled, does not necessarily mean that it’s fermented or rich in probiotics. For a food to be fermented, it needs the presence of live bacteria that also provide health benefits. Many foods are pickled using vinegar or “quick pickled,” which doesn’t allow for this probiotic presence.

Related: Tasty Ways to Eat Fermented Food and Improve Your Gut Health

3. Not All Fermented Foods Have Probiotics

Case and point: sourdough bread. The dough is fermented by bacteria, but once heated the probiotics are eliminated. Sourdough still has wonderful health benefits, probiotics are just not one of them. Other examples are beer and wine that have undergone fermentation but no longer have probiotic bacteria.

On the flip side, here are seven probiotic-rich foods you should incorporate into your diet:

1. Kimchi

Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish composed of pickled vegetables, mainly cabbage, and spices. It’s crunchy, hot and a delicious side addition to many meals. You can buy it at the grocery store or easily make it at home.

2. Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is another fermented cabbage dish, but this one was popularized in Eastern Europe. It’s got tons of Vitamin C and A, both important for keeping the immune system strong. Eat it as a side dish, in salads or on top of a sausage. Like kimchi, you can buy sauerkraut at the grocery store and farmers’ markets or make a batch in your kitchen.

3. Kefir

Kefir is like a yogurt drink, but it’s slightly thinner and tangier with more bacterial presence. It’s often recommended to people who have digestive issues since it’s really rich in probiotics. It also has folic acid, so it’s a fabulous beverage to incorporate into your diet if you’re pregnant. Drink it by the glass or transform it into a delicious coleslaw dressing.

4. Tempeh

Tempeh is a fermented soy cake originating from Indonesia. If you’ve never eaten it before, that description may sound odd, but it lends itself well to marinades and sauces and it makes for a fabulous mock bacon. The fermentation process not only provides probiotic richness, but it also helps eliminate phytates found in soybeans: these are anti-nutrients that bind to important minerals, like calcium, and prevent your body from absorbing them.

Get the recipe for Coconut Crusted Tempeh Skewers With Mango Salsa

5. Miso

Miso is one of the most versatile condiments: stir it into hot water to make miso soup, make it into a salad dressing, spread it over fish, chicken or cooked vegetables or even use it as an ingredient in baking cookies! It originates from Japan and is made from a combination of fermented soybeans, rice or barley.

Miso soup in bowl

Get the recipe for Glazed Salmon Miso Soup Rice Bowl

6. Kombucha

Kombucha is a fermented tea that is delightfully fizzy like pop. It’s brewed using a starter often called a mother or scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeasts). This naturally carbonated beverage is rich in probiotics, antioxidants and B vitamins. Find it in the fridge at your grocery store or make it yourself at home.

7. Preserved Lemons

If you’ve ever eaten a dish with preserved lemon, you know how tangy, tart and delicious they are. The really nutritious parts of lemons, such as the rind and pith (white part), are typically not eaten because of their bitterness, but after fermentation they become edible and tasty. A preserved lemon is a wonderful addition to Moroccan and Middle Eastern flavoured dishes; after fermentation, its concentration of vitamin C is heightened as well as its probiotic population.

First photo courtesy of Getty Images

BBQ Tempeh Banh Mi with Pickled Carrots and Cabbage

You can enjoy the fresh flavour combination of a traditional Vietnamese-style banh mi — but with no meat at all! This simple sandwich is a great meatless Monday option and you’ll be craving the left overs all week. You’ve probably seen a vegetarian take on the classic banh mi made with tofu, but we like the heartiness and bold flavour of tempeh. Smothered with sweet BBQ sauce, it goes perfectly with a quick-pickled cabbage and carrots, crunchy cucumbers, spicy jalapenos and citrusy cilantro.

888_bahn-mi-sandwich

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Makes: 4 sandwiches

Ingredients:
1 brick/package tempeh (250 g)
½ cup favourite BBQ sauce
¼ cup water
1 cup shredded cabbage
1 cup carrot ribbons (or shredded)
½ cup white wine vinegar
½ cup water
1 garlic clove, minced
1 tsp raw sugar
½ tsp ground mustard
½ tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp sea salt
¼ tsp ground pepper
1 long French-style baguette (divided into 4 pieces) OR 4 crusty rolls
½ cup vegan mayonnaise
3 field cucumbers, thinly sliced or shaved
¼ cup pickled jalapenos
1 cup cilantro leaves

Directions:
1. Pre-heat oven to 350°F.
2. Slice tempeh into approximately ¼” thick slices. Whisk together your favorite BBQ sauce with ¼ cup water and marinate tempeh for 20 minutes in the fridge.
3. In small pot combine white wine vinegar with ½ cup water, minced garlic, raw sugar, ground mustard, cumin seeds, sea salt and ground pepper and bring just to a boil. Remove from heat, and submerge cabbage and carrots in the liquid. Refrigerate until ready to assemble sandwiches.
4. Lay marinated tempeh slices onto a parchment lined baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes, flipping the slices halfway through baking time.
5. Prepare the baguette/buns by spreading 1 Tbsp of vegan mayonnaise on the inside of each side of the bun.
6. Shake excess liquid off pickled cabbage and carrots, and place a small handful on the bottom bun. Place a couple slices of baked tempeh on top and add cucumber, cilantro and pickled jalapenos.

See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.

Vegan Kale Caesar Salad with Tempeh Bacon

Caesar salad is something that non-vegans will swear we can’t re-create. But the truth is, a vegan Caesar salad is SO much healthier for you, you’ll only want to eat this version from now on. It will leave you feeling light, clean, and energized. Feel free to use romaine lettuce instead of kale for an even more traditional salad. We just like to switch it up and get our dark leafy greens in wherever we can. Tempeh bacon makes this more of an entree salad, but you can use coconut bacon for an appetizer version (as seen in right photo). You can also use the coconut bacon in the entree salad for added flavour and texture.

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I like the taste of roasted garlic in a Caesar dressing because it makes it sweeter and less overpowering. In case you don’t know how to roast garlic, just peel the outer layers off the garlic bulb, leaving a thin layer still in tact and cut the top of the bulb off (approx. 1/4 inch from the top) so the cloves are visible. Coat in 1 Tbsp of olive oil (per bulb) and a pinch of sea salt and then bake at 400°F for 35 minutes or until the cloves are browned and soft to the touch.

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Caesar Dressing

Ingredients (makes 2 cups):
3/4 cup raw cashews (soaked for a minimum of 3 hours)
3/4 cup water
1 bulb of roasted garlic (approximately 7-9 cloves. Feel free to do more/less depending on your taste.)
1 pitted medjool date
1 lemon, juice & zest
3 1/2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp  sea salt
1 tsp ground pepper

Directions:
1. Drain the soaked cashews and rinse with more water until it runs clear.
2. Place all the ingredients in a vita-mix or high powered blender and mix on high until smooth. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving on your salad.

Garlic Croutons

Ingredients:
3 cups cubed bread (your choice)
1/4 cup olive oil
1 Tbsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp ground pepper
2 Tbsp go veggie! vegan Parmesan

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a mixing bowl whisk together olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, sea salt, and pepper. Toss the cubed bread in the mixture until well coated. If you’re adding the vegan Parmesan, then toss them in that next.
2. Lay out the bread onto a baking sheet and bake for approximately 10-15 minutes, turning over once in the middle of baking, until golden brown. Depending on the bread you use the time will vary so just keep an eye on them. Gluten-free bread takes longer, approximately 20 minutes. and gluten free bread is always a bit gummy so don’t expect them to be crispy crunchy croutons like when they’re made with regular bread. Italian baguette is our favourite for this recipe.

vegan-kale-caesar-salad-8

Tempeh Bacon

Ingredients:
1 package of tempeh (approximately 250 grams)
1/2 cup tamari (can sub soy sauce or Bragg’s aminos)
1/2 Tablespoon water
1/3 cup liquid smoke
1/3 cup maple syrup
1 Tbsp smoked paprika
1-2 Tbsp coconut oil (for frying)
Extra water for de-glazing the pan

Directions:
1. Thinly slice the tempeh.
2. Whisk together all the liquid ingredients and smoked paprika in a shallow dish that you can use to marinate the tempeh in.
3. Lay the slices of tempeh in the dish and pour in half the sauce. Marinate in the fridge for at least 1 hour.
4. To cook, heat a non-stick pan to medium and add 1 Tbsp of coconut oil. When it’s heated, add the slices of tempeh.
5. Once the first side starts to brown you’ll want to start de-glazing the pan with left over marinade and a bit of water every so often to prevent them from sticking and to get them really caramelized and browned. Flip the slices and do the same thing on the other side.
6. You might want to use another Tbsp of coconut oil on the other side to get them frying up nice. You’ll start to notice the liquid becoming absorbed and the tempeh getting crispier and stickier. Cook time is approximately 15-20 minutes. Remember, you’re trying to caramelize the tempeh, times may vary.
7. Remove from the heat to cool while you assemble the Caesar salad.
8. All there is left to do is wash and chop your romaine lettuce or kale.

Garnish your Caesar salad with more black pepper, lemon wedges, and additional go veggie! vegan Parmesan if you like! And…I think we might just convert you to being a vegan Caesar salad lover.

Kale tip: If you’re using kale, finely chop it and massage it with your hands in some lemon juice for 3-5 mins. Massaging the kale is actually beneficial. It makes the tough, bitter green sweeter, softer and easier to digest. I like using lemon juice for this salad, but massaging kale with olive oil, lime juice or a pinch of sea salt will wilt it and break it down just the same.

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See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.