Tag Archives: steak

This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

When it comes to quick and easy five-ingredient meals, you can rely on The Pioneer Woman for a healthy and scrumptious weeknight option. With fresh cherry tomatoes, crunchy bell peppers and juicy cuts of boneless ribeye steaks, this bright and bold sheet pan wonder from Ree Drummond is everything you need in a well-balanced meat and veggie dish. *chef’s kiss*

Related: Simple and Satisfying Recipes That Use 5 Ingredients or Less

Steak Sheet Pan Supper

Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients:

2 red bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
2 yellow bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
1 large yellow onion, cut into thick rounds (large rings only)
2 cups whole cherry tomatoes
Two 12-ounce boneless rib-eye steaks, about 1 1/2 inches thick
4 tsp Montreal steak seasoning
4 Tbsp olive oil
4 Tbsp salted butter
1 loaf crusty, artisan-style French bread, for serving

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Directions:

1. Position an oven rack on the highest level in the oven. Preheat the broiler on high.

2. Arrange the peppers on a sheet pan in a single layer. Do the same with the onions and cherry tomatoes. This will create a bed of vegetables for the steaks to sit on.

3. Lay the steaks directly on the vegetables with an inch or two between the steaks so they aren’t touching. Season the top of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle the top of each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Top each steak with 1 tablespoon butter.

4. Broil until the tops of the steaks are nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and use a set of tongs to flip the steaks over. Sprinkle the other side of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil and top each with 1 tablespoon butter. Slide the pan back into the oven and broil the other side for 3 minutes.

5. Plate each steak with half of the veggies from the pan. Serve with a chunk of crusty French bread.

Watch the How-To Video for Steak Sheet Pan Supper


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Charred Okra, Tomato and Steak Salad: The Perfect Late-Summer Recipe

Okra is an amazing vegetable, but when you boil or sauté it, the little green veggie gets slimy. Our workaround? We love tossing okra on the grill and giving it a good char! Here we’ve paired it with tomatoes and hanger steak, as well as a zippy hit of lime, for the perfect late-summer salad recipe. Bonus: the whole dish comes together in under 30 minutes. Plus, did we mention there’s steak?!

Charred Okra, Tomato and Hanger Steak Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients:

1 hanger steak, 300g
1 tsp canola oil, divided
¼ tsp fine sea salt
¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 Tbsp fish sauce
2 tsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp lime juice
250g okra
1 pint cherry tomatoes

Directions:

1. Preheat BBQ to medium-high (about 400°F). Pat steak dry, brush with ½ tsp of oil then season with salt and pepper.

2. Oil grill. Grill steaks until medium-rare, about 4 minutes per side (or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of steak register 120°F). Transfer to a plate and tent with foil. Set aside for 10 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, combine fish sauce, soy sauce and lime juice in a medium bowl and set aside.

Related: Pork Banh Mi Burgers With Grilled Pineapple Will Be Your Go-To Summer Recipe

4. Then slice okra in half lengthwise and toss with remaining ½ tsp of oil in a large bowl. Immediately transfer to the grill cut-side down (if you take too much time getting it on the grill, the okra will become slimy). Grill until tender and charred, about 2-3 minutes per side. Remove from grill and transfer to bowl with fish sauce-mixture.

5. Add tomatoes to grill. Cook, turning occasionally, until soft and blistered, about 5 minutes. If you are concerned the tomatoes will fall through the grates, you can preheat a cast iron on the barbecue and cook tomatoes in pan. Remove and transfer to bowl with okra.

6. Cut steak, against the grain, into ½-inch thick slices. Transfer to a serving platter or individual plates. Arrange the okra and tomatoes around the steak. Spoon dressing on top.

Like this recipe? Try these crunchy salad ideas for when you’re running low on greens.

Recreate the Winning Dish From Junior Chef Showdown

While the sumptuous Wagyu beef needs no introduction, it does require mouth-watering sidekicks to accompany it for a properly balanced – and extra-flavourful – meal. Luckily for us, this season’s Junior Chef Showdown winner, Audrey, has got us covered.

Don’t be deterred by the amount of ingredients and steps required – you don’t have to be an insanely talented kid chef to make this meal at home. This is a deceptively simple dish packed with complex flavours and textures that are sure to satisfy. Bon appétit!

Watch: Junior Chef Showdown Judges Sound Off on How to Get Your Kids to Cook

Junior Chef Audrey’s Wagyu Steak with Grilled Veggie Salad, Garlic Scape Pesto and Potato Crisps

Prep time: 20 minutes
Total time: 40 minutes, plus 1 hour soaking time for potatoes
Serves: 2

Ingredients:

Fingerling Potato Chips
2 fingerling or small Yukon gold potatoes, sliced very thin
Salt
Oil for frying

Garlic Scape Pesto
6 garlic scapes
5 Tbsp olive oil, divided
½ cup toasted pine nuts
1 cup packed arugula
1 Tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp salt
1 to 2 Tbsp water

Steak
1 Wagyu strip steak, about ¾-inch thick**
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
1 Tbsp grapeseed oil
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 clove garlic, peeled and slice in half
2 sprigs thyme

Grilled Veggie and Peach Medley
8 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and discarded
2 king oyster mushrooms, sliced lengthwise about ¼-inch thick
1 peach, stoned and cut into 8 wedges
1 bunch of multicoloured radishes, trimmed and cut in half
2 Tbsp olive oil
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper

To serve
2 cups loosely packed arugula

Related: Jordan Andino’s Quick and Comforting Chinese Broccoli & Shrimp Stir-Fry

Directions:

**Remove steak from your fridge 30 minutes to one hour before cooking. This will allow the meat to cook more evenly, yielding a tastier result.

Fingerling Potato Chips
1. Soak potato slices in cold water for 1 hour (optional: if you don’t have time for this step, simply rinse the potatoes once or twice before drying them). Drain, rinse and pat dry thoroughly with a clean kitchen towel.

2. Fit a wire cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet and set aside. Heat an inch of oil in a medium heavy-bottomed pot or deep fryer until a thermometer reads 325°F.

3. Add potatoes in batches and fry until golden and crisp, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from oil with a slotted spoon onto prepared sheet. Sprinkle with salt immediately.

Related: Lynn Crawford’s Bacon and Egg Ramen Soup is the Comfort Food You Didn’t Know You Needed

Garlic Scape Pesto
1. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.

2. Toss scapes with 1 Tbsp olive oil in a medium bowl. Add to pan and cook until charred and tender, about 5 minutes, turning occasionally. Remove from grill and set aside to cool slightly.

3. Roughly chop the scapes and place into the bowl of a food processor. Add remaining ingredients except for the water and pulse until blended. Add water to loosen, if desired. Taste and season with more salt and lemon juice, if desired.

Steak
1. Heat a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat.

2. Pat steak dry with a paper towel and season with salt and pepper.

3. Add oil to pan and heat until shimmering. Add steak with the fat cap facing towards you and cook until crusted and browned, about 3 minutes per side. Add butter, garlic and thyme in the last minute of cooking; tilt pan gently towards yourself and quickly spoon butter repeatedly over steak to baste. Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil and set aside to rest for 8 to 10 minutes. Slice right before serving.

Related: Anna Olson’s Herbed Avocado Dip Will Take Your Sandwiches and Veggies to the Next Level

Grilled Veggie Medley
1. Heat a cast iron grill pan over medium-high heat.

2. Toss veggies and peach with oil, salt and pepper in a medium bowl.

3. Add to grill pan and cook until charred and tender, about 5 to 7 minutes, turning occasionally.

4. To serve, spread some pesto onto two plates (reserve any remaining pesto to toss with your favourite pasta and cherry tomatoes for a delicious meal). Top with a handful of arugula, followed by the grilled veggies and peach. Top with the steak and potatoes. Enjoy!

Watch Junior Chef Showdown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

how to grill the perfect steak

How to Grill the Perfect Steak Every Time

When it comes to cooking steak, nothing beats the grill. It’s the combination of that slight char and simple seasoning that pushes us to cook outdoors — even when it isn’t summer grilling season.

If you’re going to brave cold temperatures for winter grilling or the high heat of the hottest months, it is a good idea to know how to make the most of a steak. What cut of meat should you buy? What grill temperature is just right? Does that lid stay open or closed? These sorts of questions are all that stand between you and a delicious, flame-kissed meal. For your perfect barbecued steak dinner, we’ve got you covered with this guide to mastering the grill. Luckily, we also believe practice makes perfect — that means steak should be on the menu all year round.

What Cut Should Make the Cut?

One of the best things about steak is that from the time it hits the grill to the time it lands on the plate isn’t too long – especially for those who prefer their steak rare. Steaks with nice marbling — those striations of white fat — cook up perfectly succulent. That is because fat means flavour. So when you’re looking at the butcher counter, opt for one of these:

Ribeye: Lots of marbling along with larger pockets of fat makes these steaks great for the grill. Preheat the grill with two burners on medium-high, and two that aren’t on at all – a two-zone fire. Sear the steaks for a few minutes per side to get those delightful sear marks, then move them to the “off “ side to finish cooking. Use a meat thermometer to ensure the perfect temperature of 125°F / 50°C. Rest for 10 minutes. The high heat will melt the fat and keep this steak super juicy.

Strip Loin: This cut, sometimes called a New York strip, is leaner than rib eye but still has plenty of beefy flavour. Season simply with salt and pepper, then sear them over direct high heat for 4 to 6 minutes per side. Rest before serving.

T-Bone: A classic cut, this is what we usually picture when we hear the word steak. Kind of like two steaks for the price of one, this cut is named after the T-shaped bone that divides the strip loin and a small portion of tenderloin. Cooking depends on the thickness. For T-Bones less than 1-inch thick, searing for a few minutes per side, then resting is enough. If the steak is over 1-inch thick start it slow, using indirect heat, on a grill set to 325°F / 165°C, until it reaches an internal temperature of 120°F / 148°C, then sear over high heat for a couple minutes per side for grill marks. Rest and serve topped with a knob of butter.

Flank Steak: This long, flat cut of beef is incredibly lean and an exception to the marbling rule. It should be cooked in a flash; too long on the grill can cause the meat to become tough. Think medium-rare, about 4 to 5 minutes per side over direct, high heat. A little help from an overnight marinade before hitting the grill is always a good idea. To serve, let the flank steak rest before slicing against the grain for tender strips of beef – ideal for tacos and sandwiches.

Skirt Steak: Similar to flank, skirt steak needs to be approached the same way. Marinate it before grilling to medium rare, rest and slice.

Filet Mignon: If you’re splurging and want an incredibly tender and thick steak, you can try a filet mignon, a cut of beef tenderloin. With only a little fat, this steak is subtle in flavour, but buttery in texture. It’s easy to overcook, so best for those who prefer their steaks medium or on the rarer side. Grill them using a similar technique to the Ribeye, and keep that meat thermometer handy.

Heat It Up

Cooking steaks is all about searing, so you want to get your grill hot, hot, hot.

Heat to at least 450°F before you put those steaks on to cook. This ensures the meat gets that delicious crust and stays tender on the inside.

When using infrared heat to cook your steak, side burners, reaching the right temperature takes less than a minute. You can go from craving a nice steak to searing in the juices for a restaurant-quality meal in mere minutes.

Open or Closed?

If you’re puzzling over whether your steaks are best grilled with the lid open or not, wonder no more. The simple answer is: keep it open when high-temperature searing.

Closing the lid turns your grill into an oven — great for roasting meats, slowly cooking thicker cuts, and cooking chicken, but not as ideal when searing. A closed grill will start to cook the top of your steak, so you’ll miss that sizzle when you flip it.

An open lid gives you more control and lets you keep an eye on things. After all, there’s nothing worse than an overcooked steak.

Grilling 101

You’ve selected your cuts, heated your grill and are eager to eat. There are just a few steps to follow to make your steak truly great.

Start by generously salting your steak and letting it come to room temperature before grilling. About a half hour is all that’s needed to let the salt do its work. Use kosher or coarse salt will bring out the best flavor. Add a little freshly ground pepper or dehydrated garlic for even more flavour.

For some additional flavour, think of getting smoky. Wood chips, like mesquite or Applewood, enhance beef without much effort. With an integrated wood chip smoker tray — adding that woodsy, smoky flavour is about as easy as turning the grill on.

It’s all about timing, but even the pros can stumble over how long each side of the steak needs to reach the perfect temperature. A good rule of thumb is you need about two to three minutes per side to reach rare for a ¾-inch steak. Four minutes will be close to medium and another minute or two per side for a well-done steak. Your best bet is to take the guesswork out of the equation by using an instant-read meat thermometer.

When flipping the meat, it’s best to use tongs. Barbecue forks will pierce the meat, letting all those delicious juices escape. Finally — and this is the hard part! — let it rest for about 10 minutes before eating. This gives those juices time to redistribute and will keep your steak tender and tasty.

Is It Done?

Cooking times may vary, but steak doneness temperatures are dependable.

For a rare steak, look for an internal temperature of 120ºF / 52°C. Medium-rare is around 135°F / 57°C. Medium steaks will read 140ºF / 60°C to 145ºF / 63°C and Medium-well between 150ºF / 66°C. A steak is well done at 160ºF / 71°C or more.

5 Budget-Friendly Cuts of Beef and How to Cook Them

As grocery prices mount, it’s a bonus to find cheaper alternatives, especially when it comes to meat. One area where you can save big and find some great new favourites is by seeking out inexpensive cuts of beef, a typically higher-priced protein. These new cuts of beef are as delectable and easy to cook as some of your old standbys, but far more affordable. Before you head to the butcher this week, take note of what to ask for and how to cook it with this handy guide.

chuck-steak-in-pan

7-Bone Steak or Chuck Steak

Often thought of as the ground meat in a good burger, chuck steak is akin to a rib steak in its fattiness and makes an excellent, cheaper alternative cut. If prepared correctly, it provides the perfect balance of marbling and highly flavourful meat. Because it contains bones, you’ll also benefit from the richness they impart.

How to Cook: Best marinated to tenderize, this steak yields greatest results when grilled over high temperature just to medium-rare doneness – overcooking will lead to a chewy, dry steak.

Bavette Steak

Also called a flap steak, this cut comes from the bottom of the sirloin. This inexpensive option boasts major flavour and benefits from being marinated and scored as you would a flank steak.

How to Cook: After grilling it should be seared at a high heat for a short time and rested before slicing against the grain. A perfect cut for a steak salad, sandwiches or tacos.

Petite Filet with Wasabi CreamGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Petite Filet with Wasabi Cream.

Shoulder Tender or Petit Tender

The consequence of being difficult to cut from the animal, the shoulder tender is an underused piece of beef. Similar to filet mignon and pork tenderloin, only more flavourful, it’s a very tender cut of beef weighing about 8 to 12 oz. Like pork tenderloin, it occasionally has a silverskin that can be easily cut away.

How to Cook: Try it seared and finished in the oven, cut into medallions and grilled or cut into strips for a fast stir-fry. It’s best cooked no further than medium to maintain tenderness.

Merlot Steak

Perfect for grilling, broiling and stir-frying, the merlot cut is known for its flavour, but is also a lean steak, making it one that needs proper attention to avoid dryness and toughening.

How to Cook: It’s recommended to cook this cut over high heat for only a few minutes per side, which helps maintain flavour and tenderness. Like the shoulder tender, keep this steak below medium doneness.

oyster-steak-with-chrimp

Oyster Steak

The oyster steak’s higher fat content and exposure to air means bigger, beefier taste. It’s called oyster steak because this cut’s interesting fat pattern looks a bit like an oyster shell.

How to Cook: Deeply flavourful, this little 6 oz gem is another steak benefiting from higher temperature for a shorter period of time, about 3 minutes per side.

Get ready for barbecue season with our essential tips for grilling any cut of steak perfectly.

How to Grill Any Cut Of Steak Perfectly

As soon as the nice weather begins, Canadians ditch cooking in the kitchen and fire up the barbecue. The aromas and flavours of meat and veggies fresh from the open fire are intoxicating. And, when it comes to steak, nothing beats a perfectly cooked, well-seasoned, juicy cut. But this is easier said than done. It can be difficult to know what to buy at the butcher, how different cuts of steak vary and the best way to cook them.

With the stakes so high (pardon the pun, but these cuts can be expensive!), we’re giving you the ultimate guide to choosing and grilling steak this summer and beyond.

grilled-steak-and-papaya-salad

BBQ Steak Basics

1. Let steak come to room temperature before grilling: About 30 minutes before grilling, take it out of the fridge. This will allow the meat to cook evenly.

2. Get the grill super-hot: You want to get good sear on your steak for the perfect finished crust. Heat your grill to at least 450ºF before cooking.

3. Season with a bit of oil and lots of salt: Brush steaks with a thin layer of high-temperature oil, like grape seed or refined avocado. Then, don’t just sprinkle salt on your steak, season with reckless abandon. A thick slab of meat needs more salt than you think. Use kosher or coarse salt on both sides and apply until you can see it on the surface of the meat.

4. Use a thermometer: Unless you’re a veteran grill master with tons of experience cooking steak, it’s difficult to tell how well cooked the meat is just by touching it. Quit guessing and take the internal temperature with an instant-read of meat thermometer. To avoid burning the exterior if a steak is very thick, remove it from direct heat and finish cooking on indirect heat until it has reached your desired internal temperature.

5. Rest the steak: Let your steak rest for at least 10 minutes on a warm plate before slicing. The meat needs time to recirculate its juices, and that can only be achieved through patience. Once you’ve come this far in cooking the perfect steak, it would be a shame to ruin it! Your steak will not get cold (this is where a warm plate comes in handy). When your time is up, slice against the grain for more tender slices.

Steak Doneness Temperatures

  • Rare: 120ºF to 130ºF
  • Medium Rare: 130ºF to 140ºF
  • Medium: 140ºF to 150ºF
  • Medium Well: 150ºF to 155ºF
  • Well Done: 160ºF +

With the basics mastered, it’s time to discuss some of the common cuts and how they differ.

The Best Cuts of Steak for Grilling

Ribeye (Rib-eye, Rib Eye) Steak: Sometimes called entrecote, it can be purchased with the bone intact or boneless. It’s a tender steak with plenty of delicious fat marbling. This cut has a big, beefy flavour and is supremely juicy. For this reason, ribeye is usually on the pricier side, making it perfect for special occasions.

Flank Steak and Skirt Steak: Both very affordable (though the popularity of flank steak has made it rise in price recently) and tasty steaks, but they require a bit more work than other cuts. Flank steak can be tough and chewy, however, marinating overnight and cooking only to medium-rare can help keep it tender. After marinating, grilling and resting, flank steak must be thinly sliced across the grain to remain tender. Skirt steak should be prepared the same way as flank steak: marinated, grilled to medium-rare, rested and sliced against the grain. Flank and skirt steaks are great for weeknights and entertaining large groups.

New York Strip Steak: This cut is also known as the strip steak, top sirloin, top loin and contre-filet. The meat has a finely-grained texture and rich, beefy flavour. Its medium fat content, decent marbling and tender texture (less so than ribeye, but this cut is also less expensive) make it an ideal steak for barbecuing.

Porterhouse Steak: This steak is also known as the T-bone, a bone-in steak that has two of the most prized cuts of beef in one tidy package. On one side, the tenderloin, and on the other, the ribeye. The tenderloin portion will generally cook a bit faster than the ribeye portion, but the bone helps to keep the meat juicy. The porterhouse is the perfect steak for high-heat barbecues and entertaining to impress.

Now that you’ve nailed barbecued steak 101, it’s time to fire up the grill and dive into a recipe. Grill guru Bobby Flay takes it from here with this summery Grilled Steak and Papaya Salad .

Steak Salad with Onions and Cilantro Chimichurri

It’s finally grilling season! And what better way to flex your (grilling) guns than with a steak salad. Flank steak is a cheaper cut of meat that grills really well. It’s flavourful and when grilled and sliced right, perfect for a salad.

I’ve come up with this twist on a basic balsamic dressing, adding cilantro chimichurri and piquillo peppers. Spanish piquillo peppers are actually sweet, not spicy. You can find them roasted, either jarred or canned. Chopping and adding them to the vinaigrette gives the dressing a slight sweet and peppery flavour. If you can’t find them, you can substitute with roasted red peppers which are very similar.

This is a staple salad in my household. It’s super easy to prep ahead of time and you can grill the onions and steak just before serving it. Every BBQ needs a salad — and this is the perfect one!

grilled-flank-steak-salad-with-chimchurri-sauce

Grilled Flank Steak and Onion Salad with Cilantro Chimichurri and Piquillo Pepper Balsamic Vinaigrette

Serving Size: 4 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 10 minutes

Grilled_Steak_Salad-recipe-with-onions-and-chimichurri-dressing

Ingredients:

2 large red onions, 1/2” thick rounds
olive oil
salt and fresh black pepper

1 1/2 lb (680g) flank steak (skirt or hanger are good too)
olive oil
salt and fresh black pepper

4 to 5 cups spinach leaves
3 to 4 cups baby arugula
1/2 cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped

For the Piquillo Pepper Balsamic Vinaigrette:
3 tablespoons finely chopped piquillo peppers (or roasted red pepper)
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 tablespoon honey
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh black pepper
3/4 cup olive oil

For the Cilantro Chimichurri:
4 cloves garlic, minced finely
3/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/3 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon paprika (hot or sweet)
1/2 teaspoon salt

Grilled_Steak_Salad--recipe-with-onion-chimichurri

Directions:

For the piquillo pepper balsamic vinaigrette:
1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the chopped piquillo peppers, balsamic vinegar, mustard, honey, salt and pepper.
2. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil while whisking vigorously to emulsify the dressing.
3. Set aside.

For the cilantro chimichurri:
1. Combine all the ingredients together in a small bowl.
2. Set aside.

Grill the onions:
1. Heat a grill (or grill pan) to medium direct heat.
2. Drizzle the onions with olive oil and generously season them with salt and fresh black pepper on both sides.
3. Grill for about 3 minutes on each side until nicely charred.

Grill the steak:
1. Heat the grill (or grill pan) on medium-high direct heat.
2. Drizzle the steak with olive oil and generously season with salt and fresh black pepper on both sides.
3. Grill the steak for 3 1/2 to 4 minutes on each side for medium-rare or 4 1/2 to 5 minutes for medium. ONLY FLIP THE STEAK ONCE!
4. Remove the steak from the grill and allow to rest for at least 5 minutes before slicing.

Assemble:
1. Toss the spinach and baby arugula with some of the dressing. The quantity for the vinaigrette above makes more than you should dress the salad with! Plate the dressed greens onto a platter.
2. Arrange the grilled onions on top of the greens and scatter the chopped hazelnuts over top.
3. Slice the steak, against the grain, into 1/3” thin strips. The thinner the better. Just be sure you are cutting against the grain of the steak or else it will be too tough to chew.
4. Place the sliced steak over the salad and drizzle with the chimichurri.
5. Serve with the remaining vinaigrette and chimichurri on the side. Enjoy!

100x100_Danielle-Oron Danielle is a chef, bakery owner, and food blogger who thinks she’s Korean, but is actually Israeli. Also, Danielle does not eat like a lady.