Tag Archives: St. Patrick’s Day

key lime pie cupcakes on serving tray

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at Home With These Key Lime Pie Cupcakes

These Baking Therapy key lime pie cupcakes are the perfect little treat to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day! Sweet and tangy flavours of key lime pie topped with a fluffy cream cheese frosting. Did I mention they’re also stuffed with a luxurious lime curd? These cupcakes are guaranteed to satisfy any sweet tooth. OK, now let’s get baking!

key lime pie cupcakes on serving tray

Key Lime Pie Cupcakes

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Rest Time: 2 hours
Bake Time: 30-40 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 12 cupcakes

Ingredients:

Lime Curd
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 egg yolk
½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice (about 3 limes)
Pinch salt
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cubed
Green food gel colouring

Cupcakes
1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup graham cracker crumbs
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 large egg
1 egg white
¼ cup sour cream
⅓ cup milk
¼ cup lime juice
2 tsp lime zest
1 tsp vanilla extract

Frosting
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
8 oz cream cheese, room temperature
5 cups icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 Tbsp lime juice
Gel food colouring (optional)

Equipment:

Muffin Pan, Amazon, $35.

Baking Cups, Amazon, $6.

key lime pie cupcake ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. First, you’ll make the lime curd. In a medium saucepan on medium-high heat, whisk together the sugar, eggs, egg yolk, lime juice and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. When the mixture starts to bubble, whisk in the butter, one Tbsp at a time. Bring the mixture to a boil again and let it bubble for 1 minute.

2. Remove from heat and strain the lemon curd. Mix in gel food colouring (if using) — it’ll make the curd brighter. Place plastic wrap directly on the curd and refrigerate until it sets, at least 2 hours.

Related: Anna Olson’s Very Best Cupcake Recipes

3. Now, for the cupcakes. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a muffin pan with paper liners, set aside.

4. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, mix together the flour, graham cracker crumbs, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Add the butter and mix until the mixture resembles wet sand, make sure not to over-mix. Add the egg, egg white, sour cream, milk, lime juice, zest and vanilla. Mix until the batter just comes together. Scrape down the sides and mix for another 10 seconds.

Related: Classic Irish Eats That’ll Bring the Emerald Isle to Your Kitchen

5. Divide the batter among the 12 cups, filling until ⅔ of the way full. Bake in the oven for 25-35 minutes until the edges are just golden and a toothpick when inserted in the centre comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes then transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

key lime pie curd next to baked cupcakes

6. Now for the frosting. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and cream cheese until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. Gradually add the icing sugar and cream until smooth. Add the vanilla extract, lime juice and food colouring (if using), mix for 1 minute. Transfer to a piping bag.

7. Use a paring knife to scoop out the centres of the cooled cupcakes. Spoon about 1 Tbsp of the lime curd into the centre of each cupcake. Ice the cupcakes with the cream cheese frosting. Pipe on four-leaf clovers or add sprinkles to make it festive. Enjoy!

key lime pie cupcakes being filled with curd on wire rack

key lime pie cupcakes on wire rack

Like Sabrina’s key lime pie cupcakes? Try her no-bake key lime pie icebox cake or her easy gluten-free quinoa chocolate cake.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

a hearty bowl of slow cooker irish stew on a stone countertop

This Slow Cooker Irish Stew Recipe is a Classic Restored

Irish beef stew is a cozy, family-friendly dinner, and it can be incredibly easy to make, especially when all you have to do is toss everything in a slow cooker. Our recipe uses beef, however, if you’re a true lover of lamb, feel free to use that instead. Of course, a hearty Irish stew isn’t complete without earthy root veggies and here, Yukon gold potatoes, parsnips, carrots and celeriac shine in a hearty medley. Make this easy version in your slow cooker or Instant Pot for St. Patrick’s Day or a chilly, yet busy weekday. It’s classic comfort food for contemporary schedules.

Irish-Slow-Cooker-stew-in-bowl

Slow Cooker Irish Stew

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 4 hours on high, 8 hours on low
Total Time: 4 hours 10 minutes on high, 8 hours 10 minutes on low
Serves: 4 to 6

Irish-Slow-Cooker-stew-ingredients

Ingredients:

2 lbs stewing beef, cut into 1-inch pieces (see Notes below)
3 Yukon gold potatoes, cubed
1 celeriac (celery root), peeled and cubed
3 medium carrots, sliced
1 medium parsnip, sliced
1 yellow onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
4 cups beef stock
1 bay leaf
1 tsp dried thyme
salt, to taste (check the saltiness of your beef stock before adding)
ground black pepper, to taste
chopped fresh parsley, for serving

Irish-Stew-in-the-Slow-Cooker

Directions:

1. Add all ingredients except parsley in a large slow cooker and stir to combine. Replace lid and cook on high for 4 hours or on low for 8 hours.

2. Once your cook time is up, give the stew a stir, spoon into bowls and top with fresh parsley. Serve warm.

Notes: 
If you have time, brown the beef first by searing the cubes in a skillet with a splash of olive oil over medium-high heat – it adds a great depth of flavour.

Serve something cool and creamy for dessert while keeping with the Irish theme and mix up this Guinness Ice Cream Float.

Irish Coffee

The Boozy History of Irish Coffee

What do flying boats and Irish coffee have in common? Everything, and more.

I should know: my family tree has a direct bloodline to Joe Sheridan, the legendary chef who invented this classic Irish cocktail. Nutty and caramely, it’s a rich, hot blend of dark coffee, fiery whiskey, brown sugar and a swirl of thick whipped cream. An Emerald Isle favourite for over 70 years, this quintessential Irish beverage has unorthodox beginnings.

Tracing the roots of Irish coffee requires venturing to Foynes, a tiny town on Ireland’s west coast that was once the epicentre for the aviation world. During World War II, Pan Am’s famed flying boats (a.k.a. clippers) transported a range of people, from celebrities such as Ernest Hemingway and John F. Kennedy, to refugees (children fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe). It’s here that commercial air travel was born — as well as Irish coffee.

Irish Coffee

One wintery night in 1943, a clipper departed from Foynes to North America, but the flight didn’t get far. After battling bad weather conditions for several hours, the captain decided to return to Ireland. As the weary passengers offloaded into the airport’s restaurant, Chef Joe Sheridan decided to prepare a special treat to spread some cheer. He brewed dark, bitter coffee, and to each cup added a shot of Irish whiskey, a little brown sugar and whipped cream on top. As the perked-up passengers slurped up the steamy drink, one asked, “Is it Brazilian coffee?”

“No,” Sheridan said. “That was Irish coffee!”

With those four words, a classic Irish drink was born. However, it took almost a decade before the toasty tipple traveled worldwide. In 1951, Stanton Delaplane, a travel journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle, took his first sip and was instantly hooked. Back home, Delaplane raved about the newfangled Irish coffee drink to Jack Koeppler, owner of the Buena Vista Café. The duo tried to re-create Sheridan’s recipe, stirring and sipping all night, but the taste was off and the cream collapsed on the surface.

Enjoy Sheridan's original recipe for Irish coffee at the Foynes Maritime Museum

Enjoy Sheridan’s original recipe for Irish coffee at the Foynes Maritime Museum.

After a slew of taste tests and a “research” trip to Ireland, the two men finally cracked the code: the tricky cream only floated when aged and frothed to a precise thickness. Regardless, they decided to poach another key ingredient: Chef Sheridan himself. In 1953, Joe Sheridan immigrated to the United States and started working at the Buena Vista Café.

Chef Sheridan’s original recipe is still served at the Buena Vista Café in San Francisco and the Foynes Maritime Museum, where there’s a small exhibit dedicated to the drink. Of course, virtually all bars and restaurants in Ireland have this boozy beverage on their menu, though flavours may vary.

However, there’s no need to travel across the pond for a mouthful of this hot cocktail. Just gather all the ingredients in your kitchen and follow these instructions. If you’re really looking to impress guests, pair the drink with a plate of Irish Coffee Pie or Anna Olson’s Irish Creamy Fudge.

valerie's irish coffee

Once you’ve mastered the recipe, get playful and try this decadent recipe for Valerie Bertinelli’s Irish Coffee, made with espresso and topped with Lemon-Vanilla Whipped Cream. Or, delight guests with Irish coffee with a Canadian twist, spiked with Canadian whisky, a drizzle of maple syrup, and maple-laced whipped cream.

For a fancy after-dinner nightcap, make a batch of Nancy Fuller’s Dressed Up Irish Coffee, sprinkled with shaved dark chocolate, it’s almost a dessert in a glass. The options are endless.

This St. Patrick’s Day, I’ll be celebrating my bloodline to booze legend, Chef Joe Sheridan, by raising a glass of Irish coffee. From my family, to coffee and whiskey lovers everywhere, I say: you’re welcome and Sláinte!