Tag Archives: soup

Ramen with tofu and bok choy in white bowl

This Hearty 20-Minute Vegan Zucchini Ramen Noodle Soup Will Not Disappoint

No matter what, you always found yourself eating ramen out of a microwaved bowl in college. It was soupy noodles and not much else. Imagine if you found a veggie-based recipe that was full of flavor, packed with protein, low carb and delicious. That’s exactly what this ramen is: healthy good food. In this Can You Vegan It? recipe, we swap eggs for tofu — further transforming this classic comfort food.

Ramen with tofu and bok choy in white bowl

Zucchini Ramen Noodle Soup

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

¼ cup sesame oil, divided
4 baby bok choy, quartered
2 Tbsp yellow miso paste (optional)
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 shallots, chopped
2 Tbsp minced fresh ginger
¼ cup coconut aminos
8 cups vegetable broth
½ tsp kosher salt
4 zucchinis, spiralized
4-6 omega-3 eggs, boiled, peeled and sliced or cooked tofu
2 3-oz (85 g) packages enoki mushrooms
1 cup scallions, diced

Related: Genius Ways to Hack a Pack of Ramen Noodles

Directions:

1. Heat 1 Tbsp of oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bok choy to the skillet and cook for roughly 2 minutes on both sides until lightly charred. Remove the bok choy from the skillet and set it aside.

2. Add the remaining oil, then add the miso (if using), garlic, shallots, ginger and coconut aminos. Sauté for 3 minutes. Add the broth and salt and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low, then add the zucchini. Let the soup simmer for 5 minutes. Serve with the bok choy, eggs (or tofu), enoki mushrooms and a topping of scallions.

Like Valerie’s ramen noodle soup? Try her zesty lamb burgers or her low sugar persimmon creme brulee.

front cover of 30-Minute Low-Carb DinnersReprinted with permission from 30-Minute Low-Carb Dinners by Valerie Azinge, Page Street Publishing Co. 2020. Photo credit: Valerie Azinge, Yasaman Shafiei and Kabir Ali.

30-Minute Low-Carb Dinners, Amazon, $23.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Ham and Collard Greens Star in This Tasty Soup From The Pioneer Woman

Ever wonder how to cook collard greens? We’ve got the perfect comforting dish for your first attempt. Collard greens have seen a resurgence in popularity of late, and The Pioneer Woman herself has an easy soul food recipe you can quickly whip up on a busy weeknight.

Crisp bunches of collard greens, diced ham, navy beans and a spicy kick from minced jalapeno simmer together in a chicken broth for a must-try soup that is the ultimate example of comfort food. Sprinkle with fresh Parmesan cheese and consider grabbing a crusty artisan baguette for serving. Voila! This simple Ree Drummond masterpiece is one of our favourite Pioneer Woman recipes.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Tex-Mex Recipes Will Satisfy Your Cheesy, Meaty Cravings

The Pioneer Woman’s Ham and Collard Soup Recipe

Total: 35 minutes
Yields: 8 servings

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp salted butter
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 jalapeno, stemmed, seeded and minced
2 quarts (8 cups) chicken stock
2 lbs ham, diced
2 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 bunches collards, stems removed, chopped
Two 15.5-ounce cans navy beans, drained and rinsed
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
Crusty artisan baguette, torn into pieces, for serving

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Top Cookie Recipes to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Directions:

1. Heat the butter and olive oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, onion and jalapeno and cook, stirring, until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the stock, ham, salt, pepper, collards and beans. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook until the collards have softened and the flavors have come together, about 20 minutes.

2. Stir in the vinegar and taste. Adjust the seasonings as needed. Serve in bowls and garnish with the Parmesan and parsley. Serve each bowl with a chunk of crusty baguette.


Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Slow Cooker French Onion Soup is the Easiest Way to Make Dinner

Love French onion soup? Don’t have time to stand around caramelizing onions? Then this slow cooker version is the perfect way to satisfy those cravings. Slow cooker soups are a great way to get a meal on the table with very little prep time and this is no exception. This is a perfect easy soup recipe for a chilly fall evening. It’ll make your home smell amazing and it’ll taste like you’ve spent hours in the kitchen when, in fact, it’s the slow cooker doing all the work for you!

Slow Cooker French Onion Soup

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 9 hours
Total Time: 9 hours, 30 minutes
Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

2 lbs onions, halved and sliced
2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
3 tsp brown sugar
1.5 L beef stock
2 Tbsp brandy (optional)
8 sprigs fresh thyme, plus some for garnish
Freshly ground black pepper
8-12 slices baguette
1 ½ cups grated Swiss cheese

Directions:

1. Place sliced onions, butter and sugar in a 6-quart slow cooker. Stir to combine.

Related: This Vegan Pumpkin Soup Has a Super-Secret Immune-Boosting Ingredient

2. Cover and cook on high for 6 to 7 hours, removing the lid and stirring from time to time. Many recipes suggest doing this overnight, but as all slow cookers are different, it’s best to be around when these are cooking so you can keep an eye on them so they don’t burn. The onions should be deep brown before you put the rest of the ingredients in.

3. Add the stock, brandy, thyme and pepper. Cover again and cook on high for approximately 2 hours.

4. Remove the lid, scoop out the thyme sprigs and stir.

5. Pre-heat your oven broiler to high. Prepare your oven-safe soup bowls by placing them on a parchment-lined tray. Top each bowl of soup with 2 slices of baguette and approximately ¼ cup grated cheese.

6. Broil for approximately 5 minutes or until the cheese is melty and golden brown. Top with a few fresh thyme leaves to serve.

Like Mardi’s slow cooker French onion soup? Try her oven-baked zucchini and corn fritters or her easy mixed berry galettes.

This Vegan Pumpkin Soup Has a Super-Secret Immune-Boosting Ingredient

Pumpkin soup is the quintessential autumn dish. It’s sweet and creamy with earthy tones and can be pantry-friendly or not, depending if you’re using canned or fresh. This vegan pumpkin soup recipe is a bit different because we’ve snuck in immune-boosting foods inside. Most soups start with a base of onions, garlic and ginger, just like this one — but did you know, these ingredients have antiviral, antibacterial and antioxidant properties? They’re also loaded with nutrients like vitamin C, selenium and zinc. But the super-secret immune-boosting ingredient here is… turmeric. That golden, bright spice has been heavily studied for regulating the immune system. It’s important to add a pinch of black pepper when cooking with turmeric to make it more absorbable in the body. This soup will warm you up in cooler weather and definitely send you back for seconds and thirds.

Vegan Pumpkin Soup

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 6 bowls of soup

Ingredients:

Soup
1 medium pumpkin (red kuri or kabocha squash also work well) or 3 cups unsweetened pumpkin puree (2 x 398 ml canned pumpkin)
2 tsp coconut oil
1 yellow onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 heaping tsp minced ginger
½ tsp ground turmeric
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ to 1 tsp sea salt, depending on taste
Pinch pepper
2 carrots, sliced
1 cup coconut milk
1 ½ cups veggie broth

Optional Garnish Toppings
2 tsp maple syrup
Drizzle of coconut milk
Squeeze of lime or lemon
Fresh cilantro, mint or parsley
Pinch of unsweetened shredded coconut
Small handful chopped walnuts

Directions:

1. If you’re using fresh pumpkin or squash, peel it, de-seed it and cut it into chunks.

2. Place a large pot over medium-high heat and add the coconut oil.

3. Toss in the onions, once they become golden, add in the garlic, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, salt and pepper.

Related: 20 Hearty Vegetable Soup Recipes Just in Time for Sweater Weather

4. Mix everything around so it’s coated in the spices. If your pot is becoming too dry, add a bit more coconut oil.

5. Drop in the carrots and if you’re using fresh pumpkin, add in the chunks. Toss to mix.

6. If you’re using canned pumpkin, spoon it in now, then pour in the coconut milk and broth. Stir. Bring to a boil, cover the pot and simmer for 15-20 minutes.

7. After 20 minutes, blitz the soup until it’s creamy. If you’re using a blender, be very careful as the soup will be scorching hot.

8. Once blended, taste and re-season with salt and pepper if needed. For an extra hit of sweetness add a few tsp of maple syrup. Top each bowl with a drizzle of coconut milk, a squeeze of lime or lemon, fresh herbs, shredded coconut and chopped walnuts if you’d like.

If you enjoyed Tamara and Sarah’s vegan pumpkin soup recipe, be sure to check out their simple miso chicken or no-bake chocolate oat bars.

This Cozy One-Pot Pasta and Chickpea Stew = Love at First Bite

Don’t be surprised if you instantly become smitten with this alarmingly simple, yet charming, comfort food – it really is love at first bite. The kid in you will delight in the pasta and chickpea combo, with the fun shapes making it all the more scrumptious.

Related: 25 Comforting One-Pot Recipes That Will Warm Your Belly

One-Pot Pasta and Chickpea Stew

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4 (6 cups)

Related: 30 Recipes That Will Make You Rethink Canned Beans

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp olive oil
Half onion, chopped
1 rib celery, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 sprigs rosemary
¾ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
2 ½ Tbsp tomato paste
1 cup small pasta such as baby shells or ditalini
2 cups drained and rinsed can chickpeas
1 cup can cherry tomatoes (optional)
4 cups water or no-salt added vegetable broth
Olive oil and Parmesan for garnish

Directions:

1. Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and rosemary, and cook, stirring until softened, 4 to 5 minutes. Add garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper, and cook 1 minute.

2. Push onion mixture to one side of pan. Add tomato paste on other side, and cook, stirring until colour deepens, 30 seconds. Add chickpeas, cherry tomatoes (if using) and water and stir to combine.

3. Add pasta; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking until pasta is al dente, following package directions.

4. Divide among bowls; drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with Parmesan.

Tip: Add 1 chopped carrot to the onion mixture for a vegetable hearty stew.



Tip:
If you don’t have can cherry tomatoes, increase the tomato paste to 3 Tbsp and adjust the seasoning after adding the water.

For more quick and breezy comfort food inspiration, try these easy stuffed pasta recipes that start with store-bought noodles or this healthy three-cheese cacio e pepe in spaghetti squash form.

The One Healthy Soup That Should Always Be in Your Freezer

This immune-boosting soup is one that you should always have on hand. It’s the perfect cure when you have a cold, are battling the flu or simply need to warm up in the wintertime. This soup has so much going for it: shiitake mushrooms, turmeric, garlic and chicken bones, to name a few of the nutrient-rich ingredients. Each ingredient has a specific job to detox the body, regulate the immune system, lower inflammation, protect from aging and help prevent cancer.  

Shiitake mushrooms are nutrition powerhouses. They have a little something called beta-glucans, which support the growth of good bacteria in the gut. When the gut is populated with good bacteria, your immune system is stronger and better able to handle whichever illness gets thrown your way. A study found that eating four ounces of shiitakes a day for four weeks enhanced immunity and reduced inflammation. In addition to that powerhouse ingredient, this healthy soup would not be complete without homemade bone broth; the chicken bones provide collagen and gelatin to the soup, which helps strengthen the gut lining. A strong gut lining aids digestion and prevents bad bacteria and viruses from getting in. So, yes, this is definitely a soup you want to batch cook ahead of time.
 

Immune-Boosting Bone Broth, Chicken and Vegetable Soup

Ingredients:
1 whole chicken (2-3 lbs) or 2-3 lbs of chicken bones
1 yellow onion, sliced
1 bulb garlic (about 6 cloves)
3 carrots, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 ½ cups shiitake mushrooms, sliced (about 12 mushrooms)
1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
1 inch fresh turmeric, peeled and roughly chopped (or 2 tsp dried turmeric)
1 bunch of parsley
1 tsp sea salt
½ tsp peppercorns
10 cups water
Few handfuls baby spinach (optional)

Directions:
1. Place all the ingredients, except for the water, in a large pot.
2. Then, pour the water in the pot until almost everything is submerged, but do not overflow. You will likely use around 10 cups of water.
3. Bring to a boil, then cover the pot and simmer.
4. After about half an hour, skim the top of the soup with a wide slotted spoon to discard the scum that’s risen to the top.

5. Allow to simmer on low heat for minimum 2 hours and up to 6 hours.
6. Place the soup through a sieve to catch the veggies and chicken (you can use some of the extra chicken meat to make other delicious dishes). Place the sieve over top of another large pot for the broth to go into.
7. You can serve the soup as this nutrient-rich broth. Or, you can add the carrots, mushrooms and chicken meat back into the broth. You can also stir in some baby spinach if you’d like.
8. Store the soup in airtight jars, containers or sealed bags.  Freeze them in individual portion sizes.

Looking for more nourishing winter dishes? Check out these 15 Best Vegan Soup and Stew Recipes and 15 Flavour-Packed Recipes to Boost Your Gut Health.

split-pea-soup-feature

The Lip-Smacking History of Split Pea Soup in Canada

When the first chill creeps into the air, the knee-jerk reaction for many Canucks is to get soups simmering on the stove. While we love our minestrone and hearty stews, it’s hard to beat dipping your spoon into a steaming bowl of split pea soup.

This classic stick-to-your-bones soup has been a  Quebecois favourite for over 400 years. For good reasons, too: pure comfort made from easy-to-preserve ingredients.

“Split pea soup is made of yellow split peas, ham hock, vegetables, and thyme, and it’s usually served with bread,” says Ottawa Chef Marc Miron, who is an expert on the dish. “Split pea soup is a dish that can be served as a starter or as a main.”

split-pea-soup-parkersGet the recipe for Parker’s Split Pea Soup

But where exactly did this hearty soup come from in the first place? Miron has an inkling, based on his own extensive research tracing the roots of “habitant soup.” Although he’s headed up kitchens around the world and cooked for celebs like Chef Gordon Ramsay and the Rolling Stones, this busy chef was drawn to explore the history of this delicious Canadian dish.

“It’s a beautiful staple in the Canadian cuisine, not only in Quebec,” says Miron.

The soup’s origins are murky, but Miron believes today’s recipe is likely a distant relative of soup made aboard explorer Samuel de Champlain’s ships from France. On long journeys, the ships would be stocked with ingredients that preserve for lengthy times, such as vinegar, honey, cheese, rice, legumes, and salted meats and fish.

“All of those ingredients were on board that they made soup with,” says Miron. “It was probably not the split pea soup as we know now. But it was a [salted] ham-broth with some peas in it and some vegetables.”

As more habitants – or Canada’s first settlers – arrived from France and landed on Canadian soil, the soup served on ships gradually evolved and came to include game meats, pork, and locally grown ingredients.

“The habitants depended on the forests for their meat, but they farmed pigs along with vegetables, fruit, peas, and beans,” says Miron. “Soup was always part of the meal. Looking at the setup of the table, the spoon would always be there for the soup. They had to get creative with it: basically finding out that the peas matched very well with the ham hock.”

Whether called habitant soup or soupe aux pois cassés or split pea soup, this early settler soup with many names became a staple item on the menu for Quebec’s settlers. For starters, it was a filling and nutritious meal that helped them survive harsh Canadian winters.

“Going through the winter, times were pretty hard,” says Miron. “Pea soup is something that gave them everything from vegetables to legumes to protein. It’s a meal by itself.”

Most habitant farmers also had bread ovens, partly explaining why today’s version of the soup is usually paired with a slice of warm, crusty bread.

“Bread is always part the tradition,” says Miron. “When times were rough for the habitants, you needed a full meal and bread provided for that.”

Of course, the original habitant-style soupe aux pois cassés has changed over the centuries, swapping out salted meats for ham hock, but the soup has become a Canadian classic that has spanned generations.

“My grandmother is 96 and she told me that pea soup was served every Friday,” says Maxime Constantin, the owner of Cabane à sucre Constantin in Quebec where they serve a mean bowl of split pea soup. “So it’s become a traditional meal served in every family.”

In terms of regional variations, Miron says that most recipes still “respect the basics,” adding split peas and vegetables to the soup. The wildcard that he’s witnessed in the culinary world involves the broth.

“The consistency in the soup is where you see the most difference,” says Miron. “Some have it more ‘brothy,’ and some have it thicker.”

As the dish became popular across the country, dry and canned versions of the old school recipe popped up, with the first emerging in the late 1800s, according to Miron.

“They did an instant pea soup around 1867,” says Miron. “When you invent a soup dry, it’s because it’s popular.”

Pig-and-Pea-Soup

Get the recipe for Split Pea Soup.

If you’re not in a hurry, skip the ready-made varieties, and try your hand at creating a homemade batch of delicious split pea soup. There’s the traditional recipe for Québécois-Style Pea Soup made with unsmoked ham hock, but also Slow Cooker Split Pea Soup using a smoked turkey leg, leeks, and green split peas. Or follow Ina Garten’s recipe for Parker’s Split Pea Soup, which uses chicken stock instead of ham hock.

Short on time? Whip up a batch of Chef Michael Smith’s recipe Speedy Split Pea Soup using dried split peas, bacon, and frozen peas. Or if you’re not in a rush, try his more traditional recipe for Pig and Pea Soup with a ham hock broth.

For a soup with a zing, there’s this recipe for Split Pea and Ginger Soup from The Burnt Tongue in Hamilton, Ont. A warming soup with a kick of ginger spice, this dish is hearty to the core without being too heavy.

The food experts have a few tips for making split pea soup at home. At Cabane à sucre Constantin, Maxime Constantin regularly cooks up a colossal cauldron of pea soup that serves 700 people at their family-owned sugar shack. His secret to soup success? Soak the peas overnight.

“At the start, you have to soak the peas a night before,” says Constantin. “After we roast the piece of pork with carrot and onion, we add broth and peas. It has to boil about 2 to 3 hours until the peas are soft.”

For Miron, making split pea soup is a two-step process, which starts with the broth and then the soup. While the other ingredients are important, “the ham stock has to be very good.”

“It’s like roasting a chicken – the leg doesn’t cook the same way,” says Miron. “So I always de-bone and cook it separately. The pea soup is the same. To do a good ham stock, you would need 2-3 hours, depending on the size of your ham hock, to make sure the meat is cooked and falls off the bone.”

Once the broth is complete, Miron adds vegetables and chunks of ham to the rich, flavourful stock, and simmers the concoction on the stove for 30 to 45 minutes.

No matter which split pea soup recipe you choose or how you cook the broth, take pride in the fact that you’re slurping up a Canadian classic that been trending since the days of Samuel de Champlain. Now that’s definitely worthy of a Canadian Heritage Minute!

Apple-Brie Pumpkin Soup Season is Here

Now that soup season is upon us, we’re looking to jazz up our old fall favourites, like classic, creamy pumpkin soup. In this mouthwatering version, we’ve added Gala apples to give the soup just a hint of sweetness, then we gave it the full French onion treatment, with a beautiful topping of crispy baguette and melty Brie. This stick-to-your-ribs soup is just what you need to feel like you’re living your best fall life.

pumpkin-apple-soup-with-baked-brie

Photo by Lindsay Guscott
Lindsay Guscott

Baked Brie Pumpkin and Apple Soup Recipe

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp. butter
1 small onion, sliced, about 1 1/2 cups
3 cloves garlic, smashed
1 small pie pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-in pieces, about 6 cups
2 Gala apples, peeled and cut into 1/2 pieces, about 3 cups
1 sprig rosemary, plus more for optional garnish
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp cayenne
1/2 cup dry hard apple cider
900 ml vegetable stock
1/2 cup whipping cream
8 slices baguette
150g double cream Brie, rind removed and thinly sliced

sugar-pumpkins

Photo by Allison Day
Photo by Allison Day

Directions:
1. Melt butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Cook until softened, 5 to 7 min.
2. Increase heat to medium-high, then stir in pumpkin and apples. Season with salt. Sauté until vegetables are lightly golden-brown, 5 to 7 min.
3. Add spices and cook until fragrant, 1 min.
4. Pour in cider. Using a wooden spoon, scrape up any brown bits from bottom of pan. Allow cider to evaporate, 1 to 2 min.
5. Add stock and rosemary sprig. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, until vegetables are tender, about 15 min. Remove and discard rosemary.
6. Working in small batches, purée soup in a blender. Return to pot. Stir in cream and cook until heated through, 1 to 2 min.
7. Ladle into oven-safe bowls, then top each with 2 slices of baguette and 2 slices of cheese. Broil on high until cheese has melted and is just starting to brown, about 1 to 2 min.
8. Sprinkle with finely chopped rosemary, if desired, and serve immediately.

pumpkin-apple-soup-with-brie-crouton

Photo by Lindsay Guscott
Photo by Lindsay Guscott

Tip: If you don’t own oven-proof bowls, assemble your Brie toasts on a foil-lined baking sheet instead. Once broiled, simply transfer the toasts to your bowl.

Looking for more fall recipes? Try our Brilliant Ways to Use Butternut Squash.

Slow Cooker Tortilla Soup

Slow Cooker Chicken Tortilla Soup is Fiesta Flavour Without the Fuss

This zesty and warming soup is just asking to be on your dinner menu this week. Toppings of tortilla chips, avocado, cilantro and lime add incredible flavour and texture to a big, comforting bowl of slow-cooked shredded chicken, sweet potato, black beans and tomatoes. To make this into a vegan or vegetarian soup, simply skip the chicken, toss in another can of black beans and replace the chicken broth with vegetable broth.

Slow Cooker Tortilla Soup

Slow Cooker Tortilla Soup

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours on high, 4 hours on low
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes on high, 4 hours 20 minutes on low
Serves: 4  

Slow Cooker Tortilla Soup

Ingredients:

Tortilla Soup
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
2-1/2 cups chicken broth
1 (28 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained and rinsed
2 small or 1 large yellow onion, diced
1 sweet potato, diced
1 red pepper, seeded and diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp salt

For Serving
1 lime, quartered
1/2 cup (about a handful per serving) tortilla chips
1/4 cup cilantro, roughly chopped
1 avocado, pitted and diced

Directions:
Tortilla Soup
1. Stir to combine all tortilla soup ingredients (except for toppings) in a large slow cooker. Replace lid and cook on high for 2 hours or on low for 4 hours.

2. After time is up, shred the chicken using two forks and stir to coat with remaining soup ingredients.

Slow Cooker Tortilla Soup

For Serving:

1. Dish the tortilla soup into bowls and top each one with a squeeze of lime, tortilla chips, cilantro and avocado. Serve hot.

For tortilla soup outside of the bowl, try this family-friendly Chicken Tortilla Casserole (aka Mexican lasagna!) from The Pioneer Woman.

Red Thai Curry Slow Cooker Soup

Slow Cooker Thai Red Curry Soup That’s Easier (and Better) Than Take-Out

Thai curry is all about layering flavours, and slow-cooking the ingredients allows everything to fully meld, creating a rich, complex dish without standing at the stove for hours. Chicken, vegetables, brown rice and roasted peanuts make this bowl a complete meal, while prepared red Thai curry paste keeps things simple. With this spicy, coconut milk and chicken soup, you’ll skip the take-out once and for all.

Slow Cooker Thai Red Curry Soup with Chicken

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours on low, 4 hours on low
Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes on high, 4 hours 10 minutes on low
Serves: 4


Ingredients:

Thai Red Curry Soup with Chicken
1 (13.5 oz) can coconut milk
1 cup chicken broth
3 Tbsp red Thai curry paste
2 Tbsp coconut sugar
1 Tbsp tamari (a gluten-free soy sauce)
1 large or 2 small yellow onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
2-inch piece ginger, minced
1 cup broccoli florets
2 carrots, sliced
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

For Serving
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/2 cup roasted peanuts
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped
1 lime, quartered


Directions:
1. Whisk the coconut milk, broth, curry paste, coconut sugar and tamari together in a large slow cooker. Add the remaining soup ingredients and stir to combine. Replace lid and cook on high for 2 hours or on low for 4 hours.

2. Once cooked, shred the chicken using two forks and give the soup a good stir.

For Serving:
1. Ladle soup into bowls and top each one with cooked brown rice, peanuts, cilantro and a squeeze of lime. Serve warm.

Looking for more Thai curry recipes? Try these 26 Thai Recipes to Make at Home and forget about take-out.

Celery Soup

7 Ways to Make Your Soups Creamy Without Dairy

During winter’s bitter, blustery days, a warming pot of soup is top of mind. If you’re craving a rich and comforting soup without adding the heaviness of cream, you’ve got plenty of options in your crisper or pantry. It’s time to think outside the box (or carton) with these seven easy, dairy-free thickeners.

Vegan Cream of Celery Soup

Creamy soups, like this vegan cream of celery soup, don’t have to be loaded with fat or heavy cream.

1. In A Slurry
When it comes down to it, some creamy soups are just white sauces with more liquid added. Building a roux from flour and butter (or margarine), cooking for a few minutes to remove the raw flour flavour, and adding chicken or vegetable stock will give you a sturdy soup without a whisper of cream. Cornstarch, on the other hand, is mixed with a few tablespoons of liquid and then stirred into the soup after it has come to a boil. Either way, the tricks you use to thicken a gravy — flour pastes, cornstarch slurries or even add-ins such as arrowroot or tapioca — can give your soup a thicker mouth feel.

2. Koo Koo For Coconuts 
For creaminess without cream, full-fat coconut milk will add a luscious sheen and body to your broth (you can use low-fat if you must, but it won’t give you as much richness). In Thai cuisine, coconut milk is added to flavourful curry pastes to produce creamy soups that pack a punch, such as this Thai Coconut Curry Corn Soup. If coconuts aren’t your thing, try subbing in soy or nut milk instead, although your soup will be a little thinner in consistency.

3. Against The Grains
Anyone who has ever made a Chinese congee knows the thickening power of rice — absorbing liquid and releasing starch to add a velvety texture when cooked. Add half a cup of rice at the beginning of the simmering period for your soup, and blend when the grains have plumped out. Pressed for time? Try using quick cooking rice instead to shorten the simmering time needed.

4. The Power Of Spuds
Don’t forget the humble potato — adding just one can add significant body and creaminess to your soup. Peel your spud if you desire, or leave it unpeeled and well scrubbed if you’re pureeing the soup afterwards. Just be warned that unless you’re using a full blender, you may end up with visible bits of potato skin sprinkled throughout. A smaller dice or thin slices will help the potato break down quicker in the boiling liquid. Sweet potato or yam can also be used, but keep in mind it will affect the colour of your finished product. You can also raid the fridge for yesterday’s mashed potatoes, leftover potato soup or baked sweet potatoes for a head start.

5. Back To Your Roots
Don’t stop at potatoes — chopped root vegetables, such as parsnips, turnips, rutabaga or carrots, all make economical and easy ways to add velvety texture. Beyond the basics, Jerusalem artichokes or sunchokes, taro or water chestnuts can also be cooked and puréed for body. Try  sneaking in some cauliflower or broccoli for some added vegetable goodness.

6. In A Nutshell
Soft nuts, such as cashews, add a creamy texture when soaked, such as in this vegan cream of celery soup. Nuts can be pre-soaked the night before, or cooked directly in simmering liquid to soften before blending.

7. Check Your Pulses
White beans, such as cannelloni, release a starchiness when cooked that will taste creamy on the palate without providing a dominant flavour. Soak and cook your own, or open a can for convenience, if you desire. Chickpeas or lentils, on the other hand, will impact the taste of your finished soup, but also provide a hearty helping, especially when paired with salty pancetta or bacon.

Looking for comforting soup recipes? Try one of these 21 Noodle Soups to Slurp Up This Winter.

The Best Vegan Chicken Noodle Soup

When the weather gets chilly and all you want to do is stay cozy inside, we know exactly what you’ll be craving: a steaming bowl of chicken noodle soup! Our favourite childhood meal, this faux chicken noodle soup is made entirely from plant-based ingredients and we promise you won’t notice the difference.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Serves: 6-8

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Ingredients:
1 cup diced yellow onion
1 cup diced carrot
1 cup diced celery
3 garlic cloves, minced
7 cups low sodium vegetable stock
170 g meatless chicken strips (approximately 2 cups)
200 g fettuccine noodles
1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
2 Tbsp sunflower oil
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/2 tsp fresh thyme
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp dried sage
1/4tsp ground pepper

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Directions:
1. Pull apart the meatless chicken strips with your hands to make smaller pieces that look shredded.
2. In a large pot, heat sunflower oil over medium heat and then add meatless chicken strips and brown for 1 minute.
3. Add basil, thyme, sage, sea salt and ground pepper, and continue browning the strips for another 5 minutes.
4. Add onion and sauté for another 2 minutes, allowing them to soften and sweat, stirring occasionally.
5. At this point, add a bit of vegetable stock to lift up the brown bits off the bottom of the pot, stir in celery and carrots and sauté for 4-5 minutes.
6. Add minced garlic and sauté for 2 minutes.
7. Add all the vegetable stock and noodles (you can use any type of pasta, which may vary the cook time) and stir to combine.
8. Cover pot with lid, lower heat and simmer for 15 minutes, or until noodles are tender and cooked through.
9. In the last 2 minutes of cooking, add in parsley.
10. Serve immediately.

French Onion Soup Casserole for Chilly Days

The biting cold of winter requires major comfort foods to indulge in, and French onion soup is at the top of our list. While we love a big bowl of soup, turning it into a cheesy casserole is a no-brainer. It’s super easy and delivers huge on flavour. The combination of rich, caramelized onions, gooey melted cheese and toasted baguette packed with the deep flavour of French onion soup will leave you weak in the knees and totally satisfied.

onion soup casserole

Prep: 15 minutes
Total: 1 hour 15 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
4 cups sliced Spanish onion
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp Madeira wine
2 1/2 cups beef stock
1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp black pepper
2 sprigs fresh thyme
6-8 1 inch slices of French baguette, toasted
1 cup of Gruyere cheese, shredded
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
1 Tbsp butter, melted

Directions:
1. Heat butter in a large pan over medium. Once butter is bubbly and foaming, add the onions and salt. Stir onions to coat in butter and let cook until deep brown and caramelized, about 30-40 minutes, stirring intermittently.
2. Once onions have caramelized, pour in Madeira wine, stir and continue to cook until alcohol is evaporated and liquid is fully absorbed into onions, about 1 minute.
3. Preheat oven to 400°F. Add beef stock, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper and thyme. Increase heat to medium and cook until stock reduces by about 1/3, about 5 minutes.
4. Pour contents of pan into a medium-size casserole dish. Remove thyme sprigs. Arrange toasted baguette slices over onion mixture and press down allowing the bread to absorb the liquid. Sprinkle with cheese and drizzle with melted butter.
5. Bake in oven until cheese is melted and golden, about 30 minutes. Serve immediately.

Looking for more comforting dishes? Try Ina Garten’s Most Comforting Casseroles.

8 Comforting Soup Spots Across Canada

Soup is notorious for filling one’s belly, warming the soul and curing a cold — but it’s also known as a simple, oftentimes cheap and hearty lunch (or dinner). Here are eight great spots in Canada that are cooking up delicious one-pot wonders.

Souper Duper Soup

Photo Credit: Souper Duper Soup

Ambrosia (Calgary, AB) 
Located right beside a Buddhist Monastery in downtown Calgary, this vegetarian Chinese eatery does an impressive job of creating unique and satisfying dishes. Go for the pickled cabbage soup for a hearty lunch or the robust and warming preserved Chinese radish soup.

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Photo Credit: Baba’s Homestyle Perogies

Baba’s Homestyle Perogies (Saskatoon, SK)
With a huge Ukrainian population in Saskatchewan, it should come as no surprise that you can find a lot of perogies and borscht around town. Baba’s (the Ukrainian term for grandmother) is located in a more industrial area of town, but worth checking out for a big bowl of this rich, salty and sweet beet soup.

Lunch Bell Bistro (Winnipeg, MB)
With quality, local ingredients and a recipe that is the embodiment of beauty in simplicity, one can never be let down by a classic chicken noodle soup. Tender chunks of Manitoba chicken, thinly sliced carrots and tender egg noodles float in an almost-clear broth that can make your shivers disappear after only a few sips.

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Photo Credit: Marché Soupson

Marché Soupson (Montreal, QC)
Open Monday to Friday, Marché Soupson’s offerings change daily. These beautiful pots of soup can range from anything like corn chowder to red lentil with toasted spices, and are mostly vegetarian or vegan; they opt for cashew cream to add that rich, velvety texture.

Soup ‘n Such Café Inc. (Toronto, ON)
Stay warm on a blustery winter day in Toronto with one of the signature soups from this little café. Turkey vegetable is a go-to. For vegan options that are equally filling, you can rely on cauliflower and red pepper, or vegetable lentil soups.

Souper Duper Soup

Photo Credit: Souper Duper Soup

Souper Duper Soup (Dartmouth, NS)
There is a long list of fun soups on the menu here, like Greek Lemon Rice, and Cheeseburger and Chicken Enchilada. But no soup stands out more than the Donair; as Halifax and Dartmouth’s (unofficially) official food, this flavourful dish features beef, tomatoes, onions and donair spice.

Stock up Café (Vancouver, BC)
With a great array of pre-made soups to take home and heat up, Stock Up also has your basic stocks and a few daily specials like butter chicken or tomato bisque to eat on the go. There’s always something at this quaint little spot that your taste buds will agree with.

Stock up Café (left) and Ravi Soups (right)

Photo Credit: Stock up Café (left) and Ravi Soups (right)

Ravi Soups (Toronto, ON)
There’s a handful of little cafés to pop into for a bite in downtown Toronto. But when it’s extra chilly outside, one of Ravi Kanagarajah’s three eateries is sure to be a short walk from the office. The popular curried apricot and lentil soup with lime crème fraiche proves that Ravi isn’t just ladling out your basic out-of-a-box soups.

5 Ways to Jazz Up Basic Potato Soup

At its simplest, potato soup is pretty humdrum — but the neutral flavour of potatoes means a big basic batch is soup-er easy to jazz-up.

Here’s how you can take a big batch of potato soup and turn it into a 5 tasty dishes. Bonus: potato soup freezes impeccably well, too!

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Basic Potato Soup Recipe

Total Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:
1 tsp canola oil
1 yellow onion (diced)
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
6 red potatoes (peeled and 1” cubed)
4 cups water
4 cups vegetable broth
2/3 cup heavy cream (or cashew milk)
Salt and pepper (to taste)

Directions:
1. Heat oil in a large pot on medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until softened, about 6 to 8 minutes.
2. Next, add butter to the pot and continue to cook, stirring regularly until onions begin to turn golden, about 10 minutes.
3. Add diced potatoes, water and broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce to medium heat and let simmer until potatoes are fork tender, about 10 to 12 minutes.
4. Remove from heat and let contents of pot cool slightly.
5. Transfer to a blender or use an immersion blender to puree soup until smooth. Stir in the cream and season to taste.

5 Ways to Spice up a Basic Potato Soup:

Loaded Baked Potato
Stir in chopped (cooked) bacon, sliced green onions and shredded cheddar. Once ingredients are warmed through and cheese is melted, pour into bowls and top with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkle with more cheese.

Pesto Chicken
Bring soup to a simmer and add 2 Tbsp. of good quality pesto (or make your own), leftover roast chicken meat and some white wine or lemon juice. Stir and let cook for 5 minutes. Top with fresh basil and grated Parmesan.

Bangers and Mash
Thinly slice 2 cooked sausages (head to a local butcher for something top notch), toss into a pan along with 1 tsp of Worcestershire sauce, 2 cups of frozen peas and thinly sliced yellow onion. Let cook on medium heat for about 10 minutes. Portion soup into bowls, and top with onion, pea and sausage mixture.

Thai Curry Vegetable
Add about 1 Tbsp of red Thai curry paste (less if you can’t handle heat), a few splashes of fish sauce, rice wine vinegar and chopped vegetables (like Chinese broccoli, carrots and cauliflower) to the soup. Once the vegetables are cooked, season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve.

Blue Cheese and Pear
This may be for slightly more adventurous palates, but trust me on this one! Crumble your favourite blue cheese into the pot of potato soup along with some diced pear and a 1/4 cup of port. Stir until cheese has incorporated into soup. Ladle into bowls and drizzle with honey before serving.

Thicken cream based soups, like this seafood chowder.

Thicken cream based soups, like this seafood chowder.

Other Ways to Use it:

Thicken any Cream-Based Soup
Traditionally, soups are thickened with a roux — a combination of butter and flour — but since so many people have gluten sensitivities these days, adding a few cups of simple, starchy potato soup will thicken things up in no time.

In Pot Pie Fillings
Similar to above, fillings for most pot pies call for flour to help hold all of the ingredients together. Pour enough potato soup over top of filling ingredients, and stir until evenly coated.

Mini Bacon Grilled Cheese with Tomato Soup Shooters

Next time you’re hosting a game-day feast or party during the cold-weather months, try serving this creative spin on a comfort-food classic.

Everyone loves a grilled cheese sandwich, but the addition of bacon, mustard and cherry tomatoes are what sets this dish apart from the rest. To really take this already delicious dish up a notch, we’re serving it a with mini tomato soup sipper that’s spiked with a touch of beer. Comfort food at its best!

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Tomato & Beer Soup Shooters

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Makes: 16 servings

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp butter
1 onion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup beer
2 cups strained tomatoes (passata)
1 cup vegetable broth
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper
Pinch granulated sugar
3 Tbsp sour cream or crème fraiche
2 Tbsp chopped fresh tarragon or chives

Directions:
1. In saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Sauté onion and garlic, stirring often, until soft and starting to turn golden, about 8 minutes. Deglaze with beer. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer until beer is almost evaporated, 5 minutes.
3. Add tomatoes and broth. Bring to simmer; cook, stirring, for 10 minutes. Season with salt, pepper and sugar. (Tip: Let cool slightly. Refrigerate in airtight container for up to 24 hours. Reheat before continuing.)
4. Transfer sour cream into small sandwich baggie. Pour soup into shot glasses or small demi-tasse cups. Snip tiny piece of corner from baggie and squeeze a small drizzle of sour cream over top of soup shooters. Sprinkle with tarragon.

Note: Make sure you choose a not-too-bitter beer, preferably from a local microbrewery, such as a malty ale or Belgian-style wheat beer.

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Mini Bacon Grilled Cheese

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Makes: 16 sandwiches

Ingredients:
1 baguette, sliced into 32, 1/2-inch thick slices
1/4 cup softened butter
2 Tbsp Dijon mustard
11/4 cup shredded old Cheddar cheese (125 g)
8 slices cooked bacon, sliced into 4 pieces each
8 grape or cherry tomatoes, halved

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425°F.
2. Spread butter over top of 16 baguette slices. Arrange, butter-side down on parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Spread tops with Dijon mustard. Sprinkle cheese over half of the pieces; top each with 1 bacon piece.
3. Spread butter on remaining 16 baguette slices, topping each cheese and bacon-covered piece with an un-topped slice, butter-side up.
4. Bake turning once, until golden and cheese is melted, 8 to 10 minutes.
5. Skewer each sandwich with a tomato half with a toothpick.
6. Serve with Tomato & Beer Soup Shooters.

Does Chicken Soup Really Cure a Cold?

Cozying up with a bowl of chicken soup certainly feels good this time of year, whether you’re on the mend or feeling in top form. If you happen to catch a cold, you’re probably looking for anything that will help ease those aches, soothe your tender throat and clear your sinuses. And while chicken soup is certainly comforting, can it really help make you feel better?Here, we dive into the facts to uncover the truth behind this old (and tasty) kitchen remedy.

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Fact: Chicken soup helps relieve congestion.

Enjoying a bowl of chicken soup can help ease congestion, according to Mayo Clinic. Warm liquids, like the savoury broth in chicken soup, make your nose run (in a good way), working to clear uncomfortable nasal congestion. The more your nose runs, the better, as this means the virus has less contact time with the lining of your nose.

Try this recipe: Tyler Florence’s Chicken Noodle Soup

Fact: Chicken soup can rehydrate you.

Eating and drinking when you have a cold can seem highly unappealing, but staying hydrated is key to a quick recovery. Chicken broth delivers hydration along with a bit of salt so your body retains the liquids more effectively.

Try this recipe: Ina Garten’s Chicken Soup 

Fiction: Chicken soup can boost your immune system.

You can’t truly “boost” you immune system, but you can support it — and chicken soup may help in this area with its rich mineral profile. Your body needs energy (calories) for recovery, and chicken soup brings this in a highly digestible form, especially helpful when you don’t feel like eating. And, the ingredients in chicken soup, like garlic, onion and carrots contain potent immune-supportive compounds.

Try this recipe: Michael Smith’s Roast Chicken Noodle Soup

Fact: Chicken soup has medicinal properties.

Surprisingly, it might. A study published in the journal Chest discussed blood samples of volunteers given chicken soup. These samples showed that the soup lessened the movement of neutrophils, which may be beneficial to the upper respiratory tract (where colds tend to linger). While this is just one study, it may make that soup you’re eating taste just a little better.

Try this recipe: Ricardo Larrivée’s Chicken Noodle Soup

Fact: Chicken soup eases an upset stomach.

A common cold can make your stomach ache, and while inherently flavourful, a classic (not spicy!) chicken soup is mild, cold-friendly food. Homemade versions, made with chicken bones, have the added benefit of gelatin, which can nourish the intestinal tract.

Try this recipe: Chuck Hughes’ Chicken Soup with Ground Chicken Meatballs

Fact: Chicken soup makes you feel better, faster.

While researchers realize there’s a bit of a placebo effect going on, slurping up chicken soup may help to speed up recovery thanks to its rich protein content, a macronutrient needed in larger amount for those who are sick.

Try this recipe: Awesome Chicken Soup for the Lazy Soul

Verdict:

Though it may not “cure” the common cold, research shows promise that the combination of the mineral-rich broth, lean protein and easy-to-digest cooked vegetables helps to make you feel better in an almost magic way.

Even if you’re on the fence about the science, it’s tough to argue about the comfort food factor chicken soup brings in both its aroma and taste. Enjoy one of our many chicken soup recipes and get well soon.

5 Simple Two-Ingredient Soups

A nearly bare cupboard can still yield ingredients for a bowl of soul-warming, good-for-you soup. With only two simple ingredients and a dash of creativity, these five easy soups come together in less time than it takes to open and heat up a can.

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Melon and Cucumber Gazpacho via Cannelle et Vanille

1. Melon and Cucumber Gazpacho
It’s hard to believe this creamy, cold soup is made up of just two things: ripe honeydew and cucumber. This gorgeously-smooth green soup doesn’t even need to be cooked — just whiz up the ingredients in a blender and pour straight into a bowl. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and a few toasted pine nuts.

2. Lentils and Vegetable Stock
A can of lentils simmered in vegetable broth makes a hearty meal that will stick to your ribs using the simplest ingredients. Bring the lentils and broth to a gentle simmer, and then use an immersion blender to smooth things out. Season with a little salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon, and serve with toasted pita wedges.

3. Tomato Soup
To make the world’s easiest soup, reach for fresh, in-season tomatoes or canned San Marzano tomatoes, blended with a splash of milk. This simplified soup is great on its own, or can be easily jazzed up with some garlic and fresh basil, served alongside a gooey grilled cheese.

4. Mushroom Soup
This quickie soup can go two ways: for a thick, belly-warming soup, add cream to a pot of sauteed mushrooms and cook together until it reaches a simmer. Feel free to use vegetable or even chicken stock for a lighter version.

5. Egg Drop Soup
A Chinese restaurant favourite, it’s easy to satisfy your egg drop soup cravings with two simple pantry staples. To make this soup, simmer chicken stock until it reaches a slow bubble and then slowly pour in whisked eggs, while constantly stirring the stock. To make it even more authentic, thicken it up with a little cornstarch and sprinkle with white pepper.

RoastedRootVegetableSoup

A Comforting Soup to Use up Extra Veggies

By Margaret Bose-Johnson

When you are the child of German immigrants, you learn not to waste a thing. Both of my parents spent their childhoods as refugees in Europe during World War II, constantly fleeing danger and subsisting on very little. Consequently, even with the abundance of the life they were able to live in Canada, they could never throw out any usable item or even the tiniest bit of food. They instilled that thriftiness into their children. We grew up in hand-me-down clothes, we washed our plastic sandwich wrap to reuse again and again, and we made all our food at home, “from scratch.” I always say my mom could turn the scraps from the compost pail into the most delicious dinner.

This soup came about one day after discovering that my refrigerator crisper drawer was full of sad, wrinkly, mould-spotted vegetables. I couldn’t throw them out! All they needed was a good trimming and a loving roast in the oven. The vegetables caramelized into luscious sweetness, to be transformed into this creamy, complex, flavourful soup.

Now I make it often, and we sometimes call it “Clean Out the Crisper Drawer Soup.”

Roasted Root Vegetable Soup, Courtesy of Margaret Bose-Johnson, kitchenfrau.com, Stony Plain, Alta.

This recipe is a great way to use up veggies that are past their prime.

RoastedRootVegetableSoup

Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 45 to 60 min
Yield: Makes about 5½ cups (1.325 L), or 4 servings

Ingredients
1 lb (450 g) mixed vegetables, peeled, trimmed and chopped (such as 1-2 parsnips, 3-4 carrots, 1 red, yellow or orange pepper)
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic
2 Tbsp (30 mL) olive oil
4 cups (1 L) chicken stock
pinch cayenne pepper
salt to taste
1 tsp (5 mL) sherry vinegar
1 Tbsp (15 mL) pure maple syrup (optional)
olive oil, truffle oil or basil oil, to garnish
fresh black pepper, to garnish

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 400°F (200ºC).
2. Combine vegetables, onion and garlic cloves in large roasting pan. 3. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat.
4. Roast vegetables for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring halfway through, until carrots are easily pricked with fork and edges of vegetables are starting to turn dark brown and crisp.
5. Transfer vegetables to blender, using rubber spatula to scrape in any remaining olive oil.
6. Add half of the chicken stock and, taking care to avoid splatters, process until smooth, adding more chicken stock if mixture is too thick. Pour purée into saucepan; add remaining chicken stock. (Alternately, transfer vegetables and oil directly into saucepan, add chicken stock and purée with immersion blender.)
7. Add cayenne pepper and, if desired, salt to taste. Add sherry vinegar. Add maple syrup, if using. Head soup over medium-high heat until just boiling.
8. Garnish each serving with olive oil and fresh-ground pepper.

Note: The flavours of this soup are brightened up by a hit of sherry vinegar and maple syrup added at the end of cooking. If you don’t have sherry vinegar, substitute red or white wine vinegar, and if you don’t have maple syrup, use honey.

Kitchen Frau
I am a mother of four, teacher and writer. The kitchen and the garden are my two favourite places to be (and out feeding my chickens). I love healthy cooking using fresh garden ingredients, whole foods and alternative grains.

A Celery Soup to Warm You Up This Winter

By Samantha Turnbull

When I was a kid, winter was my favourite season. Every morning I would run down the stairs, turn on the radio, and cross my fingers waiting for another snow day. If I was so lucky that the weather cancelled my education for the day, I would pull my snowsuit right over my pajamas and leap outside into the snow to build snowmen, make snow forts and go tobogganing. I would eventually get so frozen that I would toddle my frozen self back inside, peel off the layers of soaking winter wear, then wrap myself in a bundle blankets and hunker down in front of a movie until I thawed.

My mom was well aware of my freezing routine and would have a big bowl of soup waiting for me, made with whatever she could scrounge up from the fridge. Whether you put off going to the grocery store or you are completely snowed in, it’s pretty likely there may be a big bunch of celery in the back of the fridge. Combine the celery with the creaminess of cashews and you create a soup that is velvety, deeply flavoured and totally lick-the-spoon scrumptious until the last drop.

Vegan Cream of Celery Soup, Courtesy of Samantha Turnbull, itdoesnttastelikechicken.com, Toronto, ON

After a long day of building snowmen and tobogganing, there’s nothing quite like coming home to a hot bowl of creamy soup.
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Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 25 mins
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
1 tbsp (15 mL) olive oil
6 ribs celery, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, finely minced
4 cups (1 L) vegetable broth
1 cup (250 mL) water
? cup (75 mL) all-purpose flour
1 bay leaf
½ tsp (2 mL) dried thyme
½ cup (125 mL) raw cashews
salt to taste
pepper to taste
celery leaves (optional)

Directions
1. Heat olive oil in large pot over medium-high heat. Add celery, onion and garlic; sauté for 5 to 10 minutes, or until celery and onion begin to soften and look translucent.
2. Add vegetable broth and water, then slowly whisk in flour, mixing well to break up lumps. Add bay leaf, thyme and raw cashews. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, until cashews are very soft.
3. Remove bay leaf, then blend soup in small batches, being careful not to fill blender too full, so it doesn’t overflow. Blend soup very well, so cashews are completely blended.
4. Return to pot briefly to reheat. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with celery leaves, if desired.

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It Doesn’t Taste Like Chicken
Hi! I’m Sam. I created, run, write and photograph the blog It Doesn’t Taste Like Chicken. I like vegan food, and I hope to show you that vegan food should really just be called food. It’s not as weird as it sounds – I promise!