Tag Archives: side dish

A heaping bowl of Kardea Brown's pan fried collard greens studded with thick cut bacon bits

Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Can a side dish really be a star? As Kardea Brown shows us with her cravaeble Southern recipes on Delicious Miss Brown, you can elevate any dish with a touch of heart, respect for tradition, quality ingredients — and her distinct and delicious penchant for making comfort-food classics her own. That’s where these delectable pan-fried collard greens come in.

A staple side dish in Southern homes, collard greens slather savoury flavour on any dinner plate — and Kardea’s recipe takes these essential greens to the next level with mouth-watering thick-sliced bacon bringing the “more, please” umami flavour. Cooked in a low-and-slow-style (but ready in 30 minutes), Kardea’s pan-fried collard greens are tender, garlicky and just a tiny bit sweet thanks to a hint of honey.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Pan-Fried Collard Greens

Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:
6 thick bacon slices, chopped into large pieces
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 lbs. collard greens (about to 2 large bunches), stems discarded, leaves washed and chopped
1 Tbsp honey
A few dashes of hot sauce
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

Directions:

1. Add bacon to a large skillet over medium heat. Cook bacon, stirring occasionally, until crispy, about 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the bacon from the pan and set aside, leaving the fat in the pan.

2. Add the onion to the bacon grease and cook, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in garlic and cook, stirring, for another 30 seconds or so, until fragrant. Add the greens, honey, hot sauce and a few pinches of salt and pepper. Cook the greens, stirring occasionally, until greens are nice and tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Taste and add more salt and/or pepper if necessary. Serve hot with bacon on top.

Related: Top 48 Sweet and Savoury Bacon Recipes

Looking for a Southern-style finish to your meal? Kardea Brown’s Caramel Apple Cake should hit the (sweet) spot.

Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


 

Headshot of Ree Drummond set against a close-up of her broccoli and rice casserole

The Pioneer Woman’s Broccoli Rice Casserole is a Comforting Twist on a Classic Side

There are a few things we all crave when we’re sitting down for that iconic Thanksgiving meal: fall flavours, harvest-inspired platters and plenty of soul-warming, comforting options. With that said — as much as we can’t get enough of seasonal classics like stuffing and cranberry sauce — there’s also plenty of room at the table for new spins on savoury side dishes. Enter the queen of home-cooking comfort food, The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond, and her latest perfect-for-Thanksgiving casserole recipe. 

Made from a delectable mix of long-grain rice, broccoli and a plethora of cheeses, this easy-to-prepare casserole is creamy and oh-so comforting — making it a delicious addition to your Thanksgiving (and everyday, really) dinner table.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Must-Try Casserole Recipes

Ree Drummond holding her cheesy broccoli and rice casserole

Best Broccoli Rice Casserole

Total Time: 50 minutes
Serves: 10 to 12

Ingredients:

4 Tbsp (1/2 stick) salted butter
1 medium yellow onion, finely diced
1 clove garlic, grated
4 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp dry mustard
1/4 tsp cayenne
3 cups whole milk
4-oz cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp paprika
8-oz processed cheese, cubed
3 cups grated sharp Cheddar
8 cups small broccoli florets
6-oz diced pimentos, drained
2 1/2 cups cooked long-grain rice

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Ultimate Comfort Food Recipes

Directions:

 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

 2. In a large skillet, melt the butter. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Sprinkle over the flour, dry mustard and cayenne and stir to mix it in well. Continue to cook for 1 minute.

 3. Next, add the milk, stirring constantly; cook until thickened, about 2 minutes. Add the cream cheese and Parmesan, stirring until totally combined. Stir in the pepper, salt and paprika. Add the processed cheese, stirring until completely melted. Next, add 1 1/2 cups of the Cheddar and stir until melted. Then, fold in the broccoli and pimentos.

 4. In a large baking dish, create a base with half of the rice. Top with half of the broccoli cheese sauce. Repeat with the remaining rice, then the remaining sauce. Sprinkle the rest of the Cheddar evenly over the top of the casserole. Bake until bubbly, about 30 minutes.

Looking for more of The Pioneer Woman’s easy comfort-food meals to warm your dinner table? Try one of these recipes from Ree Drummond this week!

Watch The Pioneer Woman and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


These Curried Brussels Sprouts Are the Fall Side Dish You Need Right Now

Fall is all about making roasted veggies — and Brussels sprouts should be high up on that list. Their small size and nutty taste make them perfect for roasting. The key is to get the edges crispy and caramelized by roasting them cut side down at a high temperature. And don’t even think about removing the small leaves that fall off — those become so crunchy and make the best Brussels sprouts chips. In this recipe, we use a delicious curry spice mix to take them to next level. All you need to do is cut the Brussels sprouts, toss them in the spice mix and roast them on a sheet pan. The perfect side dish for any meal!

Curried Brussels Sprouts

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Serves: 4-6

Ingredients:

1 lb Brussels sprouts
3 large garlic cloves
1 ½ tsp curry powder
¼ tsp chilli powder (more to taste)
½ tsp paprika
1 tsp salt
3 Tbsp olive oil
Lemon wedges (optional)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Wash the Brussels sprouts well and pat dry using a paper towel. Trim the ends and cut in half lengthwise. It’s fine if some of the outer leaves fall off, keep them to roast on the pan.

2. Peel the garlic and crush it using a garlic press. Mix together the curry powder, chilli powder, paprika, salt, olive oil and crushed garlic.

3. Toss the Brussels sprouts with the marinade ensuring they are well coated. Turn the Brussels sprouts cut side down on a sheet pan and space them out evenly (do not overcrowd!).

4. Bake for approximately 25 minutes or until the bottom is golden brown. Serve as a side with lemon wedges.

Looking for more fall recipes? Try this vegan pumpkin soup or this easy paleo butternut squash tart.

This Fiery Korean Gochujang Cauliflower Popcorn is Comfort Food at Its Finest

Gochujang, the fermented Korean hot pepper paste, has gained popularity by way of recipes featuring grilled proteins, like chicken, beef and pork. However, this recipe brings you that umami bite of sweet and spicy flavour with a veggie spin: lightly battered cauliflower popcorn bites. No hard and fast rules apply here, serve this on game night, as an appetizer or side dish.

Korean Gochujang Cauliflower Popcorn

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

2 tsp vegetable oil (plus more for frying)
2 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
3 Tbsp ketchup
2 Tbsp white vinegar or cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
2 Tbsp water
1 cup all-purpose flour
⅓ cup potato starch or cornstarch
¼ cup rice flour
1 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp baking soda
¾ cup water (approx.)
2 eggs, whisked
1 small head cauliflower, cut into small florets (8 cups)
1 tsp toasted sesame seeds (optional)
Greek yogurt or sour cream for dipping (optional)

Tip: Rice flour and potato starch are common ingredients in a Korean pantry, the combination will lighten and aerate the batter. Look for them in an Asian market or bulk store.

Tip: Gochujang is a fermented Korean hot pepper paste; and while shelf-stable when you purchase it, please refrigerate after opening.

Directions:

1. Heat enough oil in your largest and widest pot to reach 1-inch high over medium to medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer reaches 350°F. Don’t have a deep-fry thermometer? Either add a cube of bread to test the oil (it should fry quickly to golden) or dip end of a wooden spoon to see if bubbles start forming.

2. Meanwhile, make the sauce. Heat 2 tsp oil in a small saucepan. Add garlic and cook, stirring for 30 seconds. Stir in gochujang, ketchup, vinegar, honey and water and simmer for 1 minute; set aside.

Related: Eddie Jackson’s Gochujang Short Ribs Are Your New All-Star Dish

3. Whisk flour, potato starch, rice flour, salt and baking soda. Whisk in water and eggs, to make a slightly thickened batter. Add all the cauliflower, stirring to coat; the batter should be just thick enough to coat, while easily dripping off the floret. Add more water if needed.

4. Carefully drop lightly battered cauliflower into the hot oil using a fork, one at a time to achieve popcorn-sized bites (dropping them in groups will create lumps and will not produce a crispy batter).

Tip: Cauliflower is made up of a ton of water and continues to steam when cooked and needs to be fried twice. The first fry steams, while the second fry will lighten and crisp the combination of potato starch and rice flour.

5. Fry, with a spider or slotted spoon, turning until golden and crispy, 2-3 minutes. Drain on a wire rack set over a baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining cauliflower. Once everything had been fried, fry again until browned and crispy, 3-4 minutes and drain on a rack.

Related: This Korean Sweet and Sour Seaweed Salad is the Perfect BBQ Side Dish

6. Rewarm the sauce until loosened. Transfer half of the cauliflower in a large bowl and drizzle with enough sauce to just lightly coat, tossing quickly. Transfer to a serving plate and repeat with the remaining cauliflower and gochujang sauce mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve with sour cream or Greek yogurt if desired.

Tip: Serve at room temperature and avoid reheating in the oven; it will steam and soften the cauliflower.

Like Soo’s fiery gochujang cauliflower popcorn? Try her pork banh mi burgers or asparagus and mushroom udon.

Meet Your New Favourite Summer Side: Grilled Za’atar Carrots with Halloumi & Mint

Carrots may seem like an odd veggie to toss on the BBQ, especially compared to their common counterparts like zucchini, onion and eggplant – but, let us assure you that you will be changed after biting into a grilled carrot. Sweet, vaguely crunchy and smoky is the name of the game; you’ll be wondering why you haven’t been grilling these slender, flavourful veggies for years. Pairing them with salty halloumi, fresh mint and a quick hit of drizzled honey and za’atar will transport you straight to the Mediterranean.  

Grilled Za’atar Carrots with Halloumi & Mint

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

1 lb medium sized carrots, halved
½ package halloumi, cut into ½ inch slices
3 Tbsp avocado oil
1 heaping tsp za’atar spice
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
2 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp honey
½ cup fresh mint leaves

Directions:

1. Slice carrots in half, and cut the halloumi into ½ thick pieces. Place them in a bowl with avocado oil, za’atar, sea salt and pepper.
2. Turn on the BBQ to medium-high and place the carrots on the grill (don’t put the halloumi on the grill just yet). Turn the carrots every few minutes so they develop the char lines and start to soften on the inside. They should take between 15-20 minutes to cook through. At the 10 minute mark, or when the carrots look like they only need 10 more minutes to cook, place the halloumi on the grill and cook for 3-5 minutes per side.

3. Take everything off the grill and place it on a serving dish, drizzle with additional extra-virgin olive oil and honey, then top with fresh mint leaves.

Keep your BBQ veg game going strong with these 3 grilled veggie “steak” recipes (read: broccoli, sweet potato and cabbage). Each one is paired with a memorable, flavour-rich marinade, too.

Grilled Chili Corn with Coconut Lime Cream

Eating grilled corn straight off the BBQ in the summer sun is one of life’s greatest (and tastiest!) pleasures, but how about dressing things up a little with a coconut-lime cream sauce, some chili butter and fresh cilantro. To celebrate National Corn on the Cob Day (June 11), we suggest you take your cobs up a notch with this simple and delicious recipe.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Makes: 6 servings

Grilled Chili Corn with Coconut Lime Cream

Ingredients:

Coconut Lime Cream:
1 Tbsp coconut oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 Tbsp minced shallot
¼ tsp cumin
1 cup canned full fat coconut milk
1 Tbsp lime juice
2 Tbsp pickled jalapeno brine (for extra spice add 1 Tbsp finely minced fresh or pickled jalapeno)
2 tsp arrowroot flour
2 tsp water
¼ teaspoon sea salt

Corn:
6 cobs of corn, husks and silks removed
4 Tbsp vegan butter (melted)
½ tsp chili powder
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro

Directions:
1. In a small sauce pan over medium-low heat, sauté garlic, shallot and cumin in coconut oil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. If using minced fresh or pickled jalapenos, add in with these ingredients.
2. Add coconut milk, lime juice, sea salt and pickled jalapeno brine, and bring up heat to medium to simmer the mixture. Whisk frequently.
3. Once at a simmer, mix arrowroot flour with water in a small bowl and add to the coconut sauce. Whisk constantly for 8 minutes until thickened, and then remove from heat.
4. When you’re ready to grill corn, melt vegan butter and stir in chili powder.
5. Brush the corn with this chili butter once it hits the grill. Baste one or two more times while you grill them on the barbecue for approximately 25 minutes.
6. Serve each corn on the cob with a generous drizzle of coconut lime cream and fresh chopped cilantro on top.

Note: You can prepare the coconut lime cream sauce in advance and refrigerate until you serve the corn. It will thicken even more.

See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.

Simple Pan-Roasted Brown Butter Radishes

Raw radishes have a sharp, pungent flavour, but pan roasting them brings out their natural sweetness. For this fresh and flavourful side dish, radishes are first sauteed and then tossed in brown butter and lemon juice until fragrant and topped with fresh chives.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 6

888_brown-butter-radishes

Ingredients:
2 bunches radishes, assorted colours and types
1 Tbsp oil
1/2 tsp salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter, melted
1 tsp lemon juice
1 bunch chives, chopped
Lemon wedges

Directions:
1. Trim the radishes so 1/2-inch (1 cm) of the stem is intact; trim and discard roots. Scrub well and dry well. Wash the leafy green tops, dry well and coarsely chop and set aside.
2. Heat the oil in a large skillet set over medium-high heat. Add the radishes, cut side down. Sprinkle with salt. Cook, shaking occasionally but not turning, for 5 to 7 minute until golden. Cook, stirring often, for an additional 3 minutes or until lightly coloured all over.
3. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, swirling the pan, for 3 minutes or until butter is starting to brown and smell nutty, then remove from heat.
4. Stir the brown butter and lemon juice into the radishes. Remove from heat and stir in the chopped chives. Serve with lemon wedges.

Looking for more seasonal recipes? Check out our collection of spring dinners that can made in 30 minutes or less.

How to Hasselback All Your Veggies

Hasselback potatoes are an incredible way to bring boring potatoes to life. The thin slices, crispy edges and soft, buttery insides make them a show stopper at any event. Why reserve this amazing cooking technique for potatoes when there’s an endless list of fruits and vegetables that benefit from the hasselback treatment. The thin slices help inject flavour into the centre of the veggie, and there are limitless flavour combinations.

Here are some tips on how to hasselback a variety of vegetables at home, plus the best cooking methods and times.

Hasselback 101
The key to hasselback is perfect slices that don’t quite go all the way through the veggie, leaving a beautiful fan, ready to crisp up in the oven.

Start by arranging veggies on a cutting board between two chopsticks. The chopsticks are there to prevent you from cutting all the way through the vegetable. Using your knife, make incisions into the vegetables at 1/8-inch intervals. Brush each vegetable with olive oil, minced garlic, fresh thyme, salt and pepper. Roast in the oven at the recommended times and temperatures below.

hasselback zucchini

Zucchini
Follow method above. Roast zucchini on a baking sheet at 400°F until tender, about 25 minutes. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese 5 minutes before removing from the oven.

hasselback squash

Butternut Squash
Peel butternut squash and cut in half lengthwise. Remove pulp and seeds. Arrange cut side down on cutting board and proceed with method. Disperse 6-8 bay leaves into the slices of the squash. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with garlic and thyme. Roast in the oven on a baking sheet at 425°F until tender, about 40 minutes. Drizzle maple syrup over squash 5 minutes before removing from the oven.

hasselback beets

Beets
Be sure to peel the beets before scoring. Follow method above. Cover beets with foil and bake in a 375°F. Remove foil after 20 minutes and continue to bake until beets are tender, about another 25 minutes. Serve with fresh basil and ricotta, or creamy horseradish.

Pear or Apples
Cut pears or apples in half lengthwise. Proceed with recipe, omitting olive oil, garlic and salt. Instead, brush pears with melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon. Place on a baking sheet and roast at 375°F until just tender, about 30 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream or yogurt and chopped walnuts.

Try this recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Hasselback Potatoes.

Thanksgiving Sides Pairing

10 Perfect Pairings for Your Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving dinner is about more than just the turkey — we also come to expect to see the table creaking under the weight of all manner of delicious side dishes paired with the juicy roast bird. From old standbys such as creamy garlic mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce to new favourites like roasted, caramelized Brussels sprouts, check out these 10 awesome ideas to pair with your turkey on Thanksgiving day.

Thanksgiving recipe Alton Brown green beans casserole

1. Alton Brown’s Best-Ever Green Bean Casserole
Few vegetables pair so perfectly with turkey as green beans, and Alton Brown’s casserole is a universe away from your typical green beans. This kicked-up casserole adds mushrooms, onion and garlic, all nestled beneath a crunchy crust of panko breadcrumbs.

Get the recipe for Alton Brown’s Best Ever Green Bean Casserole.

2. Guy Fieri’s Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes are practically a given at any Thanksgiving dinner, and there are seemingly endless variations on how to prepare this tasty tuber. Rather than simply baking or mashing, Guy Fieri serves up this twice-baked recipe that adds extra texture thanks to chopped pecans, all topped with a brown sugar, nutmeg and cinnamon crust.

Get the recipe for Guy Fieri’s Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes.

Thanksgiving recipes Bobby Flay_Roasted-Brussel-Sprouts

3. Bobby Flay’s Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta
Once upon a time, Brussels sprouts were those soggy, boiled-to-mush vegetables that kids would try to hide under their napkins — but no more. Bobby Flay turns that idea on its head with this Thanksgiving-ready side dish of perfectly caramelized and crispy mini cabbages with rich pancetta bacon. Don’t be surprised if this fall side becomes your family’s favourite new Thanksgiving side dish.

Get the recipe for Bobby Flay’s Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta.

4. Lynn Crawford’s Cheddar Cheese Biscuits
Instead of the same old dinner rolls, kick your Thanksgiving dinner into overdrive with Lynn Crawford’s easy-to-make biscuits, delectably infused with the taste of sharp cheddar cheese.

Get the recipe for Lynn Crawford’s Cheddar Cheese Biscuits.

Thanksgiving Ree Drummond cranberry sauce recipe

5. Ree Drummond’s Cranberry Sauce
Thanksgiving turkey without cranberry sauce is like a ski vacation without snow, and Pioneer Woman host, Ree Drummond offers her own creative take on this time-honoured sauce. With orange juice and maple syrup adding extra sweetness and some grated orange rind for extra zest.

Get the recipe for Ree Drummond’s Cranberry Sauce.

6. Ricardo’s Roasted Root Vegetables
No Thanksgiving table should be without a healthy serving of colourful, roasted root vegetables. Ricardo serves up a simply prepared but undeniably delicious combo of potatoes, parsnips, celeriac, carrots, turnips and onions, roasted together to mouth-watering perfection.

Get the recipe for Ricardo’s Roasted Root Vegetables.

Sausage and Herb Stuffing; Ina Garten

7. Ina Garten’s Sausage and Herb Stuffing
Stuffing is a Thanksgiving dinner favourite and everyone seems to have their own unique tried-and-true recipe. It’s pretty much a given that the Barefoot Contessa would have a killer stuffing recipe up her sleeve. If you’re looking to try out a new recipe to pair with your turkey this year, look no further than this savoury sweet stuffing by Ina Garten featuring diced apples and spicy Italian sausage.

Get the recipe for Ina Garten’s Sausage and Herb Stuffing.

8. Alton Brown’s Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Simple but delicious, Alton Brown’s recipe for mashed potatoes adds half-and-half cream, sautéed garlic and some grated Parmesan for a savoury side dish that will pair perfectly with any turkey. But be forewarned: don’t be surprised if guests come back for a second helping of these fluffy, flavourful spuds, so you’ll want to make plenty!

Get the recipe for Alton Brown’s Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes.

Thanksgiving-Tyler-Florence-gravy

9. Tyler Florence’s Roasted Turkey Gravy
Nothing on the Thanksgiving table pairs more perfectly with everything than gravy. Whether it’s mashed potatoes, stuffing or turkey, a classic gravy is a tasty addition to dress up any dish. Tyler Florence’s drool-worthy sage- and thyme-flavoured gravy recipe will produce about three cups of aromatic sauce for your lip-smacking pleasure.

Get the recipe for Tyler Florence’s Roasted Turkey Gravy.

10. Ree Drummond’s Mushroom Pilaf
In addition to recipes that offer new spins on old favourites, this filling side dish by Ree Drummond is bursting with the rich, savoury flavour of shitake mushrooms.

Get the recipe for Ree Drummond’s Mushroom Pilaf.

Looking for some main-spiration? Look no further than Our Best Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes.

how-to-make-cauliflower-rice-and-flavourful-recipes

How to Make Cauliflower Rice (and 3 Flavourful Variations)

Cauliflower has gained a lot of popularity among healthy eaters for its fibre-rich and disease-preventative benefits. As well, it’s a bit of a chameleon when it comes to nutritious meals. This cruciferous vegetable has a mild, agreeable taste that can take on any flavour and be transformed into risotto, pizza crust and cauliflower “rice” — all without the hefty dose of carbs!

how-to-make-cauliflower-rice-and-recipes

If you don’t have a food processor, you can still make this sneaky healthy side dish with a knife or box grater. Here are a few easy ways to make the perfect cauliflower rice, and a few simple seasoning ideas.

Three Ways to Make Cauliflower “Grains”

Food Processor Method:
1. Cut cauliflower into several rough pieces and remove the tough core.
2. Working in 2 batches, add to a food processor fitted with a metal blade, and pulse until the size of rice or couscous. Add to a large bowl.
3. Repeat with the second batch of cauliflower.

Box Grater Method:
1. Cut cauliflower into several rough pieces and remove the tough core.
2. Working in several, manageable batches, grate cauliflower on the medium-sized holes of you grater. Add to a large bowl.
3. Repeat with remaining pieces of cauliflower.

Knife Method:
1. Cut cauliflower into several rough pieces and remove the tough core.
2. Make small slices crosswise into cauliflower pieces.
3. When entire head is slices, chop until fine, roughly the size of rice or couscous.

How to Cook Cauliflower Rice and Flavour Variations

Cauliflower rice is a nutritious addition to meals whether served raw or cooked. Add your uncooked rice into salads, soups, or bake into casseroles for textural delight.

Simple Rice: Warm olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the cauliflower “grains”, sprinkle with salt and cook covered for 8 minutes until fluffy. Serve as a side dish or bed for curries and stews.

Roasted Rice: Roast rice until crispy, and use as a crunchy topper for avocado toast or hummus. For more flavour, try roasting the rice with cumin, cinnamon and thyme.

Southwestern Cauliflower Rice: Sauté onion, red bell pepper and garlic with cumin, chili powder and smoked paprika. Add cauliflower rice and cook until tender. Season with a squeeze of lime juice, salt and chopped fresh cilantro. Serve inside tacos, as a side dish or toss in black beans to make it the main event.

Chinese Fried Cauliflower Rice: Sauté onion, carrot, ginger and garlic. Add cauliflower rice and cook until tender. Season with soy sauce or tamari, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil and Sriracha. Stir in diced green onions and serve inside lettuce cups with shredded cooked chicken or duck.

Greek Cauliflower Rice: Sauté onion, garlic, dried oregano, a pinch of nutmeg and chopped fresh rosemary. Add cauliflower rice and cook until tender. Season with salt, lemon zest and lemon juice. Remove from heat and stir in pitted black olives, seeded and diced Roma tomato, chopped fresh dill and crumbled feta. Serve with pita and hummus.

Rhubarb Relish Revival

By Katherine Eisenhauer, as told to Nancy Fornasiero

Katherine Eisenhauer, a ninth-generation resident of Lunenburg, N.S., has been the chef-owner of The Savvy Sailor Cafe in her hometown since 2012. Her unassuming little restaurant, which boasts a view of Lunenburg’s historic UNESCO World Heritage Site waterfront, is a favourite with tourists and locals alike. Fresh locally sourced ingredients and a diverse menu that includes many of her own family’s favourite dishes are the secrets to her success.

Rhubarb is definitely a well-loved ingredient in Nova Scotia; it grows in many backyards, including my own. I still remember helping my grandmother—my dad’s mum, Josephine—pull rhubarb from the huge patch in the yard of the home she lived in with Gramps when I was a kid. I think they had the best rhubarb patch in town. We would have a great time together gathering it, washing it and chopping it up. Although she made different things with it, Gamma (as I always call her) was most famous for her rhubarb relish. I can hardly remember a family gathering where fish was served when it wasn’t on the table.

Hers is the exact recipe I still use today in the café. In fact, I followed it right from her own handwriting in the Dutch Oven cookbook just this morning! The Dutch Oven is a Lunenburg classic. It was first published in 1953 by Gamma and her friends in The Ladies Auxiliary of the Fishermen’s Memorial Hospital, and it’s full of traditional Nova Scotia recipes. When they created it as a fundraiser back then, the ladies sure didn’t expect it to remain popular all these years later. It’s now in its 21st printing.

Around here, rhubarb relish is typically eaten with whitefish, cod or haddock, or with other cod-based dishes, like fish cakes. That’s how we serve it at the café: alongside our famous fish cakes and baked beans as part of our “Lunenburg Breakfast.” It’s one of our most popular items, even though it’s pretty unusual for people to choose fish for breakfast. (I guess when they visit us, they figure: When in Rome…?) People really love the relish—they’re always asking me, “Can I buy some? Can I buy some?” So when I have enough on hand, I sell some to customers. When stored properly in the fridge, it lasts many months. We also serve it for dinner alongside fish cakes and salad or pan-seared Atlantic cod and salad.

This recipe has so many great personal connections for me, but what really stands out is our family’s annual “fish-cake brunch.” For as long as anyone can remember, we’ve been gathering for this event between Christmas and New Year’s—both sides of the family, as well as family friends. It’s the sort of meal where we prep about 50 pounds of potatoes and 15 pounds of cod! The relish is always a big part of that meal.

We’ve been in Lunenburg since 1753, when the three Eisenhauer brothers first arrived from Germany. Traditions mean a lot to us. Grandma’s 90 now, and though she still loves to cook, I make the relish these days and take my relish over to her. She’s given it her stamp of approval! I’m so happy to be keeping her tradition alive.

The Savvy Sailor’s Rhubarb Relish, courtesy of Katherine Eisenhauer

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 1 ½ hours (includes chilling time)
Yield: approx 8 cups

Ingredients
8 cups (2 L) chopped rhubarb
8 cups (2 L) onions, thinly sliced
7 cups (1.75 L) granulated sugar
3 cups (750 mL) cider vinegar
2 tsp (10 mL) salt
2 tsp (10 mL) ground cloves
2 tsp (10 mL) cinnamon

Directions
1. Chop rhubarb into rough dice; set asi1002de.
2. Add onions to separate bowl. Cover with boiling water; let sit for 5 minutes. Drain and discard water.
3. In heavy-bottomed pot, dissolve sugar in cider vinegar on medium heat. Add onions, rhubarb, salt, cloves and cinnamon. Stir well. Cook, stirring often, until it reaches a thick jam-like consistency, 40 minutes to 1 hour.
4. Remove from heat; let cool. Place in jar and refrigerate.

Jump over here to print, save or share this Rhubarb Relish recipe.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!

CreamyMashedPotatoes

The Creamiest Mashed Potatoes for a Holiday Dinner

By Ashley Fehr

Is there a person on Earth who doesn’t like mashed potatoes? To me, they’re the perfect holiday dish.

When I reach back in my memory, I can’t think of a single Easter, Christmas or Thanksgiving that didn’t have mashed potatoes on the menu. They are the epitome of comfort food, and they go with anything.

A steaming bowl of mashed potatoes brings back memories of being in Mom’s kitchen, with the whole family gathered round the table. And, yes, since being in Manitoba means we could very well be under snow at Easter, Christmas and Thanksgiving, a warm, hearty meal with family is one of the best remedies for the winter blues.

But even though we’re all yearning for a holiday feast, we’re not always willing to give up time together to spend hours slaving over every aspect of a meal that will most certainly be devoured in minutes. These potatoes come together quickly, with help from a secret ingredient, to keep you from having to hide out in the kitchen all day. They are rich, creamy and the perfect accompaniment to any holiday meal.

Ultra Creamy Mashed Potatoes, Courtesy of Ashley Fehr, thereciperebel.com, Portage la Prairie, Man.

These rich mashed potatoes will make a decadent side dish for your holiday dinner.

CreamyMashedPotatoes

Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 15 mins
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
5 russet potatoes (about 10 cups/2.50 L chopped)
1 can (10 oz/284 mL) condensed cheddar cheese soup
¾ cup (175 mL) heavy cream or whipping cream
2 tbsp (30 mL) butter
black pepper, to taste
2 tbsp (30 mL) chopped chives (optional)

Directions
1. Cook potatoes in a large saucepan of salted, boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes or until fork tender. Drain well. Set aside for 10 minutes to cool slightly. Mash to desired consistency.
2. In pan over medium heat, combine soup and whipping cream. Cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes, or until simmering. Fold in mashed potatoes. Stir in butter and pepper. Garnish with chives if desired.

The Recipe RebelAshley Fehr creates and shares easy, family-friendly recipes, homemade breads and decadent desserts on her blog The Recipe Rebel. She loves to put a creative, new twist on old favourites.

Smashed Potatoes with Roasted Garlic Cashew Butter

If you’ve been serving regular ol’ mashed potatoes every Thanksgiving for the past decade, we think it’s time you kicked things up a notch with smashed fingerling potatoes! Paired perfectly with fresh thyme and a dollop of our creamy roasted garlic cashew butter, wow your family and friends with this tasty new side dish.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 55 minutes
Serves: 6

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Ingredients:

Roasted Garlic Cashew Butter:
¾ cup raw whole cashews (soaked for 3 hours)
1 garlic bulb (roasted with 1 tsp olive oil + pinch sea salt)
¼ cup water
1 Tbsp coconut oil
¼ tsp sea salt

Smashed Potatoes:
6-7 cups fingerling potatoes (approximately 30)
1 Tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp fresh thyme + extra sprigs for garnish
¼ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp ground pepper

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Directions:
1. To roast the garlic bulb, pre-heat oven to 450°F. Trim about a ¼” off the top of the bulb to expose the cloves. Drizzle with 1 tsp olive oil and a pinch of sea salt. Bake for 20-25 minutes until roasted and soft on the inside.
2. Rinse and drain soaked cashews. Add to a high-powered blender with roasted cloves of garlic, water, coconut oil and sea salt. Blend until very smooth and refrigerate for 2 hours or more.
3. Toss whole fingerling potatoes in 1 Tbsp olive oil, fresh thyme, sea salt and ground pepper. Bake in an oven pre-heated to 450°F for 20 minutes.
4. Smash the whole potatoes with a fork to break open the skin. Drizzle with another 2 tsp olive oil and place whole thyme sprigs on top so they can crisp up as well. Bake again for another 10-12 minutes until crispy.
5. Serve immediately with a dollop roasted garlic cashew butter on each potato.

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Sophisticated Cabbage From a Country Kitchen

By Rosemary Martin, as told to Jasmine Mangalaseril

As the eldest of eight children to a Mennonite family in Waterloo County, Ont., Rosemary Martin helped her mother prepare “company meals” for up to 30 people every other Sunday for most of her life. Today, Rosemary’s Company Cabbage is a favourite that appears at family suppers and special meals with friends.

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When I was growing up, we attended our home church every other Sunday; in between, we would visit another church in the area. For those weeks when we were at our home church, we would invite visitors for lunch, which was the main meal of the day. As our family alone was 10 people, plus two more similar-sized families or three smaller families were in attendance, there would easily be up to 30 for “company meals.” A casserole or stew, bread (always bread!) or rolls and butter were served, and we usually had green salads and jellied salads, too. I abhorred jellied salads, and my dad didn’t like them, either, but a lot of people did (it was a big thing back then). Desserts tended to be 13- by 9-inch pans of refrigerator or freezer desserts, and Mom loved to make chiffon cakes, so we would often have three. We wouldn’t mind if there were leftovers!

When it was just our family, we tended to eat fairly basic meals, partially because of our culture and partially because there were 10 of us. But they consisted of fresh or frozen homegrown vegetables and locally sourced meats—either smoked ham or summer sausage, and every now and then, a roast chicken or a roast beef.

I’m not a traditional Mennonite cook. As long as I can remember, I have liked a variety of foods and experimenting. I would beg Mom to vary from her routines because I quickly tired of eating the same foods three Sundays in a row. I learned more about food when I started eating out at higher-end restaurants with friends and by reading recipe books like they were novels with pictures. But I do credit my father for my plating skills. He always said, “Food first has to pass by my eyes before it reaches my stomach,” so I learned to serve food attractively from him.

I love cabbage in almost every form. I love cabbage soup and sauerkraut, of course. Growing up, cabbage was typically used in coleslaw or as wedges, cooked with roast beef or roast chicken. My grandma would pickle whole wedges with whole cloves or a pickling spice, vinegar, sugar and water. She cooked it until tender, marinated it in brine for several days, then kept it chilled. It was really good.

My Company Cabbage recipe is not a typical Mennonite recipe. I found it in a magazine and tweaked it over the years. You can do all the shredding and chopping the night before, then cook it in about five minutes just before serving. People are usually surprised they like it because it’s cabbage, but it has a delicious unique flavour because of the nuts, the mustard and the dill. Savoy cabbage gives you that nice curly edge. That and the green onions combine so you have light springy-summery colours.

Company Cabbage, courtesy of Rosemary Martin

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
2 tsp (10 mL) chicken bouillon
4 cups (1 L) coarsely shredded green or Savoy cabbage
½ cup (125 mL) shredded carrots
¼ cup (60 mL) chopped celery root or celery
¼ cup (60 mL) sliced green onions or chopped shallots
½ tsp (2 mL) dried dillweed (or 1½ tsp/7 mL fresh)
3 tbsp (45 mL) chopped pecans
1 tbsp (15 mL) melted butter
½ tsp (2 mL) prepared mustard
⅛ tsp (0.5 mL) pepper

Directions
1. In large saucepan, heat 1/3 cup/75 mL water over medium-high; add chicken bouillon, stirring until dissolved. Add cabbage, carrots, celery root, green onions and dillweed, stirring to combine. Cook, covered, for about 5 minutes, stirring slightly, until tender.

2. Stir together pecans, butter, mustard and pepper. Pour over cabbage mixture; tossing to combine.

Click to print, save or share this Company Cabbage recipe.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!

How to Make Creamy Pennsylvania Dutch Mennonite-Potatoes

By Abram Shantz, as told to Jasmine Mangalaseril

Abram Shantz was born in 1933 to an Old Order Mennonite family in Wallenstein, Ont. At 16, Abram left his family and moved to Kitchener, where he got married, raised a family and started a construction company. This retired widower and great-grandfather now lives in Breslau and happily shares the food of his childhood with his friends and family.

I was born during the Depression. My father had many kids: He had 10 with my mother, then after she died, he married again and had three more. We didn’t have a farm, but we had three acres with two little barns and one or two cows for milk, cream and butter, some pigs and a pen with chickens for eggs and meat. And we always had a big garden.

We kids weren’t in the kitchen a lot while the cooking was going on—we were outside playing or outside working—but I most vividly remember the smell of cooking when we came in. Everything had its own aroma. Of course, potatoes don’t give off as much of an aroma as a chicken in the kettle!

In our house, bledley grumbara (“saucer potatoes” in Pennsylvania Dutch), or cream potatoes, was a common Mennonite dish my mother served at the evening meal.

We weren’t tempted to sneak a taste while it was cooking, but the moment that cream was added, and especially when my mother grabbed a big slab of butter, that’s when you really wanted to taste it.

I got my wife to make cream potatoes a few times, but she said that cream costs too much, and they just didn’t turn out when she used skim milk! After she passed away, I did my own cooking and started trying this, trying that. I didn’t have the recipe, but I knew what was supposed to happen, so I had to make it happen.

I use russets, but I think white potatoes would have good flavour, too. Peel the potatoes, then slice them like saucers, as thin as you can comfortably slice them, as you would for scalloped potatoes. The texture isn’t right if you chop them so that some are thick and others are thin. Boil the potatoes in water with a pinch of salt until they fall apart. Drain the water, then pour in enough cream to coat the potatoes and the inside of the pot. Bring to a boil to create the sauce—the potatoes will absorb a lot of the cream, which will stop them from becoming dry. Add a spoonful of butter and more salt, if you want, for flavour.

When I eat cream potatoes, I think back to when I was little, sitting at a big table along with lots of hungry kids. My father is at the end, and then my mother, and then we kids are all around. The potatoes are in a great big bowl served with summer sausage and pickled beets. Always in the middle of the table is a plate with a tall stack of fresh bread. Everyone grabs what they want.

Cream potatoes are so simple to make. It just happens I like them, and I’ve liked them for 80 years.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!

Fig Salad with Honey Yogurt Dressing

If you’ve indulged a little too much on the heavier foods lately, this simple fig salad with honey yogurt dressing is the perfect way to get back into your healthy routine.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 2

figsalad

Ingredients:
4 ripe mission figs, halved
2 cups baby salad greens
¼ cup 0% plain Greek yogurt
2 tsp honey
1 Tbsp white balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Whisk together the Greek yogurt, honey, white balsamic, cinnamon and pinch of salt and pepper.
2. Divide salad greens and mint between two plates, top with figs and drizzle with dressing. Serve immediately.

Notes: white balsamic vinegar can be substituted for white wine vinegar.

amanda riva Amanda Riva is the host of The Hot Plate, a free online cooking show dedicated to inspiring culinary confidence in new cooks. The Hot Plate also offers regular cooking tips and advice, how-tos, and information on seasonal ingredients. Amanda Riva is part of the Blog Network family.

No-Cook Stuffed Red Bell Pepper Salad

Fresh and satisfying, stuffed red bell peppers are vibrant to look at and a snap to whip up if you have a food processor. The filling mixture keeps well in the fridge for up to 3 days. If preparing in advance, store filling separately; then slice and stuff peppers immediately before eating.

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Makes: 4
Total Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:
2 cups almonds
1 cup sunflower seeds
1 cup water
2 1/2 teaspoons turmeric
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 green onion (chopped)
1/2 cup mushrooms (chopped)
1/2 cup carrots (shredded)
2 whole red bell peppers (to stuff)

Directions:
1. To make the filling, process almonds and sunflower seeds in food processor until powder-like.
2. Add water, turmeric and sea salt and process again until mixture forms a smooth paste.
3. Transfer processed ingredients to a large bowl. Add chopped mushrooms, shredded carrots and green onion. Stir gently with a spoon until combined. Filling is now complete.
4. Slice bell peppers in half, remove seeds and stem. Stuff peppers with filling.
5. Enjoy immediately.

100x100_laura-jane-rawtarian Laura-Jane The Rawtarian is a leading creator of simple, satisfying raw vegan recipes.

2 Easy BBQ Side Salads, 10 Ingredients

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It’s always fun to invite your best buds over for a good ol’ summer BBQ, but that one afternoon can turn into quite the costly (and bloat-inducing) event. After the burgers, beer and baked goods, it’s the healthy side dishes that are typically forfeited to keep costs down, or just simply forgotten

But side dishes can be super easy to make, and very cost-effective. To show you how it’s done, we’ve got recipes for two tasty salads, made out of just 10 simple ingredients. Chances are, you already have them in your kitchen!

Cucumber Salad

Ingredients:
1 English cucumber, sliced
3 radishes, sliced
2 Tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 Tablespoons olive oil
¼ small red onion, sliced
Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Whisk together vinegar and oil in a large bowl. Add sliced cucumber, radishes and onion, and toss to mix. Season with salt and pepper.

Herb Potato Salad
Ingredients:
16 small red potatoes boiled and sliced in quarters
¼ cup chopped parsley
¼ cup copped chives
¼ small red onion, sliced
1 Tbsp mustard
1 tsp red wine vinegar
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Mix together herbs, sliced onion, oil, mustard and vinegar in a medium bowl. Add the chopped, boiled potatoes, toss, and season with salt and pepper.

headshot Renée Reardin is a lifestyle writer and stylist living in Toronto. To learn more about her, visit www.reneereardin.com, and follow her on Twitter @reneereardin.

Jarlsberg Cheese Biscuits with Creamy Garlic and Herb Butter

Jarlsberg-Cheese-Biscuits-with-Creamy-Garlic-and-Herb-Butter

Soft and pillowy on the inside with a light, cheese-topped outer crust, these homemade biscuits make even the speediest meals feel special and are bound to become a family favourite. Whether you to eat them fresh out of the oven, smothered in garlic-herb butter, as a vehicle to mop up chili, or as a base for eggs Benedict, the subtle sweet and nutty taste of Jarlsberg cheese give these warm biscuits an added layer of flavour you’ll love.

The best part about this recipe is that they freeze well, so you can double the recipe and stash away the extras for an easy weeknight treat.

Do you have a winning Jarlsberg recipe? Share it now for a chance to win a set of Le Creuset cookware worth $1500 and a 10 kg wheel of Jarlsberg cheese. Details here.

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Jarlsberg Cheese Biscuits with Creamy Garlic and Herb Butter

Prep Time: 20 mins
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Serves: Makes about 12 biscuits

Ingredients:

2 cups all purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons shortening
1 cup shredded Jarlsberg cheese
1 cup buttermilk
extra shredded Jarlsberg cheese for topping

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
3. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, mix cold shortening into flour mixture until combined.
4. Quickly blend cold butter into the flour mixture until butter is roughly the size of peas. Add the shredded Jarlsberg cheese and mix until blended.
5. Make a well in the centre of the flour and pour in the buttermilk. Working from the outside in, bring the flour into the centre with a large spoon, scooping and turning the bowl until the buttermilk is incorporated into the flour. Do not over mix.
6. For rustic-style biscuits, drop large tablespoon-sized pieces of dough onto an ungreased baking sheet. Brush the tops with the garlic-herb butter and add some shredded Jarlsberg cheese.
7. Bake for about 12 to 15 minutes. Serve warm with more garlic-herb butter.

Jarlsberg Cheese Biscuits with Creamy Garlic and Herb Butter Recipe
Creamy Homemade Garlic and Herb Butter

Ingredients:

1/2 lb unsalted butter
2 tablespoons of rosemary, minced
2 tablespoons of parsley, minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions:

1. Add minced herbs, garlic and butter to a food processor and blend until well combined and creamy.
2. Spoon mixture on to a waxed paper and roll, twisting the ends to secure. Put in fridge until ready to use or store in the freezer.

BonnieMo Bonnie Mo is a Toronto-based editor and the face behind Food Network Canada’s 1 Dish, 2 Ways column. She’s also a contributing editor over at slice.ca. For more recipe ideas, visit bonniemo.ca, or catch her on Instagram @bonniemo

Sweet Eats: Best-Ever Yorkshire Pudding

My British grandmother had a knack for making consistently sky-high Yorkshire puddings. As a child, I remember watching her throw flour, eggs and milk into a bowl, without ever measuring a thing and always revealing the puffiest, most enviable Yorkshire puddings I can remember devouring.

I’ve had varying rates of success with my Yorkshire puddings. So, I decided to test this recipe multiple times so I could get them just right. These are perfect alongside any roast dinner, served with a big bowl of chili or even smothered in jam or nutella!

Yorkshire Pudding recipe

Best-Ever Yorkshire Puddings

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
4 large eggs
1 cup milk
¼ cup cold water
2 teaspoons hot English mustard or Dijon (optional)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Yorkshire pudding recipe

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F.
  2. Sift the flour into a large bowl. Mix in the salt and a few cracks of black pepper. Create a well in the flour and add the eggs, milk, cold water and mustard. Mix well. Let sit for at least 10 minutes. If there are lumps strain through a fine sieve into a jug for pouring. The consistency should be like whipping cream, if it is too thick, pour in a bit more milk.
  3. Divide the vegetable oil between a 12-tin muffin tray and place in the preheated oven for at least 5 minutes. It is really important that the oil is sizzling hot, almost smoking.
  4. Working quickly, pull the tin out of the oven and fill the muffin holes ¾ full of batter. If you want giant yorkies, fill them right to the top (you’ll just have less). Remove from the oven and serve immediately.
  5. Bake for 20 minutes. The puds should be golden brown and crispy. If they’re not crispy, they will sink as soon as they come out of the oven.

SONY DSCMiranda Keyes is a freelance food stylist, recipe developer and writer who used to live in London, UK but moved back to Canada for nanaimo bars, maple syrup and poutine. To learn more about her, follow her on Instagram @littlemirandapiggy and Twitter @mirandaak.