Tag Archives: quick and easy recipes

This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

When it comes to quick and easy five-ingredient meals, you can rely on The Pioneer Woman for a healthy and scrumptious weeknight option. With fresh cherry tomatoes, crunchy bell peppers and juicy cuts of boneless ribeye steaks, this bright and bold sheet pan wonder from Ree Drummond is everything you need in a well-balanced meat and veggie dish. *chef’s kiss*

Related: Simple and Satisfying Recipes That Use 5 Ingredients or Less

Steak Sheet Pan Supper

Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients:

2 red bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
2 yellow bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
1 large yellow onion, cut into thick rounds (large rings only)
2 cups whole cherry tomatoes
Two 12-ounce boneless rib-eye steaks, about 1 1/2 inches thick
4 tsp Montreal steak seasoning
4 Tbsp olive oil
4 Tbsp salted butter
1 loaf crusty, artisan-style French bread, for serving

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Directions:

1. Position an oven rack on the highest level in the oven. Preheat the broiler on high.

2. Arrange the peppers on a sheet pan in a single layer. Do the same with the onions and cherry tomatoes. This will create a bed of vegetables for the steaks to sit on.

3. Lay the steaks directly on the vegetables with an inch or two between the steaks so they aren’t touching. Season the top of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle the top of each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Top each steak with 1 tablespoon butter.

4. Broil until the tops of the steaks are nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and use a set of tongs to flip the steaks over. Sprinkle the other side of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil and top each with 1 tablespoon butter. Slide the pan back into the oven and broil the other side for 3 minutes.

5. Plate each steak with half of the veggies from the pan. Serve with a chunk of crusty French bread.

Watch the How-To Video for Steak Sheet Pan Supper


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

When it comes to quick and easy meals, you can rely on Ree Drummond for an instant classic family staple. With a plethora of diverse palate-pleasing spices and hearty beans and cheeses, this one-pot wonder from The Pioneer Woman is everything you need from an easy chicken-forward chili recipe. Bon appetit!

Related: Ree Drummond’s Best Holiday Desserts (From Cookies to Cheesecake)

The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Yields: 6 servings

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp ground coriander
1 Tbsp ground cumin
2 tsp dried oregano
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp kosher salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp olive oil
4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts (1 ½ to 2 pounds total)
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
½ cup heavy cream
2 Tbsp masa harina
Two 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
Two 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, drained
One 10-ounce bag frozen corn
2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese
1 avocado, diced
4 to 6 lime wedges

Related: 100 Popular Chicken Breast Recipes You Need to Try

Special Equipment: Pressure cooker

Directions:

1. Mix the coriander, cumin, oregano, paprika, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper together in a small bowl.

2. Add olive oil to a pressure cooker, set to saute and add the chicken. Sprinkle the spice mix over the chicken and toss. Cook until the chicken has started to sear on the outside, then add the broth.

3. Place the lid on the pressure cooker, set the valve to sealing, and cook on manual for 6 minutes. Release the steam using the quick-release cycle. Remove the chicken to a board and shred with two forks.

4. Put the heavy cream and masa harina in a small bowl and mix until smooth with a whisk or fork.

5. Switch the pressure cooker to saute and return the chicken to the pressure cooker along with the masa and heavy cream mixture, cannellini beans, green chiles and corn. Let cook, stirring occasionally, until the chili has thickened and the corn is warmed through, about 10 minutes.

6. Ladle the chili into 6 bowls. Top with cheese and avocado. Serve with lime wedges.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Watch the How-To Video:


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

These Pan-Fried Pork Chops With Roast Cabbage Wedges Will Help Your “What’s for Dinner?” Woes

Healthy and budget-friendly, cabbage is one of the most delicious and versatile cruciferous veggies. Anyone who is “on the fence” about cabbage will be converted with this roasted variety — promise! High heat cooking caramelizes the outer cabbage layers and opens up the nutty sweetness, while maintaining a tender, textured crunch. With the addition of the quick and easy pan-fried pork chops, this meal ticks off all the boxes and will become a family favourite.

Pan-fried pork chops and roasted cabbage on white plate

Pan-Fried Pork Chops With Roast Cabbage Wedges

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Cabbage
1 red cabbage (feel free to swap out red cabbage with white cabbage or a medium Savoy cabbage)
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¾ tsp kosher salt
½ tsp freshly ground pepper
2 Tbsp lemon juice or red wine vinegar

Pork Chops
2 bone-in pork chops (1 ¼ to1 ½-inch thick) (approx. 1 ½ lbs)
½ tsp each kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
6 thyme sprigs
3 cloves garlic, smashed
4 green olives (optional)

Garnish
Chopped parsley
Finely grated Parmesan

Ingredients for pan-fried pork chops and roasted cabbage

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Cut cabbage in half and then each half into 6-8 equal wedges, keeping the core and stem intact. Arrange on a rimmed baking sheet; brush with ¼ cup of the oil all over and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

2. Roast until browned and slightly charred on bottom, about 10 to 15 minutes. Flip and continue roasting until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Drizzle with lemon juice or vinegar.

Cabbage roasting on pan

3. While the cabbage is cooking, sprinkle pork chops with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil and cook pork chops until golden brown on one side, 1 to 2 minutes. Flip and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes; repeat flipping and cooking until browned and instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 135°F, about 8 minutes total.

Related: 12 Must-Try Fall Cocktails to Give Thanks for This Autumn

4. Remove pan from heat. Add butter, thyme, olives (if using) and garlic to pan, tilting and spooning the butter mixture over chops, basting the fat cap to brown.

Pork chops in pan

5. Transfer chops to a cutting board; cover and rest for 5 minutes. Cut into thick slices, reserving juices. Sprinkle with parsley or grated Parmesan (if using). Serve with cabbage.

Pork chops and roasted cabbage

Like Soo’s pan-fried pork chops with roast cabbage wedges? Then try her Chinese stir-fried eggplant or pork banh mi burgers.

We Tested 4 Popular Canadian Meal Delivery Kits. Here’s How They Compared

I have a confession to make: When it comes to cooking, I have a love/hate relationship with the entire process. In theory, I love the idea of whipping up a home-cooked meal – the gathering of fresh ingredients, discovering new recipes and enjoying the scrumptious finished product. More often than not, however, it’s an often harried battle wherein my husband and I arrive home late from work and we’re just looking for the shortest, fastest route to getting food on the table.

Many of my friends swear by meal delivery services, referring to them as complete game-changers that ultimately expanded their recipe repertoires and drastically cut down the amount of time spent sweating over the stovetop. Perhaps this was the solution I was looking for, even if only on weeknights when time was short and my patience was thin.

If you’re wondering what I’m talking about, meal delivery kits are essentially boxes of raw ingredients with easy-to-follow recipes that typically feed up to four people. You don’t have to be home to receive the box; they can be left on your doorstep or at your condo’s front desk, since they’re stocked with reusable ice packs. Each recipe and its wealth of ingredients are individually packaged in their own brown paper bags and come with printed card stock with all the relevant directions and health information. In an effort to reduce the food waste that accumulates from the typical family meal, these services provide their ingredients in pre-measured amounts – although it often results in a lot of packaging. (Note: pantry staples, such as olive oil, salt and pepper, are not included.)

So, I decided to give it a shot, testing out four of the major Canadian companies that provide fresh meal ideas and ingredients to thousands of hungry fans across the country. Here’s how it went.

Hello Fresh

Availability: A 95 per cent delivery reach in Canada, including Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Newfoundland and the Maritimes.

Average price per person: As low as $10.31/serving.

Packaging: With its paper-based packaging, the boxes are made from 100 per cent recyclable and biodegradable cardboard. Even the insulation and ice packs are made of sustainable cardboard and recyclable plastic, respectively. Hello Fresh has also eliminated single-use packaging for any produce with its own natural skin or peel (for example, potatoes, garlic and limes).

Dietary Variety: A diverse selection of recipes that will satisfy both vegetarians and carnivores. In addition, you can customize your Meal Preferences online or via the app by clicking on such options as No Beef Meals, No Fish Meals, No Pork Meals, etc. They’re also the first meal kit service in Canada to partner with Beyond Meat, which was only recently announced this summer.

Convenience: The average meal takes approximately 30 minutes, including prep time, and when ordering online or via the app you can choose from options such as quick family-friendly meals to vegetarian dishes.

Favourite Recipe: One-Pot Mexican Quinoa and Black Beans with Cilantro-Lime Crema

Overall Experience: Each meal comes with a detailed, one-page summary that includes total cooking time, ingredients and thorough instructions that are clear and easy to follow. Although the finished product never looked quite as good as advertised (which is on me: I was never good at plating meals), I don’t have any complaints in the taste department. I was genuinely surprised by how flavourful and tender the dishes were. Although the meals are certainly quick and easy to prep, one thing I discovered was that I was often left with a stack of dirty dishes, as some of the recipes required multiple pots, pans and other kitchen utensils. Incidentally, my favourite meal wound up being a one-pot dish, which made clean-up a breeze. The One-Pot Mexican Quinoa and Black Beans with Cilantro-Lime Crema (say that three times fast!) was so delicious that I could have polished off a second bowl in one sitting. The recipe also did something I previously never thought impossible: It made me fall in love with sour cream. I’d debated whether I should even add the dollop of cilantro-lime crema to the dish, but I wanted to try the recipe in all its glory and I’m so glad I did. This dish was such a hit with both myself and my husband that I’ve actually made it a second time already.

Best For:
● Offering Beyond Meat options
● Customizing your Meal Preferences

Chefs Plate

Availability: Currently delivers in Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with plans to expand.

Average price per person: As low as $8.99/serving.

Packaging: All packing is 100 per cent recyclable and can be easily broken down once all the ingredients and ice packs are removed from the box. Many of the containers used to house Chefs Plate‘s ingredients are also ideal for leftovers, so don’t be in such a hurry to dispose of them.

Dietary Variety: Each recipe includes a detailed description of ingredients and instructions in a handy booklet with chef’s notes, portion sizes and caloric intake. Chefs Plate also offers gluten-free and dairy-free options, although they aren’t available every week. You can edit your Taste Preferences profile online or via the app to default to recipes that don’t include meat or fish, for example.

Convenience: For those with hectic work weeks, the fact that Chefs Plate is currently the only meal delivery service that offers an option for 15-minute meals will be vastly appealing to many.

Favourite Recipe: Beef and Black Bean Chili

Overall Experience: Similar to its sister company, Hello Fresh, I found the instructions easy to follow thanks to a clear and concise booklet containing the week’s recipes and ingredient list. I appreciated that the simple and flavourful Beef and Black Bean Chili meal (my favourite of the bunch) provided a handy lunch option made from the leftovers, including the additional provision of six soft shell tacos that helps transform the recipe from beef chili to beef taquitos. I particularly enjoyed the seasoning that came with the meal and appreciated that it listed all the spice blends on the packaging so I knew what it contained. Similar to the other meal kit delivery services, however, I found that there were more dishes to wash afterward than was the norm in our household (although, when cooking for myself and my husband, I typically opt for one-pot or sheet pan meals because I hate washing dishes). I appreciated the wide selection of meals to choose from and was surprised by how fresh the ingredients were when I reached into their bags.

Best For:
● Offering dairy-free and gluten-free options
● Providing 15-minute meal selections for hectic weeknights

GoodFood

Availability: Currently delivers in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and the Maritimes.

Average price per person: As low as $5.85/serving.

Packaging: The GoodFood cardboard boxes, insulation liners, bags, bottles and baskets are all 100 per cent recyclable. Tip: Use the ice packs to keep food cool during a family picnic. My freezer is now fully stocked with them.

Dietary Variety: Choose your weekly meals from a variety of categories such as Clean15 (low-carb) and Vegetarian.

Convenience: The average meal takes approximately 30 minutes to whip up, while those looking to incorporate more smoothies in their daily routine will be thrilled to discover that GoodFood offers fresh ready-to-blend Breakfast Smoothies (starting at $4.99/each) that can easily be stored in the freezer.

Smoothies: Initially, when I learned that GoodFood had recently introduced a series of ready-to-blend smoothies, I scoffed a little. Who can’t chop a few fruits and veggies and toss them into a blender? Little did I know how much easier mornings could be when all I had to do was reach into the freezer, dump the contents of the smoothie into the blender, add a little milk and hit the Power button. In addition, each delivery comes with easy-to-clean reusable straws. Members can choose from 16 original recipes chock-full of superfood chunks and farm-frozen fruits and veggies. I also appreciated that GoodFood included ingredients I typically wouldn’t have on hand at home (acai, hemp, maca, goji, etc.), making for an even sweeter smoothie experience. My husband, in particular, was obsessed with them – he wasn’t much of a smoothie drinker before this experience so I can thank GoodFood for his newfound love.

Favourite Recipe: Butter-Poached Lobster Fra Diavolo over Fresh Fettuccine with Pine Nut-Basil Gremolata

Overall Experience: This rich, buttery pasta dish was just the type of carb overload I needed on the night I decided to prep it. I was expecting a flimsy lobster portion given how pricey the shellfish can be, so I was pleasantly surprised to find that the meaty chunks were as plentiful as they were flavourful. I also appreciated that the Fra Diavolo spice blend had a list of its ingredients. Again, clean-up was a bit more chaotic than I’d like, but nothing quite beats the feeling of being able to simply reach into your fridge for one of those brown paper bags with everything you could possibly need for a well-balanced meal.

Best For:
● Those who want to incorporate more smoothies in their diet
● Introducing more Clean15 (low-carb) meals to your routine

Cook It

Availability: This Montreal-based company is currently only available in Quebec and Ontario but it’s looking to expand. All packaging and instructions come in both French and English.

Average price per person: As low as $7.89.

Packaging: All the ingredients come inside a chilled, 100 per cent recyclable and reusable cardboard box. Of all the companies I tested, Cook It had the most manageable box in terms of size (the majority are pretty bulky and I don’t quite have the wingspan to carry them comfortably) and was the easiest to break down and discard.

Dietary Variety: Members can choose from a diverse selection of meat and vegetarian options.

Convenience: There are a couple of unique features here. Unlike the other meal delivery services I tested, Cook It offers a Pantry section on their website where customers can order local products to add to their box, such as smoothies, milk or granola bars – which is ideal if you’re looking to get in a little grocery shopping as well. They also offer a Ready-to-Eat selection each week that allows you to select from cooked meals that are ready to go once you’ve popped them in the oven or microwave for five minutes.

Favourite Recipe: Curry-Spiced Chicken and Peach Salad

Overall Experience: These were probably the simplest recipes of all the meal delivery kits I tried, both in terms of easy-to-follow instructions and minimal ingredients. The Curry-Spiced Chicken and Peach Salad was a lot easier to prep than I first anticipated and it was savoury and refreshing simultaneously. In fact, all the meals were consistently delicious, including the ready-to-eat beef lasagna that I just needed to heat up in the microwave. I’m leery of pre-cooked packaged meals because I tend to associate it with awful plane food, but the lasagna tasted homemade – my husband, who arrived home late that night, didn’t even realize it wasn’t freshly-prepped. (Airlines might want to consider hiring Cook It to prep their in-flight meals.) In addition, because the recipes I received were so low-maintenance, it also meant the least amount of clean-up afterward, compared to the other companies.

Best For:
● Offering a Pantry section and a selection of ready-to-eat meals
● The most manageable boxes in terms of size and break-down

Final Verdict

There are plenty of pros when it comes to trying out a meal delivery service. It’s ideal for people short on time, who hate meal planning or dread making regular trips to the grocery store. An added bonus is that it truly does help cut down on food waste as everything is so expertly measured out in advance that nothing gets left behind. I loved being able to reach into my fridge each night, pull out a brown paper bag and know that everything I could possibly need for my meal was all in one place.

At the same time, things start to add up and it’s likely going to be more costly overall to rely on meal delivery kits (unless you’re not planning on doing it every single week). Also, be prepared for more of a clean-up than you might be accustomed to and lots (and lots!) of boxes and recyclable materials to take out to your bins.

How To Host a Top Chef Canada-Worthy Drag Brunch at Home

This week’s episode of Top Chef Canada turned the party with its seamless blend of drag artistry and culinary skills.

With the eighth season of the hit series well underway, the diverse cast of culinary warriors have embarked on plenty of intense challenges already. This week, however, the chefs were challenged to a fabulously unique Quickfire Challenge that focused on creating a scrumptious drag brunch – and it gave us life! Spoiler Alert: You’ll want to watch this week’s episode, Drag Brunch, before reading any further to avoid spoilers.

Related: Recap the Top Moments From Top Chef Canada

For the uninitiated, drag brunches are increasingly popular Sunday morning staples in most major cities – an entertaining way to enjoy your eggs and down some mimosas while taking in a live comedy and lip-sync performance extravaganza from a local queen. In light of recent circumstances, however, drag artists have taken the internet by storm, streaming live performances to their loyal fans. (All you need to do is Google your favourite queen or visit their Instagram page to check out their upcoming schedules.)

And so, with Toronto-based drag artists Baby Bel Bel and Miss Moco looking on, the chefs offered up plenty of opulent eats that left us drooling.

Dominique, Adrian and Jo came out on top with their cinnamon and orange zest-themed eats. With that team’s convincing win in mind, we’re sharing our recipes for a fancy drag brunch based on the winning team’s recipes – albeit easier and less time-consuming (we can’t all be top chefs, after all).

Related: What Famous Food Dish From Top Chef Canada Should You Make?

Dominique’s first course: Scotch Quail Egg with Radicchio Salad with Spiced Orange Vinaigrette

Try it Yourself: Scotch Egg

Don’t have quail eggs on hand to mirror Dominique’s dish? Fear not! There’s nothing wrong with a deliciously simple regular egg instead. Pair your homemade breaded Scotch Egg with a light salad if you’re feeling particularly peckish.

Try it Yourself: Brunch Frittata

Treat yourself to a low-key drag brunch by combining tomatoes, asparagus, herbs and goat cheese for a dish that’s ready in less than 30 minutes – leaving you plenty of time to queue up a drag queen performance to stream live.

Adrian’s second course: Allspice French Toast Orange Peel-Infused Fried Chicken with Scotch Bonnet, Rosehip and Ginger Syrup

Try it Yourself: Biscuit French Toast with Cinnamon-Orange Cane Syrup

If straight-up French Toast isn’t your jam, you can still stick to Adrian’s southern comfort food theme by crafting this mouth-watering biscuit-inspired version.

Try it Yourself: Fried Chicken with Wild Rice Waffles and Pink Peppercorn Sauce

Before you take in all those sickening death drops on your drag brunch livestream, curl up with some crispy fried chicken on homemade waffles that will leave you feeling full right up to dinner.

Jo’s third course: Carrot Cake Scone with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting and Candied Walnuts

Try it Yourself: Waffled Carrot Cake

If you didn’t opt for waffles in the second course, there are still opportunities to save the best for last.  Elevate the average waffle with carrot cake-infused cream cheese frosting and roughly chopped pecans for a drag brunch that will satisfy your sweet tooth.

Try it Yourself: Bacon-Cranberry Scones with Citrus Basil Butter

If you’re not a fan of carrot cake, try these savoury scones you can enjoy with your second (or third) cup of coffee or tea.

Watch Top Chef Canada Mondays at 10ep and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Black Garlic: What It Is, and Why You Need to Cook With It This Year

As Canadians get more adventurous in the kitchen, it’s only natural that they’d be on the lookout for the latest on-trend foods and dishes to try at home. And, with 2020 kicking into high gear, black garlic has continued its steady ascent as one of the most sought-after ingredients in North American cuisine. But if you’re left reeling at the thought of cooking with the inky, blackened cloves – or don’t entirely understand how to incorporate it into your favourite recipes – you’re definitely not alone.

Although not an entirely new concept (Japan, Thailand and South Korea have been extolling the virtues of black garlic for years) this versatile ingredient can be easily swapped in for traditional white garlic in most dishes.

Still not convinced? We break it all down for you – from the what to the how – and offer up some of our favourite garlicky Food Network Canada recipes as mouth-watering examples of where you can introduce this on-trend ingredient into your repertoire.

Related: 12 Hottest Food Trends We’ll Be Devouring in 2020

What is it?

In short, it’s your everyday run-of-the-mill white garlic – albeit gradually aged over a period of weeks. By gently heating entire bulbs in a humidity-controlled environment (think: rice cookers), you wind up with darkened, sticky cloves that quite frankly resemble garlic gone bad. Despite their slightly charred and off-putting appearance, the Maillard reaction (the chemical reaction between amino acids and sugars that lend browned/aged foods their unmistakable taste) actually deepens their flavours for an entirely different – and elevated – culinary experience.

Related: Mouth-Watering Recipes That Use 10 or More Cloves of Garlic


Get the recipe for Roger Mooking’s 30 Cloves of Garlic Sauce

What does it taste like?

For starters, it doesn’t taste much like traditional garlic. Once blackened, the cloves become earthy and syrupy-sweet in flavour, with additional hints of prunes, balsamic vinegar and black licorice. It’s also softer and has a molasses-like texture, making it easier to spread on crackers or crostini. Something for at-home chefs to consider: due to the loss of its original sharp taste, a larger volume of black garlic is required with any recipe in order to achieve higher taste levels.


Get the recipe for 8-Minute Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

How to use it

You can add black garlic to salad dressing or dip recipes, purée them with olive oil, create scrumptious pastes from scratch or rub onto fish or meat before popping your dish in the oven. If you purchase it in powdered form, you can also sprinkle it on pretty much anything your heart (and stomach) desires.

Related: Pinterest Predicts the Top 15 Food Trends for 2020


Learn how to make Everything Garlic Bread Knots

How to make it at home

We’ll be honest: it’s a long, drawn-out process, but if you have the time to spare, the results are well worth the wait. A relatively easy hack is to break out the rice cooker and use the “warm” setting to transform white garlic into black garlic over the span of roughly three to four weeks (or 40 days). You can also use your slow cooker.


Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Garlic Parmesan Twists

Where to buy it

Although it might be a little difficult to track down in major grocery chains, specialty stores, like Whole Foods, often carry both whole heads of pre-humidified black garlic and the powdered variety.

Health benefits

Although it’s lower in allicin, the compound that gives traditional garlic many of its health-boosting properties, black garlic is still rich in amino acids and contains double the antioxidants as the white variety. It’s also a great source of vitamins C and D.

For more at-home cooking experiments, check out these 8 Realistic Ways to Stick to Healthy Habits and the 10 Best Foods (and 5 Worst) for Your Mental Health and Wellness.

15-Minute Cheesy One-Pot Pasta to Reclaim Your Weeknights

The weather may be warming, but we’re still all about indulging in comfort food with a fresh, seasonal upgrade. This dish is a twist on mac ‘n’ cheese that literally takes the same (or less!) amount of time to cook as the boxed variety. Bonus: Though it features three different types of cheese, it also contains peas, which lighten the dish and really make it pop (in colour and flavour). This one-pot recipe is a great choice make on those nights when there’s “nothing to eat” in the house – all the ingredients are fridge and pantry staples!

15 Minute Three-Cheese Pasta with Peas

Serves: 4

Ingredients:
225g (1/2 box) medium shell dry pasta
2 cups vegetable broth, warm but not boiling
1/2 cup spreadable cream cheese
3/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups frozen peas
1 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
Flaky sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
1. Place all ingredients except peas, Parmesan, salt and pepper in a large pot.

2. Mix gently to start melting the cream cheese.
3. Place the pot on the stovetop over medium-high heat and bring to a boil.
4. Lower the heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly for 7 minutes.
5. After 7 minutes, add the peas and Parmesan, stir well and cook, continuing to stir, a further 2 minutes or until the pasta is al dente.

6. Season to taste with salt and pepper. The sauce will thicken as the pasta sits, so if you prefer it more thick and creamy as opposed to saucy, let it sit for a few minutes, stirring from time to time.

For more one-pot wonders, browse these 55 Quick and Easy One-Pot Recipes and 15 One-Pot Chicken Dinners Ready in 30 Minutes or Less.

10 Quick & Easy Meals with Rotisserie Chicken

Whether you’re craving chicken noodle soup, cheesy chicken quesadillas or a hearty chicken pot pie, stretching your leftover rotisserie chicken is a cinch with these quick and easy recipes.

888_rotisserie-chicken-recipes

1. Rachael Ray’s Roast Chicken Enchilada Suizas Stacks Casserole
This crowd-pleasing casserole is loaded with tortillas, chicken, poblano peppers, onion, fresh herbs and Swiss cheese.

2. Ina Garten’s Chicken Pot Pie
A creamy trio of peas, carrots and shredded chicken make for all the comforting flavours of a classic pie. Swap in ready-made crusts and suddenly weeknight pot pie is possible.

3. Slow Cooker Rotisserie Chicken Congee
This easy, savoury rice porridge is slow cooked with leftover rotisserie chicken, then spiced up with slivered ginger, green onions, soy sauce and smoky sesame oil.

4. Michael Smith’s Roast Chicken Noodle Soup
Filled out with carrots, celery, corn, peas and egg noodles, this healthy chicken soup comes together in less than 30 minutes.

5. Rotisserie Chicken and Chorizo Jambalaya
Chorizo, rotisserie chicken and bacon fat infuse this jambalaya rice dish with an incredible amount of flavour.

6. Bobby Flay’s Chinese Chicken Salad with Red Chile Peanut Dressing
Cold noodle salad is bursting with fresh flavours and a ton of crunchy textures, thanks to carrots, cabbage, cilantro and mint and a homemade sweet and sour fish sauce to bring it all together.

7. Garlic Parmesan Chicken Lasagna Bake
While technically not a lasagna, this creamy casserole dish combines a mouthwatering combo of wavy lasagna noodles, rotisserie chicken, peas, Parmesan, creamy butter garlic sauce, breadcrumbs and fresh thyme.

8. Chicken Tostada Salad
These neat and tidy taco cups are the perfect finger food: stuffed with shredded chicken, taco seasoning, tomatoes, avocado, cilantro and a healthy dose of gooey cheese.

9. Roger Mooking’s Chipotle Chicken Quesadillas
Chicken is sautéed in a spicy chipotle sauce and combined with smashed white beans, corn salad and tomato-watermelon salsa, cheese and three gooey cheese, all rolled up in a flour tortilla and crisped up in a cast iron pan.

10. Thai Fried Rice
This Thai spin on classic fried rice features red bell peppers, celery and cooked chicken, while a dash of Thai red curry paste, ginger and lime juice make a flavourful sauce.

5 Simple Two-Ingredient Soups

A nearly bare cupboard can still yield ingredients for a bowl of soul-warming, good-for-you soup. With only two simple ingredients and a dash of creativity, these five easy soups come together in less time than it takes to open and heat up a can.

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Melon and Cucumber Gazpacho via Cannelle et Vanille

1. Melon and Cucumber Gazpacho
It’s hard to believe this creamy, cold soup is made up of just two things: ripe honeydew and cucumber. This gorgeously-smooth green soup doesn’t even need to be cooked — just whiz up the ingredients in a blender and pour straight into a bowl. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and a few toasted pine nuts.

2. Lentils and Vegetable Stock
A can of lentils simmered in vegetable broth makes a hearty meal that will stick to your ribs using the simplest ingredients. Bring the lentils and broth to a gentle simmer, and then use an immersion blender to smooth things out. Season with a little salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon, and serve with toasted pita wedges.

3. Tomato Soup
To make the world’s easiest soup, reach for fresh, in-season tomatoes or canned San Marzano tomatoes, blended with a splash of milk. This simplified soup is great on its own, or can be easily jazzed up with some garlic and fresh basil, served alongside a gooey grilled cheese.

4. Mushroom Soup
This quickie soup can go two ways: for a thick, belly-warming soup, add cream to a pot of sauteed mushrooms and cook together until it reaches a simmer. Feel free to use vegetable or even chicken stock for a lighter version.

5. Egg Drop Soup
A Chinese restaurant favourite, it’s easy to satisfy your egg drop soup cravings with two simple pantry staples. To make this soup, simmer chicken stock until it reaches a slow bubble and then slowly pour in whisked eggs, while constantly stirring the stock. To make it even more authentic, thicken it up with a little cornstarch and sprinkle with white pepper.

5 Easy Ways to Turn Tonight’s Dinner into Tomorrow’s Lunch

So you’ve got visions of Pinterest-worthy lunches floating around in your head — join the club. Like anyone who has ever eaten a sad desk lunch knows, good intentions won’t fill you up. Here are five realistic ways to take last night’s dinner, transform it into today’s lunch and brown bag it like a pro.

Become a Sandwich Master
Leftover roasted vegetables, steak or roasted chicken make for the beginnings of a mean sandwich. Simply stack what you’ve got — red peppers, tomatoes, steak or chicken — and line a soft baguette with a little mayo, goat cheese or some hunks of brie, add few fresh sprigs of arugula and you’re all set.

Try: Grilled Steak Sandwich with Onions & Arugula

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Undress Your Salad
That big salad at dinner will be a soggy mess after a night in the fridge, so if you plan to take it to work the next day, keep it naked. Give it some heft by adding canned tuna, shredded roast chicken, smoked tofu or even leftover quinoa, and save the dressing until the very last minute to keep it perky and fresh.

Try: Bobby Flay’s Chicken Salad with Red Chile Peanut Dressing

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Double Up on Your Sides
Whether it’s brown rice, quinoa, pasta or potatoes, plan to make more than you need. Then, turn those sides into a hearty desk-side salad by adding a simple vinaigrette, a whack of raw or cooked vegetables and some fresh herbs.

Try: Quinoa, Roasted Eggplant and Apple Salad with Cumin Vinaigrette

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Soup it Up
A hot lunch of leftover soup or stew can warm the biggest office chill, and you can be sure that any soup you’ve got will taste even better while slurping in the staff lunchroom. Make it a main by adding a buttered baguette to dip in chicken stew, some pita wedges for that lentil soup or even a some rice, fresh thyme and and parsley to chicken soup.

Try: The Pioneer Woman’s Chicken Rice Soup

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Takeout Transformation
Instead of simply nuking your leftovers, give them new life with a few fresh ingredients and a little creativity. Last night’s pad Thai can be today’s cold noodle salad when you add green beans or shelled edamame, while a Chinese delivery of rice, beef or chicken and vegetables can easily be reborn as a quick stir-fry.

Try: Korean Beef Fried Rice

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BonnieMo Bonnie Mo is a Toronto-based editor and the face behind Food Network Canada’s Food Fetish column. She’s also a contributing editor over at slice.ca.