Tag Archives: Poutine

Indulge In This Luscious Lobster Poutine

As if poutine wasn’t decadent enough — an indulgence of crispy fries, thick gravy and cheese curds — we’ve amped up the luxuriousness with fresh lobster, salty bacon, diced tomatoes and, of course, loads of gravy. This secretly easy-to-make weekend meal is worth every cheesy, lobster-filled bite.

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Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients:

For the Fries:
3 russet (baking) potatoes, skin intact, cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch strips or wedges
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp salt

For the Toppings:
11/2 cups cooked lobster meat, torn into bite-sized pieces
200 g poutine cheese curds
2 strips cooked bacon, chopped
1 plum tomato, seeded and diced
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 cup gravy, heated

lobster-poutine-1

Directions:

For the Fries:
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.
2. On a large baking sheet, toss all potato ingredients until potatoes are evenly coated.
3. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork and golden brown on the bottom.

Assembly:
1. On a warm platter, add a bed of fries. Top with lobster, cheese curds and bacon, if using. Ladle over hot gravy (use as much as you like; there may be extra). Garnish with chopped tomatoes, parsley. Serve immediately.

Love poutine? Learn more about the iconic Canadian dish with these 9 fun facts.

poutine week feature image

A Poutine for Each Province and Territory

Oh, Canada! To celebrate Poutine Week, we’re highlighting local ingredients from each province that would make tasty additions to our gravy-covered national treat. Get the fries cooking and your taste buds ready for these creative poutine combos.

Poutine week

British Columbia: Dungeness crab and sautéed wild mushrooms

Yukon: Smoked salmon and citrus crème fraîche

Alberta: Braised short ribs and baked beans

Saskatchewan: Roasted beets and sour cream

Northwest Territories: Ground bison and grainy mustard

Manitoba: Sweet corn and pickled red onions

Nunavut: Grilled caribou and caramelized onions

Ontario: Pulled pork and apple slaw

Québec: Montreal smoked meat and toasted caraway seeds

lobster poutine

Nova Scotia: Lobster and lemon aioli

New Brunswick: Grilled oysters and hot sauce

Prince Edward Island: Clothbound cheddar and stout gravy

Newfoundland and Labrador: Salted cod and summer savory

For more creative ways of making this class Canadian dish, check out our tasty poutine recipes.

Poutine combos by Charlotte Katz.

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Leftover Turkey? Make This Family-Style Poutine

You’ve made turkey soup and endless turkey sandwiches, but there’s one more deliciously Canadian way to use up those last bits of leftover holiday turkey.

All of the best parts of a festive turkey dinner combine to make a cheesy, gravy-filled poutine. Roast sweet potatoes make a festive, crispy and colourful base for leftover or quick homemade gravy, cranberry sauce, turkey and squeaky cheese curds. Just set in the middle of the table with lots of forks, and enjoy!

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Serves: 10 to 15

Ingredients:

Sweet Potato Fries
2 large sweet potatoes, skin intact, cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch strips or wedges
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp salt

Cranberry Sauce (or 1/2 cup prepared cranberry sauce)
1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
1/4 cup orange juice
2 Tbsp maple syrup

For the Extra Toppings
200g cheese curds
8 oz cooked smoked or roasted turkey meat (not deli meat), shredded
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary, plus whole fresh rosemary twigs to garnish

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Directions:

Sweet Potato Fries
1. Preheat oven to 425ºF.
2. On a large baking sheet, toss all sweet potato ingredients until sweet potatoes are evenly coated.
3. Roast for 30 to 35 minutes until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork and beginning to brown on the bottom.

Cranberry Sauce
1. In a medium skillet or small saucepan, bring all cranberry sauce ingredients to a boil. Reduce to medium low. Cook, uncovered, for 5 to 10 minutes, until liquid has reduced and cranberries are burst.
2. Remove from heat, mash cranberries with a fork until desired texture is reached. Set aside.

Assembly
1. On a warm platter or in a warmed cast-iron skillet (for presentation only), add a bed of fries. Top with cheese curds and turkey. Ladle over gravy (use as much as you prefer; there may be extra), followed by cranberry sauce and chopped rosemary. Garnish with a rosemary twig and serve immediately.

Looking for more tasty leftover ideas? Try our 14 Ways to Enjoy Holiday Leftovers.

How to Throw a Canada Day Party for Under $50

The birthday of our home and native land is just around the corner, so we’ve got the perfect excuse to plan a stellar red-and-white-themed bash. But you’ll quickly find that a simple celebration can cost a lot more than you’re willing to spend. That’s okay! You can still throw a quaint Canada Day shindig without having to give up on all your patriotic party hopes and dreams.

From simple and reusable décor to snacks that’ll satisfy any true Canadian’s taste buds, learn how to throw a Canada Day party for your friends and family, all for under $50.

Canada Day Party

To begin, gather a few home décor pieces and party supplies you already own. This can include anything from a reusable banner, snack labels (along with a chalk pen), twine for the sandwiches, platters and a crate for the display, and some form of tea lights.

Décor Expenses:
Chip cups: $2
Poutine containers: $2
Napkins: $1
Flowers: $7
Sparklers: $1
Total: $13

For the food, it’s only appropriate to serve every cliché, most-loved food Canada has to offer. This includes BLTs, poutine, ketchup chips, butter tarts and maple doughnuts.

Food Expenses:
Bread, Canadian bacon, lettuce, tomatoes and mayonnaise for BLTs: $14
Smoke’s traditional poutine: $10
Ketchup chips: $3
Maple doughnuts: $5
Butter tarts: $4
Total: $36

Total Cost: $49

Maple Doughnuts

For the focal point on the table, stack maple doughnuts on a cake stand, sitting on top of a crate. I figured they’re maple, they’re doughnuts — surely they deserve the utmost attention at a Canadian affair, right? If you’re looking to make doughnuts from scratch, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Maple Glazed Doughnuts.

Canadian BLTs

Make mini versions of our country’s favourite sandwich, the BLT, and line them up on a long platter. Want to opt for a heartier sandwich? Try this Fried Chicken BLT Melt recipe.

Canadian BLTs

Use twine to tie red and white striped napkins around the sandwiches for an al fresco feel.

Smoke's Poutine

And what Canada Day celebration would be complete without our country’s signature food, poutine? Use takeout-inspired boxes to display five mini servings of these gravy-doused, cheese-topped French fries. But if you want to add a little more flair to your poutine, try making your own version of Smoke’s Nacho Grande Poutine.

Butter Tarts

For a dessert that has “Made in Canada” written all over it, butter tarts are the way to go. Made with eggs, sugar, raisins, and of course, butter, this quintessential dessert features a buttery, flaky crust and super-sweet filling. How could we Canucks resist? If you have a little extra time on your hands, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Pecan Butter Tarts.

Ketchup Chips

Chances are you won’t be able to find ketchup chips outside of the country, so it’s quite necessary to serve Canada’s “exclusive” snack at your little shindig. Set out portions of ketchup chips in red and white striped, easy-to-grab cups.

Canada Day Food Table

Accent the table with some mercury tea lights as vases to hold daisies.

Doughnuts and Sparklers

And of course, to continue with tradition, sparklers can be added for the finishing touch to the celebration.

Love Poutine? You Need to Try Newfoundland Fries

Never heard of Newfoundland Fries? We’re not surprised. Similar to poutine, this gravy-smothered dish is Newfoundland‘s best kept secret. Crispy fries are covered in a dressing or stuffing flavoured with savory spice, and topped off with a rich beef gravy. The result is a delicious cross between Thanksgiving dinner and your favourite late-night snack.

You can find the satisfying fast-food dish on the menu at most greasy spoons, chip trucks or canteens around Newfoundland. If you’re lucky enough to taste it right on The Rock, be sure to wash it down with a cold can of birch beer or pineapple Crush.

This recipe is a slight variation of the classic using panko instead of breadcrumbs, and adding cider vinegar and Worcestershire in the dressing for a bit of tang.

Newfie Fries

Newfoundland Fries

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Serves: 2

Ingredients:

For the Fries
1 3-L container canola oil
3 lbs Yukon gold potatoes or PEI potatoes, cut into long 1/2 inch wide strips
1/4 tsp kosher salt

For the Dressing
1/2 cup panko crumbs
1 tsp dried savory
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp granulated sugar
1/8 tsp kosher salt
Black pepper, freshly ground, to taste

For the Gravy
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef stock
2 tsp cider vinegar
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp kosher salt

Newfie Fries

Directions:
1. Place potatoes in a large bowl filled with cold water. Let sit, refrigerated, for at least 1 hour. Drain and let dry on a baking sheet.
2. Add enough oil (about 7 cups) into a large, heavy-bottomed pot until it reaches 4 inches up the sides. Heat oil over medium heat until temperature reaches 300°F.
3. Blanch fries in 2 batches for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer to baking sheet lined with paper towel.
4. Increase heat until oil reaches 375°F. Add fries in 2 batches and cook until golden-brown, about 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt.
5. To make dressing, toast panko breadcrumbs with dried savory in a large pan set over medium heat, until light golden brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl.
6. Add butter to the pan, then onion, cook until softened, about 3 to 5 minutes. Season with sugar, salt and pepper. Stir onion mixture into bread crumbs.
7. To make the gravy, melt the butter in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Add flour, whisking occasionally, until paste turns a light golden brown, about 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in stock, vinegar and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to a boil, then lower heat to medium-low and let simmer 2 minutes.
8. To assemble, divide fries between two plates. Sprinkle with dressing, then cover in gravy. Sprinkle with more dressing if desired.

Want to share your variation of Newfoundland fries? Share your recipe with us!

Looking for another taste of Newfoundland? Discover What a Newfoundland Kitchen Party is Really Like.

Le Roy Jucep Poutine

The History of Poutine: One Hot Mess

When it comes to poutine, three things are certain: it was invented in Québec, it’s best made with fresh cheese curds and it’s undeniably delicious. What’s less clear is who first made it, and when.

The very history of this palate-pleasing, artery-clogging French Canadian masterpiece is a hot mess, peppered with colourful characters and laced with a distracting array of secret sauces and gooey melted cheese curds.

Jucep Poutine

Two Québec restaurants in the region south of Trois-Rivieres claim to be first to serve up the now-iconic dish. Café Ideal, later re-named Le Lutin Qui Rit (The Laughing Elf), has the earliest claim. Story has it, the Warwick, Qué. café was serving poutine — or something quite like it — as early as 1957. But detractors suggest that even if Café Ideal served it first, their piping hot bag of fries and fresh cheese curds was missing a key ingredient — the gravy, known in Québec as ‘sauce brune.’

The more widely accepted claim to serving all three key ingredients together comes from Drummondville’s Le Roy Jucep, once owned by the late Jean-Paul Roy. Le Roy Jucep holds the trademark as “l’inventeur de la poutine” but just like their menu, which offers 23 options for cheesy, sauce-smothered fries, their origin story comes in several flavours. Some say it was an out-of-town customer who first asked his waitress to toss fresh cheese curds — widely available in the dairy-rich region — onto his plate of fries and gravy. Others claim the culinary ménage a trois was a frequent off-menu request from the diner’s regulars – so frequent that Roy decided to make it an official menu option around 1965 or 1967.

Le Roy Juce

Le Roy Juce, is one of a few restaurants claiming to be the birthplace of poutine.

“Whoever’s the first human to put cheese, gravy and fries on a plate, we’ll never know for sure,” says Charles Lambert, Le Roy Jucep’s third owner and current protector of the diner’s secret sauce recipe. “[But] the first restaurant to write the letters P-O-U-T-I-N-E on a menu is for sure Le Roy Jucep. And that represented fries, cheese curds and gravy.”

According to Lambert, in the mid-60’s wait staff grew tired of writing “fries, cheese curds and gravy” each time a customer ordered the increasingly popular dish, and decided it needed a name. Lambert has a few ideas for how the now famous moniker came to be. “Poutine” was regional slang for “pudding,” and another way of saying “mix” or “mess” — both appropriate adjectives. Moreover, one of Le Roy Jucep’s cooks went by the nickname “Ti-Pout,” so “poutine” was a name that honoured both the dish and its maker.

Café Ideal’s name story is a similar, albeit saltier tale. Popular history has it that when Eddy Lanaisse, reportedly the first customer to ask for cheese curds with his fries, made his request, owner Fernand Lachance exclaimed, “Ça va te faire une maudite poutine!” or “That will make a damned mess!”

On that point, at least, we have accord: poutine is a mess, but damned if it isn’t delicious.

Can’t get enough poutine? Try these delicious 9 Fun Facts About Poutine.

8 Must-Try Poutineries From Coast to Coast

A Canadian classic, poutine is always at the top of our comfort food list. And although there are tons of casual chains offering up plates of cheesy, gravy-soaked fries, here are 8 eateries that add a bit more pizzazz to this iconic dish.

Below Deck Tavern (Calgary, AB) – Good Ol’ Fashioned Poutine
For East Coasters looking for a little taste of home in Western Canada, this is the spot to be. Revel in deliciousness with dishes such as deep-fried pepperoni and cottage pie. But for something a little extra special, opt for Below Deck’s spin on a poutine. They season skinny fries with old bay seasoning and top with the regular curds and gravy. Add on some donair meat while you’re at it.

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Caplansky’s (Toronto, ON) – Smoked Meat Poutine
Food Network Canada personality, Zane Caplansky, has built a big brand for himself in Toronto creating a successful delicatessen-style business. Try his version of the poutine, chock full of quality, kosher smoked meat.

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La Banquise 24th (Montreal, QC) – Hot Dog Poutine
Open 24 hours for all your post-bar, drunken food cravings, this popular spot for poutine in the heart of poutine land — Montreal — serves up more variations on this theme than you can imagine. Naturally, after a hard night out, you’re not always thinking, so skip the brain work and just go for the hot dog option. I mean, who’s counting calories at 3 am?

La Pataterie Hulloise (Gatineau, QC)
Most Ottawans will tell you that if you’re really interested in finding a great poutine, then you need to take a short drive over the river from Ottawa to Gatineau. This no frills spot keeps their offerings simple because sometimes, you just don’t need to mess with a good thing.

Peasant Cookery (Winnipeg, MB)
There’s something nice and homey about this restaurant in the exchange district of downtown Winnipeg. The menu is all about good ol’ home cooked food, but taken up a notch. Crispy fries are topped with curds from a local producer, Bothwell Cheese and a bacon gravy. We’ll order two please.

The-Reef---Jerk-Chicken-Poutine

The Reef (Vancouver, BC) – Jerk Chicken Poutine
I guarantee that you’ve never had Caribbean jerk in this application before. Sure, the cheese curds and fries are pretty average, but the pulled chicken in this dish is great and the gravy is sweet and spicy with hints of cinnamon. Out of every dish on this list, this bastardization (if you will) of poutine is one of the most interesting.

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Schryer’s Smoked BBQ Shack (Saskatoon, SK) – Smoked Mozza Poutine
I’m still a little shocked there’s not a poutine-inspired perogy dish in my hometown (maybe there is and I’m just out of the loop) and even more shocked that a good poutine is still hard to come by in Saskatoon, but thankfully this top notch barbecue joint is saving the day. If you’ve never had smoked mozzarella, you haven’t lived. Add this gooey delicacy into a poutine equation and you’ve got something really worth forking into.

Willy’s Fresh Cut (Halifax, NS)
Like I mentioned earlier with Below Deck Tavern, donair meat in a poutine is an East Coast favourite and Willy’s can definitely verify that fact. If donair meat isn’t your cup of tea, try Willy’s stuffing poutine, or one with a big helping of pulled pork on top.

Dan-Clapson-Avatar Dan Clapson is a food writer and culinary instructor based out of Calgary. He is constantly creating new recipes and striving to expand his culinary horizons. He thinks yam fries are overrated.