Tag Archives: Lynn Crawford

A platter of deviled eggs and tempura cauliflower and a plate of ricotta topped figs

3 Crowd-Pleasing Appetizers From Lynn Crawford That Make the Perfect Snack Board (Plus Recipes!)

Kids aren’t the only ones that like to snack! Grazing platters are an impressive way to plate a variety of appetizers perfect for entertaining when you just can’t decide on one dish. Beyond that, snack platters can make for a special dinner at home that’s casual and delicious.

These three elegant appetizers from Junior Chef Showdown judge and mentor Lynn Crawford are so easy to make and, when plated together, make for a lovely spread of hors d’oeuvres. Featuring classic deviled eggs, lightly crusted tempura cauliflower and ricotta-stuffed figs drizzled with honey, this picturesque and crowd-pleasing grazing platter tastes as good as it looks.

Easy Five-Ingredient Deviled Eggs

Total time: 20 minutes
Yields: 12 devilled eggs

Seven deviled eggs on a wooden platter

Ingredients:

6 eggs, hard boiled and peeled
⅓ cup mayonnaise
1 tsp Dijon mustard
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 Tbsp salmon roe
1 Tbsp minced chives

Directions

1.  First, cut the hard boiled eggs in half. Remove yolks and transfer to a small bowl.

2.  Pass the yolks through a fine mesh sieve or mash well with a fork.

3.  Add mayonnaise and Dijon and stir until creamy. Season with salt and pepper.

4.  Spoon or pipe filling into egg halves evenly and then top evenly with roe and chives. Serve immediately.

Related: Lynn Crawford’s Bacon and Egg Ramen

Better-Than-Takeout  Cauliflower Tempura With Quick and Easy Buttermilk Ranch

Total time: 30 minutes
Yields: 6 servings

Three plates of cauliflower tempura and buttermilk ranch

Ingredients:

Cauliflower Tempura
1 small head cauliflower, cup into medium florets, about 4 cups
1 cup flour, divided
3 egg yolks
1 cup cold club soda
1 Tbsp cornstarch
1 tsp salt
Oil for frying

Buttermilk Ranch
Sour Cream
Mayo
Fresh Herbs (Parsley, Dill, Chives)
Buttermilk

Related: BBQ Halibut Collar & Tempura Spot Prawn Salad

Directions:

1. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a cooling rack and toss cauliflower with ¼ cup flour in a large bowl.

2. Then, whisk together egg yolks and water in a large bowl until foamy. Add remaining flour, cornstarch and salt. Mix until smooth.

3. Heat oil in a deep fryer or heavy-bottomed saucepan to 325°F.

4. Toss cauliflower and flour in the batter. Add in batches to oil and fry for 3 minutes. Transfer to prepared sheet, sprinkle with more salt and cool slightly before serving.

5. Serve with buttermilk ranch (recipe below) or your dipping sauce of choice.

6. For buttermilk ranch, in a small bowl stir sour cream and a little mayo with  fresh herbs such as parsley, dill, and chive. Add buttermilk until desired consistency and salt and pepper. Optional: Add a few dashes of your favourite hot sauce.

Ricotta-Stuffed Figs Drizzled With Honey

Total time: 20 minutes
Yields: 12 stuffed figs

Six figs topped with ricotta and drizzled with honey on a plate

Ingredients:

12 figs
¾ cup ricotta cheese
1 Tbsp lemon juice
¼ cup chopped pistachios
2 Tbsp honey
1 tsp lemon zest

Directions:

1. Prepare the figs by cutting 1/2-inch off the steams. Them, score the top of each fig with an “X” about 1/2-inch  deep.

2. Gently separate the cuts and set aside.

3. In a separate bowl, stir cheese with lemon juice. Place the sauce into a small piping bag or sandwich bag.

4. Cut the tip and pipe the cheese mixture into each fig and sprinkle with the crushed pistachios.

5. Stir honey with the lemon zest. Drizzle over the figs before serving.

Related: 3 Classic Sauces From Lynn Crawford That Will Be Instant Staples (Plus Recipes!)

Watch Junior Chef Showdown Sundays at 9ep and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Lynn Crawford headshot with her Chinese Veggie Stirfry With Black Bean Sauce

3 Classic Sauces From Lynn Crawford That Will Be Instant Staples (Plus Recipes!)

The secret to elevating any meal from meh to memorable is all in the sauce. A delicious sauce is a sure-fire way to boost flavour and add texture and dimension to any dish. These three classic sauces from Junior Chef Showdown judge and mentor Lynn Crawford are super versatile and can elevate any weeknight dinner from just delicious to simply divine. From a creamy, cheesy Mornay sauce (daughter sauce to the French béchamel) to a simple and fresh Sofrito (a Latin American staple) to a Chinese black bean sauce that’s bursting with salty umami flavour, you’ll be making these staple sauces again and again.

Related: Lynn Crawford’s Comforting Bacon and Egg Ramen Soup

Chinese Veggie Stir Fry With Quick and Easy Black Bean Sauce

Total Time: 35 minutes
Yields: 4 servings + 1 cup of sauce

A healthy veggie stir fry with easy black bean sauce on a bed of rice.

Ingredients:

Black Bean Sauce
2 Tbsp canola oil
2 Tbsp minced garlic
2 Tbsp minced ginger
1 green onion, minced
3 Tbsp fermented beans, soaked in water for one hour, drained and mashed with a fork
½ cup mirin
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp sugar
½ tsp pepper
1 Tbsp water
1-½ tsp cornstarch

Chinese Veggie Stir-Fry
2 heaping Tbsp of Black Bean Sauce
2 Tbsp canola oil, divided
2 cups sliced or torn shiitake mushrooms
½ cup Vidalia onion, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 carrot, thinly sliced
1 red pepper, sliced into ½ inch strips
2 Tbsp julienned ginger
6 baby bok choy, cut in half lengthwise
6 stems gai lan (Chinese broccoli), stems cut in half lengthwise, cut into 1-inch sections
1 cup sugar snap peas
4 cups cooked jasmine rice
2 green onions, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 finger chili, thinly sliced

Related: Blind Sauce Taste Test With the Junior Chefs

Directions:

1. For the Black Bean Sauce, heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger; cook until translucent, about 2 minutes. Add green onion; cook for 1 minute. Add beans and cook for 1 minute.

2. Add mirin, soy sauce, rice vinegar, sugar and pepper to pan and  bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low.

3. Mix together water and cornstarch in a small bowl. Add to bean mixture and cook until thickened slightly, about 2 to 3 minutes.

4. Spoon onto a serving platter and sprinkle with pine nuts and cheese.

5. For the stir-fry, heat up 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat in a wok or large non-stick skillet.

6. Place the mushrooms and cook until beginning to brown, 4 to 6 minutes.

7. Then, add the remaining oil, onion and carrots and cook for 2 minutes. Add red pepper and ginger into the wok and continue to cook for another minute.

8. Add bok choy and gai lan; cook until the gai lan is tender crisp, about 2 to 3 minutes.

9. Stir in sauce to combine (add up to two tablespoons of water if needed to help the sauce coat the vegetables).

10. Serve hot over rice sprinkled with green onions, sesame seeds and chilies.

See More: Jordan Andino’s Perfect Burger Recipe

Creamy Mac and Cheese With Classic Mornay Sauce

Total Time: 55 minutes
Yields: 4-6 servings + 3 cups of sauce

Lynn Crawford's creamy mac and cheese with Mornay sauce in a cast iron skillet

Ingredients:

Creamy Mornay Sauce
1 bay leaf
1 clove
1/4 white onion, peeled, root attached
2 tbsp butter
2 tbsp flour
⅛ tsp nutmeg
⅛ tsp white pepper
2 cups whole milk
½ cup grated Gruyere cheese
¼ cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano
Salt, to taste

Mac and Cheese
Classic Mornay Sauce
½ cup diced pancetta
⅓ cup breadcrumbs (seasoned or plain)
8 cups cooked short pasta, such as macaroni or rigatoni
¼ cup grated parmesan cheese

Related: Macaroni Recipes That Will Satisfy All Your Pasta Cravings 

Directions:

1. For the Creamy Mornay Sauce, first, pin bay leaf to onion with the clove.

2. Then, melt butter in the medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add flour, nutmeg and pepper; whisk until the mixture is bubbling; cook, whisking constantly for 1 minute.

3. Gradually whisk in milk, add onion and increase heat to medium-high. Bring mixture to a simmer and continue to whisk until thickened, 5 to 7 minutes.

4.  Strain out the onion, bay leaf and clove, reduce heat to medium-low and return mixture to saucepan.

5. Stir in the cheese until melted. Season with salt, to taste.

6. For the mac and cheese, heat oven to 375°F.

7. Cook pancetta in a medium non-stick skillet over medium heat until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, about 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and set aside.

8. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of fat from the pan and add breadcrumbs. Cook until toasted, stirring occasionally, about 4 minutes.

9. Toss pasta with mornay sauce and transfer to a lightly greased 2L casserole dish.

10. Sprinkle with breadcrumbs and parmesan cheese.

11. Bake for 30 minutes until the mixture is bubbling at the sides.

Related: How to Perfectly Crack Eggs With the Junior Chefs

Refreshing Grain Salad With Authentic Sofrito Sauce 

Total Rime: 35 minutes
Yields: 4 servings + 1 cup of sauce

Lynn Crawford's grain salad with refreshing Sofrito sauce on a platter

Ingredients:

Sofrito Sauce
2 cloves garlic,  finely minced
½ tsp salt
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, minced
½ tsp dried thyme
½ tsp dried rosemary
1 small bay leaf
1 cup canned whole tomatoes, drained, seeded and chopped
¼ tsp pepper

Grain Salad
3 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1-1/2 cups cooked farro
1-1/2 cups cooked barley
1-1/2 cups cooked wild rice
1 small bunch watercress
1 cup breakfast radishes, quartered lengthwise
1 cup chopped fresh herbs such as parsley, chives, mint and cilantro
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup toasted pine nuts
½ cup crumbled feta cheese

Related: Fresh, Flavourful Salads to Celebrate Spring 

Directions

1. For the Sofrito sauce, pulverize garlic with salt into a paste using the side of a chef’s knife on a cutting board.

2. Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat; add the garlic puree and cook for 1 minute. Add onion and herbs, cook until onion is translucent, for approximately 5 minutes.

3. Add tomatoes to the pan and cook until broken down and sauce has thickened slightly for approximately 4 minutes.

4. For the grain salad, mix together Sofrito, olive oil and lemon juice in a large bowl.

5. Add grains, watercress, radishes and herbs. Toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper.

6. Spoon onto a serving platter and sprinkle with pine nuts and cheese.

Watch Junior Chef Showdown Sundays at 9ep and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

The Perogie Recipe 85 Years in the Making

Mary Didur was born in 1925 on a farm in Wakaw, SK, about 90 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon. The child of Ukrainian immigrants, she grew up eating — and cooking — dishes with Eastern European flavour. At 18, Didur attended cosmetology school in Saskatoon, then found work at the local hair salon. After the war, she met her future husband, John, at a community hall dance. A modern woman, she continued to work after getting married and having two children, eventually opening her own salon, La Chez Marie. Here, this Saskatoon grandmother shares with us her famous recipe for perogies.

perogies on blue platter with side of sour cream

“The first time I made perogies, I was probably five or six years old,” says Mary. “I learned in the old-fashioned kitchen of the farmhouse where I grew up one of eight children: two girls and six boys. There was a spare table where we used to roll out the dough. I found it fun; kids like to work with dough.”

“The recipe has gone through so many changes,” Mary explains. I actually got my basic recipe from a friend and she got it from somebody else. Each time it has changed hands, it has been improved. My mother probably got her recipe from her mother, in Ukraine.”

Related: Tasty Dumplings Recipes From Around the World

“When my mother was making the dough, she used just flour, water and salt. Today, I use milk and oil and sometimes an egg, too, and that makes a difference; you get a richer dough. My mother taught me that the dough must be soft, and not pasty; we used to work with it to make it smooth with good elasticity.”

“At that time, my mother made her own cottage cheese, and we’d use it as a stuffing, mixed with potatoes and onions sautéed in butter. Now, I do a mix of cottage cheese and cheddar. Mother wouldn’t have had access to cheddar; she used what she had. We now eat them with mushroom sauce and sour cream, or bacon bits and onions. They accompany a meal, like you could have fried chicken with perogies and mushroom sauce instead of potatoes.”

“You can stuff perogies with all kinds of things. It was a tradition in our family to have poppyseed rolls at Christmastime, and one time I had leftover poppyseeds, so I tried making a perogie filling with those and some honey. They didn’t go over so well! I’d say Saskatoon berries or plums are especially delicious as a filling. Perogies are just a bit harder to make with fruit, because of all the juices.”

“We’d eat regular perogies at least once every two weeks when I was growing up. It was lively at family dinnertimes with all those people at the table. And the next day, if there were any leftover perogies, we’d fight about who could deep-fry them to eat as a snack.”

“With all those unmarried boys still living at home there were a lot of perogies to make for one sitting. When boys over the age of 15 eat them, they’ll eat at least 20 each. Today, my granddaughter is married to a man who has a 15-year-old boy, and the last time they were here, they had a competition to see who could eat the most perogies. He ate 32. Still, 20 is the average.”

“My two sons didn’t ever learn to make perogies; they just ate them. But my granddaughter, who is now in her 30s, learned in her teens. Every time she used to come over, she’d say, “Grandma, no perogies?” So one day, I told her she’d better learn to make them with me the next time she visited. And she did. She really loves them.”

Grandma Mary’s Perogies With Potato-Cheese Filling

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 1 ¾ hours
Total Time: 2 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 100 small perogies

Watch the how-to video here:


Ingredients:

Dough
4½ cups flour
½ cup vegetable oil
1 cup milk, room temperature
1 cup boiling water
1 tsp salt

Potato-Cheese Perogie Filling
6 large red-skinned potatoes (not baking potatoes), peeled and halved
4 to 6 oz medium cheddar cheese
1 medium onion, diced, sauteed in butter
Salt and white pepper to taste
½ cup dry cottage cheese (“not the sloppy kind” says Mary)

Directions:

Dough
1. Mix together flour, oil, milk, water and salt. Knead dough until smooth. Let stand for 30 to 60 minutes.

2. With rolling pin, roll out really thin. Cut dough into squares. (I prefer to make smaller perogies, so they’re 2 x 2 inches/5 x 5 cm.) Spoon about 1 tbsp (15 mL) of potato-cheese filling onto each square. Fold dough into triangle and pinch edge closed to seal in filling.

3. Add to pot of boiling water. Once floating, cook for 1 to 1½ minutes.

Potato-Cheese Perogie Filling

1. Boil potatoes as you would for mashed potatoes. Drain.

2. While potatoes are hot, stir in cheddar. Cover until cheese is melted, about 1 minute.

3. Stir in sautéed onion; using potato masher, mash until smooth. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

4. Using clean cloth, squeeze out all moisture from cottage cheese. Stir into potato mixture. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Published September 21, 2015, Updated February 1, 2020

Iron-Chef-Lynn-Crawford-tile1

Why Iron Chef Canada’s Lynn Crawford Was Destined for Kitchen Stadium

Canada boasts a wide variety of chefs from coast-to-coast, but one name that always reigns supreme is chef Lynn Crawford. From her early days on Restaurant Makeover to her food travel series Pitchin’ In, (not to mention a plethora of guest-starring gigs on shows like Top Chef Canada in between), Crawford has become synonymous with showcasing Canadian cuisine, cultures, and ingredients.

Now the former Four Seasons chef and current Ruby Watchco owner is poised to continue that mission on Iron Chef Canada. We caught up with Crawford—who also happens to be the first Canadian female chef to have participated in the American series—to get her take on Canada’s tastiest ingredients, her inherent love of food, and what it takes to make it in Kitchen Stadium.

Iron-Chef-Lynn-Crawford-talking-to-judges

Where does your love of food stem from and did you always want to be a chef?

Oh, absolutely. I’ve always enjoyed cooking. Fond family memories have always been about everyone preparing our family supper and sharing our day with one another—that was really important. I just had a passion for food, I love it. I loved everything about it. Helping mom and dad in the kitchen and exploring. Each time we went out on a little adventure, a road trip, different restaurants that we’d go to, farmers markets, all that—I loved it.

When did you realize cooking could be your career?

Not until my university days when I handled a part-time job and I was surrounded by people that were attending the HAFA program at the University of Guelph and they were really shining a spotlight that there is a profession out there in cooking.

As a champion for locally-raised food, do you have a favourite ingredient right now?

Right now there are too many to talk about! Right now is all about the fall squash, pumpkin, pears, apples, sweet corn. The  most exciting time for any chef to be cooking is during the fall harvest.

Which Canadian chef is inspiring or exciting you right now?

There are so many incredibly talented chefs out there. Can you just pick some for me? There are just so many. That’s what’s so incredible about Canada, from coast-to-coast and in the middle we’re just surrounded by so many talented chefs. I’m inspired by so many. My dear friend Lisa Ahier from Tofino is landing here in Toronto to do an event with Michael Blackie who is another dear friend up in Ottawa. And then I’ve got Wayne Martin up in Winnipeg who is absolutely incredible. Ned Bell, his advocacy for sustainable seafood, what he does. Connie [DeSousa] and John [Jackson] at Charbar and Charcut. Dale McKay and what he’s doing. There are so many, it’s a long list. I’m just so grateful to have met so many and had so many opportunities to cook alongside [these chefs].

How did it feel to bring Iron Chef to Canada?

It was just a matter of time for the competition to come to Canada. The Iron Chef franchise, to be included in that is exceptionally special for all of us who are participating, both the iron chefs and the competitors. And to have Kitchen Stadium here in Canada, that’s brilliant. The high level of expertise and talent and commitment that goes into participating in a battle is unlike any competition that you’ll ever participate in or experience. For me, personally, the Canadian twist in it is how we are showcasing the Canadian talent, the Canadian ingredients, and the Canadian passion for excellence.

What was your preparation like for the competition?

I’ll never do it again! No, I’m kidding. It was hard. It was war. Lora [Lora Kirk], my wife was six months pregnant [at the time]. Michael Blackie flew in from Ottawa. We did all of our practice at home.

What did you learn from the Iron Chef America Stadium that you brought to Iron Chef Canada?

The kitchens are quite similar and just having had that opportunity to go down and battle in New York was surely beneficial. But that was a long time ago. And of course, every battle that you’re preparing for is very different. You don’t know who your competitor is, you don’t know what the secret ingredient is, and is your team ready for that day and for that battle? But I know more now than I did back then. That was many, many years ago.

What can we expect from the competition this season?

It’s going to be exceptionally entertaining and it’s going to really showcase Canada’s finest. It’s going to be really intense, it’s going to be absolutely incredible. A lot of creativity, a lot of talent, a lot of passion. It’s the original food competition show that really showcasing excellence. It was a thrill to participate now on both sides.

What did your time in Kitchen Stadium teach you?

You’re only as good as your last dish. I was striving for excellence. My excellence or my philosophy of what I do each and every day. I just want to give the very, very best to my guests. I’m lucky that I get to do what I do.

Are there any chefs—living or dead—that you would love to take on in Kitchen Stadium?

I kind of like the surprise element. Is there somebody that I would like to have a battle with? To cook with? You have the opportunity to cook with so many different chefs, but one-on-one? Wow. That’s a good question.

What’s your go-to staple tool in the Iron Chef Canada kitchen?

Nothing was really out of the ordinary. Your basic chef kit is really all you really need. You don’t have time for the gadgets. All a chef needs is a great peeler, a good set of chef knives, and away you go.

How did you feel about the secret ingredients?

There were no ingredients where I wondered how I would make five wonderful dishes. I was very happy with what was revealed on each day that I cooked.

What goes through your head when you hear the secret ingredient and how do you put your menu together?

It’s really spontaneous. When the ingredient is revealed, there are five dishes that you think about and there’s not a lot of time to think about what you want. So it’s really honouring the ingredient and making that the star of the dish. You have to be very quick about what it is that you’re going to prepare and if I were asked to do something with the ingredient again, I’m sure it would be really different.

If you could pick a secret ingredient, what would you choose?

It could really be anything. Right now looking around the kitchen, I’ve got lovely Cortland apples. We’ve got butternut squash we’ve got a lovely artisanal cheese. There’s a pumpkin. Beef tenderloin. Lobster. A beautiful chanterelle? Why not? Can we have all of them?

Did you have a dish that you cooked in the Kitchen Stadium that you’re most proud of?

How can I say it without giving away with giving it away? Listen, I would cook them all again—they were all delicious!

 

Chef Lynn Crawford's Seafood Risotto

One-Pot Seafood Risotto from Lynn Crawford is Entertaining Made Easy

When you want to go that extra mile for friends and family around the holidays, you can still use that back-pocket one-pot cooking technique – especially when it’s as elegant as this party-pleasing seafood risotto.

 

Risotto is refined yet cozy comfort food, and here, Food Network Canada Chef School’s Chef Lynn Crawford is showing you how to master this crowd-pleasing meal, with a sophisticated seafood twist. The seafood included in this meal, fresh, sweet crab and juicy, meaty scallops aren’t your everyday risotto add-ins, which makes them super-special and worthy of a place on your Feast of the Seven Fishes Christmas Eve menu or a classy New Year’s Eve dinner at home.

Chef Lynn explains each and every ingredient so you can nail this dish on your first try. We find out that arborio rice is key to ultra-luscious risotto because its natural starches turn into a creamy sauce as you stir in the white wine, here, Chardonnay, which is naturally buttery on the palate, and the hot stock.

Flavours of red Thai chili, tarragon, parsley, lemon and Parmesan cheese make this dish pop, but are mellow enough to leave the sweet and succulent seafood front and centre.

 

To add that extra special touch, try picking your own crab meat out of the shell, or recruit a family member to be your sous chef. In this tip video, Chef Lynn shows you how to do it, and explains the different types of crabmeat you’re working with. Put on some holiday tunes and pick away until you get most of the meat out of the shell, setting it aside with the fun-sized scallops for their risotto debut. And save those shells for a seafood stock in the future.

After the final stir, our mouths are watering! Chef Lynn calls this risotto “a magical dish,” and we couldn’t agree more.

It’s time to take your tips, tricks and techniques, and put them to the test in your own kitchen. Stir up Chef Lynn Crawford’s Seafood Risotto this holiday season with her easy to follow recipe found here.

Lynn Crawford

Lynn Crawford’s New Year’s Food Resolutions

At a recent lunch to celebrate the launch of Sunwing Café, Lynn Crawford’s new menu for the vacation airline, the chef was all smiles. Graciously, she greeted the assortment of journalists, food bloggers and fans assembled at her Toronto restaurant, Ruby Watchco.

As ebullient as always, you’d never know that at the time, Lynn Crawford had a three-week-old baby back at home, a newborn still in the parental demanding early days of life. Ask for the secret to her seemingly endless energy and the Chopped Canada judge doesn’t miss a beat: “Coffee.” But later, over the phone from her home in Toronto, she reveals another reason for her effusive smiles: Love.

“She’s beautiful,” says Chef Lynn about her daughter, Addie Pepper. “She’s absolutely perfect, and it’s amazing how a little one can change your life so much.”

Relative to her size, Chef Lynn’s newborn is playing a huge influence in the Food Network star’s life, impacting everything from her schedule to the foods and flavours she wants to try in 2017.

Foodie Resolution #1: Travel and Eat



“There’s a wonderful world of food out there, and Lora and I both being chefs, we really want to explore that world with Addie,” she says. “And as two chefs who love food as much as we do, a big part of it is certainly travelling.”

The family is planning a trip to Hawaii this spring, where Chef Lynn hopes to reconnect with the macadamia nut banana bread and fish tacos with pineapple caper salsa she enjoyed so much on her last trip to Maui.

She also hopes to revisit some of the tasty restaurants she’s explored on her own, and as a Great Canadian Cookbook host, like Tofino’s Wolf in the Fog,  Calgary’s Charbar and Quidi Vidi’s Mallard Cottage.

Foodie Resolution #2: Pitchin’ in at Home

Apples

Despite the vacation plans, babies have a way of keeping their parents housebound, and for Chef Lynn, that’s meant getting reacquainted with her home kitchen.

“I’ve done more cooking in the last three weeks being at home than I have in such a long time,” she says without complaint. “It’s a fine line, commenting on how to parent a child in the wonderful world of food,” she admits, but still, Chef Lynn is excited to introduce little Addie to healthful, homemade, seasonal whole foods. “I’ve got Addie in one arm and I’m going around the kitchen and I cut into this Macintosh apple and Addie smells it — it doesn’t register yet, but it’s nice to get her senses excited about food!”

Foodie resolution #3: Ordering in

Although Chef Lynn has been spending more time than ever in her home kitchen, she’s also excited about all the new apps that allow diners to order in, and thinks she might try a delivery of her favourite Vietnamese comfort food next year. “I love a really good pho,” she says.

How Chopped Canada Stars will Celebrate Canada Day

Believe it or not, this year Canada is turning 149 years old —but it doesn’t look a day over 100. To celebrate, the stars of Chopped Canada are eager to rejoice in our great nation with cottages, cocktails, and, of course, food.

Lynn Crawford’s Weekend Getaway
“My cottage in the Kawarthas is my little piece of heaven. I’ll be there with my friends and family. We have a pizza oven that always gets fired up. We always make sure there’s dessert pizza, too, with marshmallows, caramel sauce, raspberries and strawberries. Summer fun!”

Eden Grinshpan Keeps it Classic
“I live in New York right now, so I will probably have a couple Ceasars and some poutine to celebrate with my husband.”

Make this classic Canadian drink absolutely amazing with these super patriotic garnish ideas.

Roger Mooking’s House Party
“It’s both my father-in-law and daughter’s birthday that weekend so we’ll be having a party at my house this year.  There may be fireworks, but, shhh, don’t tell anyone!”

Michael Smith’s Berry Canadian Cake
“Canada Day on Prince Edward Island often coincides with the start of our strawberry season so we like to celebrate with Strawberry Shortcake, then as many fireworks as I can round up.”

Strawberry Rhubarb ShortcakeGet Michael Smith’s recipe for Strawberry Rhubarb Shortcake.

Massimo Capra Craves International Foods
“Here in Canada, we have incredible diversity in food and people, so we can celebrate with just about anything. The beauty of this country is that we love food from all over the world. We can go back to the old English days and cook up some bangers and mash! But right now I’m craving some beautiful curry.”

Get the recipe for Curry Tofu Chutney Salad. Perfect for summer!

Brad Smith Keeps it Low Key
“This is the first summer I’ll have to myself. Every other summer since I was 21 I’ve had to work, so I’ll go to a buddy’s cottage, relax and enjoy what Canada has to offer.”

John Higgins’ Great BBQ
“Scotland is my birthplace but Canada is definitely my home. My wife has a family of 14 siblings and there’s always people coming over. We do something simple [on the barbecue] like peameal bacon. It has to have spicy honey mustard sauce and a great coleslaw.”


Get the recipe for Maple Bourbon Peameal Bacon Sliders.

Anne Yarymowich and the Great Outdoors
“Always start the day with a Caesar and then have fun with it. Find something local, something that is grown and raised within a 10 km radius of where you live and throw that on the barbecue. We have such a short summer season and Canada Day is at the height of it, so being outside is essential.”

Lynn Crawford’s Flavour-Packed Father’s Day Menu

Let Chopped Canada judge and award-winning chef Lynn Crawford be your sous-chef with these delicious ideas for your Father’s Day feast.

Make Memories

When planning your Father’s Day menu, chose ingredients that spark happy memories for the two of you. Lynn’s father and other members of her family were all butchers, and she recalls how proud her father was when she decided to pursue a culinary career.

Lynn also recommends taking advantage of the good weather by sparking up the grill.

“Dads love when their kids are making a meal for them. It’s nice weather [this time of year] and ultimately the feast should include a barbecue,” says Lynn.

Appetizer

Start your Father’s Day meal with a sweet summer salad your dad will want to eat over and over again. Lynn’s love of beets comes from her father’s penchant for pickling.

“He always made pickled beets. I have memories of all those different jars on the counter, purple hands, and the smell of vinegar all over the kitchen.”

Get Lynn Crawford’s recipe for Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Salad with Summer Greens.

Side

“My father and I cooked a lot together. As a kid growing up, dad was home from work first, so it was always about peeling potatoes and getting them on the stove. He had these dad repertoire recipes which were always very easy.”  Add some flair to your mashed potatoes with this easy and creative side.

Get the recipe for Lynn Crawford’s Lobster Mashed Potatoes.

Main

“My father had a couple of recipes he was known for. To this day, we still use those recipes,” says Lynn. “He’s got a great marinade for steak. He loved the barbecue!” Take a cue from Lynn and grill your dad a big, juicy steak for the special occasion.

Get the recipe for Lynn Crawford’s Coffee-Salted, Pan Seared Rib Eye Steak with Cowboy Steak Fry Salad and Smoked Paprika Aioli.

DessertChef Lynn dessert

To cap off a wonderful meal, go for a a burst of citrus with these shortcakes as a light and airy dessert. Chef Lynn is a big fan of incorporating grapefruit in lighter dishes that boast tangy, bright flavours.

Get Lynn Crawford’s Florida Grapefuit Shortcakes recipe.

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Where to Enjoy Dishes Made by Chopped Canada Judges

Ever wonder what makes Chopped Canada judges such experts on cuisine? Answer: They are all nationally renowned chefs who have spent time running incredibly successful restaurants. When it comes to delicious eats and a well-run kitchen, these spots certainly take the cake. See for yourself and sample the creations of your favourite Chopped Canada judges at these restaurants across the country.

Chopped Canada restaurants
Photo: Park Restaurant

Anne Yarymowich and John Higgins, The Chefs’ House at George Brown Chef School (Toronto, ON)

After working for years, heading up the food and beverage department at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Chef Yarymowich has moved on to the world of education. When she’s not judging and chopping contestants on Chopped Canada, Yarymowich can be found mentoring new generations of young chefs at George Brown alongside fellow judge, John Higgins. The Chefs’ House is the culinary program’s restaurant where the soon-to-be graduates practice their skills in a real-time service setting. With any sort of student-run service, you might expect a few hiccups along the way while dining, but rest assured you’re in good hands with these two Chopped Canada judges involved in the process.

Antonio Park,  Park (Montreal, QC)

With Lavanderia (Park’s newest Latin American concept) nominated as one of ‘Canada’s Best New Restaurant 2015’ in enRoute Magazine and one of the newer judges to the Chopped Canada panel, Antonio Park has had one heck of a year! Another one to mention is Park’s popular spot Jatoba, which offers a mix of Asian and South American cuisine. His first restaurant, Park, remains one of Montreal’s top spots, a Japanese eatery known for its stunning presentation and signature sushi platters. This place is frequented by many celebrities. On any given night you may be dining beside NHL players, or even cross paths with actor Neil Patrick Harris.

Lynn Crawford, Ruby Watchco (Toronto, ON)

One of Canada’s most well-known chefs aims to impress with her popular Toronto restaurant, Ruby Watchco. Chef Lynn and Chef Lora Kirk source local, seasonal ingredients to create a menu that changes daily. Think foraged mushrooms with polenta, butternut squash with bacon sauerkraut and rack of pork with Warner’s Farms spicy plum sauce. The restaurant also offers a four course family-style meal in their private dining room for special events. A slightly cozier setting than the main floor, which also features a chilled out ambiance for an incredible meal you won’t soon forget.

Massimo Capra, Mistura (Toronto, ON)

Lively and Italian through-and-through, it should come as no surprise that Capra’s restaurant  match his personality. His main eatery, Mistura, focuses on well-crafted Italian fare from freshly made pastas to antipasto, such as cured duck prosciutto and mortadella, to crostini topped with mushroom, arugula and gorgonzola. If you ever find yourself at Toronto Pearson airport, you can also head to Boccone Trattoria to have a little taste of Capra’s cooking.

Mark McEwan, Bymark (Toronto, ON)

No doubt one of the country’s most successful chefs, McEwan has built a culinary empire for himself while starring in two major television series, The Heat and Top Chef Canada, with multiple successful restaurant properties and his namesake boutique grocery store chain. Bymark restaurant was one of the first places in Canada to define the “gourmet burger” — 8 ounces of beefy goodness topped with shaved truffle, porcinis and brie — and has been a staple of the higher end dining since it opened its doors. Outside of Toronto’s financial district, you can also dine at one of Chef McEwan’s restaurants, including ONE Restaurant, North 44° and Fabbrica.

Michael Smith,  Fireworks (Bay Fortune, PEI)

Michael Smith’s restaurant has undergone a major renovation within the last year, making dinner here more of an immersed, interactive dining experience than ever. The focal point of the room is the giant 25-foot fireplace-meets cooktop, where the kitchen team prepares their nightly meals as you watch all the action front and centre. Smith is a huge advocate of local food, so expect everything to be seasonal at the Inn at Bay Fortune restaurant, Fireworks. Make sure not to miss oyster hour every night at 6pm, where the culinary team shuck through a pile of their world famous Colville Bay and Fortune Bay oysters.

Roger Mooking, Twist (Toronto, ON)

This bubbly chef has been a longtime staple of Toronto’s food scene with past restaurant endeavours, but has been getting a lot of buzz recently with his eatery, Twist, that you can find inside of Toronto Pearson Airport. His cool concept breaks the mould of the standard, subpar airport restaurant, offering diners a nice selection of craft beer and wine and a long list of comfort food like homemade burgers and pastas with interesting twists (hence the name!). Next time you have a bit of extra time before boarding your flight, pop into Twist to see what a nice, contemporary airport meal can feel like.

Susur Lee, Lee (Toronto, ON)

If you enjoy the breadth and depth found in the many facets of Asian cuisine, book a table at Lee to experience those robust flavours with a master chef’s finesse. Pulling from many overseas regions like Thailand and Japan, Susur Lee crafts a menu full of intriguing and well-crafted dishes like lobster ravioli with yuzu squash purée and housemade XO sauce or crispy tofu with pepper and mushroom compote and a soy chili glaze. The cocktail list is as equally well thought out, so start off dinner with a saketini (or two). Following in fellow judges Capra and Mooking’s footsteps, Lee also embraced the trend of elevated airport dining by opening up Lee Kitchen in Toronto Pearson airport earlier this year. Lee also owns glitzy dim sum restaurant Luckee, and Asian-fusion Bent with his two sons, Kai and Levi Bent-Lee.

7 Reasons to Love Chopped Canada Season 3

Chopped Canada Season 3 is so good we added an extra 6 episodes, but we still can’t get enough! Here are the reasons why this season takes the cake.

Face Value

Our judges are great chefs, but food isn’t the only medium they transform. Their very own faces serve as canvases for some of the most artful reactions we’ve ever seen on television. We’ve compiled them all here so you can revisit all the sulks, stink-eyes and moments of utter shock.

Family Matters

Brotherly love turned to sibling rivalry when brothers Dany and Pete Sok competed against Bijou and Imrun Texeira, and they all competed against each other. Don’t worry if you missed the epic Bro-Down Showdown – you can watch it here.

Sweet Redemption

It’s not easy getting chopped in the dessert round, but this season offered four returning chefs a shot at sweet, sweet redemption.

A Whole Host of Awesomeness

Sure, he was a good CFL star and a great Bachelor, but new host Brad Smith truly found his calling when he joined Chopped Canada. The Montreal native has charmed us all with his calm in the kitchen, judge impressions and megawatt smile.

Life’s Great Mysteries

The producers outdid themselves this season, turning familiar ingredients like flaky roll dough into huge challenges when they were paired with side stripe prawns, finger limes and a candy necklace!

Mic Drops

Contestants had better be upfront, especially when Roger Mooking’s in the house, as one competitor memorably learned when he called his scrambled eggs a ‘freeform frittata.’ And re-visit Chef Lynn Crawford’s disapproval when one contestant dared to “play it safe.”

Good Hair Days

“Judging by your hairstyle and your knife skills, I can see that you’re very precise,” is the comment that proved Mark McEwan considers the full package when he’s assessing a dish.

If you can stand the heat in the kitchen, apply to be a contestant! Application deadline is April 11, 2016.  Catch new episodes of Chopped Canada Saturdays at 9 E/P.

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Lynn Crawford on How to Cook an Ostrich Egg

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Ask Chef Lynn Crawford about ostrich eggs, and her enthusiasm is as obvious as a five-pound embryo. “They’re beautiful bone white, they’ve got this lovely patina to them and unbelievable thickness. And the yolk! It’s a beautiful, beautiful product,” she says.

But for the contestants who found ostrich eggs in their Chopped Canada mystery baskets, surprise trumped enthusiasm. Chef Lynn loved watching their facial expressions as they registered the enormity of the eggs before them.

“The sheer weight of them is what I find just astonishing,” she says. “They can be anywhere from three and a half to five pounds, and the equivalent of two dozen chicken eggs. So right then and there, to come up with a dish to use the entire ostrich egg — would they cook it in time?”

But deciding how to cook the ostrich eggs was the contestants’ second problem — figuring out how to crack them was the first.

Chef Lynn keeps a carpenter’s hammer in her kitchen toolkit to achieve this challenging task. “You can’t expect to break that egg with a spoon or crack it over the side of a mixing bowl,” she says. “It’s extremely hard, the shell. You need either a hammer or a chisel or some sort of power tool to get into the egg.”

Chopped Canada Lynn Crawford

If you ever want to challenge yourself to cook an ostrich egg, scrambling is the simplest preparation. You can coax the liquid interior from a small hole without worrying about keeping the yolk intact. A small hole also preserves more of the shell for later use as a serving dish.

“In New York we had scrambled ostrich egg if it was for special brunch, with the addition of caviar,” says Chef Lynn. “I think caviar and lobster is delicious, and straight up parmesan cheese. But you’re not going to have a soft boiled egg on your restaurant menu because it would take an hour and a half to cook.”

Topped with haute additions, and served in its own shell, scrambled ostrich egg is easy to cook and stunning to serve. “It has a lot of wow factor and it’s a beautiful thing,” she says.

If you’re lucky you might come across the gigantic eggs at your local butchers or specialty grocers, but if you don’t see them there, ask for a special order. Better yet, find an ostrich farm in your area and visit it directly for a peek at the mammoth birds.

“Look at the size of the shell — it’s a real showstopper,” says Chef Lynn. “I think everybody should try to cook an ostrich egg at least once. And for some of those chefs that did compete, it’s probably the last time they will, too.”

Missed the episode? Watch Chopped Canada contestants battle it out using this egg-cellent ingredient online.

Chopped Canada airs Saturdays at 9PM E/P.

Sophisticated Cabbage From a Country Kitchen

By Rosemary Martin, as told to Jasmine Mangalaseril

As the eldest of eight children to a Mennonite family in Waterloo County, Ont., Rosemary Martin helped her mother prepare “company meals” for up to 30 people every other Sunday for most of her life. Today, Rosemary’s Company Cabbage is a favourite that appears at family suppers and special meals with friends.

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When I was growing up, we attended our home church every other Sunday; in between, we would visit another church in the area. For those weeks when we were at our home church, we would invite visitors for lunch, which was the main meal of the day. As our family alone was 10 people, plus two more similar-sized families or three smaller families were in attendance, there would easily be up to 30 for “company meals.” A casserole or stew, bread (always bread!) or rolls and butter were served, and we usually had green salads and jellied salads, too. I abhorred jellied salads, and my dad didn’t like them, either, but a lot of people did (it was a big thing back then). Desserts tended to be 13- by 9-inch pans of refrigerator or freezer desserts, and Mom loved to make chiffon cakes, so we would often have three. We wouldn’t mind if there were leftovers!

When it was just our family, we tended to eat fairly basic meals, partially because of our culture and partially because there were 10 of us. But they consisted of fresh or frozen homegrown vegetables and locally sourced meats—either smoked ham or summer sausage, and every now and then, a roast chicken or a roast beef.

I’m not a traditional Mennonite cook. As long as I can remember, I have liked a variety of foods and experimenting. I would beg Mom to vary from her routines because I quickly tired of eating the same foods three Sundays in a row. I learned more about food when I started eating out at higher-end restaurants with friends and by reading recipe books like they were novels with pictures. But I do credit my father for my plating skills. He always said, “Food first has to pass by my eyes before it reaches my stomach,” so I learned to serve food attractively from him.

I love cabbage in almost every form. I love cabbage soup and sauerkraut, of course. Growing up, cabbage was typically used in coleslaw or as wedges, cooked with roast beef or roast chicken. My grandma would pickle whole wedges with whole cloves or a pickling spice, vinegar, sugar and water. She cooked it until tender, marinated it in brine for several days, then kept it chilled. It was really good.

My Company Cabbage recipe is not a typical Mennonite recipe. I found it in a magazine and tweaked it over the years. You can do all the shredding and chopping the night before, then cook it in about five minutes just before serving. People are usually surprised they like it because it’s cabbage, but it has a delicious unique flavour because of the nuts, the mustard and the dill. Savoy cabbage gives you that nice curly edge. That and the green onions combine so you have light springy-summery colours.

Company Cabbage, courtesy of Rosemary Martin

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
2 tsp (10 mL) chicken bouillon
4 cups (1 L) coarsely shredded green or Savoy cabbage
½ cup (125 mL) shredded carrots
¼ cup (60 mL) chopped celery root or celery
¼ cup (60 mL) sliced green onions or chopped shallots
½ tsp (2 mL) dried dillweed (or 1½ tsp/7 mL fresh)
3 tbsp (45 mL) chopped pecans
1 tbsp (15 mL) melted butter
½ tsp (2 mL) prepared mustard
⅛ tsp (0.5 mL) pepper

Directions
1. In large saucepan, heat 1/3 cup/75 mL water over medium-high; add chicken bouillon, stirring until dissolved. Add cabbage, carrots, celery root, green onions and dillweed, stirring to combine. Cook, covered, for about 5 minutes, stirring slightly, until tender.

2. Stir together pecans, butter, mustard and pepper. Pour over cabbage mixture; tossing to combine.

Click to print, save or share this Company Cabbage recipe.

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A West Coast Bannock Story

GccGy Marnie Helliwell, as told to Nancy Fornasiero

Bannock is a staple enjoyed across the country by native Canadians, and each tribe—even each family—has their own favourite version. It’s also known as frybread, bannaq, galett and sapli’l. This particular recipe was passed on to Tofino, B.C.’s Marnie Helliwell in the traditional First Nations way: via word of mouth. It came from her friend, Grace George, who received the recipe from her own mother, Helen.

Marnie Helliwell

Marnie Helliwell

Ever since my seven-year-old son, Colby, first tasted bannock at Wickaninnish Community School back in kindergarten, he can’t stop talking about it. He learned about it thanks to Grace, a local First Nations woman and elder who works at our elementary school as a First Nations education assistant. She teaches the kids about the culture and history of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations. Whether she’s sharing food, teaching about traditional dances and songs or telling a folktale, we parents (native or not) appreciate the fact that she shares her rich heritage with our kids. But nothing gets Colby more excited than when Grace makes a visit to make bannock. “Mom,” he comes home gushing, “Grace makes the bestest bannock!”

So, when my friend Lisa Ahier, the chef at Tofino’s popular SoBo restaurant, organized a potluck dinner and told us each to bring a Canadian dish that meant something special to us, I knew right away what I was bringing: bannock. Nothing says Canada to me more than this dish; and besides, my kids love to eat it probably more than anything else.

Full disclosure: I’m not much of a cook. In the past, when we’ve enjoyed bannock as a family, it was usually because Grace made it or because we ate it during our travels around the province. Bannock is often served at local festivals, sold at farmers markets and dished up at celebrations hosted by the First Nations families in our tight-knit community. My kids and I make a point of sampling it any time we can—and the consensus is that Grace’s Nuu-chah-nulth recipe is the ultimate version. I decided it was time to fully embrace this dish and learn to make it myself!

Grace has become a good friend of mine, so I was pretty sure I could get my hands on the recipe. All the same, I followed the proper First Nations etiquette of formally requesting the family recipe from an elder. (Luckily Grace is an elder!) I couldn’t believe how simple the recipe was: only four ingredients.

The really funny part was when I popped over to the Tofino Co-op to buy the ingredients and caused a bit of a ruckus. I bumped into another Nuu-chah-nulth lady I know and innocently asked what sort of oil I should buy. “Oil?!” she shouted. “Why are you using oil? Biscuits have fat in them, bannock doesn’t!” Other Nuu-chah-nulth shoppers heard the fuss, then they gathered around, adding their two cents’ worth:

“Yes, you can use oil, just don’t overmix!”

“My grandmother always said to use high heat if you want a good crust.”

“Water’s fine; no need to use milk.”

“Mother always fried it at our house.”

Clearly, there are a lot of bannock recipes out there, but I knew if I wanted to keep Colby happy, I’d better stick to Grace’s instructions. While the bannock baked, Colby and my daughter, Mackenzie, impatiently inhaled the delicious aroma, and when we dove into it, still warm from the oven, they said it was as good as Grace’s. Phew.

The next time I made it, it was for the whole gang at Lisa’s paddleboarding potluck dinner. It was a huge hit with my girlfriends, too, especially when served with jam made from local berries. Not bad, for a non-baker like me!

I love this dish even though I don’t have a drop of aboriginal blood. The culture of our native peoples really means a lot to me—their traditions, their respect for nature. Their sense of spirituality especially lands with me: When my son Braeden passed away a few years ago, we had a beautiful service based on the Nuu-chah-nulth culture that brought me a lot of comfort.

First Nations culture is so interwoven into our lives here that I feel a part of it. It’s hard for people outside Tofino to understand that. It’s really something special.

Read more: See three simple ways to cook bannock here.

Traditional Bannock, courtesy of Marnie Helliwell

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Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 40 minutes
Yield: 8 to 12 servings

Ingredients
6 cups (1.5 L) flour
6 tbsp (90 mL) baking powder
3½ cups (875 mL) milk, warmed
¼ cup (60 mL) vegetable oil

Directions
1. In large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, milk and oil. Stir until dough comes together in a ball; do not overmix. Shape into rough oval; place on baking sheet or oven-safe casserole dish.
2. Bake in 400°F (200°C) oven “until a beautiful golden brown,” about 30 minutes.
3. Serve warm or cooled. Excellent with B.C. blackberry jam.

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The Berry Crumble Recipe That Makes Her Think of Mom

By April Robson, as told to Kate Paddison

April Robson is a Tofino, B.C.-based yoga instructor, mom to daughter Waverly and self-proclaimed “jammer,” teaching how to preserve local fruits and vegetables and how to make yogurt at local reskilling festivals. Her recipe for berry crumble with homemade yogurt is very dear to her heart: Robson’s mother died when she was 11 years old, but fond memories of her mom’s berry crumble help Robson feel close to her again.

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My mom used this recipe for berry crumble and homemade yogurt quite often in her kitchen. It’s a recipe so familiar to me I don’t really even think about it when I’m making it myself; it kind of comes through naturally. I love this recipe because it can be made in all seasons, all across the country. There is no special berry; you can use the wild berries from your yard or you can use frozen berries. You can make this for everyday or a special occasion, plus it travels well for a potluck. It’s an easy go-to recipe—warm and homey.

My mom was diagnosed with leukemia when she was 42 years old. It came on very suddenly, and within a year of her being diagnosed, she passed.

I can remember her essence. I remember her in the kitchen, teaching me to cook, preparing certain dishes, such as this one. And now, I feel really attached to the things I had in my childhood, specifically cooking, because it’s a way for me to connect with her.

I grew up not far from Tofino on a float house, which is a home on a dock. We were right on the ocean and my parents owned an oyster farm. We ate a lot of seafood—clams, fish, crab—and a lot of fresh greens because my mom had a garden on the dock. We were essentially a mini floating homestead that relied on solar power and lived completely off the grid.

We did a lot of our own things, such as harvesting wild food, plus what my mother had grown on the dock. We also had chickens. There was no running water, so we had to haul up our own or use rainwater. My family’s favourite restaurant in my town at the time was one we went to only a couple of times a year because we had so much already available to us.

As a kid, I fought to get out of that life. I wanted to get away and have a normal yard and running water and a bathtub. Now, I’ve spent my whole adult life trying to get back to those roots, which is why I really enjoy baking and foraging. In the summer, we have four kinds of berries in the front yard, and it’s extremely easy to go around and pick them.

My mom and dad taught me how to provide for my family, how to make healthy homemade meals from the earth. The way our planet is going, it’s really important for our children to be connected to our food, the land and the environment. It’s all supported by each other, and if we don’t take care of our food system now, we won’t have it for very long. It’s important to me that my kids have the same feeling about a healthy relationship with their food and their environment.

See more: Watch Lynn, April and baby Waverly make this berry crumble at home.

Wild Berry Crumble with Homemade Yogurt, courtesy of April Robson

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Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour
Yields: about 6 servings

Ingredients
Wild Berry Crumble
1 cup (250 mL) flour
1 cup (250 mL) packed dark brown or Demerara sugar
½ cup (125 mL) salted butter (if you prefer unsalted butter, add 1 tsp/5 mL salt to flour mixture), cubed
1 tsp (5 mL) cinnamon or other desired spices (optional)
4 cups (1 L) berries and/or sliced fruit (any assortment of berries or seasonal fruit, such as apples, pears or stone fruits, will work great)
juice of ? lemon

Homemade Greek-Style Yogurt
4 cups (1 L) 10% or 18% cream or table cream
1 pkg yogurt culture or 3 oz (85 g) plain Greek yogurt (if using store-bought yogurt as a starter, scrape off surface layer and use yogurt underneath; it will likely have a higher concentration of healthy bacteria)

Directions
Wild Berry Crumble
1. In bowl, mix together flour and brown sugar. Stir in cinnamon, if using.
2. Using pastry blender or 2 knives, roughly cut in butter into flour mixture. Using hands, further incorporate butter until mixture is well moistened.
3. Add lemon juice to berry mixture, tossing to coat. (If using especially juicy or frozen fruit, toss with 1 tbsp/15 mL flour to prevent runniness.)
4. Add berry mixture to baking dish; spread flour mixture evenly over top. Bake in 375°F (190°C) oven for 45 to 60 minutes or until topping is evenly browned and filling is bubbling up around sides.

Homemade Greek-Style Yogurt
1. Boil water in large nonreactive pot for 10 minutes to sterilize; discard water. Set pot aside to cool for 5 minutes.
2. Pour cream into pot over medium-low heat; cook until just before boiling point. (Heat should be low enough that cream doesn’t scald while being hot enough to raise temperature.) Do not stir cream. Remove from heat.
3. Allow cream to cool until you can comfortably hold pot without burning hands, when temperature reaches about 110°F to 115°F (43°C to 46°C). (This can take a few hours, but if you add yogurt culture to cream while it’s still too hot, it will curdle and yogurt won’t set.)
4. Using ladle, scoop a bit of cream into small bowl; add yogurt culture and mix until well combined. If skin has formed on top of cream, remove with fork and discard. (Remember to sterilize all utensils in boiling water before using.)
5. Add yogurt culture mixture to pan; stir well but gently as to not create foam.
6. Pour inoculated cream into 2 sterilized 2-cup (500 mL) canning jars; place in warm environment, such as yogurt maker or bread proofer for 8 for 10 hours or until yogurt is firm. Keep at about 110°F (43°C)—or as close to it as possible—the entire time.
7. Set on counter until room temperature.
8. Refrigerate until chilled. Serve with Wild Berry Crumble.

Click to print, save or share this Wild Berry Crumble and Homemade Greek-Style Yogurt recipe.

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Mac and Cheese: A Canadian Twist on the Classic

By Shep Ysselstein, as told to Michele Sponagle

Shep Ysselstein, owner of Gunn’s Hill Artisan Cheese, near Woodstock, Ont., is one of Canada’s brightest young cheese makers. By the time he reached 30, he’d already snagged the top honour at the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix for his Five Brothers in the firm-cheese category. (And in April 2015, his Handeck won for best farmhouse cheese at the same competition.) A dairy-inspired life was mapped out for him as a child: His parents still own Friesvale Farms (right next door to Gunn’s Hill), which supplies the milk for Ysselstein’s Swiss-style cheeses. It’s all in the family there.

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Alpler macaroni is an old Swiss recipe. “Alpler” is the name for the people who work up in the mountains, milking cows and making cheese. Traditionally, this dish is what they would have eaten. For a summer, when I learned cheese making in the Berner Oberland area of Switzerland, I would have been considered an alpler.

While I was there, the head cheese maker had a friend who was a chef make us the macaroni dish with the cheeses we made. We ate it in a very traditional cheese-making hut: several hundred years old with thick stone walls built into the side of the mountain. It was very rustic and primitive with low ceilings that were black from all the smoke generated by the fire used to produce the cheese. In that space, we cooked and ate our own meals—we even slept upstairs.

When I ate alpler macaroni for the first time, I thought, Wow! I need to know how to make this! Obviously, I’m a big fan of dairy products, and this recipe has a lot of them, drawing flavour from the types of cheese you use.

The chef taught me how to make alpler macaroni, but he didn’t give me a written recipe. So I learned the steps but not specific volumes. He just told me, “If it’s too thick, add a little more milk. Too thin? Add more cheese.”

This dish is a meal—a heavy one. Historically, alplers would not have had access to a lot of foodstuffs since everything would have had to be trekked up the mountain. So they used what they had available, primarily dairy products: milk, butter, cream and cheese. For this dish, they would have just needed to bring dry pasta up the mountain.

When I came back home to Canada, I made it for my family: Mom, Dad and whomever of my four brothers was around. I’ve made it more than once for them, and I make it for different groups of friends, too. I also made it for my wife, Colleen Bator, when we were first dating. It worked out pretty good—she married me eventually.

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Alpler Macaroni is my go-to recipe for many occasions. It incorporates the things that are important in my life: my cheese factory in Oxford County; and my summer in Switzerland that helped me become a cheese maker. Plus, our cows make the milk, so it’s special in that way, too. This dish is handcrafted from the very beginning, starting with a cow. The only thing I need to do now is make my own pasta…

Alpler Macaroni and Cheese, courtesy of Shep Ysselstein

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 40 minutes
Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
1 cup (250 mL) macaroni
2 tbsp (30 mL) butter
1 onion, sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp (15 mL) flour
1 cup (250 mL) (approx) milk
1 cup (250 mL) heavy cream
1 cup (250 mL) (approx) Handeck cheese (18-month cow’s milk Swiss alpine-style cheese)
2 cups (500 mL) (approx) Five Brothers cow’s milk cheese or Appenzeller cheese
pepper and nutmeg to taste

Directions
1. In pot of boiling water, cook macaroni; drain.
2. Add butter to large pan; fry onion and garlic until soft. Add flour (to thicken and bind mixture). Add milk and cream. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture is warmed throughout and just beginning to bubble.
3. Add Handeck and half of the Five Brothers cheese, 1 small handful at a time, stirring constantly, until cheese is completely melted. Do not boil. Allow to slightly simmer; add pepper and nutmeg. If mixture is too thick, add more milk; if too thin, add more cheese. (You can never have too much cheese!)
4. In buttered baking dish, add half of the macaroni. Pour in half of the cheese mixture; sprinkle on remaining Five Brothers cheese. Add remaining half of macaroni; pour in remaining half of cheese mixture.
5. Bake, uncovered, in 400°F (200°C) oven for 20 minutes or until cheese is golden brown.

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Grandma’s Date Squares that Taste Like Home

The first time I tasted date squares I was about four years old and I absolutely hated them. But because they were at all of our family events, I eventually grew to love them, asking my grandmother to bake them for my eighth birthday.

To me, date squares taste like home. They’re sort of crunchy with the rolled oats on the outside, while date-filled centre is kind of gooey, especially when you warm them up.

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Because Newfoundland is an island, people didn’t always have the luxury of fresh fruit year-round, so canned fruits were always a hot commodity, and many traditional dishes here are made with dates. It was my mother’s mother, Grandma Morrissey, who taught me how to make date squares. I’d say I eat them once or twice a month, if I’m lucky, and at all family events, especially on my grandfather’s birthday. When I make them, I use homemade butter that my father’s mother, Dolores Tobin, taught me to make.

When my father was a child, my Nanny Tobin opened a creamery in Ship Cove, outside of Placentia. They started making butter and called it Spyglass Butter, as she would make prints on top with an old-fashioned wooden stamp shaped like a spyglass. My grandmother gave her kids shares in the creamery when they were young, and to earn their keep, she had them do things like watch the machines and churn the butter.

The photo on the butter label was of my great-aunt: Nanny Tobin’s mother’s sister. As a young girl, my great-aunt had a cream cow named Bessie, and it was her chore to make butter for the family. As she got older, she learned to make stamps of butter. She gave these stamped celebration butters to people for birthdays and holidays.

They were really, really good, so one day when Nanny Tobin was about my age, she asked her sister, “Can you teach me to make them, too?” Nanny said it was the hardest thing she’d ever done because the churning was all done manually, and she wasn’t used to that kind of work. When her aunt passed away, my grandmother continued to make the butter and started her company.

Nanny Tobin’s Spyglass Butter was eventually sold all over Newfoundland and in Ontario, too. The creamery grew so big that today it’s part of Central Dairies, and the butter is no longer made by hand.

Around Christmas, I go to my grandmother’s house where she has a big wooden bucket on the porch and we churn our own butter manually, just as she was taught by her aunt. For my date squares, I buy a lot of Spyglass Butter to bake them with, and that’s what makes them taste so good.

Grandma Morrissey’s Date Squares
Recipe courtesy of Caroline Tobin.

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Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 ¼ hours
Yield: 12 servings

Ingredients:
2 cups (500 mL) dates
1 cup (250 mL) hot water
1 cup (250 mL) packed brown sugar
1½ cups (375 mL) rolled oats
1 cup (250 mL) flour
¾ cup (175 mL) Spyglass Butter or other butter
1½ tsp (7 mL) baking soda
½ tsp (2 mL) salt

Directions:
1. In saucepan, combine dates, water and ½ cup (125 mL) of the brown sugar, then let simmer over medium heat until dates are mashable. Give them a stir to ensure the dates have fallen apart completely.
2. In a large bowl, mix together oats, flour, remaining brown sugar, butter, baking soda and salt until crumbly.
3. Divide oat mixture in half. Press half (or slightly more than half) into the bottom of an 8-inch glass baking dish. Spread the entire date mixture overtop, and crumble remaining oat mixture over top.
4. Bake at 350°F for just under 1 hour or until golden brown. Let cool and cut into squares.

Written by Caroline Tobin, as told to Valerie Howes

Caroline Tobin is a young teen living in Mount Pearl, N.L., near St. John’s. Date squares are one of her favourite things to bake because they bring together traditions from both her mother’s and her father’s sides of the family.

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How Cream Cheese Transformed This Banana Cake

By Audrey Vrooman, as told to Alex Mlynek

Former bank executive Audrey Vrooman’s post-retirement passions—cake decorating and quilting—led her to this moist and flavourful banana cake. It’s become her go-to recipe for when a special treat is called for to celebrate family and friends, plus she gets special requests to make it for weddings and showers once or twice a year.

Twelve years ago, I was putting together a cookbook for our quilting guild to sell as a fundraiser. One of the members of our guild at that time, Ruby Sowpel, gave me a banana cake recipe. After reading the directions, it struck me as a very old recipe, so I had to ask Ruby where she got it from. She told me that when she was a young bride—so in the early 1940s—she had been given this recipe by her sister-in-law, who had received it many years before from her mother-in-law. We were able to trace the origin back to about 1900. It was originally handwritten with things like “a handful of butter”—there was no measuring. When I included this recipe in the book, I had to convert all the ingredients from the original instructions into what I guessed they’d be in measuring cups.

I like the original recipe, but I’ve made some changes that I think result in a much lighter, fluffier and longer-lasting cake. Using buttermilk, instead of regular milk or cream, definitely helps lengthen the life of the recipe. I also use a lot more bananas than the original recipe called for—I wouldn’t add any fewer than five.

Ruby’s original banana cake was served with maple fudge frosting, but I don’t care for the kind of firmness that a fudge icing gives (it makes it harder to decorate), so I started experimenting. I really like my recipe for maple cream cheese frosting even better than other versions I’ve seen because it’s less stiff on the cake. The original recipe called for chopped walnuts; personally, I wouldn’t put chopped walnuts in many things, as they go rancid easily. But in the olden days, that was all you could get. We’re quite spoiled. For instance, I remember that when it was winter, you didn’t get certain fruit or vegetables, but now we can get everything we want year-round.

I didn’t grow up in a family where my mother did much cooking or baking; it’s something I came to after I retired. I started to make cakes for my grandsons, and at first, I would make just chocolate and white. When I found this banana cake recipe, I began to play around with it. It reminds me of how when I was a child, my mother used to make banana bread. That would be a really special treat for us.

A bride-to-be asked if I would make her this cake for her wedding. On the night of her wedding, she wrote me an email while traveling between her reception and hotel room to say how awesome the cake was, that there was none left. That was really, really nice.

The truth is I don’t eat much dessert, but I do love to make them. I like the satisfaction of knowing how happy they make other people. This is a delicious, awesome cake, and people are going to get a lot of accolades if they make it.

Banana Cake With Maple Cream Cheese Frosting, courtesy of Audrey Vrooman

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Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 1 ¼ hours
Yields: 1 large 9-inch (2.5 L) square cake or 9-inch (1.5 L) round cake, or 12 to 16 servings

Ingredients
Cake
5 bananas, peeled
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
½ cup (125 mL) butter
1½ cups (375 mL) granulated sugar
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups (500 mL) cake-and-pastry flour
2 tsp (10 mL) baking powder
½ tsp (2 mL) salt
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
1½ tsp (7 mL) vanilla

Frosting
250 g tub cream cheese
¼ cup (60 mL) butter
¼ cup (60 mL) pure maple syrup, medium grade
1 tsp (5 mL) vanilla
1 tsp (5 mL) pure maple extract
4 cups (1 L) icing sugar
2 tbsp (30 mL) meringue powder

Directions
Cake
1. In small bowl, mash bananas; add baking soda. Set aside.
2. In separate bowl, cream butter with sugar; whisk in eggs.
3. In third bowl, mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Add one-third of flour mixture to butter mixture, stirring to combine. Stir in half of the buttermilk. Stir in another third of the flour, the remaining buttermilk and the remaining flour. Stir in banana mixture; stir in vanilla.
4. Scrape into cake pan. Bake in 350°F (180°C) oven for about 40 minutes. (Option: Slice cake horizontally to make two layers, instead of cake with no layers.)

Frosting
1. In large bowl, beat together cream cheese and butter until smooth. Add maple syrup, vanilla and maple extract; beat until well combined. Beat in icing sugar and meringue powder until smooth.
2. Ice top and sides and cake.

Option for layer cake with banana filling: Cut cake horizontally into 2 layers. Ice cut side of bottom layer (you could use vanilla cream cheese icing between layers with maple cream cheese icing on top and sides of cake. To make vanilla cream cheese frosting, omit maple syrup and maple extract). Lay sliced bananas on top of iced layer. Replace second layer of cake over filling, cut side down. Frost sides and top of cake.

Any leftover cake or icing can be double-wrapped in plastic wrap and frozen for up to three months.

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How to Make Creamy Pennsylvania Dutch Mennonite-Potatoes

By Abram Shantz, as told to Jasmine Mangalaseril

Abram Shantz was born in 1933 to an Old Order Mennonite family in Wallenstein, Ont. At 16, Abram left his family and moved to Kitchener, where he got married, raised a family and started a construction company. This retired widower and great-grandfather now lives in Breslau and happily shares the food of his childhood with his friends and family.

I was born during the Depression. My father had many kids: He had 10 with my mother, then after she died, he married again and had three more. We didn’t have a farm, but we had three acres with two little barns and one or two cows for milk, cream and butter, some pigs and a pen with chickens for eggs and meat. And we always had a big garden.

We kids weren’t in the kitchen a lot while the cooking was going on—we were outside playing or outside working—but I most vividly remember the smell of cooking when we came in. Everything had its own aroma. Of course, potatoes don’t give off as much of an aroma as a chicken in the kettle!

In our house, bledley grumbara (“saucer potatoes” in Pennsylvania Dutch), or cream potatoes, was a common Mennonite dish my mother served at the evening meal.

We weren’t tempted to sneak a taste while it was cooking, but the moment that cream was added, and especially when my mother grabbed a big slab of butter, that’s when you really wanted to taste it.

I got my wife to make cream potatoes a few times, but she said that cream costs too much, and they just didn’t turn out when she used skim milk! After she passed away, I did my own cooking and started trying this, trying that. I didn’t have the recipe, but I knew what was supposed to happen, so I had to make it happen.

I use russets, but I think white potatoes would have good flavour, too. Peel the potatoes, then slice them like saucers, as thin as you can comfortably slice them, as you would for scalloped potatoes. The texture isn’t right if you chop them so that some are thick and others are thin. Boil the potatoes in water with a pinch of salt until they fall apart. Drain the water, then pour in enough cream to coat the potatoes and the inside of the pot. Bring to a boil to create the sauce—the potatoes will absorb a lot of the cream, which will stop them from becoming dry. Add a spoonful of butter and more salt, if you want, for flavour.

When I eat cream potatoes, I think back to when I was little, sitting at a big table along with lots of hungry kids. My father is at the end, and then my mother, and then we kids are all around. The potatoes are in a great big bowl served with summer sausage and pickled beets. Always in the middle of the table is a plate with a tall stack of fresh bread. Everyone grabs what they want.

Cream potatoes are so simple to make. It just happens I like them, and I’ve liked them for 80 years.

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A Newfoundland Kitchen Party Seafood Feast

By Ray Palmer, as told to Crys Stewart

When Ray Palmer was growing up, his family didn’t need a lot of people to have a kitchen party. With him on guitar, his brother at the piano and his dad playing the accordion, they were the party. Now sharing a home with his wife, Wanda, in the City of Mount Pearl (near St. John’s, N.L.), this born-and-raised Newfoundlander keeps the province’s strong traditions of hospitality alive and kicking.

You’re definitely going to have a kitchen party at Christmastime, and during the year, there might be an occasion, too. The food is always out in the dining room. Over the years, we’ve learned that you shouldn’t keep the bar in the kitchen because that’s where everybody hangs out, and the first stop, of course, is always in the kitchen.

Squid is the highlight for a lot of my friends. You can stuff them with anything, really, but we use a basic bread crumb dressing. They’re a ‘picky’ type of thing, like an hors d’oeuvre. I’ve got a son who comes early when he knows I’m doing squid. And I say, “Now, boy, you can only have a couple because you know there’s a few more here besides you, so don’t have them all gone.” My friend used to have a kitchen party every Christmas with a crowd of 20 or 25 people, and there’d be more there than cod tongues and squid, I can guarantee you—we’d have a moose heart that would be stuffed. Other kinds of pickies, too.

A lot of people think that fish don’t have tongues, but they do. When you look at the fish and open its mouth, there it is looking at you. Years ago, young boys on the wharf would wait for when the fishermen came in with their fish, cut out the cod tongues, then go sell them. They were very cheap back then. The better ones are the smaller type that cook pretty quickly. The bigger cod tongues take longer to cook, so they’re not as good. Once they’re crisp and crunchy, they’re fantastic.

If you get a knock on your door and a bunch of mummers come in that you’re not expecting, you can have no idea who they could be. Mummery is sort of a dying thing, but we’re trying to keep it alive. A bunch of people get together and dress up—you’re disguised—and you go around to your friends’ homes. They don’t know you and your fellow mummers are coming, and you’ve probably got a guitar and an accordion with you. You come in and have a little scuff (a little dance) in the kitchen or wherever they can fit you, then have a little toddy. Everyone in the house is trying to guess who everybody is, of course. Sometimes, they’re right; sometimes, they’re wrong.

When we’re having a party, my three grandchildren are always a part of it. They’re only six and seven years old, but I’m sure once they get into their teens, they’ll be having kitchen parties, too. Guaranteed, they will.

Fried Cod Tongues With Scrunchions, courtesy of Ray Palmer
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Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
2 lb (900 g) cod tongues (preferably fresh; I prefer the smaller tongues)
½ cup (125 mL) flour
1 tsp (5 mL) salt
¼ tsp (1 mL) pepper
½ lb (225 g) pork fatback

Directions
1. Wash tongues carefully; dry with paper towel. Add flour, salt and pepper to plastic bag. Add tongues, shaking bag to coat. Set aside.
2. Cut pork fatback into small cubes. Add to skillet; fry at low to medium heat until fat is rendered out and fatback is crispy and brown. (Don’t overheat or the fat will burn.) Remove pork scrunchions; set aside.
3. Add tongues to same skillet; cook over medium heat until tongues are brown and crispy on both sides. Put scrunchions back in skillet when tongues are almost ready. Cod tongues can be served as an appetizer by themselves or served with fries as a main meal.

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Baked Stuffed Squid, courtesy of Ray Palmer
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Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
6 squid tubes, cleaned and washed thoroughly
½ tsp (2 mL) salt
4 cups (1 L) bread crumbs (1 bag of bread crumbs)
¼ cup (60 mL) savory
¼ cup (60 mL) melted butter
1 medium onion, chopped finely
pepper to taste

Directions
1. Sprinkle squid with salt.
2. Mix together bread crumbs, savory, butter, onion and pepper. Loosely stuff squid (don’t overstuff).
3. Add enough cold water to cover bottom of 13 x 9-inch (3 L) baking dish. Add squid; cover with foil. (Don’t seal foil around sides of dish; keep tented.) Bake in 325°F (160°C) for about 50 minutes. Turn quid halfway through; add more water, if necessary. Remove from pan when cooked; slice into rings.

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Borscht: ‘My Family’s Version of Chicken Soup’

By Sam Yachiw, as told to Leslie Wu

Sam Yachiw shares her love of curling with local kids through the nonprofit Curl Saskatoon. At home, this fourth-generation Ukrainian-Canadian loves sharing a hearty bowl of her baba’s borscht with family and friends. In fact, Yachiw’s favourite way to explore her heritage is to navigate her grandparents’ dinner table, where some of her fondest memories take place.

Borscht was my family’s version of chicken soup, fed to us when we were sick or sad. I’ve had it since I was a toddler, and I’ve always liked its unique taste and that warm feeling with every mouthful. It would have been my great, great-grandmother who brought the recipe over from Ukraine. The core recipe is the same, but it’s been adapted and tweaked over the years.

With my baba [grandmother] and dido [grandfather], we make a big batch of this soup once a year: about 20 single-serving jars and a whole bunch of larger jars, which are distributed among the family. On borscht cooking day, we start early in the morning with the chopping. The whole process takes about two hours, or even three, depending on how much we’ve been talking. We’re usually done by noon, then we’ll heat up some fresh borscht for lunch. For most of the afternoon, we come together as family and just talk! We’re such a close-knit family, and I love it.

We sit down to share borscht as the second course at Ukrainian Easter. This holiday is different for every family, depending on how traditional you are. For us, it’s lunch after church, which turns into about four hours of feasting, then relaxing in a comfortable chair to chat with someone you may not have seen in many years. My grandparents know so many people I’ve never met in the 27 years I’ve been alive, so there’s always someone new at the kitchen or dining table. Last year, they hosted a lady who was in their wedding party more than 60 years ago.

Borscht has brought my baba and I together. Most of my memories of her are in the kitchen; it’s part of who she is, and she’s always been like that. My grandfather, on the other hand, doesn’t really do a lot of cooking, but he helps out. Any memory I’ve had, he’s been around helping, especially if it’s a bigger meal. My baba’s a social butterfly, so she loves to cook for people. It didn’t matter if we were just visiting for a day or a weekend, there were these amazing, extravagant meals. It’s something I learned from her, and I try to continue this tradition even now with my own friends; we all get together and celebrate, even if it’s just over an everyday meal. Food is one thing that brings everybody together—it doesn’t matter what culture you’re in.

Baba’s Borscht, courtesy of Sam Yachiw

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 1½ hours
Yield: 10 to 12 servings

Ingredients
2 tsp (10 ml) salt
4 cups (1 L) beets, peeled and shredded
2 carrots, diced
1 large onion, chopped
1 large potato, diced
? cup (75 mL) diced celery
2 tbsp (30 mL) white vinegar
1 cup (250 mL) canned diced tomatoes
1 can tomato soup
1 tbsp (15 mL) fresh or frozen dill

Directions
1. Add salt to 8 cups (2 L) water. Cook peeled and shredded beets for 30 minutes.
2. Add carrots, onion, potato and celery; simmer for 30 minutes.
3. Add vinegar, tomatoes, tomato soup and dill; simmer for about 15 minutes. (Add peas and/or beans, if you like.) Cook until vegetables are tender. Serve with borscht.

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