Tag Archives: lobster

Indulge In This Luscious Lobster Poutine

As if poutine wasn’t decadent enough — an indulgence of crispy fries, thick gravy and cheese curds — we’ve amped up the luxuriousness with fresh lobster, salty bacon, diced tomatoes and, of course, loads of gravy. This secretly easy-to-make weekend meal is worth every cheesy, lobster-filled bite.

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Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients:

For the Fries:
3 russet (baking) potatoes, skin intact, cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch strips or wedges
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp salt

For the Toppings:
11/2 cups cooked lobster meat, torn into bite-sized pieces
200 g poutine cheese curds
2 strips cooked bacon, chopped
1 plum tomato, seeded and diced
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 cup gravy, heated

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Directions:

For the Fries:
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.
2. On a large baking sheet, toss all potato ingredients until potatoes are evenly coated.
3. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork and golden brown on the bottom.

Assembly:
1. On a warm platter, add a bed of fries. Top with lobster, cheese curds and bacon, if using. Ladle over hot gravy (use as much as you like; there may be extra). Garnish with chopped tomatoes, parsley. Serve immediately.

Love poutine? Learn more about the iconic Canadian dish with these 9 fun facts.

Sweet and Simple Lobster Rolls in Old Town Lunenburg

By Adam Bower, as told to Signe Langford

Oh, how times have changed! Back in the 1950s and ’60s, when Adam Bower’s mom was growing up in a small fishing village outside Lunenburg, N.S., the curtains were drawn if lobster was on the table for dinner. In those days, it was considered poor man’s food, a source of shame. Today, it’s with great pride the sommelier-owner of Grand Banker Bar & Grill in Lunenburg serves what is now a highly prized delicacy.

By the time I was growing up in Lunenburg, eating lobster was no longer considered shameful or something you had to do when times were tough. It was a pretty special occasion, and we only had a big lobster feed a couple of times a year. Mom and Dad would make a call, then go and meet a lobsterman at the dock for 10 pounds of the freshest lobster—literally, it had been out of the water for just minutes! Mom would boil it and serve it with potatoes, corn on the cob, salad and lots of melted butter. Dad would break them all down—claws in one bowl, tails in another, legs and all the smaller bits in another—so we kids got to pick our favourite parts. The next day, Mom would turn any leftover lobster meat into lobster rolls. But to be honest, I was a picky eater, and it wasn’t until I was in my early teens and had started working in the restaurant business that I really started to appreciate lobster.

When I was 19, I went to work for Alan Creaser at the Grand Banker Bar & Grill. The place was a fixture in Old Town Lunenburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The restaurant is on the waterfront, across from where the Bluenose II is docked. When Creaser called to tell me he was selling the restaurant and asked if I wanted to buy it, I leaped at the chance to come back home to take it over. I started hearing from locals and loyal customers. I’d get letters saying, “I hope you’re leaving such-and-such on the menu.” So I left core signature dishes but made many enhancements, including fresh menu items, an in-depth wine list, craft beers and switching over to a local artisanal bakery—Boulangerie la Vendéenne—for all the breads and buns we use. That’s one of the reasons our lobster roll is so special; I serve it in a warm brioche roll that’s eggy and a little bit sweet, and it complements the claw and knuckle meat perfectly.

Our lobster roll is simple: some house-made citrus aioli, green onion, a small amount of lettuce and a good quarter pound of claw and knuckle meat—I want the lobster to shine. When lobster is in season, I take a 20-second walk down to the lobster pound for lobster that’s just come off the boats. We don’t do anything fancy; the lobster meat is so sweet and fresh we don’t need to—just boil them in salted water. And don’t forget a cold Propeller pilsner or one of Nova Scotia’s delicious white wines to wash it down!

Nova Scotia Lobster Roll, courtesy of Adam Bower

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Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 35 minutes
Yields: 1 sandwich

Ingredients
1¼ lb (565 g) Nova Scotia lobster, bands removed
2 tbsp (30 mL) mayonnaise
1 tsp (5 mL) lemon zest
1 tbsp (15 mL) lemon juice
1 tbsp (15 mL) green onions, chopped
1 artisan-style hotdog bun
1 leaf romaine hearts, chopped
1 handful of parsley, chopped
lemon wedge

Directions
1. In stockpot, bring water to boil. Add live lobster; cook for about 10 minutes, until lobster is bright red. Remove; let cool. Crack claws and knuckles, removing meat. Reserve remaining meat for future use.
2. In bowl, mix together mayonnaise, lemon zest, lemon juice and green onions. Stir in lobster meat.
3. In oven, toast bun (fresh from your local bakery, if possible), until warm and crisp outside. Score down middle; fill with romaine.
4. Place lobster mixture on top of romaine; sprinkle with parsley. Serve with lemon wedge.

Click here to print, save or share this Lobster Roll recipe.

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How to Crack Open a Whole Lobster

By Colleen Fisher Tully

You’ll need:
• whole cooked lobster, cooled
• kitchen shears
• bamboo skewers
• lobster-shell cracker or nutcracker

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1. The Tail
Bend lobster tail back slightly and twist to remove—it should come apart easily. Starting at open end, using kitchen shears, cut shell down middle of tail’s underside, as shown. Open up shell like a book; remove meat in one piece. If there is green pasty stuff (the liver and pancreas, called tomalley), wipe it away with a paper towel and discard. The same goes for any tiny eggs.

Editor’s Note: Some Canadians love tomalley! Just remember, Health Canada advises children avoid it and adults to restrict their consumption to no more than the amount found in one lobster.

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2. The Claws, Part A
Twist two front legs off body of lobster. If they don’t twist off easily, use kitchen shears to snip through any cartilage. Bend small pincer back and forth until it breaks off, as shown. Carefully pull shell away from meat to keep claw intact. If meat breaks apart, use bamboo skewer to pull meat out of pincer.

 

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3. The Claws, Part B
Using lobster shell cracker, break into large claw shell at base, as shown. Using fingers or skewer, pull out claw meat. If needed, use kitchen shears to cut into shell further, opening it like a book and lifting out meat. Make sure all hard cartilage has detached from claw meat before setting aside. Don’t forget the knuckle! Break this leg section into pieces and push out meat with skewer.

 

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4. Reserve Shells
Now you have the secret ingredient to the most amazing soups, stocks and flavoured butters: lobster shells. If you can’t use them right away, toss them in a freezer-safe bag or container and store them in the freezer.

Editor’s Note: The skinny leg pieces have very small bits of meat you can extract with a skewer, or many cooks leave them intact to help flavour the next recipe.

Here’s how to make Lobster Butter.

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5. Enjoy!
From lobster rolls to risottos to decadent eggs Benedict, there’s no end to enjoying succulent Canadian lobster meat. Try it in this seafaring chef’s signature dish: Oleg’s Seafood Chowder.

How to Make a Classic Lobster Roll

I’ve got a confession — I have never had a lobster roll. Lobster roll’s aren’t something you see in a small prairie city like Saskatoon. But of course, having watched more then enough Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives, I’ve seen and drooled over a lobster roll or two (or ten)! Feeling rather deprived, while also having leftover lobster in my fridge, I knew it was time to change my sad lobster roll-less existence. It was simple, easy and delicious. I only hope I can taste a fresh Maine lobster roll one day to know true bliss!

Prep Time: 5 mins
Cook Time: 5 mins
Serves: 1

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Ingredients:
1 thick slice of french bread
Butter
¼ cup chopped lobster meat
1 Tbsp mayonnaise
1 tsp chopped green onion
1 Tbsp chopped celery
3 cherry tomatoes (quartered)
A few drops of lemon juice (to taste)
Salt & pepper to taste
Romaine lettuce

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Directions:
1. Get a pan and put on medium heat.
2. Cut a thick slice of french bread (about an 1 1/2 thick), then cut 3/4 down the middle of the slice, forming a bun.
3. Generously butter the outside of of bread, frying both sides in the pan until golden brown.
4. In a bowl mix lobster, mayo, green onion, celery and tomatoes. Add in lemon juice, salt & pepper to taste.
5. Place leaf of romaine lettuce in the center of your roll.
6. Place lobster filling into your bread and enjoy!

100x100_BS Carlene and Bob Deutscher are the dynamic sibling duo behind BS’ in the Kitchen. While Carlene leans towards the sweeter side of things, baking up delicious desserts, you can count on Bob to cook up something savoury! Aside from blogging on BS’ in the Kitchen, Carlene works in marketing & communications, and sidelines as a lifestyle & wedding photographer, while Bob operates his own media company, with a focus on food photography, and videography! Carlene and Bob Deutscher are part of the Lifestyle Blog Network family.

 

Lobster Grilled Cheese

Lobster grilled cheese? Yes, please! Rich meaty lobster chunks, surrounded by melted cheese and toasty buttered bread… This is one rich, tasty sandwich! The idea for this bad boy stemmed from the thought of lobster mac & cheese, which seems to be fairly popular these days.

With that thought delicious combo in mind, I knew I didn’t want to stick with just one cheese, so I mixed in a little creamy, buttery Gouda and some aged cheddar cheese for a stronger cheese flavour. A little mayo on the bread for some zip, some salt & pepper to enhance the flavours, and you’ve got yourselves a winner!

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Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 1

Ingredients:
2 slices french bread (or similar)
1 lobster tail (around ½ a cup of lobster meat)
¼ cup gruyere cheese
? cup gouda cheese
¼ cup aged cheddar cheese
1 Tbsp clarified butter
1-2 Tbsp mayonnaise
Salt & pepper

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Directions:
1. Get a pan on low-medium heat, placing about 1 Tbsp of butter in it. Once butter melts and begins browning, remove film over top of the butter, until most of the milk solids have been removed.
2. While you’re waiting for the butter to clarify, begin preparing your sandwich.
3. Break the lobster tail in half, removing meat and roughly chopping.
4. Spread mayonnaise on top and bottom slice.
5. Shred cheese add ¼ cup gruyere, then an ? cup of gouda.
6. Chop up lobster tail, place on sandwich and add some salt and pepper.
7. Top with ¼ cup of aged cheddar cheese and top slice of bread.
8. Brush both outer sides of sandwich with clarified butter.
9. In a pan on medium heat, fry until golden brown on each side and cheese has melted.

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100x100_BS Carlene and Bob Deutscher are the dynamic sibling duo behind BS’ in the Kitchen. While Carlene leans towards the sweeter side of things, baking up delicious desserts, you can count on Bob to cook up something savoury! Aside from blogging on BS’ in the Kitchen, Carlene works in marketing & communications, and sidelines as a lifestyle & wedding photographer, while Bob operates his own media company, with a focus on food photography, and videography!

Carlene and Bob Deutscher are part of the Lifestyle Blog Network family.

Dan’s Good Side: Lobster and Green Pepper-Stuffed Mushroom Caps

I was chatting with my friend Mel the other week about the fact that green peppers always seem to suck. They aren’t great raw, they aren’t great cooked. Is there a good way to cook them? Is there? I may just be a jaded, old green pepper hater, but I’m willing to keep trying avenues where they can be more enjoyable.

Anyway…recently I spent a good chunk of time out on the east coast, so I decided to bring a few lobsters back home with me to cook up a lobster-centric dinner for some friends. I thought it would be fun to go a little old school with some stuffed mushroom caps and there happened to be a green pepper from my last Spud Calgary delivery pre-travels, staring at me every time I opened the fridge, so it was time to use it.

It’s hard to go wrong with stuffed mushroom caps, especially when cream cheese and lobster are involved, but I must admit, the green pepper was an enjoyable addition to this recipe and everyone seemed to love them, so maybe I just need to cool it on my anti-green pepper campaign…

Lobster and Green Pepper-Stuffed Mushroom Caps

Yields: 24 stuffed mushroom caps
Total Time: 45 minutes

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Ingredients:

1 green pepper (halved and seeds removed)
1 Tablespoon canola oil
1 yellow onion (diced)
2 cloves garlic (minced)
2 Tablespoons white wine
1 Tablespoon unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups cream cheese (softened)
2 cups cooked lobster meat (finely chopped)
1 Tablespoon liquid honey
2 teaspoons smoked paprika
salt and pepper (to taste)
24 white mushroom caps (stems removed)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 °F.
  2. Place green pepper on a small roasting pan, drizzle lightly with oil and let roast until tender, approximately 20 minutes.
  3. Heat remaining oil in a medium pan on medium-high heat and cook onion and garlic for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add white wine to pan and let cook until almost completely reduced, then add the butter and continue to cook for 5 more minutes.
  5. Transfer contents of pan to a blender, puree until smooth and set aside to cool. While that’s cooling, dice up the roasted green pepper and place into a large mixing bowl along with the next 4 ingredients.
  6. Once onion puree is cool, add it to the bowl and stir until everything is well-incorporated, then season to taste with salt and pepper.
  7. Place mushroom caps on a large baking sheet and spoon the cream cheese and lobster mixture into each cap. Bake in oven until mushroom is tender and the filling has started to brown, about 18-20 minutes.

Dan-Clapson-Avatar Dan Clapson is a food writer and culinary instructor based out of Calgary. He is constantly creating new recipes and striving to expand his culinary horizons. He thinks yam fries are overrated.