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beef with plantains on white plate

This Beef With Plantains and Black Beans Recipe is a Taste of Venezuela

A dish indigenous to Venezuelan people for over 100 years, this primavera beef with plantains and black beans recipe is filled with so many delicious ingredients, including onion, garlic, mushroom gravy, peppers, cilantro, spices and of course, beef, plantains and black beans. The perfect weeknight dinner!

beef with plantains on white plate

Primavera Beef With Plantains and Black Beans

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes
Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:

2 lbs of beef in cubes
1 medium onion chopped finely, divided
3-4 cloves of garlic, divided
½ cup mushroom gravy
½ cup beef broth
1 red and 1 green bell pepper chopped in cubes
1 dried red hot pepper
¼ tsp oregano
Salt to taste
½ lb of black beans
¼ tsp black pepper
1-2 plantains
1 lime cut into quarters
Cilantro to garnish

Directions:

1. In a frying pan, cook the beef with ½ the onion, ½ the garlic, mushroom gravy and beef stock, until tender.

2. Add the bell peppers, red pepper powder and oregano and add salt according to taste.

Related: Transgender Day of Visibility: Yasmeen Persad Talks About Food Insecurity and Trans Nutrition

3. Also in a pan, cook black beans with salt, pepper and remaining onions and garlic until soft.

4. Peel off the skin of 2 large plantains and slice them thin. Deep fry in vegetable oil.

5. Serve all with steamed rice. Garnish with lime and cilantro.

Cover of the cookbook 'Cooking With Trans People of Colour'Excepted from Cooking With Trans People of Colour, a cookbook of recipes of significance from The 519’s Trans People of Colour Project (TPOC). The cookbook is compiled by and for racialized trans people, also featuring unique sections including cooking and eating on a budget, hormones and healthy eating for trans folks, and resources and sexual health promotion information to support racialized trans folks.

Cooking With Trans People of Colour, Glad Day Bookshop, $25.

Photo by: Eli Carmona

Tangy Sauce and Sofrito Are a Tasty Team With These Puerto Rican Skewers

Do certain aromas transport you back to another time and place in the most delicious way? For Yimara “Yia” Medina, the scent of grilled pinchos — marinated chunks of pork or chicken on a stick, traditionally served with a slice of warm bread — is like a passport to happy childhood days in Puerto Rico.

“It’s one of the island’s most popular street foods — and some of my favourite childhood memories are of sitting and talking or dancing around by my cousin’s roadside pinchos stand,” Yia says. “There are lots of versions of pinchos, but what I think makes this recipe especially good is the use of sofrito, the magical Puerto Rican blend of herbs and aromatics that’s the base of some of our tastiest dishes. Sofrito is easy to make yourself or you can buy it premade.”

Related: The Very Best Ways to Devour Street Food Around The World

Pinchos

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 12 hours
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Active Time: 12 hours, 20 minutes
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

½ cup sofrito
⅓ cup olive oil
1 ½ Tbsp sazon
1 ½ Tbsp adobo seasoning
1 ½ tsp onion powder
1 ½ tsp granulated garlic
½ tsp ground black pepper
2 ½ lbs pork tenderloin, cut into 2-inch cubes
¼ cup BBQ sauce
1 loaf bread, sliced 1 ½-inch thick

Equipment:

12- to 14-inch skewers

Related: 10 Veggie-Forward Grilled Skewers and Kebabs to Try This Summer

Directions:

1. Combine the sofrito, oil, sazon, adobo, onion powder, granulated garlic and black pepper in a large bowl. Add the pork and toss to coat. Marinate the meat at least overnight or 12 hours for best results.

2. When ready to cook, remove the meat from the refrigerator. Drain off and discard the marinade. Preheat a grill to 450ºF or medium-high heat. Thread the meat onto 12- or 14-inch skewers, leaving a 3-inch space at the bottom of each skewer.

3. Place the skewers on the grill and grill for 3 minutes. Carefully flip the skewers and grill the other side for 3 minutes. Flip the skewers again and cook for an additional 2 minutes on the other side, then brush the pinchos with BBQ sauce. Flip once more and cook until the pinchos are browned and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the pork registers 145ºF, about 2 minutes more. Remove from the grill, brush again with BBQ sauce and rest 5 minutes before serving. Toast the slices of bread on the grill; skewer one slice onto the top of each pincho.

Are you a newbie to the grill? This guide to the perfect grilling times and temperatures is a great place to start!

Crispy, Crunchy Octopus Tops Tangy Citrus Cebiche in This Fresh Peruvian Dish

Cebiche — also known as ceviche — was born in Peru, and the fresh, acid-cooked seafood dish takes on many delicious iterations all around the world. Inspired by a version of that’s popular in Lima, this cebiche recipe from Julio-Cesar Florez is topped with crispy, golden-fried octopus — which delivers the perfect warm crunch to contrast with the tasty cold fish. The fish itself (you can go with striped bass, longfin yellowtail or even mahi mahi — just make sure it’s fresh!) is soaked in a tangy liquid that Peruvians call “leche de tigre,” or “tiger’s milk.” Some see leche de tigre as an aphrodisiac or a hangover cure, while others just see it as delicious! However you think of it, be sure to pick up your bowl and sip the delicious liquid up when you’re done eating the fish.

Related: Top Pescatarian Dinner Ideas That Make Seafood the Star

Cebiche Carretillero

Active Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 1

Ingredients:
Soybean oil, for deep frying
3 oz boiled octopus, cut into ½-inch pieces
2 ½ tsp garlic puree
All-purpose flour, for coating
Kosher salt
1 tsp minced aji limo or other hot chile pepper
1 tsp finely chopped cilantro
5 oz very fresh fish fillet; striped bass, almaco jack (longfin yellowtail) and mahi mahi are good choices
½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice
Lettuce leaves, for serving
1 sweet potato, boiled, peeled and cut into ½-inch-thick slices
Boiled choclo kernels (see Cook’s Note), for serving
Cancha corn (see Cook’s Note), for serving
1 red onion, cut into thin strips and soaked in a bowl of cold water

Special Equipment: a deep fryer (optional), deep-fry thermometer

Related: This Zingy Edamame Tofu Brings the Fresh Flavours of Japan to Your Table

Directions:
1. Heat a few inches of oil in a deep fryer or small heavy pot set over medium-high heat until it reaches 350ºF on a deep-fry thermometer. Put the pieces of octopus in a bowl and toss with 1 1/2 teaspoons of the garlic puree. Place flour in a shallow bowl and coat the pieces of octopus evenly with flour. Shake off the excess flour, place the octopus in the oil and fry until golden. Drain on a rack or paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and set aside.

2. Combine the aji limo, cilantro, remaining 1 teaspoon garlic puree and a pinch of salt in a medium bowl and mash with the bottom of a spoon. Cut the fish into 1/2-inch-thick slices and place in the bowl with the aji limon. Sprinkle the fish with salt and toss to coat evenly. Set aside for 2 minutes, then add the lime juice and toss again.

3. Line a plate with lettuce leaves. Place the sweet potato, choclo kernels and cancha on one side. Next to it, place the cebiche, along with the liquid in the bowl (”leche de tigre”). Top with drained strips of red onion and fried octopus and enjoy.

Cook’s Note: Cebiche is not a dish eaten very cold; it tastes better when the ingredients are room temperature, so don’t worry about chilling the ingredients or the plates it’s served on. Choclo corn is a Peruvian variety with very large kernels, often sold boiled and frozen. Cancha corn is a kind of toasted corn similar to corn nuts. You can buy both types of corn in some larger supermarkets and in grocery stores catering to Peruvian or South American customers, or find them online.

Can’t get enough fresh seafood? These chef-approved tips will help you always buy the best catch.