Tag Archives: garlic

How to Grow Fall Vegetables and What to Do With Them

Sweater weather is here, but growing season is far from over. Just because the days are shorter and the temperatures are dropping, it doesn’t mean you have to abandon your garden. Want your very own harvest of autumn produce? Here are the fall vegetables you should consider and some recipes to try once they’re ready to pick.

How to Grow Garlic

If you’re new to fall gardening, growing garlic is a good place to start. If you’ve ever wonder how to grow garlic, it can be easily planted mid-autumn in a sunny spot with soil that is well-drained. Separate the cloves and set them with the pointed end up and the root side down in rows that are at least one foot or 30 centimetres apart — and you should have some new bulbs by late fall. Take your freshly harvested garlic and roast it, pickle it or add it to  your favourite dishes. Interested in growing garlic indoors? While you can’t grow bulbs if you don’t have any outdoor space, you can easily grow garlic greens in a pot on a sunny window ledge. In about 7 to 10 days, you can snip the greens and add them to soups, salads, baked potatoes and more.

A chicken breast cooked to a golden finish with whole cloves of garlic and a creamy sauce

Get the recipe for The Barefoot Contessa’s Chicken With Forty Cloves of Garlic

How to Grow Cauliflower

It may be the most challenging vegetable in the cabbage family to cultivate, but fall is the perfect time for growing cauliflower. The secret is to start your seeds indoors about four weeks before you plan to plant them. Once the seedlings are ready, select a spot in your yard where they’ll get lots of light and be sure to water them so they grow quickly. Plant them outside when it’s between 18°C and 24°C for a late fall or early winter harvest. Once the florets are densely formed, the cauliflower is ready to harvest. Serve as a side dish with Sunday roast, toss it into a stir-fry or use it in a low-carb mac and cheese.

Cauliflower prepared popcorn style with a red Korean gochujang sauce

Get the recipe for Korean Gochujang Cauliflower Popcorn

How to Grow Beets

Beets are a fall harvest favourite that is best grown from seeds. Plant them in mid-summer or early fall — at least eight weeks before the first heavy frost — in an area with full sun and well-loosened soil. To speed up germination, soak the seeds in water for 24 hours before planting. After planting, add a thin layer of mulch to keep the roots cool on warmer days. When you’re growing beets, you’ll want to give them water regularly to develop healthy roots. Harvest when they’re anywhere from the size of a golf ball to a tennis ball. And don’t discard those greens! They’re packed with nutrients and a tasty whether sautéed on their own or added to pastas and soups.

Roasted red beet quarters tossed with fresh tarragon and parsley

Get the recipe for Valerie Bertinelli’s Roasted Beets With Herbs

How to Grow Brussels Sprouts

It takes patience to grow Brussels sprouts, but they are an easy crop that takes up minimal space in your garden. The seeds have to be planted six to 10 weeks before the first frost in rows three feet or 90 centimetres apart. Water them weekly and harvest after the first fall frost for the sweetest flavour. Twist them off the stem when you’re ready to cook them and any remaining sprouts will stay on the plants through part of the winter, even after the snow has begun. If you plant your seeds in the fall, don’t expect any sprouts until late winter or early spring. Roast them with bacon and maple syrup, shave them into a salad or even try them in your air fryer.

Get the recipe for Orecchiette With Vegan Sausage and Brussels Sprouts

How to Grow Broccoli

Growing broccoli takes time and extra care. You’ll have to plant the seeds in early fall, well before the first frost of the season. Plant them 18 to 24 inches or 45 to 60 centimetres apart in well-drained soil that gets at least eight hours of sun per day, ideally a partially-shaded area. There are so many ways to enjoy fresh broccoli, whether you include it in a sheet pan dinner or serve it steamed with melted Cheddar on top.

Slices of beef and broccoli florets on wooden skewers with teriyaki sauce

Get the recipe for Broccoli Beef Skewers With Teriyaki Glaze

How to Grow Pumpkins

Bright orange gourds and fall go hand in hand. Early June is the time to start thinking about planting as the seeds need warm soil to get started. They also need ample space for the long, rambling vines. Once planted, give them a deep watering of about one inch per week and adjust the amount depending on rainfall to prevent the vines from rotting. Once the pumpkins begin to grow on the vines, you’ll need to raise them off the ground using supports for even colouring and shape. If you have limited space, but still want to grow a pumpkin or two, plant smaller sugar pumpkins that are perfect for cooking and baking. They’re perfect for pies, cakes and soups.

Orange pumpkin soup served in white bowls topped with fresh herbs

Get the recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Soup

Don’t know the difference between butternut and acorn squash? Our ultimate squash guide breaks it down for you.

Recreate the Winning Dish From Junior Chef Showdown

While the sumptuous Wagyu beef needs no introduction, it does require mouth-watering sidekicks to accompany it for a properly balanced – and extra-flavourful – meal. Luckily for us, this season’s Junior Chef Showdown winner, Audrey, has got us covered.

Don’t be deterred by the amount of ingredients and steps required – you don’t have to be an insanely talented kid chef to make this meal at home. This is a deceptively simple dish packed with complex flavours and textures that are sure to satisfy. Bon appétit!

Watch: Junior Chef Showdown Judges Sound Off on How to Get Your Kids to Cook

Junior Chef Audrey’s Wagyu Steak with Grilled Veggie Salad, Garlic Scape Pesto and Potato Crisps

Prep time: 20 minutes
Total time: 40 minutes, plus 1 hour soaking time for potatoes
Serves: 2

Ingredients:

Fingerling Potato Chips
2 fingerling or small Yukon gold potatoes, sliced very thin
Salt
Oil for frying

Garlic Scape Pesto
6 garlic scapes
5 Tbsp olive oil, divided
½ cup toasted pine nuts
1 cup packed arugula
1 Tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp salt
1 to 2 Tbsp water

Steak
1 Wagyu strip steak, about ¾-inch thick**
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
1 Tbsp grapeseed oil
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 clove garlic, peeled and slice in half
2 sprigs thyme

Grilled Veggie and Peach Medley
8 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and discarded
2 king oyster mushrooms, sliced lengthwise about ¼-inch thick
1 peach, stoned and cut into 8 wedges
1 bunch of multicoloured radishes, trimmed and cut in half
2 Tbsp olive oil
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper

To serve
2 cups loosely packed arugula

Related: Jordan Andino’s Quick and Comforting Chinese Broccoli & Shrimp Stir-Fry

Directions:

**Remove steak from your fridge 30 minutes to one hour before cooking. This will allow the meat to cook more evenly, yielding a tastier result.

Fingerling Potato Chips
1. Soak potato slices in cold water for 1 hour (optional: if you don’t have time for this step, simply rinse the potatoes once or twice before drying them). Drain, rinse and pat dry thoroughly with a clean kitchen towel.

2. Fit a wire cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet and set aside. Heat an inch of oil in a medium heavy-bottomed pot or deep fryer until a thermometer reads 325°F.

3. Add potatoes in batches and fry until golden and crisp, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from oil with a slotted spoon onto prepared sheet. Sprinkle with salt immediately.

Related: Lynn Crawford’s Bacon and Egg Ramen Soup is the Comfort Food You Didn’t Know You Needed

Garlic Scape Pesto
1. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.

2. Toss scapes with 1 Tbsp olive oil in a medium bowl. Add to pan and cook until charred and tender, about 5 minutes, turning occasionally. Remove from grill and set aside to cool slightly.

3. Roughly chop the scapes and place into the bowl of a food processor. Add remaining ingredients except for the water and pulse until blended. Add water to loosen, if desired. Taste and season with more salt and lemon juice, if desired.

Steak
1. Heat a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat.

2. Pat steak dry with a paper towel and season with salt and pepper.

3. Add oil to pan and heat until shimmering. Add steak with the fat cap facing towards you and cook until crusted and browned, about 3 minutes per side. Add butter, garlic and thyme in the last minute of cooking; tilt pan gently towards yourself and quickly spoon butter repeatedly over steak to baste. Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil and set aside to rest for 8 to 10 minutes. Slice right before serving.

Related: Anna Olson’s Herbed Avocado Dip Will Take Your Sandwiches and Veggies to the Next Level

Grilled Veggie Medley
1. Heat a cast iron grill pan over medium-high heat.

2. Toss veggies and peach with oil, salt and pepper in a medium bowl.

3. Add to grill pan and cook until charred and tender, about 5 to 7 minutes, turning occasionally.

4. To serve, spread some pesto onto two plates (reserve any remaining pesto to toss with your favourite pasta and cherry tomatoes for a delicious meal). Top with a handful of arugula, followed by the grilled veggies and peach. Top with the steak and potatoes. Enjoy!

Watch Junior Chef Showdown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Not Your Average Tuna Salad: Refresh Pantry Cooking With This Oh-So Garlicky Dish

As many of us begin our venture in pantry-style cooking, two go-to canned items are always tuna and beans. But, instead of a lackluster tuna or bean salad, we paired them together and created something that’s vibrant, fresh and oh-so garlicky. You’ll already have the majority of these ingredients in your pantry or fridge, and if you’re missing something and can’t get your hands on it, swap it for what you do have, or simply leave it out. The garlic chips are really the star of this dish anyways, and every kitchen has a supply of garlic, right?

Tuna Salad With Tomatoes, Basil, Beans, Kale and Garlic Chips

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Servings: 2-3

Ingredients:

6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 can tuna, drained
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
5 cherry tomatoes, halved or ¾ cup chopped tomato
½ cup basil leaves, roughly chopped
1 small shallot or ¼ red or yellow onion, slivered
3 cups kale, chopped
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper


Directions:

1. In a skillet, heat 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil over medium. Add in the garlic slices and toss around until they become brown and crisp, this will only take a few minutes.

2. Place them on a towel to drain some of the oil and dry up. You can save the oil that’s left in the pan and use it for dressings or sauces.

Related: 3-Ingredient Salad Dressing Combos That Will Save Your Lunch and Dinner

3. Put the tuna, chickpeas, tomatoes, basil, shallots and kale into a bowl.

4. Whisk together 2 Tbsp of oil, along with the apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper and pour over the ingredients in the bowl.

5. Top with garlic chips and enjoy.

Cooking with more pantry staples lately? Try these creative canned salmon recipes and macaroni dish ideas.

Black Garlic: What It Is, and Why You Need to Cook With It This Year

As Canadians get more adventurous in the kitchen, it’s only natural that they’d be on the lookout for the latest on-trend foods and dishes to try at home. And, with 2020 kicking into high gear, black garlic has continued its steady ascent as one of the most sought-after ingredients in North American cuisine. But if you’re left reeling at the thought of cooking with the inky, blackened cloves – or don’t entirely understand how to incorporate it into your favourite recipes – you’re definitely not alone.

Although not an entirely new concept (Japan, Thailand and South Korea have been extolling the virtues of black garlic for years) this versatile ingredient can be easily swapped in for traditional white garlic in most dishes.

Still not convinced? We break it all down for you – from the what to the how – and offer up some of our favourite garlicky Food Network Canada recipes as mouth-watering examples of where you can introduce this on-trend ingredient into your repertoire.

Related: 12 Hottest Food Trends We’ll Be Devouring in 2020

What is it?

In short, it’s your everyday run-of-the-mill white garlic – albeit gradually aged over a period of weeks. By gently heating entire bulbs in a humidity-controlled environment (think: rice cookers), you wind up with darkened, sticky cloves that quite frankly resemble garlic gone bad. Despite their slightly charred and off-putting appearance, the Maillard reaction (the chemical reaction between amino acids and sugars that lend browned/aged foods their unmistakable taste) actually deepens their flavours for an entirely different – and elevated – culinary experience.

Related: Mouth-Watering Recipes That Use 10 or More Cloves of Garlic


Get the recipe for Roger Mooking’s 30 Cloves of Garlic Sauce

What does it taste like?

For starters, it doesn’t taste much like traditional garlic. Once blackened, the cloves become earthy and syrupy-sweet in flavour, with additional hints of prunes, balsamic vinegar and black licorice. It’s also softer and has a molasses-like texture, making it easier to spread on crackers or crostini. Something for at-home chefs to consider: due to the loss of its original sharp taste, a larger volume of black garlic is required with any recipe in order to achieve higher taste levels.


Get the recipe for 8-Minute Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

How to use it

You can add black garlic to salad dressing or dip recipes, purée them with olive oil, create scrumptious pastes from scratch or rub onto fish or meat before popping your dish in the oven. If you purchase it in powdered form, you can also sprinkle it on pretty much anything your heart (and stomach) desires.

Related: Pinterest Predicts the Top 15 Food Trends for 2020


Learn how to make Everything Garlic Bread Knots

How to make it at home

We’ll be honest: it’s a long, drawn-out process, but if you have the time to spare, the results are well worth the wait. A relatively easy hack is to break out the rice cooker and use the “warm” setting to transform white garlic into black garlic over the span of roughly three to four weeks (or 40 days). You can also use your slow cooker.


Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Garlic Parmesan Twists

Where to buy it

Although it might be a little difficult to track down in major grocery chains, specialty stores, like Whole Foods, often carry both whole heads of pre-humidified black garlic and the powdered variety.

Health benefits

Although it’s lower in allicin, the compound that gives traditional garlic many of its health-boosting properties, black garlic is still rich in amino acids and contains double the antioxidants as the white variety. It’s also a great source of vitamins C and D.

For more at-home cooking experiments, check out these 8 Realistic Ways to Stick to Healthy Habits and the 10 Best Foods (and 5 Worst) for Your Mental Health and Wellness.

The Best Way to Cook with Wine This Season: Chorizo al Vino Tinto

Take a trip to Spain without leaving your kitchen with this simple, comforting dish that boasts bold flavours. Whether served as an accompaniment to other tapas or on its own as a companion to a lovely bottle of vino, this dish is sure to impress. It’s the perfect way to cook with red wine, as it showcases the depth and character of the fermented grapes. Try it tonight!

Chorizo al Vino Tinto

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Serves: 4 to 8

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
2 garlic cloves, 1 thinly sliced, 1 cut in half
2-4 cured chorizo sausages
2 cups dry Spanish red wine, such as Tempranillo
1 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 demi baguette, cut into ½-inch thick slices on a slight bias

Directions:

1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in a small, non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring often, until softened, about 2 minutes.

2. Pierce each sausage a few times with a fork and add to pan along with wine; bring to a simmer.

3. Cover and cook for 20 minutes, flipping sausage halfway. Remove from heat and let stand covered for 5 minutes. This will infuse the sausages with flavour.

4. Remove sausages from pan and cut into ½-inch thick slices. Pour wine into a heat-proof bowl or measuring cup and set aside.

5. Return sausages to pan over medium-high and cook until browned on both sides, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and add reserved wine; cook until slightly reduced, about 5 minutes.

6. Meanwhile, position an oven rack 6-inches from top of oven and heat broiler to high. Place baguette slices on a rimmed baking sheet and brush both sides with remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil. Place in oven and broil until golden, 1-2 minutes per side, checking often.

7. Once toasted, rub with cut side of remaining garlic clove.

8. Remove sausages and wine sauce to a serving dish and sprinkle with parsley. Serve with toasted bread.

Here, we’ve rounded up 50 creative ways to cook with sausage for dinner, plus our coziest fall comfort food recipes.

30-Minute Pasta with Green Garlic Pesto and Roasted Tomatoes

It’s always exciting when the farmers’ market stands start to show signs of spring and summer. Often, though, this produce doesn’t stick around for very long, so you need to take advantage when it’s available. One way of making spring last a little longer is to make pesto from some of the best seasonal offerings – in this case, green garlic (also known as young garlic that boasts a milder, more delicate flavour) but you can easily substitute for garlic scapes or ramps – then freeze to relish the flavours even when they’ve disappeared from the market.

The best thing about this recipe? Even though it features a few different components, if you multitask, it’s ready in about 30 minutes – leaving you more time to enjoy those lovely longer daylight hours we’re all so grateful for this time of year.

Spring Pasta with Green Garlic Pesto and Roasted Tomatoes

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients: 

Pasta
250g dried bucatini pasta

Roasted Tomatoes
3 cups cherry tomatoes, halved
Olive oil
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Pesto
6-8 green garlic shoots
1 cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated (approx.)
⅓ cup toasted pumpkin seeds
½ – ¾ cup olive oil
½ tsp salt

Assembly
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Fresh basil leaves

Directions:

1. Pre-heat the oven to 400˚F.
2. Line a baking tray with parchment paper and lay the tomatoes in a single layer on the tray.
3. Drizzle with a little olive oil and season with salt and pepper.
4. Roast the tomatoes for 15 minutes, remove from the oven and set aside.
5. While the tomatoes are roasting, prepare the pasta. Cook according to the directions on the package. Drain and set aside.
6. Make the pesto: Clean and trim the green garlic, and roughly chop.
7. Place the green garlic in a food processor with the Parmesan and the pumpkin seeds.
8. Start processing the mixture, slowly pouring in the oil until you reach your preferred consistency. Season to taste with salt.
9. Add approximately ½ cup of pesto to the pasta, using tongs to toss so the pasta is completely coated. Season with flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
10. Divide the pasta between four bowls, and top with the roasted tomatoes. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan and fresh basil leaves.

Notes:
● This makes approximately 1 cup of pesto, which is more than you’ll need for this recipe.
● If you won’t use the pesto immediately, place it in the fridge with a piece of plastic wrap touching the surface. You can also freeze the pesto for up to 2 months (in ice cube trays for convenient portioning!)

Looking for more easy and ultra-satisfying pasta recipes for spring? This 15-minute three-cheese pasta with peas is a seasonal must-make. We’ve also rounded up 25 spring dinners ready in 30 minutes or less.

8-Minute Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

This dish embodies the spirit and heart of Italian cuisine; fresh, simple ingredients with a few key flavours like garlic and oregano. Pan-frying the shrimp with lots of Parmesan gives this dish wonderful contrasting texture.

Perfect for a light summer lunch, finish with a squeeze of lemon juice and serve with chunk of toasted ciabatta bread slightly dipped in a good quality olive oil.

panfried-garlic-shrimp2

Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

Prep Time: 4 minutes
Cook Time: 4 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
2 dozen shrimp, deveined, head removed and tail on
1/4 cup olive oil
4 large cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/8 tsp ground pepper
Handful finely chopped basil leaves
Zest of one lemon + juice
1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan, divided

Directions:
1. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk olive oil, salt, pepper, oregano, garlic, lemon zest and chopped basil to combine.
2. Add shrimp and 1/2 Parmesan, and toss well with hands to coat.
3. Heat pan on maximum heat, add shrimp and cook each side until pink, about 3 to 4 minutes total.
4. Remove from heat and squeeze lemon juice on top; cover with the rest of the Parmesan and serve immediately with slices of toasted ciabatta or baguette.

Garlic Fingers with Donair Sauce

As every East Coaster knows, garlic fingers are a must when it’s late at night and you’re looking for a snack. But if you’re not in the Maritimes, you can rely on this quick and easy recipe to satisfy your cravings.

What makes this cheesy snack complete is the dipping sauce. If you’ve ever enjoyed a donair, you’ve licked this addictively sweet sauce off your fingers and maybe even your shirt. Creamy, thick and tangy, donair sauce is the real deal and a must-have with garlic fingers.

Garlic Fingers with Donair Sauce

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Makes: 2 to 4 servings

Ingredients

Donair Sauce
2/3 cup sweetened condensed milk
1/4 cup white vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic powder

Garlic Fingers
1 500g pkg pizza dough
1 Tbsp garlic butter, melted
2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

Garlic Fingers

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
2. Combine sweetened condensed milk with vinegar and garlic powder. Set aside.
3. Dust a 15-inch pizza pan with cornmeal. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Roll dough into a 14-inch circle. Transfer to pan. Brush garlic butter evenly over dough. Sprinkle with cheese.
4. Bake until cheese and crust are golden brown, about 15 minutes. To serve, cut pie in half, then rotate 90 degrees and cut pie into 2-inch strips. Serve with donair sauce.

Looking for more tasty snacks? Try our Poutine Pizza.

Smashed Potatoes with Roasted Garlic Cashew Butter

If you’ve been serving regular ol’ mashed potatoes every Thanksgiving for the past decade, we think it’s time you kicked things up a notch with smashed fingerling potatoes! Paired perfectly with fresh thyme and a dollop of our creamy roasted garlic cashew butter, wow your family and friends with this tasty new side dish.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 55 minutes
Serves: 6

888_smahed-potatoes

Ingredients:

Roasted Garlic Cashew Butter:
¾ cup raw whole cashews (soaked for 3 hours)
1 garlic bulb (roasted with 1 tsp olive oil + pinch sea salt)
¼ cup water
1 Tbsp coconut oil
¼ tsp sea salt

Smashed Potatoes:
6-7 cups fingerling potatoes (approximately 30)
1 Tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp fresh thyme + extra sprigs for garnish
¼ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp ground pepper

888_smahed-potatoes-2

Directions:
1. To roast the garlic bulb, pre-heat oven to 450°F. Trim about a ¼” off the top of the bulb to expose the cloves. Drizzle with 1 tsp olive oil and a pinch of sea salt. Bake for 20-25 minutes until roasted and soft on the inside.
2. Rinse and drain soaked cashews. Add to a high-powered blender with roasted cloves of garlic, water, coconut oil and sea salt. Blend until very smooth and refrigerate for 2 hours or more.
3. Toss whole fingerling potatoes in 1 Tbsp olive oil, fresh thyme, sea salt and ground pepper. Bake in an oven pre-heated to 450°F for 20 minutes.
4. Smash the whole potatoes with a fork to break open the skin. Drizzle with another 2 tsp olive oil and place whole thyme sprigs on top so they can crisp up as well. Bake again for another 10-12 minutes until crispy.
5. Serve immediately with a dollop roasted garlic cashew butter on each potato.

See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.

How to Make Everything Garlic Bread Knots

Garlic knots are incredibly easy to make. Don’t be afraid of yeasted dough — it’s actually very versatile. I’ve used this recipe to make pizza and focaccia as well. If you’re looking for something sweet, you can make a cinnamon and sugar mixture to roll the dough in before knotting it, too.

I also believe that everything spice can be used as a condiment or topping of sorts. I always have a jar of it on hand to sprinkle over a piece of toast with cream cheese and tomato slices. Use it to garnish soup, add flavour to dressings, top avocado toast or coat cheese balls.

Everything_Garlic_Knots-4

These are best eaten the day you make them but are just as delicious warmed up the day after.

Prep Time: 2 hours, 40 minutes (2 hours rise time)
Baking Time: 15 minutes
Makes: 12 knots

Everything_Garlic_Knots-2

Ingredients:

For the dough:
1 ¼ cup all purpose flour
1 cup bread flour
1 ½ tsp active dry yeast
1 cup room temperature water
½ tsp salt
2 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for oiling bowl

Everything_Garlic_Knots-1

For the everything spice mix:
1 Tbsp poppy seeds
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
2 tsp dried garlic flakes
2 tsp dried onion flakes
1 tsp coarse salt

For the garlic butter:
1 ½ Tbsp olive oil
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
3 cloves garlic, minced

Everything_Garlic_Knots-3

Directions:

For the dough:
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook, combine all dough ingredients on low speed.
2. Once the dough starts to come together, turn the mixer up to medium to knead for 3 minutes.
3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured or lightly oiled surface and knead by hand for an additional 3-5 minutes, until the dough is tight and smooth.
6. Lightly oil a large bowl and place the dough into the bowl.
7. Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and place it in a warm spot to rise for 1 hour or until it has doubled in size.

For the everything spice mix:
1. Combine all ingredients together in a bowl.
2. Transfer the spice mix onto a large plate for easy rolling.

Everything_Garlic_Knots-10

For the knots:
1. After the dough has doubled in sized, turn it out of the bowl onto a lightly floured or oiled surface and resist the urge to deflate and knead it.
2. Roll out the dough to a 6-inch by 12-inch rectangle with a rolling pin. Don’t over work the dough!
3. Cut the rectangle into twelve 1-inch strips with a knife or pizza roller.
4. Using lightly floured hands, roll each strip in the everything spice mix and knot the dough.
5. Place the knots on a lightly greased baking sheet, cover with a kitchen towel and place them in a warm spot to rise for 1 hour.
6. Pre-heat the oven to 400°F and bake the knots for 12-15 minutes, rotating the baking sheet halfway through for even baking.

Everything_Garlic_Knots-9

For the garlic butter:
1. Combine the olive oil, butter and minced garlic in a small pan.
2. Heat over medium-low until the butter has melted and the garlic is fragrant, about 1-2 minutes.
3. When the knots come out of the oven, brush each generously with the garlic butter, making sure to get the minced garlic onto the knots.

Everything_Garlic_Knots-6

100x100_Danielle-Oron Danielle is a chef, bakery owner, and food blogger who thinks she’s Korean, but is actually Israeli. Also, Danielle does not eat like a lady.

Made Easy: Colourful Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Quinoa

The leaves have fallen off the trees and the skies are consistently grey. It’s time to head to the farmers’ markets for a dose of colour! Vibrant heirloom carrots, creamy parsnips, ruby red beets, and yellow and red mini potatoes are in season now, so a colourful roasted vegetable platter will impress at the dinner table (or Christmas table for those already planning menus). Serve it with a side of this garlicky quinoa and grilled chicken seasoned with salt, pepper and Italian seasoning for a meal that you can also pack for lunch the next day.

Colourful Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Quinoa

RoastedVegetablesQuinoa_sized

Ingredients:
1 bunch baby heirloom carrots, peeled and cut into smaller sticks
1 bunch baby parsnips, peeled
2 whole garlic bulbs, tops sliced off
4 whole beets
24 red and yellow mini potatoes
1 cup dried quinoa, rinsed and strained
1 1/2 cups water
Vegetable or avocado oil*
Salt and pepper
Italian seasoning

RoastedVegetablesPan_sized

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven at 400°F.
2. In a pot of salted boiling water, blanch the potatoes for five minutes. Drain and let dry.**
3. Toss the parsnips, carrots, garlic bulbs, and potatoes with oil, salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning in a large bowl.
4. Wrap whole, unpeeled beets individually in aluminum foil.***
5. Place all the vegetables in a single layer on two large baking trays lined with parchment paper. Bake for an hour until the vegetables are soft, begin to appear wrinkled, and become fragrant.
6. In the meantime, bring 1 1/2 cups of salted water to a boil in a small pot over medium heat. Add in the quinoa, cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the water has evaporated and the quinoa has a fluffy texture. Remove lid and fluff with a fork.
7. When the vegetables are done roasting, remove from oven. Take three or four garlic cloves from the bulb and dice (or mash) into smaller pieces. Add the garlic into the pot with the quinoa. Gently toss with a fork.****
8. Remove the beets from the aluminum foil and peel off the skin. Slice the beets into thin slices.
9. Arrange the vegetables on a platter and serve with the garlic quinoa. Serves four generously.

RoastedVegetables_sized

Notes:

*Avoid using olive oil when cooking or roasting at high temperatures. Olive oil smokes and becomes bitter when exposed to high temperatures, so use oil that has a higher smoke point like vegetable or my current obsession, avocado.
**Have you ever roast potatoes and find that the insides are still hard and raw even after an hour of cooking? Blanch the potatoes first to give them a head start at cooking. This will give the potatoes their pillowy, almost mashed texture inside and a crispy skin on the outside. This extra step was a revelation for me.
***Unlike most vegetables where you first peel then roast, the skin of beets are much easier to remove when you roast them first. You’ll notice that you can literally peel the skin right off with your fingers once the beet is roasted. Of course, let the beet cool first so you don’t burn yourself. You’ll also want to do the peeling over the baking sheet and close to the sink since beet juice stains everything it touches.
****Garlic is downright heavenly when it caramelizes in the oven, creating a sweeter and less sharp garlic taste compared to its raw state. Leftover roasted garlic cloves can be added to soups, hummus, spreads, other roasted vegetables, grains, heck, it makes everything better.

734863_10151322355189438_2070375187_n Karon Liu is a freelance food writer based in Toronto who is slightly lactose intolerant but will otherwise eat and cook anything.

Topics: Made EasyVegetablesQuinoa