Tag Archives: fries

3 Healthy Baked Veggie Fries

Homemade vegetable fries, baked right in the oven, are a healthier way to get your fry fix. Just like potatoes, sturdy vegetables such as rutabaga, carrot, parsnip and zucchini, can withstand the heat of the oven needed for a crispy, golden-brown exterior and tender interior. These nutrient-rich frites offer great flavours and texture, in a healthy-carb package that was made for dipping.

Here are three simple variations of oven-baked French fries, along with a few tips on how to get them crisp, plus tasty dip ideas.

Italian-Zucchini-Fries-2

Veggie Fry Baking Tips
– After slicing, pat vegetables dry with a cloth or paper towel to remove excess moisture.
– Coat veggies in cornmeal or panko bread crumbs to add another layer of crunch to the exterior.
– Use the convection setting on your oven if you have it; baking at a higher heat (400ºF to 425ºF) for slightly less time. Circulating air means a crispier exterior.
– Use a high-temperature cooking oil, such as grapeseed, avocado, camelina or olive oil (not extra-virgin) to avoid smoke in the hot oven.
– Enjoy the fries as fresh as possible – like their deep-fried counterparts, these will soften as they cool.
– Make sure your parchment paper brand can withstand heat up to 425ºF.

Dip Ideas
Classic ketchup
Curry mayonnaise
Tzatziki
Greek yogurt with chipotle and lime
Garlicky honey mustard
Marinara sauce
Homemade cheese sauce

Rutabaga-Fries-1-1

Rutabaga Herb Oven Fries

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
1 large rutabaga, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch matchsticks
2 Tbsp olive oil or grapeseed oil
1 tsp herbs de Provence or dried thyme
1/2 tsp salt
Ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. Add all ingredients to prepared baking sheet and toss to combine; spread into a single layer.
3. Roast for 30 to 35 minutes, or until tender and golden brown on the underside. Serve.

Italian-Zucchini-Fries-3

Italian Zucchini Panko Wedge Fries

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs
1 tsp Italian seasoning or dried oregano
1/4 tsp salt
2 zucchini, halved crosswise and lengthwise, cut into thick sticks
1 Tbsp olive oil or grapeseed oil

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. Combine panko, Italian seasoning or dried oregano and salt on a plate. Coat zucchini in oil. Press zucchini into breadcrumbs and line up on prepared baking sheet.
3. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until zucchini is tender and golden brown on the underside. Serve.

Sesame-Carrot-Fries-1

Sesame Carrot Shoestring Fries

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
4 carrots, peeled, halved crosswise and cut into thin matchsticks
1 Tbsp olive oil or grapeseed oil
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
1 tsp black or white sesame seeds
1/4 tsp salt

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. In a medium bowl, toss carrots with olive oil, sesame oil, tamari and sesame seeds. Transfer to prepared baking sheet and spread into a single layer.
3. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, or until carrots are crisp and beginning to caramelize. Serve.

For more healthy alternatives, check out these 13 baked versions of your favourite fried foods.

RIV-Chip-Stand

Fry Guys on the Hunt for Spectacular Spuds Across Canada

The Fry Guys are on a delicious mission. A mission to eat at every single chip truck on the Trans-Canada Highway. The group of four, fry-loving friends from Toronto started their epic journey last summer. Packing up a vintage ‘74 Airstream trailer, they set out on the three-week Ontario leg, cameras and forks in hand, documenting every delicious, golden spud along the way.

Patrick T. Lo, 31, Chris Solomon, 32, Zachary Muir-Vavrina, 33, and Paul Parolin, 32, met at the Ontario College of Art and Design, where they bonded over a love of food, travel and Canadiana. Last year, the longtime friends cooked up the mouthwatering idea of eating their way across the country together, on an epic road trip along the Trans-Canada Highway.

trans-canada-fryway

Conjuring fond memories of roadside food, chip trucks stuck out as a quintessential part of Canadian road trips.

“It is such an interesting part of Canadiana that doesn’t really get the attention that it deserves,” says Parolin. “What if we went around and reviewed all of them and documented them? It might be what people are looking for to embark on the trip themselves.”

With Solomon at the wheel and Lo filming their culinary adventure, they hit the Trans-Canada Fryway in Toronto last August. Driving east to Québec, north to Kenora and round-trip back to Toronto, the Fry-Guys taste-tested chips at 55 different wagons along the way.

Each exit was a chance to taste a bit of local flavour, and the guys were ready with a slew of criteria and a five-fork rating system to apply to each stand. Only judging the fries, they got one small order with gravy, per stand, looking for fresh, crispy chips that stood up on their own. While the fries were the most important part, they were only one component. The ambiance, the number of picnic tables and even the number of seagulls were all factors for a winning chip truck.

“If there’s seagulls, you know it is worthwhile,” says Parolin.

While they started as humble food lovers, the Fry Guys refined their potato palate considerably on this road trip.

“At first, we were earning our credentials, but now I feel like we are the experts, for sure,” says Parolin. “After the pure number, I know right away if (the fry) has been sitting out, or if it has been frozen.”

Wes' Chips in Arnprior, ON

Wes’ Chips in Arnprior, ON.
Trans-Canada Fryway

In the three-week journey, only three spots earned the Fry Guys ultimate 5-Fork rating. Wes’ Chips in Arnprior stood out with its evenly-cooked fries and the Ottawa Valley tradition of letting the customer add in ketchup, salt or vinegar halfway, before topping up the container with more perfectly-fried spuds. Excellent fries, combined with lots of picnic tables and vintage signage makes Wes’ a must-visit, as locals have known for years.

“If you were remotely close to Arnprior, it is definitely worth the stop,” says Parolin.

Kingston’s Country Cabin Chip Hut and Kenora’s Ye Olde Chip Truck are also the trucks to beat in Ontario. Beyond the fantastic fries, Ye Old Chip Truck was one of the Fry Guys’ most interesting stops along the way. The chip truck chain is owned and operated by a pair of 20-something best friends, who bought their uncle’s former business, turning it into a spud-tacular empire.

“It was such an amazing passing of the torch moment, to see a place that has been around for 60 years in such great hands now with these two young entrepreneurs,” says Parolin.

While chowing down was a big part of the trip, it’s that unique Canadian chip truck culture that the guys aimed to capture. Like the dueling French fry stands in Sturgeon Falls.

Situated between North Bay and Sudbury, Larry’s and the Riv have been serving up fries across the highway from one another for more than 25 years. These fry-vals caught word of the Fry Guys’ trip long before they arrived and there was a crowd ready to greet them.

“Larry’s is run by people who have been there for 20 years, themselves. Then to go next door to Riv’s, it was like a high school class, everyone there knew each other,” says Parolin. “Their older siblings worked there, and their parents had worked there. It was almost like a right of passage if you are from that region.”

RIV-Chip-Stand

Fries and gravy from The Riv in Sturgeon Falls, Ont.

While these stands are often social hubs for the local community, the Fry Guys found their voyage helped connect fellow fry-cooks across Ontario. One stop in Deep River was especially moving. They asked the owner of a fry stand to sign their trailer and she stopped and told them how much it meant to her to see all the other people who spend their day slicing and frying.

“When she looked at all these other names of people across our country who are doing the same thing she’s doing, it felt like she was a part of something bigger,” says Parolin. “It is stuff like that that made the trip worthwhile.”

Since the sunny days of August, the guys have been working away to publish the first leg of their trip as a web series. (Check out their first episode below.) They hope to have the rest of their Ontario episodes complete this spring, and to continue their cross-Canada road trip this summer, ahead of Canada’s 150th birthday.

“Eating the French fries was the thread that holds our idea together, but it is just as important to us to focus on the actual journey of going across the country and what that means to Canadians,” says Parolin.

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Leftover Turkey? Make This Family-Style Poutine

You’ve made turkey soup and endless turkey sandwiches, but there’s one more deliciously Canadian way to use up those last bits of leftover holiday turkey.

All of the best parts of a festive turkey dinner combine to make a cheesy, gravy-filled poutine. Roast sweet potatoes make a festive, crispy and colourful base for leftover or quick homemade gravy, cranberry sauce, turkey and squeaky cheese curds. Just set in the middle of the table with lots of forks, and enjoy!

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Serves: 10 to 15

Ingredients:

Sweet Potato Fries
2 large sweet potatoes, skin intact, cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch strips or wedges
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp salt

Cranberry Sauce (or 1/2 cup prepared cranberry sauce)
1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
1/4 cup orange juice
2 Tbsp maple syrup

For the Extra Toppings
200g cheese curds
8 oz cooked smoked or roasted turkey meat (not deli meat), shredded
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary, plus whole fresh rosemary twigs to garnish

Family Style Holiday Poutine

Directions:

Sweet Potato Fries
1. Preheat oven to 425ºF.
2. On a large baking sheet, toss all sweet potato ingredients until sweet potatoes are evenly coated.
3. Roast for 30 to 35 minutes until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork and beginning to brown on the bottom.

Cranberry Sauce
1. In a medium skillet or small saucepan, bring all cranberry sauce ingredients to a boil. Reduce to medium low. Cook, uncovered, for 5 to 10 minutes, until liquid has reduced and cranberries are burst.
2. Remove from heat, mash cranberries with a fork until desired texture is reached. Set aside.

Assembly
1. On a warm platter or in a warmed cast-iron skillet (for presentation only), add a bed of fries. Top with cheese curds and turkey. Ladle over gravy (use as much as you prefer; there may be extra), followed by cranberry sauce and chopped rosemary. Garnish with a rosemary twig and serve immediately.

Looking for more tasty leftover ideas? Try our 14 Ways to Enjoy Holiday Leftovers.

Love Poutine? You Need to Try Newfoundland Fries

Never heard of Newfoundland Fries? We’re not surprised. Similar to poutine, this gravy-smothered dish is Newfoundland‘s best kept secret. Crispy fries are covered in a dressing or stuffing flavoured with savory spice, and topped off with a rich beef gravy. The result is a delicious cross between Thanksgiving dinner and your favourite late-night snack.

You can find the satisfying fast-food dish on the menu at most greasy spoons, chip trucks or canteens around Newfoundland. If you’re lucky enough to taste it right on The Rock, be sure to wash it down with a cold can of birch beer or pineapple Crush.

This recipe is a slight variation of the classic using panko instead of breadcrumbs, and adding cider vinegar and Worcestershire in the dressing for a bit of tang.

Newfie Fries

Newfoundland Fries

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Serves: 2

Ingredients:

For the Fries
1 3-L container canola oil
3 lbs Yukon gold potatoes or PEI potatoes, cut into long 1/2 inch wide strips
1/4 tsp kosher salt

For the Dressing
1/2 cup panko crumbs
1 tsp dried savory
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp granulated sugar
1/8 tsp kosher salt
Black pepper, freshly ground, to taste

For the Gravy
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef stock
2 tsp cider vinegar
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp kosher salt

Newfie Fries

Directions:
1. Place potatoes in a large bowl filled with cold water. Let sit, refrigerated, for at least 1 hour. Drain and let dry on a baking sheet.
2. Add enough oil (about 7 cups) into a large, heavy-bottomed pot until it reaches 4 inches up the sides. Heat oil over medium heat until temperature reaches 300°F.
3. Blanch fries in 2 batches for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer to baking sheet lined with paper towel.
4. Increase heat until oil reaches 375°F. Add fries in 2 batches and cook until golden-brown, about 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt.
5. To make dressing, toast panko breadcrumbs with dried savory in a large pan set over medium heat, until light golden brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl.
6. Add butter to the pan, then onion, cook until softened, about 3 to 5 minutes. Season with sugar, salt and pepper. Stir onion mixture into bread crumbs.
7. To make the gravy, melt the butter in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Add flour, whisking occasionally, until paste turns a light golden brown, about 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in stock, vinegar and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to a boil, then lower heat to medium-low and let simmer 2 minutes.
8. To assemble, divide fries between two plates. Sprinkle with dressing, then cover in gravy. Sprinkle with more dressing if desired.

Want to share your variation of Newfoundland fries? Share your recipe with us!

Looking for another taste of Newfoundland? Discover What a Newfoundland Kitchen Party is Really Like.

Le Roy Jucep Poutine

The History of Poutine: One Hot Mess

When it comes to poutine, three things are certain: it was invented in Québec, it’s best made with fresh cheese curds and it’s undeniably delicious. What’s less clear is who first made it, and when.

The very history of this palate-pleasing, artery-clogging French Canadian masterpiece is a hot mess, peppered with colourful characters and laced with a distracting array of secret sauces and gooey melted cheese curds.

Jucep Poutine

Two Québec restaurants in the region south of Trois-Rivieres claim to be first to serve up the now-iconic dish. Café Ideal, later re-named Le Lutin Qui Rit (The Laughing Elf), has the earliest claim. Story has it, the Warwick, Qué. café was serving poutine — or something quite like it — as early as 1957. But detractors suggest that even if Café Ideal served it first, their piping hot bag of fries and fresh cheese curds was missing a key ingredient — the gravy, known in Québec as ‘sauce brune.’

The more widely accepted claim to serving all three key ingredients together comes from Drummondville’s Le Roy Jucep, once owned by the late Jean-Paul Roy. Le Roy Jucep holds the trademark as “l’inventeur de la poutine” but just like their menu, which offers 23 options for cheesy, sauce-smothered fries, their origin story comes in several flavours. Some say it was an out-of-town customer who first asked his waitress to toss fresh cheese curds — widely available in the dairy-rich region — onto his plate of fries and gravy. Others claim the culinary ménage a trois was a frequent off-menu request from the diner’s regulars – so frequent that Roy decided to make it an official menu option around 1965 or 1967.

Le Roy Juce

Le Roy Juce, is one of a few restaurants claiming to be the birthplace of poutine.

“Whoever’s the first human to put cheese, gravy and fries on a plate, we’ll never know for sure,” says Charles Lambert, Le Roy Jucep’s third owner and current protector of the diner’s secret sauce recipe. “[But] the first restaurant to write the letters P-O-U-T-I-N-E on a menu is for sure Le Roy Jucep. And that represented fries, cheese curds and gravy.”

According to Lambert, in the mid-60’s wait staff grew tired of writing “fries, cheese curds and gravy” each time a customer ordered the increasingly popular dish, and decided it needed a name. Lambert has a few ideas for how the now famous moniker came to be. “Poutine” was regional slang for “pudding,” and another way of saying “mix” or “mess” — both appropriate adjectives. Moreover, one of Le Roy Jucep’s cooks went by the nickname “Ti-Pout,” so “poutine” was a name that honoured both the dish and its maker.

Café Ideal’s name story is a similar, albeit saltier tale. Popular history has it that when Eddy Lanaisse, reportedly the first customer to ask for cheese curds with his fries, made his request, owner Fernand Lachance exclaimed, “Ça va te faire une maudite poutine!” or “That will make a damned mess!”

On that point, at least, we have accord: poutine is a mess, but damned if it isn’t delicious.

Can’t get enough poutine? Try these delicious 9 Fun Facts About Poutine.

How to Make Paul McGreevy’s Saskatoon Pie Fries

“When you make a lot of pies, you end up with a lot of dough trimmings,” says Paul McGreevy, executive chef at Calgary brunch hotspot The Beltliner. “As a chef, you want to think of ways to utilize the leftovers of any ingredient or product, so we tested out this idea I had for pie ‘fries’. We ran it for a feature for a few weeks and people really loved it, so now they’re on the menu.”

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Here’s how to make The Beltliner’s signature treat at home:

Do the dough right.
The most important tip is to avoid over-mixing your dough, says McGreevy. The second most important thing is to work with cold butter or lard to make sure you get a perfectly flaky pastry.

Fill ’em up.
“I have tried a lot of fillings and have yet to find one that hasn’t worked,” says Chef McGreevy. “Use a filling you love.”

Chill out! Your filling, that is.
It’s always better to work with chilled filling while making these pie fries or any pie in general. Warm filling and cold pastry don’t go together!

Play with presentation.
“I like to play off of French fries for presentation,” says McGreevy, “so paper bags, small baskets work well.”

Serve with dip.
Vanilla crème Anglaise and caramel are great choices.

Saskatoon Pie Fries
Makes: 12 pieces

Ingredients:

For the Filling:
4 cups Saskatoon berries (fresh or frozen)
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 cup granulated sugar
1/8 cup cornstarch
1 Tbsp unsalted butter

For the Pie Dough:
315 g all purpose flour
3/4 tsp salt
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
250 g unsalted butter
125 ml ice water

Directions:

For the Filling:
1. Combine all ingredients except butter in a heavy bottom sauce pot and place over medium heat.
2. Once the juices have started to come out of the berries, turn the heat up to high and continue to cook until the liquid has reduced and the mixture is thick.
3. Remove from heat and allow to cool completely before use.

For the Pie Dough:
1. Dice butter into 1/4-inch cubes and place in fridge.
2. Mix all dry ingredients together in a stainless steel mixing bowl.
3. Add diced butter to flour and using a paddle attachment, mix at low speed until the butter is pea meal size.
4. Add ice water and mix until just incorporated.
5. Wrap the dough and place in fridge for at least 1 hour.

To Assemble:
1. Place filling in a food processor and pulse until the berries have broken up. Place mix into a piping bag.
2. Cut the ball of dough in half.
3. Roll the dough until 1/4-cm thick and into a rectangular shape (15 inch x 9 inch). Repeat with second piece.
4. Starting 1/2 an inch from the edge of the pastry, pipe the filling approximately 1 cm thick. Leave a 1-inch space then pipe a second line of filling. Repeat twice more.
5. Carefully lay the second sheet over top and gently rest on top. Using a chef’s knife, cut in between each row of the filling.
6. Cut strips into 3-inch long pieces and place on baking tray lined with parchment paper.
7. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Bake at 350°F for 8-10 minutes.

Cheesy Grit Fries with Old Bay Mayo

Southern cuisine is definitely on the rise and more often than not, you’ll find that grits are big part of this good ol’ comfort food. Today you can find grits at trendy restaurants all over Canada, so keep an eye out for them!

Grits are usually stone ground to achieve a fairly coarse corn meal similar to polenta. You’ll often find them served as a side, but there are a few dishes, like New Orleans’ style BBQ shrimp and grits, which really showcase their creamy goodness. Sub out those average mashed potatoes for grits in your next family meal. Trust me, they go with almost everything.

Here I decided to cook them in a classic way, but then I refrigerate them, cut them, and deep-fry them into fries! This goes perfectly with some Old Bay-flavoured mayo dip to really transport you down to the country.

Grit_Fries_Old_Bay_Mayo-6

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes
Serves: 6 – 8

Ingredients:

For the Old Bay Mayo:
½ cup mayonnaise
1 tsp old bay seasoning
½ tsp white vinegar

For the Grit Fries:
1 cup medium ground white grits
2 ½ cups water
1 ½ cups heavy cream
3 tbsp unsalted butter
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
¾ cup grated Gruyère
¾ cup grated sharp cheddar
½ cup cornstarch
1 ½ tsp smoked paprika
Peanut oil or canola oil, for frying
Finishing salt (such as Maldon Salt)
Chopped parsley, garnish

Directions:

For the Old Bay Mayo:
1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and set in the fridge until ready to serve.

For the Grit Fries:
1. Place the grits, water, heavy cream, butter, salt and pepper in a sauce pot, and place over medium heat.

2. Once it comes to a boil, turn the heat down to low, cover and simmer for 20-22 minutes, stirring very often until the grits are thick and super creamy.

Grit_Fries_Old_Bay_Mayo-1

3. Turn the heat off and add the Gruyère and cheddar. Stir until all the cheese as melted into the grits. Taste and adjust for seasoning.

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4. Prepare a sheet pan by spraying with a light coating of cooking spray. Pour the grits onto the sheet pan and spread until level.

5. Cover with plastic wrap and leave on the counter for 20 minutes to cool. Transfer the pan to the fridge and allow to set for at least 1 hour or up to 24 hours.

Grit_Fries_Old_Bay_Mayo-3

6. Carefully turn out the grits onto a cutting board. Cut into ¾” x 3” long pieces that look like fries.

7. Combine the cornstarch and paprika in a shallow bowl, and season with a bit of salt and pepper.

8. Heat a large skillet with 1/4” of oil over medium-low heat. Once the oil is rippling, dredge the grit fries in the cornstarch mixture shaking and patting off the excess cornstarch, then place them in the oil.

Grit_Fries_Old_Bay_Mayo-4

9. Fry for 1 ½ – 2 minutes per side and transfer onto a cooling rack or paper towel lined plate.

10. Season with finishing salt when the fries come out of the oil.

Grit_Fries_Old_Bay_Mayo-7

11. Arrange nicely on a serving tray and garnish with chopped parsley. Serve with Old Bay Mayo.

Greek Waffle Nachos with Spiced Lamb

This downright comforting dish combines crispy waffle fries tossed in oregano and lemon juice, piled high with gyro spiced lamb, tzatziki, tomatoes, onions, kalamata olives and feta cheese. It’s a Greek food lover’s dream made at home.

If you don’t have a spit to cook real gyro at home (and I’m assuming most of us don’t), a skillet works fine here. The ground lamb is browned with tons of spices and garlic to really give you all the flavours that come from gyro, but with none of the hassle. My only tip is to serve this hot and with lemon wedges. Squeeze the lemon over top of the lamb and fries. It gives this dish a nice brightness. Enjoy!

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-6

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-4

Ingredients:

For the tzatziki:
½ English cucumber
1 cup plain Greek yogurt
1 clove garlic, minced finely
1 Tbsp chopped dill
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 pinches of salt

For the gyro spiced lamb:
1 lb (454 g) ground fatty lamb
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried thyme
¼ tsp coriander
¼ tsp cumin
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp black pepper

For the waffle fries:
1 package (22 oz or 623 g) frozen waffle fries, baked or fried as per package instructions
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
½ tsp dried oregano
½ tsp salt

Diced tomatoes
Sliced red onions
Crumbled feta cheese
Torn kalamata olives
Chopped dill
Lemon wedges

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-3

Directions:

For the tzatziki:
1. Peel and cut the cucumber in half, length wise.
2. Using a spoon, scrape out the seeds of the cucumber and discard. Then grate the cucumber on the large hole of a box grater.
3. Place the grated cucumber in clean tea towel and sprinkle with a few pinches of salt. Allow the cucumber to sit and release its water.
4. After 10 minutes, pull the corners of the tea towel together and wring out as much of the water as possible.
5. Place the cucumber in a bowl and combine with the yogurt, garlic, dill, lemon juice and two pinches of salt.
6. Set aside in the fridge until you’re ready to serve.

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-1

For the gyro spiced lamb:
1. In a large skillet over medium heat, start to brown the ground lamb while breaking it up. It will begin to release its fat.
2. After 1-2 minutes, mix in the garlic, oregano, thyme, coriander, cumin, salt and pepper.
3. Continue to brown the lamb for another 7-8 minutes until cooked through.
4. Drain off most of the excess fat from the lamb.

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-2

For the waffle fries and plating:
1. As soon as the waffle fries come out of the oven or fryer, toss with lemon juice, oregano and salt in a large bowl.
2. Transfer the fries onto the serving dish. I used a skillet because I thought it was cool.
3. Top the fries with dollops of tzatziki. Pile the lamb on top and garnish with as much or as little diced tomatoes, sliced onions, crumbled feta, torn kalamata olives and chopped dill as desired.
4. Serve immediately with lemon wedges! Enjoy!

Gryo_Spiced_Lamb_Waffos-7

100x100_Danielle-Oron Danielle is a chef, bakery owner, and food blogger who thinks she’s Korean, but is actually Israeli. Also, Danielle does not eat like a lady.

8 Must-Try Poutineries From Coast to Coast

A Canadian classic, poutine is always at the top of our comfort food list. And although there are tons of casual chains offering up plates of cheesy, gravy-soaked fries, here are 8 eateries that add a bit more pizzazz to this iconic dish.

Below Deck Tavern (Calgary, AB) – Good Ol’ Fashioned Poutine
For East Coasters looking for a little taste of home in Western Canada, this is the spot to be. Revel in deliciousness with dishes such as deep-fried pepperoni and cottage pie. But for something a little extra special, opt for Below Deck’s spin on a poutine. They season skinny fries with old bay seasoning and top with the regular curds and gravy. Add on some donair meat while you’re at it.

kiwianne_Caplanskys_Poutine

Caplansky’s (Toronto, ON) – Smoked Meat Poutine
Food Network Canada personality, Zane Caplansky, has built a big brand for himself in Toronto creating a successful delicatessen-style business. Try his version of the poutine, chock full of quality, kosher smoked meat.

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La Banquise 24th (Montreal, QC) – Hot Dog Poutine
Open 24 hours for all your post-bar, drunken food cravings, this popular spot for poutine in the heart of poutine land — Montreal — serves up more variations on this theme than you can imagine. Naturally, after a hard night out, you’re not always thinking, so skip the brain work and just go for the hot dog option. I mean, who’s counting calories at 3 am?

La Pataterie Hulloise (Gatineau, QC)
Most Ottawans will tell you that if you’re really interested in finding a great poutine, then you need to take a short drive over the river from Ottawa to Gatineau. This no frills spot keeps their offerings simple because sometimes, you just don’t need to mess with a good thing.

Peasant Cookery (Winnipeg, MB)
There’s something nice and homey about this restaurant in the exchange district of downtown Winnipeg. The menu is all about good ol’ home cooked food, but taken up a notch. Crispy fries are topped with curds from a local producer, Bothwell Cheese and a bacon gravy. We’ll order two please.

The-Reef---Jerk-Chicken-Poutine

The Reef (Vancouver, BC) – Jerk Chicken Poutine
I guarantee that you’ve never had Caribbean jerk in this application before. Sure, the cheese curds and fries are pretty average, but the pulled chicken in this dish is great and the gravy is sweet and spicy with hints of cinnamon. Out of every dish on this list, this bastardization (if you will) of poutine is one of the most interesting.

Schryers-Smoked-BBQ-Shack_fb-smoked-mozza-poutine

Schryer’s Smoked BBQ Shack (Saskatoon, SK) – Smoked Mozza Poutine
I’m still a little shocked there’s not a poutine-inspired perogy dish in my hometown (maybe there is and I’m just out of the loop) and even more shocked that a good poutine is still hard to come by in Saskatoon, but thankfully this top notch barbecue joint is saving the day. If you’ve never had smoked mozzarella, you haven’t lived. Add this gooey delicacy into a poutine equation and you’ve got something really worth forking into.

Willy’s Fresh Cut (Halifax, NS)
Like I mentioned earlier with Below Deck Tavern, donair meat in a poutine is an East Coast favourite and Willy’s can definitely verify that fact. If donair meat isn’t your cup of tea, try Willy’s stuffing poutine, or one with a big helping of pulled pork on top.

Dan-Clapson-Avatar Dan Clapson is a food writer and culinary instructor based out of Calgary. He is constantly creating new recipes and striving to expand his culinary horizons. He thinks yam fries are overrated.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Chipotle Dipping Sauce

Sweet potato wedges make a fantastic snack or simple side dish, especially when paired with a tasty sauce for dipping. Sweet potatoes are packed with Vitamin A and fibre, among other health benefits, and their naturally sweet flavour and crispy exterior (once baked) makes them a fan favourite you can feel good about serving your friends and family.

888_Sweet-Potato-Wedges-with-Chipotle-Sauce

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
2 medium sweet potatoes, scrubbed clean and cut into wedges
1 tsp canola oil
½ tsp kosher salt
¼ tsp pepper
¼ cup mayonnaise
2 tsp honey
½ tsp cumin
1 tsp adobo
1 tsp minced chipotle

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425°F with a baking sheet in the centre of the oven.
2. In a bowl, gently toss sweet potato with oil, salt and pepper. Arrange sweet potato wedges in a single layer on the preheated baking sheet. Bake for 30 minutes, turning once midway through until browned on all sides.
3. Meanwhile, whisk together mayonnaise, honey, cumin, adobo and chipotle. Serve wedges alongside chipotle dip.

amanda riva Amanda Riva is the host of The Hot Plate, a free online cooking show dedicated to inspiring culinary confidence in new cooks. The Hot Plate also offers regular cooking tips and advice, how-tos, and information on seasonal ingredients. Amanda Riva is part of the Blog Network family.

Avocado Fries with Roasted Garlic Dip

After coming across other blogs featuring avocado fries, I knew I had to try this intriguing combination. Here is my take on these curiously delicious snack.

avocado-fries-recipe

I haven’t tried this recipe with any other type of avocado, but I would recommend using one that isn’t quite ripe yet, and still stiff when you squeeze it. Store it in your fridge before making these, this way you don’t have to worry about it being too soft when you bread and cook it.

Ingredients:

For the fries:
1 Avocado
3/4 Cup Panko Bread Crumbs
2 to 3 Tbsp flour
1 egg
Parmesan cheese
Salt and pepper
Canola oil

For  the dip:
2 cloves roasted garlic
1 Tbsp butter
3 Tbsp sour cream
Chili paste
Lemon juice (optional)

Directions:
1. In a small frying pan on low heat, add one tablespoon of butter and two cloves of chopped garlic, cooking until browned. Once the garlic is done, add it into a bowl with your sour cream and a few drops of chili paste (add as much or as little as you want, depending on your heat preference). Mix it all together with a spoon, mashing up the garlic as much as you can. Taste it once it is thoroughly mixed, if you feel it needs a little more zing, try adding a few drops of lemon juice. Set aside.
2. Take two plates and a bowl, put your panko and flour on the plates and scramble an egg into your bowl. Shred some Parmesan cheese into your bowl of panko. Add salt and pepper to taste (mix it around and get your finger wet, dip it in the panko and give it a taste until its to your liking). Slice your avocado into fry-like chunks, cover with flour, then egg and finally bread it with the panko and put it on a plate. Repeat this until all your avocado is done.
3. While you are breading everything, get a pan ready on medium-high heat with enough oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Once the pan is evenly heated, drop all your avocado fries in and cook each side until golden brown. Serve immediately with dip.

100x100_BS Carlene and Bob Deutscher are the dynamic sibling duo behind BS’ in the Kitchen. While Carlene leans towards the sweeter side of things, baking up delicious desserts, you can count on Bob to cook up something savoury! Aside from blogging on BS’ in the Kitchen, Carlene works in marketing & communications, and sidelines as a lifestyle & wedding photographer, while Bob operates his own media company, with a focus on food photography, and videography! Carlene and Bob Deutscher are part of the Lifestyle Blog Network family.

Edamame Mash Sandwiches with Baked Fries

Veggie sandwiches don’t have to be dull and drab. Combining bright green edamame and fresh herbs makes for a delicious and beautiful sandwich filling. In this recipe we offer up some pretty pairings for your sandwich, but feel free to let your creativity fly and stack this sandwich with as many ingredients as you like. Bake up a batch of easy homemade fries and you’ve got yourself a meatless dinner the whole family can enjoy.

Serving Size: 4
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 65 minutes

888_edamame mash

Ingredients:

Sandwich:
1 cup red cabbage, shredded
1/2 cup sauerkraut
8 slices of thick cut bread of your choice
4 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise
2 tomatoes cut into slices
1 1/2 cups baby spinach

Edamame Mash:
1 1/2 cups frozen shelled edamame
2 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon vegan mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves
1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves
1 tablespoon fresh dill fronds
1/4 teaspoon ground mustard
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

Baked Fries:
4 russet potatoes
1/4 cup sunflower oil
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 teaspoon paprika

888_edamame mash sandwich

Directions:

1. Mix red cabbage with sauerkraut and let it sit in the fridge overnight. The cabbage will soak up the fermented liquid in the sauerkraut and soften.
2. Preheat the oven to 425°F for the fries.
3. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Wash the potatoes and cut into approximately 1-centimetre sticks, leaving the skin on. Once the water is at a rolling boil, submerge the potato sticks in the water and                    cook for 10 minutes.
4. Drain the water from the pot and toss them in oil, sea salt, ground pepper, and paprika until evenly coated.
5. Lay the fries out on baking sheets without over crowding. Bake for 50-55 minutes, flipping halfway through. Meanwhile, prepare the edamame mash.
6. Place edamame in heat safe bowl. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a kettle and pour over edamame. Place a plate or lid on top of the bowl and let them sit for 5 minutes. Drain the hot water and rinse                     under cold water until they are no longer emitting heat.
7. Place edamame, garlic, lime juice, vegan mayonnaise, cilantro, mint, dill, ground mustard, sea salt, and ground pepper into a food processor.
8. Process until the mash is well combined but still has some texture to it. Refrigerate until ready to assemble sandwiches.
9. To assemble the sandwiches, spread vegan mayonnaise onto one side of each slice of bread, then add edamame mash to the other side
10. Top with the cabbage/sauerkraut mixture, tomato slices, baby spinach leaves, and top with another slice of bread.
11. Serve with baked fries right out of the oven.

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