Tag Archives: Fresh

Watermelon-Fattoush-Salad-feature-image

3 Delicious Ways to Use All That Leftover Watermelon

There is nothing better than a cold, crisp slice of watermelon on a hot sunny day. Biting into sweet, refreshing fruit that leaves juice dripping down your face is one of the quintessential moments of summer.

Unless you’re having a seed spitting contest, chances are, you won’t eat the whole melon in one sitting. Watermelon loses its fresh texture when it’s been in the fridge for a few days, getting soft and mealy. To make the most of this seasonal melon, you’ll need to think beyond the standard wedge. Don’t feel burdened by this extra large fruit; instead, try one of these recipes to savour those watermelon leftovers.

Watermelon Fattoush

Watermelon Fattoush Salad
Watermelon and feta salad is old news. Replace it with this fresh and flavourful summer salad. Drizzle pita with olive oil and za’atar and toast until crisp. Break the pita into bite-size crackers. If you don’t have za’atar, just use some sesame seeds and salt. Cube watermelon into 1-inch chunks and toss with sliced cucumber and some finely sliced red onion. Mix the pita, onion, cucumber and melon together with some parsley leaves. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Slice halloumi cheese into 1/2-inch slices. Grill it over high heat until crisp and then top the salad with it.

watermelon basil lemonade

Watermelon Basil Lemonade
Muddle 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves with 1/3 cup sugar and 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice. Blend 3 cups watermelon with 1 1/2 cups cold water. Pour through a fine-mesh strainer and transfer to pitcher. Mix in the basil and lemon mixture. Pour over ice and garnish with fresh basil, lemon and lime slices.

watermelon pops

Watermelon Kefir and Kiwi Popsicles
Blend two cups of chopped watermelon with 1 cup kefir, the juice of one lime and 1 tablespoon of honey. Slice 2 kiwis into 1/4-inch slices. Divide kiwis into 6 popsicles molds and then pour in the watermelon mixture to fill. Place in freezer until frozen through, about 4 hours.

Looking for more marvelous melon? Try these Refreshing Watermelon Recipes.

The Ultimate Summer Condiment (and 5 Ways to Use It)

Summer is made for spontaneous cooking; grilling what you bring home from the farmer’s market, tossing enormous salads with what you have on hand and building sky-high sandwiches to take on a picnic.

While there are lots of sauces, dressings and toppings, all you really need is one super summer condiment to finish your creations with big flavour. And we’ve got just the thing: Salsa Verde. Not the Mexican version, which packs tomatillos and heat (although that one’s good, too) — the Italian kind, loaded with fresh garden herbs, nuanced with briny capers, garlic, umami-rich anchovies and enlivened with a touch of piquant mustard. It adds a deep, savoury, herbal, rich flavour perfect for all impromptu summer eating adventures.

Salsa Verde

Salsa Verde
Active Time: 5 minutes
Makes: ¾ cup

Ingredients:
¼ cup capers
6 anchovies
2 medium garlic cloves
1 tsp grainy mustard
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
½ cup finely chopped parsley
¼ cup finely chopped basil
¼ cup finely chopped mint
Salt, to taste

Directions:
1. Combine capers, anchovies, garlic and mustard in a small food processor and process to a coarse paste (or do it by hand with a mortar and pestle).
2. Transfer to a medium bowl and whisk in olive oil, then stir in herbs. Season with a good pinch of salt, taste, and add more if desired.
3. Store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Salsa Verde

Here are 5 delicious ways to use up your jar of green gold:

1. Use it as a marinade for beef, lamb, chicken or halloumi cheese. Simply toss a big spoonful into a freezer bag with your protein of choice and marinate for 30 minutes to 24 hours.

2. Stir it into thick Greek yogurt with a squeeze of lemon and serve alongside salmon, toss with boiled potatoes for a vibrant, herb-filled potato salad, or use as a green goddess dip for garden-fresh crudités.

3. Swirl it into mayo for an herb aioli, and then use it to spread on sandwiches; chicken, lamb or beef burgers; and as a dressing for veggie-packed pasta salads.

4. Mash it into softened butter as a flavour-loaded finish for grilled steaks, lamb chops and corn on the cob. Just dab it onto piping hot food to melt before serving.

5. Thin it out with a bit more olive oil and drizzle over grilled vegetables, or use as a dressing for salads. Add a squeeze of lemon for brightness.

How to Keep Fruit Fresh

How to Keep Summer Fruit Fresh Longer

As summer stretches into long, balmy afternoons and ripens to a peak, so does the fruit in the fields and orchards. Suddenly the market is brimming with sweet, juicy nectarines, ruby red strawberries, and plump indigo blueberries. And then, poof! As quickly as they appeared, they’ll be gone. If this brief, dizzying moment of plenty sends you into a buying frenzy, you’re not alone. Once you’ve carried home your weight in peak-ripeness apricots and raspberries, how do you keep them from turning to mush before you can devour every last one? Here’s how to extend the life of your precious summer bounty.

How to make fruit last longer

Keep it cool.
Refrigerate all berries and ripe stone fruits as soon as you bring them home.  Once they’ve reached their peak, the heat (even room temperature) will cause spoilage, quickly. Perfect strawberries can go bad in a single afternoon on the counter.

Keep it dry.
Humidity is the enemy. Don’t wash your fruit until ready to eat, and store on paper towels or a clean dish towel to absorb any excess moisture. Keep it on a shelf in your fridge, not in the crisper drawer — unless you have one you can program. The standard fridge drawers offer a higher-humidity environment suited to vegetables, but unfriendly to fruit.

Give it space.
Ripe fruit is soft and injures easily. Don’t leave raspberries piled into the box they came in to be mushed under their own weight, and don’t cram juicy nectarines into a produce bag where they bash and bruise each other senseless every time you rustle them. Whenever you damage the flesh, you create an opportunity for mould.

How to Keep Fruit Fresh

Give it air.
If fruit is packed tightly, there is little air circulation, which means more humidity and faster rot. Store ripe stone fruit like peaches, plums and cherries in a shallow bowl in the fridge. Gently transfer fragile berries to a wide container lined with paper towels, keeping them in a single layer or close to it. Leave the container lid slightly ajar to let excess moisture escape.

Wash in acid.
If you’ve brought home apricots or strawberries that are still slightly under-ripe, try giving them an acid bath. Swish any whole (never cut), firm fruit in one part vinegar to 10 parts water. The solution kills off any mould spores already on the fruit, potentially increasing its longevity.

Looking for more tasty recipes? Try one of our 36 Strawberry Desserts to Celebrate Summer.