Tag Archives: fish

Blackened trout and green beans on white plate

This Blackened Trout With Green Beans Only Takes 10 Minutes to Make (Yes, Really!)

Whether you seriously have no time to cook or you just have no desire to cook long, lengthy recipes, this is the perfect dinner for you! Blackening fish for this We Know You Have 10 Minutes recipe may seem complicated, but it is far from it. You simply combine a few spices, place them on the flesh of the fish and sear. Voila, that’s it! As the fish is cooking, you add orange juice in the pan to help poach and sweeten it. The fish isn’t actually blackening or burning, rather it is the spices that are and this technique helps enhance their flavours. Pair it with blanched green beans for a speedy side of veggies.

Blackened trout and green beans on white plate

Blackened Trout With Green Beans

Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cook Time: 7 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 lb French green beans
1 Tbsp paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
1 tsp Italian seasoning
1 tsp sea salt, divided
4 4-5 oz pieces of trout
1 Tbsp + few tsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
¾ cup orange juice (3 oranges), divided
½ lemon squeezed
3 tsp orange zest
¼ cup fresh parsley, roughly chopped

Blackened trout and green beans ingredients on kitchen countertop

Directions:

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Salt the water. As you’re waiting for the water to boil, prepare an ice bath in another big bowl.

2. Carefully drop the green beans into the boiling water and let them cook for 2 minutes, then drain and place them in the ice bath.

Related: 10-Minute Vegan Antipasto Skewers Are the Creative Plant-Based Appetizer You Need

3. While the green beans are cooling, mix the paprika, cayenne pepper, Italian seasoning and ½ tsp sea salt together in a wide dish. Place the trout flesh side down in the spices to ensure the flesh is coated.

Blackened trout seasoned on kitchen countertop

4. Place a wide pan on the stove, heat to medium-high, add 1 Tbsp oil and swirl around the pan. Place the trout flesh/spice side down.

5. Once the spices look like they’re browning, after about 2-3 minutes, add in ½ cup orange juice. Once the juice has mostly evaporated and caramelized, flip the fish over and cook for another 3-5 minutes. If your pieces are thick and aren’t cooked on the inside, place them in a 350°F oven for a few minutes.

Related: Healthy 10-Minute Meals When You Just Don’t Feel Like Cooking

6. Drain the beans again and place them in another bowl. Season with few tsp of oil, ½ tsp salt, the rest of the orange juice and lemon juice. Put the green beans on a dish with the trout and top both with orange zest and fresh parsley.

Blackened trout and green beans on plate

Like Tamara and Sarah’s 10-minute blackened trout with green beans? Try their 10-minute sauteed cauliflower and chickpeas.

Get the how-to recipe here:

Your New Favourite Fish Dish: The Pioneer Woman’s Crispy Cerveza Battered Cod

We love a classic fish and chips recipe as much as the next person — but if you’re looking to up your kitchen (and seafood) game, make this crispy, battered fish dish from Ree Drummond herself.

Two pounds of fresh cod is simmered in Mexican lager-infused spicy seasonings, while homemade charred lime crema is the perfect topper in addition to the napa cabbage, onions, flour tortillas and lime wedges. Although it might take a little longer than the average dish, go ahead and break out that deep-frying thermometer and get started! Bon appetit!

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Tex-Mex Recipes Will Satisfy Your Cheesy, Meaty Cravings

The Pioneer Woman’s Crispy Cerveza Battered Fish

Total Time: 1 hour
Yields: 6 servings
Special Equipment: a deep-frying thermometer

Ingredients:

Crispy Battered Fish

Vegetable oil, for frying
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup cornstarch
1 Tbsp kosher salt
2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
Two 12-ounce bottles Mexican lager
2 lbs cod, cut into 1/2-by-1 1/2-by-3-inch sticks

Related: This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

Serving

12 flour tortillas (7-inch)
2 cups shredded napa cabbage
1 cup finely diced red onion
1 cup fresh cilantro sprigs
1 cup lime wedges
Charred Lime Crema, recipe follows

Charred Lime Crema

2 jalapenos
1 small white onion, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch rounds
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, plus more for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup Mexican-style crema
1 lime, zested and juiced ‘

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

Close-up of Crispy Cerveza Battered Fish

Directions:

1. For the crispy battered fish: Preheat the oven to 200°F. Fit a wire rack in a baking sheet; set aside.

2. In a large pot, heat 2 inches of vegetable oil over medium-high heat to 375°F.

3. Make the batter: In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch, salt, cayenne, paprika, baking powder and pepper. Add the beer and whisk until smooth.

4. Working in 2 to 3 batches, coat the fish in the batter. Carefully transfer the battered fish to the hot oil. Fry each batch for 4 minutes, flipping halfway through. Remove the fried fish to the wire rack on the baking sheet to allow the oil to drain away. This will ensure it stays crispy. Transfer the baking sheet with the fish to the oven to keep warm while you get everything else ready. The fish can sit in the oven up to an hour staying warm.

5. For serving: Wrap the tortillas in foil and place in the oven to warm for 10 minutes.

6. Unwrap the tortillas and serve alongside the fish and all the fixings: cabbage, red onion, cilantro, lime wedges and Charred Lime Crema.

Charred Lime Crema

1. Heat a grill or grill pan over medium-high heat.

2. Toss the jalapenos and onion rounds in the olive oil in a bowl. Grill the jalapenos and onion rounds until charred all over, turning as needed, about 5 minutes total. Place the jalapenos in a bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap for 10 minutes. Set the onions aside.

3. Cut the jalapenos in half, remove the stems and seeds and gently scrape off the charred skin. Roughly chop the grilled onion rounds.

4. Combine the jalapenos, onion, cilantro and some salt and pepper in a food processor. Pulse in 2-second increments until finely minced.

5. Whisk together the crema and lime zest and juice in a medium bowl. Add the jalapeno-onion mixture to the bowl with the crema and fold everything together until fully incorporated.

6. Pour into a serving dish and garnish with cilantro leaves. Serve as a flavorful topping on your favorite tacos.

Watch the full how-to video:


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Baked Salmon With Spicy Mango Avocado Salsa, Because Summer is Coming

Summer is all about simple cooking: few ingredients that are fresh and easy to prepare. That’s why this salsa is about to become a staple in your home. It’s one of the quickest salsas to whip up and it has big zesty flavours. It marries so well with salmon — but, the truth is, this salsa is really versatile and the perfect addition to grilled chicken or shrimp, over a cabbage slaw or even dolloped on top of a coconut curry or stew. A quick tip: if you don’t have access to fresh mango, we tested it with frozen and it worked just as brilliantly!

Baked Salmon With Spicy Mango Avocado Salsa

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 16 minutes
Total Time: 31 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients:

Salmon
2 pieces salmon (5 oz each)
½ tsp chili powder
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
Splash of extra-virgin olive oil

Salsa
½ large or 1 small mango, diced (or heaping ½ cup diced frozen mango, defrosted)
1 avocado, diced
3 Tbsp cilantro, finely chopped
1 stalk green onion, finely sliced or 2 Tbsp finely diced red onion
½ to 1 jalapeno pepper, finely diced
3 Tbsp lime juice
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper

Directions:

1. Preheat your oven to 375°F.

2. Season salmon with chili powder, sea salt and pepper.

3. Place a pan, that’s also oven safe, on the stove over medium heat and add a splash of extra-virgin olive oil and swirl it around.

4. Once hot, place the salmon in the pan, flesh side down and sear it for 2 minutes, then flip and sear for another 2 minutes on the other side.

Related: Middle Eastern Sumac Chicken With Date Syrup, Lemon and Pecans

5. Carefully take the pan off the heat and place it in the oven to cook for 12 minutes until perfectly flakey and tender.

6. While the salmon is cooking, prepare the mango avocado salsa. Start by dicing both the mango and avocado: first score them lengthwise and horizontally, then scoop out the fruit into a bowl.

7. Add the remaining salsa ingredients and mix until well combined.

8. When the salmon is done, remove from the oven and top with fresh mango avocado salsa.

Craving more easy summertime recipes? You can whip up this simple miso chicken and this salad with tuna in almost no time!

Kedgeree With Flaked Smoked Trout Will Be Your New Favourite Dish

Kedgeree, an East Indian dish composed of lentils, rice, fried onions, spices and ginger, was promptly adopted (and adapted) by the English in the 18th century and transformed into what is now a popular British breakfast. Here, we’ve swapped the traditional English smoked haddock in favour of tender, flaky smoked trout, and we swear by this recipe for brunch, lunch or any dinner occasion.

The Perfect Kedgeree: Smoked Fish With Rice, Fried Onions and Eggs

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes (includes rice cooling time)
Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

1 cup basmati rice
3 cooked eggs, shelled and quartered (see tip)
3 Tbsp ghee or unsalted butter or vegetable oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp minced ginger
1 Tbsp medium curry powder or mild curry powder
1 tsp cumin seeds (or 1 tsp each cumin seeds, kosher salt and turmeric)
1 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp turmeric
2 ripe tomatoes, quartered, seeded and chopped
½ cup frozen peas, thawed
190g hot smoked trout or salmon, flaked into chunks (1 ½ cups)
3 green onions, thinly sliced
½ cup torn cilantro leaves
lemon wedges (optional)

Directions:

1. Wash the rice in a bowl covered with cold water, swishing with your hand, or until the water runs clear.

Tip: For the fluffiest grains of rice, wash and drain the rice 3x then cover with cold water for 20 minutes or until the grains are pearly white. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve and continue with the recipe.

2. Combine rice and two cups water to a medium saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered for 10-12 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 10 minutes; fluff with a fork and spread on a large platter or baking sheet. Let cool.

3. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add butter to melt. Add onions and cook, stirring until almost softened, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, curry, cumin, salt and turmeric, and cook until fragrant, 1-2 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook, stirring until softened, 2-3 minutes.

4. Crumble in half of the cooled rice and all the peas. Stir just enough to incorporate the rice; stir in remaining rice, and cook until flavours are combined and just hot. Sprinkle with green onions and cilantro.

Related: I Cooked With 6 Trending Spices to See if They’re Actually Worth the Hype

5. Scrape onto a serving platter and top with quartered eggs and lemon wedges for squeezing (if using).

Tip: To cook eggs, bring a small pot of water to a boil. Using a spoon, gently drop the eggs and cook over a medium boil for 9 minutes. Drain and immerse under cold running water until cool. Remove shells and set aside.

Try these 25 Indian Recipes That Are Even Better Than Takeout or these 20 Healthy Mediterranean Recipes to Bookmark Right Now.

seafood tower

How to Make a Stunning Seafood Tower

The holidays are a time of year when we indulge — and there’s just something ultra festive about a vibrant, chilled seafood tower. Typically looked at in awe while dining at a contemporary seafood restaurant, you might be surprised to realize that making a tower chock-full of delicious ocean bounty is quite easy to do at home. All it takes is a little preparation and final assembly right before your holiday party guests arrive. Just follow these simple tips and everyone will be impressed!

seafood tower

Buy Good Quality, Sustainable Seafood

When you’re serving friends and family a big smattering of seafood, you want it be as fresh and delicious as possible. While some grocers offer fresh shellfish at their seafood counters, you’re better off going to a local fishmonger.

Prepare Seafood Same-Day, if Possible

Shellfish like mussels, clams and oysters, can be purchased a day or two ahead, and live safely in your refrigerator until you’re ready to prep them. The latter two can be cooked and chilled hours before eating, but set aside a few minutes to shuck the oysters right before assembling the tower.

Chill Tower Tiers Before Serving

Got a fridge full to the brim with holiday dishes and bottles of wine? Well, one of the handy things about our Canadian winters is the fact that our back deck or balcony can double as a large freezer (or fridge if you’re closer to the west coast). Giving the tower layers an hour or so to get cool will help keep the ice from melting too quickly while you’re assembling.

seafood tower

Have the Right Tools Handy

While you can remove all of the lobster meat beforehand, guests like a little hands-on activity at a party, so make sure to have the necessary seafood picks and seafood crackers (nut crackers work well in lieu) for people to use. Napkins too!

Don’t Have a Tower?

Although the tiered presentation definitely adds a “wow” factor to the table, using a couple large serving trays and laying out the myriad of shellfish over ice, studded with lemon wedges and ramekins of sauce is pretty appetizing, too.

seafood tower

How to Make a Seafood Tower

Total Time: 1 hour
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

Tower
Crushed ice (enough for each tower level, approximately 10 cups)
1 lb fresh mussels (steamed and chilled)
1 lb fresh manila clams (steamed and chilled)
12 freshly shucked oysters
24 large cooked prawns
1-2 lbs cooked lobster (claws, arms and tail separated)
⅔ cup seafood sauce
1 lemon (halved and cut into thin wedges)

Spicy Lemon Aioli
½ cup mayonnaise
2 Tbsp sambal oelek
1 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp lemon zest
¼ tsp ground black pepper

seafood tower

Directions:

1. Evenly distribute crushed ice onto each of the 3 tower tiers.

2. On the bottom tier, lay out all of the clams, ½ of the mussels and ½ of the oysters.

3. On the outside of the second tier, alternate 1 oyster with 4 prawns. Work your way around the tier. Take lobster claws, arms and tail and place around the centre of the tier.

Seafood Tower

4. Fill any empty space on the second tier with remaining mussels.

5. On the top tier, place ramekins of sauce and fill remaining space with lemon wedges.

Related: Tasty Lobster Recipes Anyone Can Make

6. Place all ingredients for the spicy lemon aioli in a small bowl and stir to combine. Keep in refrigerator until ready to serve with seafood.

spicy lemon aioli

Published December 19, 2016, Updated December 1, 2019

Guy and Hunter’s European Vacation: How to Eat Like a Brit

Guy and Hunter’s epic adventure winds down in London, England where the father-son duo visit the oldest fish & chips shop in town. If you haven’t already caught the episode, you can watch it online here.

Rock & Soul Plaice, established back in 1871, is a year-long hotspot among locals and tourists alike. While the French invented “pomme frites” (French fries), it was the Brits who invented “chips.” The humble restaurant owner reveals the best ingredient for a traditional fish & chips dish is cod loin. They’re coated in a thin, crisp batter, leaving just a light crush on the fish. Nothing on the plate is greasy.

“It’s flaky and light but still has a nice crunch on the batter,” Guy says upon his first bite.

After touring the city on a double-decker bus, it was time for the two to indulge in some “real deal Indian food,” as Guy likes to call it. “This is an important part of the culture of food in London.”

At Punjab, the oldest the oldest North Indian restaurant in the UK, the duo took turns making their own naan bread. A typical naan recipe involves mixing white flour with salt, yeast and yogurt to make a smooth, stretchy dough. It’s cooked in a cylindrical clay oven also known as a tandoor. After passing around plates homemade chutney, seekh kebab, chicken korma and papadum, the food coma sets in and it’s time to call it a day.

Take a trip to England just like Guy and Hunter and eat like a Brit with this London-inspired menu.

Appetizers:

Naan Wedges

Chicken Cornish Pasties

Salt Cured Cod and Roasted Garlic Spread Crouton

Fish Sticks with Dill Caper Aoili

Main Dishes:

Fish and Chips

Bangers and Green Mash with Onion Gravy

Chicken Tikka

Jhal Muri

Desserts:

Classic English Trifle

Yorkshire Pudding

Rhubarb and Rosewater Eton Mess

Blueberry Scones with Lemon Glaze

Guy and Hunter’s European Vacation: How to Eat like an Italian

Guy and Hunter kicked off their family vacation in Athens, where the father-son duo learned how to eat like Grecians. This week, the two cruise through Italy on their vespas, and learn how to make the essential Italian dessert: gelato.

“Of all the countries to visit, I think  Italy is the most important,” Guy says, explaining it’s where his entire family originated.

It’s in Rome where the two Fieris learn how to make fig and banana gelato, which is a chilled Italian delicacy. Gelato is churned at a slower rate and served at a slightly warmer temperature than ice cream, making its texture silkier and smoother.

Guy and Hunter leave the sweets behind and head to Venice via gondola to check out the seafood markets for a big family reunion dinner. Guy decides to make some surf and turf for his cousins, as Hunter meets many of them for the first time.

No trip to Italy is complete without trying branzino, a popular silver-skinned fish sea bass. Guy stuffs his branzino with lemons and veggies, and garnishes with parsley. The Fieri’s Italian feast isn’t complete without plates of spaghetti and clams, a recipe which originates in Naples. Typically in North America, spaghetti is served with red sauce and loads of meatballs on top, but in Italy, the rule is it has to be white.

Take a trip to Italy like Guy and Hunter, and eat like an Italian with this inspired menu.

Appetizers:

Artichoke and Tomato Panzanella

Grilled Treviso with Citrus Bagna Cauda

Cheese Stuffed Dates with Prosciuotto

Crispy Ceci

Main DishesbranzinoBaked Branzino with Citrus Gremolata

Ferris’ Clam Linguine

Spaghettini with King Crab

Anna Olson’s White Pizza

Desserts:

Meyer Lemon Gelato, Beet Root Spongecake and Dark Chocolate Crisp

Fresh Citrus with Gelato and Almond Cookies

Pineapple Semifreddo

Torrone

Watch all new episodes of Guy & Hunter’s European Vacation Thursdays at 10:30 E/P. Catch up on episodes online.

The Seared Tuna Worth Walking 316 Kilometres For

By Quoashinis “Cosy” Lawson, as told to Crys Stewart

Cosy Lawson is proud of balancing her job in speech and language development for preschool-aged children with raising her family. She teaches her kids what she was taught growing up, from catching and preparing fish to protecting the ocean’s bounty. So when she and her young daughter made headlines in 2010 by walking to Vancouver Island’s capital to raise awareness for declining salmon numbers, she took it all in stride.

I was born on a beach on Wickaninnish Island, just off of Tofino, B.C. My mom just couldn’t bring herself to go to the hospital, and besides, our neighbours were doctors and nurses. I think she had more doctors there than she would’ve had in a regular hospital room. So I was born, literally, on the beach under the sun. My name comes from a gentleman named Joe David from the Clayoquot band; he gave me that name when I was born. It means “raven” in the Nuu-chah-nulth language.

Growing up, the only form of transportation off the island was either a rowboat or you borrowed my dad’s boat and learned how to drive it. From a very early age, we were given all the tools and the encouragement to perform everything we could alongside our parents. My job in the family was to provide the fish. My dad taught us all how to fish, but I was the one who absolutely enjoyed it. Every waking hour, I was out there bringing home the fish.

I’ve witnessed the fish numbers decline over the years. Back in 2010, we’d heard about this group of people who were going to walk from Port Hardy to Victoria to raise awareness about declining fish stocks. Over dinner, I said that would be a huge cause near and dear to my heart and that I’d really like to walk part of it. My daughter said, “Well, I think we should walk it all.” Of course, I went into “I’ve got work! I’ve got kids! I’ve got responsibilities!” mode, but when I woke up the next morning and realized this was a very important matter to her as well, I decided we should walk the entire 316-kilometre route together.

From Tofino, it’s a winding road with not much of a shoulder, but my parents, husband and son were in our support vehicle. It took about two weeks to complete the journey. By the time we got down to the island highway, communities were welcoming us, and we marched into Victoria along with 7,000 or 8,000 people. My daughter turned 12 on the steps of the parliament buildings the day we arrived. Afterward, I heard all the walkers among us ended up shutting down the main part of Victoria for many, many hours.

I want to teach my kids the things that were instilled in us growing up: respect for our environment, our resources, never taking more than you can eat. We go out once a year for the tuna and get enough for my whole family. I was taught to make sure I thanked anything that gave its life for my food and make sure nothing goes to waste. I don’t think we’d be the same people without making sure those things are passed on.

I have a big family—my two sisters and their families, my two brothers and my parents—and, often, good friends who are like family join us as well. We get together quite often, and 99 per cent of the time, it’s spur of the moment. Seared tuna is a really easy go-to! Once it’s seared, I slice it very thin and cover it in garlic-ginger ponzu sauce. It’s really simple and amazingly delicious.

For dinner on the beach on Wickaninnish, we all show up in our boats. My sister will have a dish. I’ll have tuna. My mom will dig up potatoes from the garden, which we’ll wash and put them in a pot over the fire. We’ll have a huge salad out of the garden that’s right beside the campfire. We’ll pick blackberries and have them with whipping cream. We’ve never been rich, but we live in an incredibly rich manner as far as love and food and friends and family go.

Seared Albacore Tuna Loin, courtesy of Quoashinis “Cosy” Lawson

grilled-tuna-article_BlogEmbed

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
Sauce
1/3 cup (75 mL) ponzu sauce
1 tsp (5 mL) finely chopped garlic
1 tsp (5 mL) grated ginger

Tuna
1 tuna loin
1/4 cup (60 mL) sesame oil
2 tbsp (30 mL) vegetable oil
Freshly cracked pepper to taste

Directions
Sauce
1. In small bowl, mix together ponzu sauce, garlic and ginger. Set aside.

Tuna
1. Dry loin with paper towel. Drizzle with 2 tbsp (30 mL) sesame oil and rub in. Add pepper all over. (I use about 2 tsp/10 mL, but I like a lot of pepper.)
2. Add vegetable oil to hot pan over medium-high heat; sear loin evenly on all sides, about 2 minutes per side for medium-size loin. Remove to cutting board.
3. Slice loin crosswise into ¼- to ½-inch (5 mm to 1 cm) thick pieces. Remove to dish or plate; drizzle with sauce. Drizzle with remaining sesame oil.

Click to print, save or share this Albacore Tuna Loin recipe.

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Okanagan Green Beans: A One-Skillet Recipe You’ll Love

By Sarah Huggins

My childhood summers were spent in the Okanagan region of B.C., where the hot, dry sun produced the most impressive green beans—long, sweet, crisp and juicy. I vividly remember my grandmother sitting on her lakeside patio each evening with a big colander of local green beans on her lap, and a glass of white wine next to her, halving the beans while she regaled us with stories and grandma jokes.

Years later, the taste of green beans is among the most nostalgic flavours for me. One bite transports me right back to my grandma’s patio, to backseat trips to the farmers’ market, and long lazy days spent with my cousins exploring the shores of Okanagan Lake.

I now halve green beans for my own family, and this One Skillet Trout with Green Beans and Almonds is one of our favourite ways to enjoy them. Reminiscent of the infamous “Trout Amandine,” but simpler, it requires only one pan, a handful of basic ingredients and about 30 minutes.

I’ve yet to make this dish for my grandmother, but I’m sure she would love it. With a glass of white wine, of course.

One Skillet Trout with Green Beans and Almonds, Courtesy of Sarah Huggins, kiwiandbean.com, Toronto

A simple rainbow trout supper made easy in the skillet.

trout-and-green-beans_888embed

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients
1 lb (450 g) rainbow trout fillets
Salt and pepper, to taste
3 tbsp (45 mL) butter, divided
¾ lb (340 g) green beans, ends trimmed
½ cup (125 mL) sliced almonds (or whole almonds, roughly chopped)
Juice of half a lemon
½ cup (125 mL) chicken broth or white wine

Directions
1. Sprinkle trout generously with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tbsp (30 mL) butter in large skillet over medium-high heat.
2. When butter is hot, but before it begins to brown, add trout, skin side down, to skillet. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until skin starts to crisp; flip trout and continue cooking a few minutes more, or until the trout is almost cooked through. Transfer to large plate or platter and keep warm.
3. Add green beans to hot skillet and cook, tossing, until tender-crisp. Top trout with beans; keep warm.
4. Add almonds to skillet and cook for 1 minute, or until they start to brown. Scatter almonds over beans and trout.
5. Add the lemon juice, broth (or wine) and remaining butter to the skillet, stirring until butter is melted and sauce begins to boil and starts to thicken. Pour sauce over top of trout and beans. Sprinkle with additional salt and pepper before serving.

Click to print, save or share this One Skillet Trout with Green Beans and Almonds recipe.

(Cooking For) Kiwi and Bean
(Cooking for) Kiwi & Bean is all about simple, wholesome family recipes: dinners you can create with pantry staples when you walk in the door at the end of the day, breakfasts you can whip up the night before, and snacks and treats that you can make with your kids.

A Newfoundland Kitchen Party Seafood Feast

By Ray Palmer, as told to Crys Stewart

When Ray Palmer was growing up, his family didn’t need a lot of people to have a kitchen party. With him on guitar, his brother at the piano and his dad playing the accordion, they were the party. Now sharing a home with his wife, Wanda, in the City of Mount Pearl (near St. John’s, N.L.), this born-and-raised Newfoundlander keeps the province’s strong traditions of hospitality alive and kicking.

You’re definitely going to have a kitchen party at Christmastime, and during the year, there might be an occasion, too. The food is always out in the dining room. Over the years, we’ve learned that you shouldn’t keep the bar in the kitchen because that’s where everybody hangs out, and the first stop, of course, is always in the kitchen.

Squid is the highlight for a lot of my friends. You can stuff them with anything, really, but we use a basic bread crumb dressing. They’re a ‘picky’ type of thing, like an hors d’oeuvre. I’ve got a son who comes early when he knows I’m doing squid. And I say, “Now, boy, you can only have a couple because you know there’s a few more here besides you, so don’t have them all gone.” My friend used to have a kitchen party every Christmas with a crowd of 20 or 25 people, and there’d be more there than cod tongues and squid, I can guarantee you—we’d have a moose heart that would be stuffed. Other kinds of pickies, too.

A lot of people think that fish don’t have tongues, but they do. When you look at the fish and open its mouth, there it is looking at you. Years ago, young boys on the wharf would wait for when the fishermen came in with their fish, cut out the cod tongues, then go sell them. They were very cheap back then. The better ones are the smaller type that cook pretty quickly. The bigger cod tongues take longer to cook, so they’re not as good. Once they’re crisp and crunchy, they’re fantastic.

If you get a knock on your door and a bunch of mummers come in that you’re not expecting, you can have no idea who they could be. Mummery is sort of a dying thing, but we’re trying to keep it alive. A bunch of people get together and dress up—you’re disguised—and you go around to your friends’ homes. They don’t know you and your fellow mummers are coming, and you’ve probably got a guitar and an accordion with you. You come in and have a little scuff (a little dance) in the kitchen or wherever they can fit you, then have a little toddy. Everyone in the house is trying to guess who everybody is, of course. Sometimes, they’re right; sometimes, they’re wrong.

When we’re having a party, my three grandchildren are always a part of it. They’re only six and seven years old, but I’m sure once they get into their teens, they’ll be having kitchen parties, too. Guaranteed, they will.

Fried Cod Tongues With Scrunchions, courtesy of Ray Palmer
fried-cod-tongues-with-scunchions_blogembed

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
2 lb (900 g) cod tongues (preferably fresh; I prefer the smaller tongues)
½ cup (125 mL) flour
1 tsp (5 mL) salt
¼ tsp (1 mL) pepper
½ lb (225 g) pork fatback

Directions
1. Wash tongues carefully; dry with paper towel. Add flour, salt and pepper to plastic bag. Add tongues, shaking bag to coat. Set aside.
2. Cut pork fatback into small cubes. Add to skillet; fry at low to medium heat until fat is rendered out and fatback is crispy and brown. (Don’t overheat or the fat will burn.) Remove pork scrunchions; set aside.
3. Add tongues to same skillet; cook over medium heat until tongues are brown and crispy on both sides. Put scrunchions back in skillet when tongues are almost ready. Cod tongues can be served as an appetizer by themselves or served with fries as a main meal.

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Baked Stuffed Squid, courtesy of Ray Palmer
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Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
6 squid tubes, cleaned and washed thoroughly
½ tsp (2 mL) salt
4 cups (1 L) bread crumbs (1 bag of bread crumbs)
¼ cup (60 mL) savory
¼ cup (60 mL) melted butter
1 medium onion, chopped finely
pepper to taste

Directions
1. Sprinkle squid with salt.
2. Mix together bread crumbs, savory, butter, onion and pepper. Loosely stuff squid (don’t overstuff).
3. Add enough cold water to cover bottom of 13 x 9-inch (3 L) baking dish. Add squid; cover with foil. (Don’t seal foil around sides of dish; keep tented.) Bake in 325°F (160°C) for about 50 minutes. Turn quid halfway through; add more water, if necessary. Remove from pan when cooked; slice into rings.

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Follow the jump to see more of what a Newfoundland kitchen party is really like.

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Traditional Fish and Brewis at Bidgood’s in Newfoundland

By Leslie Bidgood, as told to Valerie Howes

Leslie Bidgood runs Bidgood’s in Goulds, N.L., alongside her father, Rick. Her grandfather, Roger, founded the business with her grandmother, Jenny. The couple began their work together—which would evolve into the Bidgood’s company of today— 68 years ago in Petty Harbour. Back then, it was a small general store, passed down by Leslie’s great-grandfather. Today, it has expanded into a supermarket, restaurant, bakery and wholesale operation with its own food line. Bidgood’s specializes in traditional Newfoundland cuisine, made with home-harvested ingredients. Here, Leslie talks about a customer favourite: fish and brewis.

Leslie Bidgood

Leslie Bidgood

Bidgood’s is much the same today as I remember it from my childhood. It has always had that family feeling. My sisters and I would come up and play hide-and-seek out back in the boxes in the warehouse after school, and I started working here myself when I was about eight, washing dishes and things like that. Two of our aunts and one uncle were involved then. And most of our staff lived locally, so there was always an upbeat, friendly kind of environment. We actually have some of the same staff now as we did when I was out back jumping on boxes and driving everyone nuts.

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Fish and brewis (pronounced “brews”) is one of the main items we sell in the store. It has been a staple Newfoundland dish for so many years. I ate it once or twice a week as a child—I grew up eating everything we make and sell here. And at my grandparents’, we were always exposed to traditional food. Nowadays, I only eat it now and again as a treat. The family recipe we use in the store hasn’t really changed over the years. If it’s working and we’re getting positive feedback from the customers, we don’t mess with any recipe!

To make fish and brewis, the girls soak hard bread overnight, then the next morning they boil it for about an hour to soften it. Then, they put this soaked bread in the strainer to drain excess water. Next, they put it into a huge mixing bowl and add fried scrunchions—diced pork fat cooked up fresh while the bread was boiling. Next, they add salted cod that has been soaked overnight—sometimes twice—to take away some of the saltiness and boiled for about 20 minutes. They stir it all together, allow it to cool and package it.

Hard bread is a traditional bread here in Newfoundland. It has to be soaked in liquid to soften it up. It’s very shelf stable, so many years ago, when people had no means to preserve foods, it was a staple in homes and at sea. As kids, when we’d go to my grandmother’s place and come out of the pool starving, she’d give us hard bread as a snack.

The difference between salted cod and fresh cod is like day and night. Obviously, salted cod is much saltier, while the fresh cod melts in your mouth. Salted cod is also harder, though it softens up once it’s soaked, drained and cooked. It’s not as tender as fresh fish, but it’s not quite as chewy as steak, either.

Fish and brewis is such a simple, quick and easy meal. And it’s tasty. It can be eaten for breakfast, lunch or supper. Some customers come in and order it for breakfast, and they pour molasses over it. A lot of people who live out of the province then return home, that’s the kind of food they’re looking for. It brings back memories.

See more photos of Lynn Crawford’s visit to Bidgood’s market here.

The Panfried Pickerel That’s so Canadian

By Patrick Hearn, as told to Devon Scoble

Patrick Hearn and Kent Rumpel live in Saskatoon’s Riversdale neighbourhood and co-own the Park Cafe and Diner, which has been credited with revitalizing the once-rundown area. One of their most popular weekend dishes is panfried pickerel, something Patrick remembers eating on fishing trips with his dad in northwestern Ontario. While it was Kent who tweaked and perfected the recipe for the diner’s customers, the dish is still made in Patrick’s grandmother’s cast-iron pan.

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Between the ages of seven and 17, I lived in a small mining town in northwestern Ontario. My mum had taken a millwright maintenance course for mechanical at the mine; she was one of the first women in Canada to be a millwright maintenance mechanic—all while raising seven children! So my dad did all the cooking throughout the week, then on weekends, my mum would do all the baking and all the stuff for our lunches.

My mum was pretty creative as a cook, often using cheaper cuts of meat to make stuff go farther. She has an English background, so we’d have pigs in a blanket, Swiss steak and steak-and-kidney pies. My dad was a pretty good cook, too, but he was more of a meat-loaf-and-mushroom-gravy or spaghetti-and-sauce kind of guy. He learned what he knew from his mother, my Grandma Hearn, who was also an excellent cook.

My dad made panfried pickerel for us kids as a shore lunch when we were fishing. He’d heat up potatoes left over from last night’s dinner and fry up a few eggs. He’d catch fresh pickerel from the lake, clean it lakeside, then panfry it with the eggs and potatoes for a delicious lunch.

The fried pickerel recipe we use at the Park Cafe is actually Kent’s. It’s something we’d done one weekend that people really enjoyed. The fish is seasoned and floured on both sides, then panfried in my Grandma Hearn’s cast-iron pan and served with eggs, hash browns and toast. This cast-iron frying pan is something we’ve used in countless ways my whole life. I’ve even turned it into a running joke over the years: “101 uses for Grandma’s frying pan!” Through the week, the panfried pickerel isn’t a big seller, but on Sundays, it just goes.

Growing up, we ate meals accompanied by lots of gravies and sauces and pastas—comfort food, I would call it. And home-cooked comfort food is what the Park Cafe is about. It kept Grandma Hearn alive until 92, so hopefully by eating the way she did, I’m going to be around for a long time!

Park Cafe and Diner’s Panfried Pickerel, courtesy of Kent Rumpel

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients
6 to 8 oz (170 to 225 g) pickerel fillet
pinch sea salt
pinch freshly ground pepper
? cup (75 mL) (approx.) flour
1½ tbsp (20 mL) clarified butter
lemon wedges

Directions
1. Lightly season fillet with salt and pepper.
2. Cover a plate with flour; dredge each side of fillet to lightly coat.
3. Melt clarified butter in cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat; panfry fillet for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown.
4. Flip and fry on other side until golden brown and fish flakes easily.
5. Top with freshly squeezed lemon, or try it with hollandaise sauce. Serve for breakfast with eggs, hash browns and toast.

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1 Dish, 2 Meals: Pan Roasted White Miso-Glazed Cod

Resist the lure of takeout with a homemade version of your favourite sushi joint entrée. The rich *marinade of white miso, sugar, soy and sesame oil, soak deep into the flesh of this light and flaky fish, transforming an economical, easy-to-find ingredient into a surprisingly simple weeknight treat.

Here, I made two completely different meals using many of the same ingredients. One; a hearty and elegant offering of nutty purple Thai rice paired with tender, quick-braised baby bok choy and the other; an even lighter meal of mellow white miso soup that cooks up in a snap. The addition of fresh herbs, a squeeze of citrus and hot pepper—and of course, the silky miso cod—elevates this quick, humble soup to superstar levels.

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Pan Roasted White Miso-Glazed Cod
*Marinate the fish the night before or if you’re pressed for time, at least 30 minutes before.

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons mirin
3 Tablespoons sake
1/2 cup white miso paste
1/3 cup sugar
Six 6- to 7-ounce skinless cod fillets, about 1 1/2 inches thick
Vegetable oil

Directions:

  1. In a small saucepan, bring the mirin and sake to a boil. Whisk in the miso until dissolved, add the sugar and cook over moderate heat, whisking, just until dissolved. Add toasted sesame oil.
  2. Transfer the marinade to a large baking dish and let cool. Add the fish and turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight, if you have time.
  3. In a medium non-stick pan, heat vegetable oil. Scrape off majority of marinade from the fish, but don’t rinse. Cook, without disturbing for about 3-4 minutes. Gently flip and cook other side for another 3-4 minutes.

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Mellow White Miso Soup with Cod, Baby Bok Choy, Sriracha and Lime

Ingredients:

4 Tablespoons miso paste (to taste)
4 ounces of somen noodles
2 green onions, tops removed thinly sliced
Small handful of cilantro
Baby bok choy, trimmed and halved
Fresh squeezed lime juice, to taste
Sliced Thai chilies (to taste)
Sriracha, to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook the somen noodles in salted water and drain. Run cold water over the noodles to stop them from cooking, shake off any excess water and set aside.
  2. In a medium sauce pan bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and remove from heat. Pour some of the hot water into a small bowl and whisk in the miso paste to avoid clumping. Stir this back into the pot. Adjust amount of miso to your own liking.
  3. Add bok choy and simmer until tender.
  4. Divide noodles between 3 or 4 bowls, and pour the miso broth and bok choy over them. Add cooked miso cod, green onions, cilantro, Sriracha, lime and chilies to taste.

White Miso-Glazed Cod with Purple Rice and Braised Baby Bok Choy

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Braised Baby Bok Choy

Ingredients:
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
6 pieces of baby bok choy, trimmed, and halved lengthwise
1/4 cup homemade or low-sodium chicken stock
3 Tablespoons soy sauce

For Purple Rice
*Cook rice according to package directions. Feel free to substitute chicken or vegetable broth instead of water and add a knob of ginger to add more flavour.

Directions:

  1. Cook dice according to package directions.
  2. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until hot, but not smoking. Add bok choy and cook, turning once, until just beginning to turn golden, about 2 minutes. Add stock and soy sauce. Cover, reduce heat to medium and simmer until bok choy is tender, about 5 minutes. Transfer bok choy to a serving platter, reserving cooking liquid in skillet.
  3. Cook liquid over medium-high heat until it is reduced by half, 1 to 2 minutes.
  4. Arrange rice, miso cod and braised bok choy on a plate, and drizzle leftover braising liquid over rice, if desired.

BonnieMo Bonnie Mo is a Toronto-based editor and the face behind Food Network Canada’s Food Fetish column. She’s also a contributing editor over at slice.ca.