Tag Archives: canned pumpkin

No-Bake Pumpkin Spice Latte Pretzel Pie (No Pastry Skills Required!)

For those who avoid making pie dough at all costs, this cream pie-style “PSL” is just the ticket. A no-bake, salty-sweet pretzel crust holds a stove top pumpkin-coffee filling, all topped with maple whipped cream. It’s a taste of fall’s famous café beverage in delicious dessert form, and perfect for autumnal entertaining this Thanksgiving and beyond.

No-Bake Pumpkin Spice Latte Pretzel Pie

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Cool Time: 3 hours
Total Time: 3 hours 35 minutes
Makes: 1, 9-inch pie

Ingredients:

Pumpkin Spice Latte Pudding
1¾ cup whole milk
¾ cup canned pumpkin purée (not pie filling)
1½ Tbsp ground coffee (regular or decaf), plus more to garnish
½ cup dark brown sugar
½ cup cornstarch
5 large egg yolks
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
½ tsp kosher salt
2 Tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla extract

Pretzel Crust
20 pretzel twists (from a 200g bag, about 1/3 bag)
16 square or 8 sheets (150g, 1 sleeve) graham crackers
½ cup dark brown sugar
¼ tsp kosher salt
½ cup unsalted butter, melted

Topping
1 cup fridge-cold heavy cream
1 Tbsp fridge-cold maple syrup

Directions:

Pumpkin Spice Latte Pudding
1. In a medium saucepan, whisk to combine milk, pumpkin and coffee. Heat over medium-low heat, whisking often, until steaming.
2. Meanwhile, in a medium heatproof bowl, whisk to combine brown sugar, cornstarch, pumpkin pie spice and salt; whisk in the egg yolks.
3.
Temper the egg mixture by pouring in one-third of the hot milk mixture while whisking constantly. Return tempered egg and milk mixture to the pot and continue to whisk constantly for 5 to 10 minutes, until the mixture has thickened considerably. Make sure a few large bubbles pop in the centre – this ensures an enzyme in the egg breaks down so your pudding will stay firm, not loosen once cool.

4. Remove the pot from the heat and whisk in butter and vanilla. Press through a fine mesh sieve over a large clean bowl, discard any coffee solids in the sieve and press plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding.
5. Cool to almost room temperature, and then refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

Pretzel Crust
1. In a food processor or blender, pulse pretzels, graham crackers, brown sugar and salt until pulverized.
2. Tip into a large bowl and stir in melted butter until fully combined and mixture holds together when pressed between two fingers (if it won’t hold its shape, add more melted butter or plain water, 1 tablespoon at time until it does).
3. Firmly press the crust into the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch pie plate.
4. Refrigerate the crust to firm up while you wait for the pudding to cool down.

Assembly
1. Once the pudding mixture has cooled and the crust is chilled, spread the cold, thick pudding evenly over the crust using an offset spatula or the back of a spoon to help.

2. Place the same piece of plastic wrap over the pudding portion of the pie again and refrigerate to firm up and come together, at least 1 hour or up to 2 days (before topping with whipped cream).

Topping
1. Right before serving, whip the cream to medium-stiff peaks, adding the maple syrup when it’s almost reached its full volume.

2. Remove plastic wrap from pie and dollop or pipe over whipped cream, swooshing haphazardly or being neat and tidy. Sprinkle with a touch of additional ground coffee. Slice and serve.

Here are 50 more creative recipes to use up the rest of that can of pumpkin purée, plus 45 perfect pumpkin desserts and 30 delicious ways to get your pumpkin spice fix.

Savoury Pumpkin, Feta & Sage Muffins You’ll Crave More Than Cornbread

It’s fall, so you know what that means: cue pumpkin everything! But instead of opting for all the sweet treats, think savoury for a change. We wanted to make a muffin that would stand up to its cornbread contender and taste equally full-flavoured with hints of sweetness. The marriage of pumpkin, feta and sage makes for a sweet, salty and earthy flavour that achieves just that. A quick tip: when buying pumpkin puree, grab the unsweetened, sugar-free stuff. And, if you like a little extra texture, you can always dice up about 1 cups’ worth of pumpkin or butternut squash, roast it and fold it into the batter along with the feta and sage for extra bite. Slather some butter on these when warmed, or eat them as is – either way, they make for the perfect addition to your autumn menu.

Savoury Pumpkin, Feta & Sage Muffins

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Bake Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 9 muffins

Ingredients:

2 cups almond flour
2 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
½ cup + 2 Tbsp pumpkin puree
2 eggs
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp almond milk
1 tsp maple syrup
½ cup crumbled feta
2 Tbsp fresh sage, finely chopped
3 Tbsp pumpkin seeds

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
2. In a bowl, mix together the dry ingredients.
3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the wet ingredients (pumpkin puree, eggs, oil, milk and maple syrup). Then pour the dry ingredients into the wet bowl and mix to combine. Fold in the feta and sage.

4. Oil a muffin tin or add liners to them, pour about ¼ cup of batter into each muffin hole.

5. Top the muffins with pumpkin seeds and bake in the oven for 25 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Ensure the muffin tray is placed on the top rack of the oven to prevent the bottoms from burning.

We’re here to keep you salivating with these 20 perfect pumpkin recipes that aren’t dessert. Still craving sweets? Try these 30+ warm and cozy fall treats.

Tasty Thai “Fall” Rolls with Pumpkin-Coconut Sauce (That You Can Make Ahead!)

A Thai-style appetizer with a Thanksgiving twist, these “fall” rolls offer a light bite before the main event. Inspired by the fresh summer rolls enjoyed at Thai restaurants, this autumnal version with roasted sweet potato and cabbage, soba noodles and peanuts is paired with a savoury coconut milk and pumpkin sauce spiced up with sriracha and juicy lime. They’re healthy, easy to prepare and can be made ahead up to one day – a bonus when holiday entertaining

Create your own filling to use up leftovers like roasted Brussels sprouts and squash, or add a bit of protein with shredded roasted turkey. You can even wrap up a Thanksgiving meal with all the trimmings. There are no rules to roll.

Fresh Thai “Fall” Rolls with Pumpkin-Coconut Dipping Sauce

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Cool Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Makes: 15 to 20 rolls

Ingredients: 

Filling
2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into ¼-inch sticks
5 cups shredded green cabbage or quartered Brussels sprouts
2 Tbsp toasted sesame oil, plus more for noodles
2 Tbsp soy sauce, plus more for noodles
2 Tbsp rice vinegar
½ (363g) pkg (2 bundles) buckwheat soba noodles 

Coconut-Pumpkin Dipping Sauce
1 (160mL) small can coconut milk
⅓ cup pumpkin purée
Juice of 1 lime
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
Sriracha, to taste 

Assembly
15 to 20 rice paper wrappers
3 green onions, sliced into matchsticks
1 cup fresh basil leaves or cilantro leaves
¼ cup roasted peanuts (salted or unsalted), roughly chopped
Black or white sesame seeds

Directions: 

1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Add squash, cabbage, olive oil, sesame oil, soy sauce and rice vinegar, and then toss to combine and spread into a single layer. Roast for 20 minutes, toss and roast for a further 15 to 20 minutes, until vegetables are very tender and beginning to caramelize. Set aside to cool to room temperature, or store airtight in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

2. Cook noodles according to package directions. Drain, rinse and drain well again. Transfer to a medium bowl and toss with a splash of additional sesame oil and soy sauce to coat and prevent the noodles from clumping. 

3. For the sauce, in a medium bowl whisk all ingredients well to combine so no lumps remain. If the coconut milk is cold, there will be lumps that refuse to whisk; if this happens, heat mixture in a pot over low heat, whisking constantly, until they melt. Pour into a serving bowl, or store airtight in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. The sauce will firm as it cools, which tastes great, too – bring to room temperature for a looser dipping sauce consistency. 

4. To assemble, fill a large pie plate or rimmed baking sheet with warm tap water. Have all the filling and assembly ingredients chopped and within arm’s reach. Line a baking sheet or plate with parchment paper and have a few damp paper towels handy. Working one rice paper wrapper at a time, re-hydrate for 20 to 30 seconds in warm water until pliable, and place on a clean service.

5. To the wrappers, in the bottom third leaving a portion of rice paper wrapper exposed at the bottom, add a small amount (about ⅓ cup total) of roasted vegetables, noodles, green onions, basil and peanuts. Tuck in the bottom, then the sides and continue to roll away from you to seal. Place on prepared baking sheet and cover with a damp paper towel to avoid drying out. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling. If making ahead, wrap each roll individually in plastic wrap and transfer to an airtight container for up to one day; unwrap before serving.

6. Add rolls to plate next to dipping sauce, sprinkle the rolls and sauce with sesame seeds, and then serve. 

With an appetizer covered, it’s time to figure out the main course – here are some hacks to keep stress down in the kitchen.

Pumpkin S’mores Sheet Cake is the Fall Dessert to Make This Season

Just when you thought you’d heard of all the pumpkin spice desserts out there, let us introduce you to this Pumpkin S’mores Sheet Cake. Anything baked in a sheet pan is already party-ready, but top it with silky ganache and fluffy, marshmallow-like frosting and it’s definitely a celebration. Dotted with chocolate chips and punctuated with show-stopping toasted meringue, this recipe is sure to impress this fall.

Pumpkin S’mores Sheet Cake

Bake Time: 28 minutes
Total Time: 90 minutes
Servings: 12 to 16

Ingredients:

Cake
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp pumpkin spice
½ tsp salt
3 large eggs
1 cup granulated sugar
2/3 cups brown sugar
14 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
15 ounces pumpkin puree
1 cup chocolate chips

Chocolate Ganache Frosting
6 ounce bittersweet chocolate chips
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
3 ounces heavy cream

Marshmallow Meringue Frosting
3 large eggs whites
1 cup granulated sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Cake
1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a 9-by-13-inch cake pan with parchment paper and set aside.
2. Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, pumpkin spice and salt. Set aside.
3. Using a stand or hand mixer, mix the eggs, granulated sugar and brown sugar together on medium speed for 3 minutes, or until pale in colour. Mixing on low speed, add the eggs, one at a time. Stop the mixer and scrape down the bottom of the bowl.
4. With the mixer on low speed, add in half of the flour mixture. Stream in the melted butter and mix until combined. Add in the remaining flour and mix until just barely incorporated. Add in the pumpkin and mix until combined. Stop the mixer and fold in the chocolate chips.

5. Tip the mixture into the prepared pan and spread evenly with a spatula or the back of a spoon. Bake for 28 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.
6. Allow the cake to cool completely before spreading the top with the Chocolate Ganache Frosting. Allow the ganache to set (at room temperature or in the refrigerator) before topping with the Marshmallow Meringue Frosting. Use an offset spatula or the back of a spoon to make swirls and peaks with the meringue. Gently toast the meringue with a culinary torch.

Chocolate Ganache Frosting
1. Place the chocolate chips and butter in a heat-safe bowl.
2.
Heat the cream in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until it just begins to simmer. 

3. Pour the hot cream over the chocolate and butter. Let stand for 30 to 60 seconds, then whisk until smooth.
4. Allow ganache to thicken before using (at least 30 minutes at room temperature, or 20 minutes in the refrigerator, stirring every 5 to 10 minutes).

Marshmallow Meringue Frosting
1. Place the egg whites and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer.  Stir to gently combine. Fill a saucepan with a few inches of water and bring to a simmer. Place the mixer bowl on top to create a double-boiler.  Stirring intermittently, heat the egg mixture until it is 160°f on a candy thermometer.

2. Once the egg whites are hot, carefully move the bowl back to the stand mixer. Whip on high speed with the whisk attachment until the meringue holds medium-stiff peaks, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the vanilla extract and mix to combine.
3. Spread the meringue on top of the ganache, being careful not to disturb or mix in the chocolate layer underneath. Lightly toast the meringue with a culinary torch.

We’ve got plenty more pumpkin-spiced desserts to make you drool. Start with these 40 perfect pumpkin treats, before exploring these healthy (and genius) recipe hacks using a can of pumpkin and 20 pumpkin pie recipes (if the classic fall dessert is your thing).

Easy No-Bake Pumpkin & Dark Chocolate Granola Bars

Get into the fall spirit with these simple no-bake granola bars with a pumpkin twist! While store-bought varieties are often filled with unhealthy preservatives, these homemade bars contain more wholesome ingredients. The end results produce a delightfully chewy, chocolate snack that encompasses all the cozy flavours of autumn. I recommend using almond butter, as it has a much more neutral taste than peanut butter. This recipe is also vegan and dairy-free, making it an ideal treat for everyone this season.

Easy No-Bake Pumpkin & Dark Chocolate Granola Bars

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 60 minutes
Servings: 12 bars

Ingredients:

3 cups quick cooking oats
½ cups natural almond butter
¼ cup coconut oil
¼ cup pumpkin puree
⅓ cup pure maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
¼ tsp ground cloves
¼ tsp ground allspice
½ cup pumpkin seeds
½ cup mini dark chocolate chips

Directions:

1. Grease an 8-inch square baking dish and line with parchment paper. Leave an inch or so of overhang for easy removal. Set aside.
2. In a saucepan over low heat, add the almond butter, coconut oil, pumpkin puree and maple syrup. Whisk until well blended.
3. Remove from heat. Stir in the vanilla, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and all spice. Let cool slightly.

4. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl. Fold in the oats followed by the pumpkin seeds and chocolate chips.
5. Transfer mixture to prepared baking dish. Press down gently to firm.

6. Let chill for 60 minutes in the freezer before slicing. To store bars, place in a lidded Tupperware. Can be refrigerated for a week or stored in the freezer for up to a month.

Get your pumpkin fix with these grain-free chocolate chip muffins, vegan pumpkin pie cups with coconut whip or decadent pumpkin pie swirl brownies!

How to Bring an Iron Chef Canada Curveball Ingredient Into Your Kitchen

Canadian cuisine is always at its best in fall thanks to the bountiful autumn harvest, but it isn’t really fall until pumpkins start popping up everywhere—from our lattes and doorsteps to our pies, soups, and table décor. The versatile orange vegetable is one popular gourd.

And as Iron Chef Susur Lee and challenger Nick Liu proved on the latest episode of Iron Chef Canada, pumpkin doesn’t have to be fresh in order to be delicious. The chefs were challenged with incorporating canned pumpkin into at least one of their dishes when The Chairman threw it at them as the week’s curveball ingredient, adding a bit of colour to the bitter greens battle.

Want to incorporate more pumpkin into your home dishes? Here’s everything you need to know about the canned stuff.

What is canned pumpkin?

Come fall, store shelves everywhere are lined with colourful cans of pumpkin. Basically, it’s a can of pumpkin that’s been roasted and pureed and is ready to throw into all of your favourite pumpkin recipes. The good news is that while fresh pumpkin comes and goes, the canned stuff is typically available year-round—it just happens to be more readily available and less expensive come autumn.

Is canned pumpkin and pumpkin puree the same thing?

Not always. When you think of pumpkin, it’s highly likely you conjure up images of the big old gourds we carve come Halloween. In reality, those carving pumpkins are edible, but they’re stringy and watery. Your best bet when it comes to cooking are “sugar pumpkins” or “pie pumpkins,” which have the meatier, sweeter flesh.

Given that intel, you’d think canned pumpkin would be canned sugar or pie pumpkins, but that’s not the case. Many manufacturers use something called a “Dickinson pumpkin,” which looks like a large, paler butternut squash. Food regulators define pumpkin as any veggie “prepared from golden-fleshed, sweet squash or mixtures of such squash and field pumpkin,” which means your can of pumpkin could actually contain a colourful variety of gourds within.

Can you eat canned pumpkin without cooking it?

Sure. Since canned pumpkin has been cooked and pureed before being canned, it’s technically fine to consume straight up with a spoon if that’s how you want to eat it. But with so many other great ways to use canned pumpkin, why would you want to?

What is the difference between canned pumpkin and pumpkin pie filling?

Canned pumpkin is exactly what it sounds like: pureed pumpkin squeezed into a can. Pumpkin pie filling, meanwhile, is pumpkin puree that has been seasoned with traditional pie flavours like cinnamon, cloves and ginger, and is sweetened to achieve that perfect pumpkin-pie taste. The former is good for all kinds of recipes and baking, while the latter is basically best for pumpkin pie and pumpkin-pie inspired treats.

What is the nutritional value of canned pumpkin?

Pure canned pumpkin is actually an excellent source of nutrients, including Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Vitamin K. It’s also high in manganese and iron, and makes a terrific source of dietary fibre. Add in that it’s low in cholesterol, sodium and saturated fat, and canned pumpkin is the perfect thing to keep in your cupboard year-round.

Can I make my own canned pumpkin?

Although pressure cookers and tools like the InstantPot make home canning increasingly popular, it’s still not recommended to can your own pumpkin puree. Pumpkins are a low-acid food, which enables easy growth of the Clostridium botulinum bacteria—the bacteria that causes botulism. If you want to can pumpkin it’s better to can it cubed, or better yet simply freeze your puree in a freezer-safe bag for up to a year.

What are some canned pumpkin recipes?

When it comes to vegetables most of us agree that fresh is better. And if you’re planning on eating savoury, roasted squash with your meal, a freshly roasted pumpkin is certainly the way to go. If you’re using pumpkin puree in a recipe though, this gourd is a rare exception where it’s perfectly okay to use the canned variety instead and no one would know the difference. From pumpkin spice pancakes and pumpkin scones to curry pumpkin soup and pumpkin pasta, there is so, so much to do with one little can of pumpkin puree.

Happy harvesting!

Watch Iron Chef Canada Wednesdays at 10 PM E/P

These Paleo Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins are Grain (And Guilt) Free

Just because you’re paleo or grain-free doesn’t mean you should miss out on all of the spectacular baked goods the fall season has to offer.  Pumpkin muffins are classic, but they’re usually made with white flour and white sugar.  Replacing those ingredients with coconut flour and coconut sugar adds a great kick of fibre and a subtle sweet taste that marries well with the spiciness of the ginger and cinnamon. And who can resist a muffin that combines both pumpkin and chocolate? After all, a baked good that can transition from breakfast to dessert is one you want in your repertoire.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 14 muffins

Grain-Free Paleo Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

Ingredients:
1/2 cup coconut flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp sea salt
2 tsp cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves

1 1/2 cups pumpkin puree
2/3 cup coconut sugar
1/2 cup coconut oil, melted
6 eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup mini chocolate chips

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 375°.
2. In a bowl, combine all dry ingredients, except for the chocolate chips.
3. Lightly melt the coconut oil and then whisk together all of the wet ingredients in a bowl.
4. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and stir well, so a smooth batter forms.
5. Using your spatula, fold the chocolate chips into the batter.
6. Line a muffin tin with liners or oil them with a little coconut oil and scoop the batter in.
7. Bake for 30 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Looking for more paleo-friendly recipes? Check out these 5 Eggless Paleo Breakfasts (Plus an Epic Grain-Free Granola)

This Vegan Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk Takes Less Than 30 Minutes

A warming bowl of Thai coconut curry soup is made even better with the addition of pure canned pumpkin. A fiery twist on the many squash soup recipes out there, this robust vegan pumpkin version is layered with flavour, coming through with a delicate balance of salty, sour, citrusy, sweet and savoury tastes. Both pumpkin and coconut milk provide dairy-free creaminess to the vegan soup base, which is super satisfying on its own, but can be quickly made into a heartier meal with cubes of firm tofu and shredded bok choy stirred in until heated through. For additional heft, a few spoonfuls of natural peanut butter or a handful of unsalted roasted peanuts would be delicious.  Make this easy vegan pumpkin soup recipe your own, experimenting with the Thai-inspired tastes you find most appealing.

Vegan Spicy Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
2 Tbsp coconut oil
1 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp vegan Thai red or yellow curry paste
1 Tbsp peeled minced fresh ginger
1 (3-inch) stalk lemongrass, bruised
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth, plus more to thin as needed
1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin puree or 2 cups fresh pumpkin puree
2 Tbsp tamari or soy sauce
1 (14 oz) can coconut milk, 1 Tbsp reserved for garnish
2 Tbsp lime juice, plus more for serving
1/3 cup shredded Thai basil or fresh cilantro
3 red Thai chilis, sliced or minced

Directions:
1. In a large pot, heat coconut oil and sesame oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion, garlic, curry paste, ginger and lemongrass, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook until onions are softened, about 10 minutes.

2. Add broth, pumpkin and tamari or soy sauce. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Remove lid and discard lemongrass. Stir in coconut milk and lime juice. Using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth, or transfer to a blender and puree soup in batches. If soup is too thick for your preference, thin with additional broth until desired consistency.

3. Reheat soup over low heat, ladle into bowls, swirl over reserved coconut milk and top with basil or cilantro and chili. Serve with additional lime juice.

Want more easy pumpkin recipes to make this autumn? See here for 12 Incredible Ways to Hack a Pumpkin and 35 Creative Pumpkin Recipes to Try This Fall.

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Cups with Coconut Whipped Cream

Pumpkin-flavoured everything defines the fall season, and pumpkin pie, the original, is no exception. This vegan version (in mini, bite-sized form!) uses coconut in a few different ways – flour, milk and sugar – to achieve a tender dairy-free crust, trademark custardy interior and must-have whipped cream topping. But rest assured, even with all of that coconut, the flavour is loud and clear: pumpkin pie with whipped cream!  The coconut is used for butteriness and richness, which vegan desserts require in order to achieve the familiar texture, taste and appearance of traditional baked goods. Spelt flour lends a nutty, wholegrain note to the pastry, but doesn’t have a too-strong flavour, like whole-wheat flour can. Spelt flour is also lower in gluten (not gluten-free), which means a more tender, flaky pie crust, naturally.   

Prepare the pastry the day before so it’s ready to take form in your muffin tin the day you want to serve these miniature vegan treats. Leftover pumpkin pie cups will last for one day at room temperature, or for a few days in the refrigerator. 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Cups with Coconut Whipped Cream

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Chilling and Cooling Time: 8 hours 20 minutes
Total Time:
 60 minutes (not including chilling and cooling time)
Servings: 10 to 12 pie cups

Ingredients:

Spelt Pastry:
1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups light spelt flour, plus more for rolling
1 Tbsp coconut sugar
Pinch, salt
1/3 cup cool coconut oil (solid but still scoopable); or cold unsalted vegan stick butter, cubed
2 tsp distilled white vinegar
1 to 5 Tbsp ice water

Pumpkin Pie Filling:
1 (15 oz) can pumpkin puree
3/4 cup coconut sugar or dark brown sugar
2 Tbsp coconut flour
2 tsp pumpkin spice, plus more to garnish
Pinch, salt
1 cup canned coconut milk (not light or reduced fat)

Coconut Whip:
1 (14 oz) can coconut milk, refrigerated for 24 hours, unshaken
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Garnish:
1/4 cup crystallized ginger pieces

Directions:

Spelt Pastry:
1. In a food processor, pulse 1 1/2 cups flour, sugar and salt until combined. Distribute pieces of coconut oil or butter over top of flour and pulse until incorporated and a coarse meal forms. Sprinkle over vinegar followed by 1 Tbsp of water. Briefly pulse dough until it begins to hold together. If it’s too sticky, add more flour; if it’s too dry, add water 1 Tbsp at a time.
2. Tip dough onto a piece of plastic wrap and form into a disc. Wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, up to 1 day.
3. Bring the dough out of the refrigerator and rest at room temperature until still cool but you are able to roll, about 20 to 30 minutes.
4. Sprinkle a large clean surface and rolling pin with additional flour. Unwrap dough and roll into a large, 1/4-inch-high round. Using a 4- to 5-inch cookie cutter or drinking glass, cut circles of dough, re-rolling as needed, for 10 to 12 circles. Fit circles into a 12-count muffin tin, removing any air pockets from the bottom. The pastry should be almost or just touching the top of the muffin rim.
5. Refrigerate formed pastry cups for at least 1 hour, or until completely chilled. Meanwhile, prepare the filling and coconut whipped cream.

Pumpkin Pie Filling:
1. In a large bowl, whisk to combine pumpkin and sugar. Sift over coconut flour, pumpkin spice and salt, and then whisk again until smooth. Slowly whisk in coconut milk until fully incorporated.

Coconut Whip:
1. Remove coconut milk can from refrigerator (don’t shake) and open. Spoon only the thick creamy top into a bowl and reserve watery liquid below for another use (in baking, smoothies, soups or sipping).
2. With electric beaters, whip coconut cream until it begins to get fluffy with soft peaks, 2 to 3 minutes. Once desired texture has been reached, beat in maple syrup and vanilla. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve, up to 1 day.

Baking and Assembly:
1. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Fill chilled pastry cups to the top with filling, smoothing slightly to flatten.
2. Bake for 15 minutes, rotate pan and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes until filling is dry to the touch and both the filling and pastry are beginning to brown. Cool in the pan for 20 minutes. Run a knife around the outside of each cup to loosen, and transfer to a wire cooling rack to cool completely, about 5 hours.
3. To serve, dollop cooled pumpkin cups with coconut whip and sprinkle with crystalized ginger and/or additional pumpkin spice, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Looking for more vegan pumpkin recipes? Try these Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Maple Glaze or Vegan and Paleo Pumpkin Blondies.

9 Simple Ways to Use Leftover Canned Pumpkin

You’ve made your pumpkin pie, but you’re left with a cup or so of pumpkin purée at the bottom of the can. So what can you do with it? Check out these easy and delicious ways to use this nutritious and versatile ingredient.

888_ways-to-use-canned-pumpkin

1. Waffles or Pancakes
Add the purée to your pancake or waffle batter along with a pinch of cinnamon for a delicious autumn breakfast treat. Try this recipe for Sweet Potato Waffles and simply swap the sweet potato for pumpkin.

2. Pumpkin Pasta
If you enjoy making pasta from scratch, pumpkin purée can replace some of the liquid in your recipe. Toss it in with the pasta after cooking with butter or olive oil, caramelized onion, sage and Parmesan.

3. “Pupcakes”
When you need to show your dogs some love, try making them some  pumpkin “pupcakes” — just add some pumpkin purée to your favourite “pupcakes” or even puppy dog biscuits.

4. Pumpkin Soup
This is an easy one! This beautiful soup is hearty and comforting — with just a touch of spice. It’s the perfect anecdote to over eating during the holidays.

5. Pumpkin Swirl Cheesecake Squares
These beautiful, tasty treats are easier to make than a full cheesecake, but just as satisfying! They’re full of colour, flavour and would be a great addition to any holiday dinner table.

6. Pumpkin BBQ Sauce
Pumpkin is a perfect consistency for sauces, and adds depth of flavour and sweetness without having to use sugar.

7. Pumpkin Maple “Butter”
Looking for an alternative to jam? Simmer pumpkin purée with a hint of maple syrup and cinnamon until it’s a spreadable consistency. It tastes great on a toasted cinnamon bagel!

8. Pumpkin Onion Dip
All you need to do is add the purée with some caramelized onions and a pinch of chili powder for a healthy, colourful dip.

9. Sugar Free Pumpkin Spice Doughnuts
Need I say more? These fragrant, spiced doughnuts are sure to hit the spot, and they’re super easy to make. Agave is used in place of sugar, making for a beautiful shiny glaze.