Tag Archives: beets

How to Grow Fall Vegetables and What to Do With Them

Sweater weather is here, but growing season is far from over. Just because the days are shorter and the temperatures are dropping, it doesn’t mean you have to abandon your garden. Want your very own harvest of autumn produce? Here are the fall vegetables you should consider and some recipes to try once they’re ready to pick.

How to Grow Garlic

If you’re new to fall gardening, growing garlic is a good place to start. If you’ve ever wonder how to grow garlic, it can be easily planted mid-autumn in a sunny spot with soil that is well-drained. Separate the cloves and set them with the pointed end up and the root side down in rows that are at least one foot or 30 centimetres apart — and you should have some new bulbs by late fall. Take your freshly harvested garlic and roast it, pickle it or add it to  your favourite dishes. Interested in growing garlic indoors? While you can’t grow bulbs if you don’t have any outdoor space, you can easily grow garlic greens in a pot on a sunny window ledge. In about 7 to 10 days, you can snip the greens and add them to soups, salads, baked potatoes and more.

A chicken breast cooked to a golden finish with whole cloves of garlic and a creamy sauce

Get the recipe for The Barefoot Contessa’s Chicken With Forty Cloves of Garlic

How to Grow Cauliflower

It may be the most challenging vegetable in the cabbage family to cultivate, but fall is the perfect time for growing cauliflower. The secret is to start your seeds indoors about four weeks before you plan to plant them. Once the seedlings are ready, select a spot in your yard where they’ll get lots of light and be sure to water them so they grow quickly. Plant them outside when it’s between 18°C and 24°C for a late fall or early winter harvest. Once the florets are densely formed, the cauliflower is ready to harvest. Serve as a side dish with Sunday roast, toss it into a stir-fry or use it in a low-carb mac and cheese.

Cauliflower prepared popcorn style with a red Korean gochujang sauce

Get the recipe for Korean Gochujang Cauliflower Popcorn

How to Grow Beets

Beets are a fall harvest favourite that is best grown from seeds. Plant them in mid-summer or early fall — at least eight weeks before the first heavy frost — in an area with full sun and well-loosened soil. To speed up germination, soak the seeds in water for 24 hours before planting. After planting, add a thin layer of mulch to keep the roots cool on warmer days. When you’re growing beets, you’ll want to give them water regularly to develop healthy roots. Harvest when they’re anywhere from the size of a golf ball to a tennis ball. And don’t discard those greens! They’re packed with nutrients and a tasty whether sautéed on their own or added to pastas and soups.

Roasted red beet quarters tossed with fresh tarragon and parsley

Get the recipe for Valerie Bertinelli’s Roasted Beets With Herbs

How to Grow Brussels Sprouts

It takes patience to grow Brussels sprouts, but they are an easy crop that takes up minimal space in your garden. The seeds have to be planted six to 10 weeks before the first frost in rows three feet or 90 centimetres apart. Water them weekly and harvest after the first fall frost for the sweetest flavour. Twist them off the stem when you’re ready to cook them and any remaining sprouts will stay on the plants through part of the winter, even after the snow has begun. If you plant your seeds in the fall, don’t expect any sprouts until late winter or early spring. Roast them with bacon and maple syrup, shave them into a salad or even try them in your air fryer.

Get the recipe for Orecchiette With Vegan Sausage and Brussels Sprouts

How to Grow Broccoli

Growing broccoli takes time and extra care. You’ll have to plant the seeds in early fall, well before the first frost of the season. Plant them 18 to 24 inches or 45 to 60 centimetres apart in well-drained soil that gets at least eight hours of sun per day, ideally a partially-shaded area. There are so many ways to enjoy fresh broccoli, whether you include it in a sheet pan dinner or serve it steamed with melted Cheddar on top.

Slices of beef and broccoli florets on wooden skewers with teriyaki sauce

Get the recipe for Broccoli Beef Skewers With Teriyaki Glaze

How to Grow Pumpkins

Bright orange gourds and fall go hand in hand. Early June is the time to start thinking about planting as the seeds need warm soil to get started. They also need ample space for the long, rambling vines. Once planted, give them a deep watering of about one inch per week and adjust the amount depending on rainfall to prevent the vines from rotting. Once the pumpkins begin to grow on the vines, you’ll need to raise them off the ground using supports for even colouring and shape. If you have limited space, but still want to grow a pumpkin or two, plant smaller sugar pumpkins that are perfect for cooking and baking. They’re perfect for pies, cakes and soups.

Orange pumpkin soup served in white bowls topped with fresh herbs

Get the recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Soup

Don’t know the difference between butternut and acorn squash? Our ultimate squash guide breaks it down for you.

A Nutritionist Reveals 10 Best Natural Foods for Dewy, Glowing Skin

If no makeup and no filter are your skin goals, Toronto-based integrative nutritionist and Good Goddess founder Natasha Geddes needs to be on your radar. This former fashion buyer and stylist to the stars, turned her laser focus to healthy eating after the birth of her son and daughter. She became passionate about quality ingredients, the power of supplements and, along the way, created an in-demand brand with a celebrity following. Here are 10 of her go-to foods for luminous skin that will help you get your glow on!

1. Wild-Caught Salmon

While Natasha likes to eat a plant-based diet as much as possible, she does make an exception when wild salmon is on the menu. It’s packed with vitamin E and Omega 3s – key players in reducing inflammation – plus a tongue-twister secret weapon: astaxanthin (pronounced asta-zan-thin). “This is a type of carotenoid and natural red pigment derived from algae,” says Natasha. “Astaxanthin helps skin maintain optimum moisture levels and has been proven to protect cells from UV damage.”


Get the recipe for Wheat Berry Bowl with Salmon and Miso Sauce

2. Avocado

Once relegated solely to taco night, this nutrient-dense fruit is now a menu powerhouse (avocado toast, anyone?). “Avocados are one of my favourite things,” says Natasha. “Full of healthy fats, they’re not only deliciously creamy, they also really pamper skin with antioxidants that brighten and hydrate. They are loaded with vitamin E, nature’s amazing moisturizer, and contain a natural sunblock that, like wild salmon, helps protect skin against UV rays – win win!”

3. Sweet Potato

Natasha remedies dry and dull looking complexions with this colourful superfood. A mashup of nutrients, the sweet potato is super skin-friendly thanks to beta carotene, the powerhouse antioxidant that converts to vitamin A when consumed. “Vitamin A promotes cell production and turnover so skin looks luminous – it’s sort of like the food version of retinol, which leaves skin supple and dewy. Use it to make fries, or swap out your avocado toast’s bread with a slice of baked sweet potato.”


Get the recipe for Sweet Potato Toast with Avocado and Sprouts

4. Cashews

Natasha rates most nuts as skin boosters – she’s especially fond of omega 3-rich Brazil nuts and how they promote skin elasticity – but her go-to for clear skin is the cashew. “It is the acne-fighting nut! Full of selenium, vitamin E and zinc, cashews reduce inflammation, promote cell growth and help renew damaged areas of the skin.” However, not all nuts are created equal when it comes to breakouts: Avoid peanuts, as they contain androgen, which speeds up sebum production and can worsen acne.

5. Bone Broth

This popular elixir is made by boiling bones to extract minerals, collagen (a key player in skin elasticity) and amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. Note: when protein levels are low, premature sagging and wrinkling can occur. One of the broth’s noteworthy amino acids is glutamine, which helps heal the intestinal barrier for optimal gut health. Natasha says, “I truly believe that great gut health equals healthier-looking skin.” She suggests adding greens to bone broth for a healthy light meal.


Get the recipe for Immune-Boosting Bone Broth, Chicken and Vegetable Soup

6. Cantaloupe

This sweet treat is the skin’s multi-tasker thanks to a dynamic combo of vitamins A and C. On its own, vitamin A keeps sebum production and cell turnover humming along so skin glows; double it up with vitamin C and you’ll double down on collagen formation, which contributes to smooth, firm-looking skin. “Vitamin C is necessary to build collagen. Just one cup of cantaloupe contains 97% of the recommended daily dosage.”

7. Blueberries

If you’re worried about broken capillaries, this berry is for you. Its point of difference is a mix of phytochemicals, including bioflavonoids, which help strengthen blood vessels so they’re less susceptible to breaking. “While everyone can benefit from blueberries, I highly recommend them to those with fair and sensitive skin.”


Get the recipe for this Antioxidant-Rich Green Tea and Blueberry Smoothie

8. Beets

Think of beets – whether juiced, steamed, roasted or raw – as the food version of wrinkle cream. “They are the anti-aging veggie!” says Natasha. “Packed with high concentrations of antioxidants, carotenoids, folate, fiber, iron, manganese, potassium and vitamin C, beets can actually decrease the depth and severity of wrinkles. The results are remarkable.”

9. Dairy-Free Coconut Yogurt

When Natasha was developing Good Goddess’s Coconut Cloud Yogurt, she knew that what she left out of it was just as important as what she put in. On the out list: dairy and sugar, which can weaken collagen and make skin vulnerable to wrinkles and sagging. On the in list: just two ingredients: coconut and vegan bacterial cultures. “This is a guilt-free treat that’s rich in probiotics, which get skin super glowy.”


See here for 20 Dairy-Free Foods Packed with Calcium

10. Detoxifying Water

To make the most of the day’s eight (or more) glasses, Natasha concocts her own detoxifying water. “Adding powerful boosters to water is fun and makes your H20 that much more efficient. My usuals: grass-fed collagen, lemon peels (filled with vitamin C to protect against free radicals), mint (fresh flavour plus nutrients) and a few slices of jalapeño (hello vitamin C and B6!). Collagen is the most abundant protein in our bodies, and it promotes skin elasticity. As we age, we lose it, so it’s important to supplement whenever we can.”

Looking for more ways to eat your way to a fabulous complexion? Be sure to avoid these 14 Worst Foods For Your Skin!

The Ultimate Grain Salad for a Summer Picnic

Combine the freshest produce of the picnic season with nutrient-rich quinoa, hearty white beans and a quick vinaigrette for a grain salad that won’t wilt or spoil on your next outdoor adventure.

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Here, we mix crunchy quinoa, cooked beets, white beans, cucumber, basil, dried cranberries, pine nuts and dill, and mix it all up with a zesty dressing. Vibrant purple beets infuse the entire salad with a beautiful and subtle pink hue. While we love the summery flavour here, you can also  mix and match with your favourite ingredients, adding or subtracting as you see fit.

Prep Time: 15
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Serves: 6

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Ingredients:
3 large beets, quartered
1 cup uncooked quinoa
11/2 cups water
1 Tbsp diced preserved lemon or 1 tsp lemon zest
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 (19 oz) can white beans, drained and rinsed
1 English cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1/4 cup dried cherries or cranberries
1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
1 Tbsp chopped fresh dill

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Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. Add beets to a covered ovenproof casserole dish with a splash of water or bunch up in a ball of foil. Roast for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until tender when pierced with a knife. When cool enough to handle, remove beet skins and thinly slice.
2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, bring 1½ cups water and quinoa to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and steam covered for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and add to a large bowl along with beets; all mixture to cool for 15 minutes.
3. For the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk preserved lemon or lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Reserve.
4. To cooled quinoa and beets, add beans, cucumber, basil, cherries or cranberries, pine nuts, dill and prepare dressing. Mix well to combine. Refrigerate until ready to pack and serve, up to 5 days.

Food-Netword-Canada-Picnic-Salad-Recipe-Allison-Day-4

Try this recipe for Fully-Loaded Summer Picnic Potato Salad.

Beet Hummus

Bright and Beautiful Beet Hummus

Brighten up your summer nights with this vibrant hummus. The punchy dip gets a natural fuchsia face-lift with the help of a sweet summertime staple: beets!

If you’ve been to the farmer’s market lately, you’ve likely seen the deep garnet beauties piled high, ready for roasting, sauteing and spiralizing. But before you pop those colourful gems into the oven, consider this tasty snack. The beets require no pre-cooking, but can be roasted if you prefer. Enjoyed with pita wedges, on toast, with vegetables and so much more, you’ll keep finding a home for this addictive dip in your kitchen.

Beet Hummus

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

Hummus:
1 raw beet, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 cup cooked black beans, drained and rinsed if using canned
¼ cup tahini
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar (preferably aged)
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp salt

Serving:
Whole wheat pita bread
Thinly sliced radishes
Sesame seeds
Fresh herbs of choice

Directions:

Hummus:
1. Pulse beet and garlic in a food processor until finely minced. Add remaining hummus ingredients and puree until smooth.
2. Transfer to a serving bowl.

Assembly:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Place pitas on a baking tray and warm for approximately 7 minutes, or until desired temperature.
3. Remove from oven and slice into wedges.
4. Serve with hummus, garnished with radishes, sesame seeds and herbs.

Borscht: ‘My Family’s Version of Chicken Soup’

By Sam Yachiw, as told to Leslie Wu

Sam Yachiw shares her love of curling with local kids through the nonprofit Curl Saskatoon. At home, this fourth-generation Ukrainian-Canadian loves sharing a hearty bowl of her baba’s borscht with family and friends. In fact, Yachiw’s favourite way to explore her heritage is to navigate her grandparents’ dinner table, where some of her fondest memories take place.

Borscht was my family’s version of chicken soup, fed to us when we were sick or sad. I’ve had it since I was a toddler, and I’ve always liked its unique taste and that warm feeling with every mouthful. It would have been my great, great-grandmother who brought the recipe over from Ukraine. The core recipe is the same, but it’s been adapted and tweaked over the years.

With my baba [grandmother] and dido [grandfather], we make a big batch of this soup once a year: about 20 single-serving jars and a whole bunch of larger jars, which are distributed among the family. On borscht cooking day, we start early in the morning with the chopping. The whole process takes about two hours, or even three, depending on how much we’ve been talking. We’re usually done by noon, then we’ll heat up some fresh borscht for lunch. For most of the afternoon, we come together as family and just talk! We’re such a close-knit family, and I love it.

We sit down to share borscht as the second course at Ukrainian Easter. This holiday is different for every family, depending on how traditional you are. For us, it’s lunch after church, which turns into about four hours of feasting, then relaxing in a comfortable chair to chat with someone you may not have seen in many years. My grandparents know so many people I’ve never met in the 27 years I’ve been alive, so there’s always someone new at the kitchen or dining table. Last year, they hosted a lady who was in their wedding party more than 60 years ago.

Borscht has brought my baba and I together. Most of my memories of her are in the kitchen; it’s part of who she is, and she’s always been like that. My grandfather, on the other hand, doesn’t really do a lot of cooking, but he helps out. Any memory I’ve had, he’s been around helping, especially if it’s a bigger meal. My baba’s a social butterfly, so she loves to cook for people. It didn’t matter if we were just visiting for a day or a weekend, there were these amazing, extravagant meals. It’s something I learned from her, and I try to continue this tradition even now with my own friends; we all get together and celebrate, even if it’s just over an everyday meal. Food is one thing that brings everybody together—it doesn’t matter what culture you’re in.

Baba’s Borscht, courtesy of Sam Yachiw

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Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 1½ hours
Yield: 10 to 12 servings

Ingredients
2 tsp (10 ml) salt
4 cups (1 L) beets, peeled and shredded
2 carrots, diced
1 large onion, chopped
1 large potato, diced
? cup (75 mL) diced celery
2 tbsp (30 mL) white vinegar
1 cup (250 mL) canned diced tomatoes
1 can tomato soup
1 tbsp (15 mL) fresh or frozen dill

Directions
1. Add salt to 8 cups (2 L) water. Cook peeled and shredded beets for 30 minutes.
2. Add carrots, onion, potato and celery; simmer for 30 minutes.
3. Add vinegar, tomatoes, tomato soup and dill; simmer for about 15 minutes. (Add peas and/or beans, if you like.) Cook until vegetables are tender. Serve with borscht.

Click to print, save or share this hearty borscht recipe.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!

Made Easy: Colourful Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Quinoa

The leaves have fallen off the trees and the skies are consistently grey. It’s time to head to the farmers’ markets for a dose of colour! Vibrant heirloom carrots, creamy parsnips, ruby red beets, and yellow and red mini potatoes are in season now, so a colourful roasted vegetable platter will impress at the dinner table (or Christmas table for those already planning menus). Serve it with a side of this garlicky quinoa and grilled chicken seasoned with salt, pepper and Italian seasoning for a meal that you can also pack for lunch the next day.

Colourful Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Quinoa

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Ingredients:
1 bunch baby heirloom carrots, peeled and cut into smaller sticks
1 bunch baby parsnips, peeled
2 whole garlic bulbs, tops sliced off
4 whole beets
24 red and yellow mini potatoes
1 cup dried quinoa, rinsed and strained
1 1/2 cups water
Vegetable or avocado oil*
Salt and pepper
Italian seasoning

RoastedVegetablesPan_sized

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven at 400°F.
2. In a pot of salted boiling water, blanch the potatoes for five minutes. Drain and let dry.**
3. Toss the parsnips, carrots, garlic bulbs, and potatoes with oil, salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning in a large bowl.
4. Wrap whole, unpeeled beets individually in aluminum foil.***
5. Place all the vegetables in a single layer on two large baking trays lined with parchment paper. Bake for an hour until the vegetables are soft, begin to appear wrinkled, and become fragrant.
6. In the meantime, bring 1 1/2 cups of salted water to a boil in a small pot over medium heat. Add in the quinoa, cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the water has evaporated and the quinoa has a fluffy texture. Remove lid and fluff with a fork.
7. When the vegetables are done roasting, remove from oven. Take three or four garlic cloves from the bulb and dice (or mash) into smaller pieces. Add the garlic into the pot with the quinoa. Gently toss with a fork.****
8. Remove the beets from the aluminum foil and peel off the skin. Slice the beets into thin slices.
9. Arrange the vegetables on a platter and serve with the garlic quinoa. Serves four generously.

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Notes:

*Avoid using olive oil when cooking or roasting at high temperatures. Olive oil smokes and becomes bitter when exposed to high temperatures, so use oil that has a higher smoke point like vegetable or my current obsession, avocado.
**Have you ever roast potatoes and find that the insides are still hard and raw even after an hour of cooking? Blanch the potatoes first to give them a head start at cooking. This will give the potatoes their pillowy, almost mashed texture inside and a crispy skin on the outside. This extra step was a revelation for me.
***Unlike most vegetables where you first peel then roast, the skin of beets are much easier to remove when you roast them first. You’ll notice that you can literally peel the skin right off with your fingers once the beet is roasted. Of course, let the beet cool first so you don’t burn yourself. You’ll also want to do the peeling over the baking sheet and close to the sink since beet juice stains everything it touches.
****Garlic is downright heavenly when it caramelizes in the oven, creating a sweeter and less sharp garlic taste compared to its raw state. Leftover roasted garlic cloves can be added to soups, hummus, spreads, other roasted vegetables, grains, heck, it makes everything better.

734863_10151322355189438_2070375187_n Karon Liu is a freelance food writer based in Toronto who is slightly lactose intolerant but will otherwise eat and cook anything.

Topics: Made EasyVegetablesQuinoa