Tag Archives: bacon

Eggs benny with peameal bacon

The History of Peameal Bacon — Plus Our Favourite Recipes

Canadians know peameal bacon as an iconic national breakfast food, but the back bacon’s backstory is even richer than its flavour. For those who don’t know, peameal bacon is wet-cured pork loin from the back of the hog that has been trimmed of fat and rolled in cornmeal, creating a yellow crust.  Originally, it was rolled in crushed yellow peas, hence the name peameal. It is much leaner than regular bacon.

White plate with three pieces of peameal bacon

Peameal bacon holds a spot in 1001 Foods You Must Taste Before You Die and it’s easy to understand why. The brining process makes it nearly impossible to overcook and it’s both leaner and juicer than regular bacon. A uniquely Canadian product, it’s often confused with Canadian bacon. What is Canadian bacon? A smoked back bacon that’s popular in the US — and isn’t Canadian at all.

These days, it’s hard to find peameal bacon outside of Canada, making it a favourite with tourists at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market. The Carousel Bakery, which has occupied the same spot in the market since 1977, is a city landmark famous for its fresh peameal bacon sandwiches.

Related: The History of Cakes: From Red Velvet to German Chocolate

Robert Biancolin, who co-owns the bakery with his brother, dubs peameal bacon Toronto’s most original food. “It wasn’t brought here from somewhere else,” he says. “It is very uniquely Torontonian. Of course, like poutine was uniquely Quebecois, it spread across the country. It is one of those dishes that encompasses being Canadian. It is part of our tradition.”

Unlike Canadian bacon (which is, let’s not forget, American) peameal bacon must be cooked. Biancolin says the best way to prepare it is by griddling, although it can also be baked, barbecued or roasted.

Related: How to Make French Toast and Other Easy Big Breakfast Recipes

Peameal bacon is delicious, iconic and Canadian, but culinary historians have struggled to identify its origins with absolute certainty. “I don’t think that you’ll find a single origin story,” says Daniel Bender, director of Culinaria Research Centre and University of Toronto history professor. “There are and have been for centuries many ways of curing pork — ways of making it last through lean months. Smoking is one. Salting is another. Corning (curing through brine) exists in numerous locations and recipes.”

Toronto’s oral history offers a clue by naming pork baron William Davies the inventor of peameal bacon. This is the story that’s been passed down through muddy stockyards, told over deli counters and posted across the blogosphere — and while the well-told tale has likely changed over the years, that doesn’t mean it’s hogwash. What we do know is that William Davies forged an empire on bacon and other pork products.

William Davies stall, St. Lawrence Market, 1911

William Davies’ stall in the St. Lawrence Market, 1911.
City of Toronto Archives

By the early 1900s, with the help of business partner Joseph Flavelle, Davies had built what was believed to be the largest pork plant in the British Empire, processing nearly half a million hogs a year at his Front Street plant near the mouth of the Don River and earning Toronto its nickname: Hogtown.

Davies couldn’t have had better timing. By the Victorian era, bacon was considered a necessity and demand for the Canadian export was high. Canadian cured pork continued to be an important food product in Britain well into the Second World War, when the Bacon Agreement stipulated that the UK would accept no less than 5.6 million pounds of Canadian ham and bacon each week.

William Davies Store, interior, 1908

William Davies store interior, 1908. Sources differ on the store’s location, which was either in City Hall Square or on Queen Street West, between Bay and Yonge streets.

Changing dietary attitudes and demographics mean that Canadian pork isn’t as popular with Brits — or Canadians — as it once was. Still, Davies’ legacy lives on. His company would eventually become today’s Maple Leaf Foods, which still produces peameal bacon for national consumption.

Meanwhile, the St. Lawrence Market remains a hub for cured meats and other delicacies. Locals, tourists and celebrities continue to flock to the market,  going hog wild for Toronto’s most original food.

Peameal eggs benny

Feeling inspired? Here are some of our favourite recipes that use peameal bacon: Anna Olson’s Eggs Benedict With Peameal Bacon on Scallion Waffles and Tomato Cream, Great Canadian Breakfast Sandwich and Maple Bourbon Peameal Bacon Sliders.

Published March 29, 2016, Updated December 20, 2020

Photos courtesy of Getty Images and City of Toronto Archives

How to Make French Toast and Other Easy Big Breakfast Recipes

As the old adage reminds us, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And while six in 10 Canadians report eating breakfast every day, it tends to be quick and easy go-to meals, leaving little time for variety and creativity. If you’re looking to up your culinary game in the coming months, why not start with breakfast classics? Think: French toast, oven-baked bacon and waffle platters that would put any charcuterie board to shame. Master the art of big breakfast recipes that’ll become household favourites in no time. You can thank us later!

Brioche French toast on plate

How to Make French Toast

There’s nothing better than the sweet scent of French toast cooking on the stovetop first thing in the morning. If you’ve never tried your hand at the breakfast staple, consider sticking with this tried-and-true classic recipe.

1. In a small bowl combine 1 tsp ground cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg and two Tbsp of sugar.

2. In a 10-inch or 12-inch skillet, melt 4 Tbsp of butter over medium heat. Whisk together cinnamon mixture, 4 eggs, ¼ cup milk and ½ tsp vanilla extract and pour into a shallow container such as a pie plate. Dip bread in egg mixture. Fry slices until golden brown, then flip to cook the other side. Serve with syrup.

Related: Overnight French Toast, Plus More Easy Breakfast Casserole Recipes

What to try something a little more challenging? How about an overnight gingerbread French toast bake (pictured below) for the perfect winter morning dish? Combine the egg mixture with gingerbread spices and cranberries for a hint of tartness.

Overnight French toast bake in pan

Get the recipe for Overnight Gingerbread French Toast Bake

How to Cook Bacon in the Oven

Is there anything better than the smell of bacon in the morning? Spoiler alert: the answer is no. Even better: this crispy and delicious one-ingredient recipe is ready in a snap.

1. Preheat oven to 400ºF.

2. Lay the bacon on a sheet pan and bake for 15 to 20 minutes until the bacon is really crispy. Dry on paper towels and serve. Voila!

10 pieces of bacon roasting on cookie sheet

Get the recipe for Ina Garten’s Roast Bacon

How to Make a Waffle Platter

Feeling ambitious? Impress your family with your culinary skills by whipping up a waffle platter for a hearty breakfast.

1. Plug in your waffle iron and mix dry ingredients (1 cup buckwheat flour, 1 Tbsp coconut sugar, 2 tsp baking powder and a pinch sea salt) into a bowl.

2. Mix the wet ingredients (1 egg, ¼ cup melted coconut oil
and 1 cup dairy-free milk) in a separate bowl.

3. Pour the dry into the wet and whisk until a batter comes together.

4. Once the waffle iron is hot, scoop about ⅓ cup batter onto the iron, close it and let it cook for about 3 minutes.

The beauty of this waffle platter is the plethora of toppings you have to work with. Think: fresh fruits, proteins (hard-boiled eggs, cheese, smoked salmon), pantry staples (dried fruits, seeds, nuts) and syrups or spreads (maple syrup, honey, peanut butter, tahini, yogurt).

Cutting board with waffles and fruit layered on top

Get the recipe for Gluten-Free Buckwheat Power Waffles

Want more how-tos? We give you the lowdown on how to make apple juice and the perfect hard-boiled eggs.

A heaping bowl of Kardea Brown's pan fried collard greens studded with thick cut bacon bits

Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Can a side dish really be a star? As Kardea Brown shows us with her cravaeble Southern recipes on Delicious Miss Brown, you can elevate any dish with a touch of heart, respect for tradition, quality ingredients — and her distinct and delicious penchant for making comfort-food classics her own. That’s where these delectable pan-fried collard greens come in.

A staple side dish in Southern homes, collard greens slather savoury flavour on any dinner plate — and Kardea’s recipe takes these essential greens to the next level with mouth-watering thick-sliced bacon bringing the “more, please” umami flavour. Cooked in a low-and-slow-style (but ready in 30 minutes), Kardea’s pan-fried collard greens are tender, garlicky and just a tiny bit sweet thanks to a hint of honey.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Pan-Fried Collard Greens

Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:
6 thick bacon slices, chopped into large pieces
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 lbs. collard greens (about to 2 large bunches), stems discarded, leaves washed and chopped
1 Tbsp honey
A few dashes of hot sauce
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

Directions:

1. Add bacon to a large skillet over medium heat. Cook bacon, stirring occasionally, until crispy, about 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the bacon from the pan and set aside, leaving the fat in the pan.

2. Add the onion to the bacon grease and cook, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in garlic and cook, stirring, for another 30 seconds or so, until fragrant. Add the greens, honey, hot sauce and a few pinches of salt and pepper. Cook the greens, stirring occasionally, until greens are nice and tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Taste and add more salt and/or pepper if necessary. Serve hot with bacon on top.

Related: Top 48 Sweet and Savoury Bacon Recipes

Looking for a Southern-style finish to your meal? Kardea Brown’s Caramel Apple Cake should hit the (sweet) spot.

Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


 

The Great Canadian Salad

Make this Canadian Summer Salad Packed with Home Grown Ingredients

In this salad, we’re combining classic Canadian ingredients, bacon and maple syrup, with two great Canadian-grown ingredients, lentils and mustard. Did you know Canada is the world’s largest exporter of lentils and mustard seeds? Really! Here, they come together in a great Canadian salad that’s a little bit sweet and a touch salty with a nice earthy crunch from grated beets and peppery bite from tender greens. Canadian pride never tasted so good.

Great Canadian Salad

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad With Maple Dijon Dressing

Total Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
Maple Dijon Dressing

3 Tbsp Dijon mustard
3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1½ Tbsp maple syrup
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper 

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad
2 cups cooked lentils (from 3/4 cup dry or canned)
100 g (approx. 1/2 cup) roughly diced cooked peameal bacon
100 g roughly chopped feta cheese
2 large handfuls greens, such as arugula
1/4 cup grated beets

Great Canadian Salad

Directions:
Maple Dijon Dressing:
1. Place all dressing ingredients a small jam jar, place the lid on and shake well. Refrigerate until ready to dress the salad.

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad:
1. In a large bowl, mix to combine lentils and bacon. Add the feta and stir gently to distribute evenly though the salad. Add the greens and beets and mix gently to avoid bruising the green leaves.
2. When ready to serve, dress the salad with your prepared dressing, to taste. Portion into bowls and serve.

Keep the Canadiana theme going and treat yourself to a little post-salad dessert in the form of butter tart monkey bread.

Bacon-Wrapped Cheesy Jalapeño Ghouls

The thrill of stuffed jalapeños is that you never know how spicy a pepper will be — a true trick or treat! A fun twist on Halloween mummies, these crowd-pleasing ghoulish appetizers are stuffed with a creamy filling of sharp Parmesan cheese, yogurt, mustard and thyme. The ghouls are then wrapped in smoky bacon, and gain vision with diced black olives.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4 to 8

bacon-wrapped-jalapeno-ghouls1

Ingredients:

For Filling:
1/4 cup Greek yogurt
1 tsp grainy mustard
1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 tsp dried thyme

For Assembly:
4 large jalapeños, cut lengthwise, seeds and veins removed
4 strips bacon, cut lengthwise into thin strips
2 pitted black olives, cut into small dice (for “eyes”)
Food colouring gel or melted dark chocolate (for “eyes”)

bacon-wrapped-jalapeno-ghouls2

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 325ºF. Line a large baking sheet with foil and add jalapeños, cut side-up.
2. In a small bowl, combine filling ingredients. Divide evenly between jalapeños and smooth out top.
3. Wrap thin strips of bacon around jalapeños, leaving a small gap near the stem for the eyes. Up to this point (precooked), you can cover and refrigerate the mummies for up to 1 day.
4. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until bacon is crispy and cheese is bubbling. Cool for 5 minutes.
5. Place two pieces of diced olive on each jalapeno (the “eyes”) in the small gap near the stem. Serve warm.

8 Flavourful Ways to Use Leftover Bacon Fat

Don’t throw the flavour out with the bacon grease. Swimming in all that leftover bacon bit-infused fat is a world of salty, porky goodness you can coax a ton of flavour from. Here are eight ways to use your excess bacon fat in everything from salad to popcorn and even cookies.

888_Insanity Burger

Courtesy of jamieoliver.com

Jamie Oliver’s Insanity Burger
The trick to getting an out-of-this world flavourful burger is to toast the buns Jamie Oliver-style in bacon fat, until lightly golden and ever so crispy.

888_Maple Bacon Popcorn

Courtesy of rachaelrayshow.com

Rachael Ray’s Maple Bacon Popcorn
Stovetop popcorn drizzled in bacon fat, topped with bacon bits and sprinkled with a salty and sweet maple sugar? Um, yes please.

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Courtesy of curtisstone.com

Curtis Stone’s Peas with Bacon and Mint
Green beans are quick-cooked in bacon grease with sauteed shallots just long enough so they are tender and bright green, giving them a decadent, salty note without adding any extra salt.

888_Bacon-Fat-Cornbread

Courtesy of bethdunham.ca

Bacon Fat Cornbread
This savoury skillet cornbread is loaded with crumbled bacon, cheese, fresh corn, green onions and chili flakes, while a splash of bacon fat added to the batter amps up the flavor and helps keep it moist.

888_bacon-roasted-potatoesChuck Hughes’ Bacon Roasted Potatoes
Fingerling potatoes are slow roasted in bacon fat with sea salt, black pepper and sprigs of fresh rosemary for a killer side no matter the occasion.

888_perfect-spinach-salad

Courtesy of foodnetwork.com

The Pioneer Woman’s Spinach Salad
Who says spinach salad has to be boring? This drool-worthy recipe calls for a trifecta of crumbled bacon, warm bacon dressing, and onions and mushrooms that have been sauteed in bacon grease.

888_country-style-omeletteRicardo Larrivée’s Country-Style Omelette
Leftover bacon grease is poured into a hot cast iron skillet and then filled with an egg mixture to create the most golden, puffy and flavourful omelette..

888_Bacon-Gingersnaps

Courtesy of cooking.nytimes.com

Bacon Fat Gingersnaps
Need an unexpected reason to hoard your leftover bacon fat? Try these bacon-infused gingersnaps with a smoky-salty undertone to offset the sweetness that sets them apart from your average cookie.

Linguine-with-mussels-feature-image

Quick Canadian Dinner: Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

This savoury, creamy pasta is a symphony of Canadian flavours. The beer adds a crispness to the rich sauce — we recommend a light, refreshing microbrew ale or lager. Thanks to the way PEI mussels are grown and harvested, they rarely have beards or grit inside them, so cleaning them just means giving them a good rinse.

Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
2 lb (900 g) mussels
1 Tbsp olive oil
4 slices bacon, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1 rib celery, diced
1 cup ale or lager
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup whipping cream (35%)
1 Tbsp chopped fresh tarragon
1/4 tsp pepper
Pinch salt
12 oz (375 g) linguine
3 Tbsp minced flat-leaf parsley

Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

Directions:
1. Rinse the mussels. Discard any that don’t close when you tap them firmly on the counter; set aside.
2. In a Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Fry the chopped bacon until crisp, about 5 minutes. With a slotted spoon, remove the bacon from the pan to a paper towel and let drain.
3. Add the onion and celery to the fat in the pan. Cook stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes. Add the beer and bring to a boil.
4. Add the mussels then reduce heat. Cover and simmer until the mussels open, about 6 minutes. Discard any that do not open. With the slotted spoon, remove the mussels to a bowl. Add the cream, tarragon, salt and pepper to the pan. Boil until the liquid is reduced by half, about 5 minutes.
5. Meanwhile, cook the linguine according to the package directions until al dente; drain. Add pasta and mussels to the pan, and toss to coat. Sprinkle with parsley and bacon.

How to Throw a Canada Day Party for Under $50

The birthday of our home and native land is just around the corner, so we’ve got the perfect excuse to plan a stellar red-and-white-themed bash. But you’ll quickly find that a simple celebration can cost a lot more than you’re willing to spend. That’s okay! You can still throw a quaint Canada Day shindig without having to give up on all your patriotic party hopes and dreams.

From simple and reusable décor to snacks that’ll satisfy any true Canadian’s taste buds, learn how to throw a Canada Day party for your friends and family, all for under $50.

Canada Day Party

To begin, gather a few home décor pieces and party supplies you already own. This can include anything from a reusable banner, snack labels (along with a chalk pen), twine for the sandwiches, platters and a crate for the display, and some form of tea lights.

Décor Expenses:
Chip cups: $2
Poutine containers: $2
Napkins: $1
Flowers: $7
Sparklers: $1
Total: $13

For the food, it’s only appropriate to serve every cliché, most-loved food Canada has to offer. This includes BLTs, poutine, ketchup chips, butter tarts and maple doughnuts.

Food Expenses:
Bread, Canadian bacon, lettuce, tomatoes and mayonnaise for BLTs: $14
Smoke’s traditional poutine: $10
Ketchup chips: $3
Maple doughnuts: $5
Butter tarts: $4
Total: $36

Total Cost: $49

Maple Doughnuts

For the focal point on the table, stack maple doughnuts on a cake stand, sitting on top of a crate. I figured they’re maple, they’re doughnuts — surely they deserve the utmost attention at a Canadian affair, right? If you’re looking to make doughnuts from scratch, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Maple Glazed Doughnuts.

Canadian BLTs

Make mini versions of our country’s favourite sandwich, the BLT, and line them up on a long platter. Want to opt for a heartier sandwich? Try this Fried Chicken BLT Melt recipe.

Canadian BLTs

Use twine to tie red and white striped napkins around the sandwiches for an al fresco feel.

Smoke's Poutine

And what Canada Day celebration would be complete without our country’s signature food, poutine? Use takeout-inspired boxes to display five mini servings of these gravy-doused, cheese-topped French fries. But if you want to add a little more flair to your poutine, try making your own version of Smoke’s Nacho Grande Poutine.

Butter Tarts

For a dessert that has “Made in Canada” written all over it, butter tarts are the way to go. Made with eggs, sugar, raisins, and of course, butter, this quintessential dessert features a buttery, flaky crust and super-sweet filling. How could we Canucks resist? If you have a little extra time on your hands, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Pecan Butter Tarts.

Ketchup Chips

Chances are you won’t be able to find ketchup chips outside of the country, so it’s quite necessary to serve Canada’s “exclusive” snack at your little shindig. Set out portions of ketchup chips in red and white striped, easy-to-grab cups.

Canada Day Food Table

Accent the table with some mercury tea lights as vases to hold daisies.

Doughnuts and Sparklers

And of course, to continue with tradition, sparklers can be added for the finishing touch to the celebration.

How to Fake Bacon Using Coconut

There’s a healthier alternative to pork if you’re craving some bacony goodness. From a vegan breakfast to a BLT sandwich, coconut bacon is a wondrous substitute that’s easy and cheap to make at home. There are brands you might find in specialty stores, but don’t bother — they’re way too expensive! Try out this recipe instead.

888_coconut-bacon-vegan-recipe

Ingredients:
3 cups flaked unsweetened coconut
3 Tbsp gluten-free tamari (can substitute in soy sauce)
2 Tbsp liquid smoke
2 Tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp smoked paprika
Sea salt to taste

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. In a mixing bowl whisk tamari, liquid smoke, maple syrup, and smoked paprika together. Then add the flaked coconut into the mixture and lightly toss with a spoon to coat evenly.
2. Spread out evenly onto a baking sheet (or 2), heavily greased with coconut oil. Bake for 20 minutes but toss the mixture on the sheet every 5 minutes. Make sure you set the timer so you don’t forget and burn the whole batch (which we have done before!)
3. Sprinkle with sea salt right out of the oven and remove the coconut bacon from the baking sheet — it’ll be very hot and will continue to brown. Dump it onto a large plate or another baking sheet to cool.
4. Store in an air tight container or jar and use it on everything: kale caesar salad, avocado toast, a bacon mushroom melt, or even maple bacon scones! The possibilities are endless.

See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.

A Baked Goat Cheese and Spinach Dip That Can’t Be Beat

By Jo-Anna Rooney

Winters in Calgary are long and very cold, but we try to embrace the season by enjoying all it has to offer. This means that during those long winter months our family can often be found outdoors, taking part in great Canadian activities like pond hockey, snowshoeing, skiing and tobogganing.

After all of the fun, we look forward to heading indoors to gather around a crackling fire and enjoy warm drinks and comforting eats. There is just nothing like filling your belly with hearty, homemade food on a cold, wintery day. This Baked Goat Cheese and Bacon Spinach Dip is perfect for such an occasion! I like to prepare it ahead of time, and have it ready to go as soon as we come inside. Serve it bubbling hot with loads of crusty bread and your favourite red wine.

Baked Goat Cheese and Bacon Spinach Dip, Courtesy of Jo-Anna Rooney, aprettylifeinthesuburbs.com, Calgary

This make-ahead treat is the perfect reward after a day of winter fun.

BakedGoatCheeseBaconSpinachDip

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time:
30 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients
2 Tbsp (30 mL) olive oil
8 oz (225 g) fresh spinach, chopped
1 onion, diced
1–2 cloves garlic, minced
5 oz (140 g) goat cheese
¾ cup (175 mL) sour cream
¼ cup (50 mL) chopped marinated artichoke hearts
8 slices cooked bacon, crumbled
salt to taste
pepper to taste
crusty bread or crackers for dipping

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
2. In skillet heat olive oil over medium-low heat. Sauté spinach, onion and garlic until onion is translucent and spinach is wilted. Remove from heat.
3. Stir in the goat cheese, sour cream, artichoke hearts and bacon. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
4. Scrape mixture into ovenproof dish and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until mixture is bubbling.
5. Serve with crusty bread or crackers for dipping.

A Pretty Life in the Suburbs
Jo-Anna is the editor, director, chief, main cook, dishwasher and home decorator on the site A Pretty Life in the Suburbs. She created the site as a way to share her love of a simple home life through uncomplicated home tips and fresh and easy recipes. Her hope is that by spending some time on A Pretty Life in the Suburbs, you are inspired to add some simplicity and deliciousness into your home and life.

Fast Family Dinner: Fried Rice With Bacon

By Katherine Chong

Fried rice is one of those super versatile dishes you can whip up on any weeknight and it works especially well with leftover rice. Sometimes my much younger cousins, ages 8 and 11, come over for dinner. This is my go-to recipe for them—they can be picky eaters and getting them to eat what’s good for them can be difficult. However, I’ve found that mixing bacon with kimchi in fried rice appeals to both kids and adults.

The beauty of this recipe is that it is packed with kid-approved flavour, it’s flexible and it’s super quick to prepare. Both the rice and the bacon can be prepared ahead of time, to make the actual dinner itself super quick. After you’ve left work and picked up the kids, just 10 minutes in the wok or pan gets dinner on the table.

Bacon-Kimchi Fried Rice, Courtesy of Katherine Chong, piqueyeater.com, Toronto

Kid-approved and made in minutes, this satisfying fried rice recipe is perfect for weeknights.
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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Yield: 6-8 Servings

Ingredients
8 pieces low-sodium bacon (or turkey bacon)
4 cups (1 L) leftover cooked rice
3 eggs, beaten
2 cups (500 mL) frozen vegetables (of your choice)
1 cup (250 mL) kimchi, chopped
2 tbsp (30 mL) soy sauce
1 tbsp + 1½ tsp (22 mL) kimchi juice
¼ cup (60 mL) chopped green onion, divided

Instructions
1. Chop bacon into 1-inch pieces. Fry in wok or non-stick skillet over medium-high heat until cooked but not crispy. Remove bacon from pan and drain off half the bacon fat.
2. Add leftover rice to skillet and cook, stirring, over medium-high heat.
3. Once rice is reheated, about 5 minutes, pour eggs into skillet and cook, tossing, until mixture begins to set.
4. Stir in frozen vegetables, kimchi, soy sauce, reserved kimchi juice, 2 tbsp (30 mL) green onions and reserved bacon. Cook, tossing, until heated through.
5. Top with remaining green onion just before serving.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!

The Piquey Eater
As a fourth-generation Chinese-Canadian, marrying the two cultures in the kitchen is a very important part of my life and something I write about on my blog. I’m also an adventurer, exploring other cuisines and cultures in the mosaic city of Toronto.

Creamy Homemade Polenta, 2 Ways

Polenta, grits, cornmeal – whatever you choose to call it, there’s a severely underused ingredient lurking in your pantry that’s kicking back, patiently waiting to be infused with just about anything you dare to throw at it. And once you discover it, there will be no more putting that polenta baby in the corner.

This stovetop cheesy polenta with smoky bacon and shrimp is exactly the kind of deceivingly easy meal you pull out for company, acting like it didn’t come together with any more effort than a few strong-armed stirs of the pot and some well-timed fry action.

The good news is that this dish is just as good meatless: Try it topped with sauteed tomatoes, spinach and a fried egg. Because, let’s face it, a fried egg makes everything better.

Prep Time: 20 mins
Cook Time: 25 mins
Serves: 4

888_Grits_Shrimp_polenta

Ingredients:

For the polenta:
4 cups water
1 cup polenta
2 Tbsp butter
1 1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
Salt

For the shrimp:
12 raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
6 slices bacon, chopped
2 Tbsp parsley, chopped
2 green onions, sliced
1 large clove garlic, minced
2 Tbsp lemon juice

For the spinach and tomato sauté:
2 cups, spinach
1/2 pint grape tomatoes, halved
1/2 glove garlic, minced
Olive oil
4 fried eggs
Kosher salt, cracked black pepper
Tobasco sauce

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Directions:

For the polenta and shrimp:
1. Bring water to a boil and add salt. Slowly whisk in polenta and cook, stirring frequently for 20 minutes, adding more water if it looks too thick. Remove from heat and stir in butter and cheese.
2. In a large skillet, fry the bacon until browned. Set on paper towel to drain. Cook shrimp in bacon grease until they turn pink, about 3-4 minutes. Add garlic, green onions, parsley and cooked bacon, and sprinkle with lemon juice. Sauté for 3 minutes.
3. Ladle polenta into individual bowls and top with shrimp and bacon mixture. Serve immediately.

For the spinach and tomato sauté:
1. Heat olive oil a large skillet and add tomatoes. Sprinkle with salt and cook until they begin to release their juices, about 3 minutes.
2. Add minced garlic and spinach. Stir and cover, letting the mixture simmer until spinach is wilted, about 3-5 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, fry eggs in screaming hot olive oil until preferred doneness. Set aside.
4. Ladle polenta into individual bowls and top with spinach and tomato mixture. Add fried egg and hot sauce, and serve immediately.

BonnieMo Bonnie Mo is a Toronto-based editor and the face behind Food Network Canada’s 1 Dish, 2 Ways column. She’s also a contributing editor over at slice.ca. For more recipe ideas, visit bonniemo.ca, or catch her on Instagram @bonniemo

The Ultimate Breakfast Pizza

Recently I decided that it was time I try making a breakfast pizza and let me tell you — it did not disappoint! Not only did it fill the kitchen with the pleasant aroma of all my breakfast favourites, but it tasted absolutely delicious. Combining breakfast classics onto thin, airy pizza crust… How could you go wrong? Well, you can’t! Unless you burn it of course…

Breakfast-Pizza-3-of-7

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 3

Ingredients:

No-Knead Pizza Dough:
250g all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
? tsp active dry yeast
180ml water

Pizza Toppings:
Tomato sauce
Cheddar cheese (grated)
Cooked bacon
Ham
Green onion
Russet potato (very thinly sliced)
Egg

Breakfast-Pizza-7-of-7

Directions:
1. In a bowl, combine dry ingredients, slowly mix in water while stirring with a wooden spoon.
2. Once dough begins to form, work it into a roughly shaped ball with your hands, leaving it in the bowl, and covering with plastic wrap.
3. Allow dough to rise at room temperature for around 18 hours or until doubled inside.
4. After 18 hours, remove dough from bowl and place on a floured work surface,
5. Cut the dough into three even pieces for personal sized pizzas.
6. Knead each piece of dough into a ball and allow to rise for another hour covered with a damp towel, or wrapped in plastic wrap.
7. If you won’t be using all the dough right away, refrigerate it, and remove it from the fridge 1-2 hours before cooking allowing it to warm to room temperature.
8. While dough is resting, if using a pizza stone, place it in the cold oven and turn the heat to 500°F (or as close to that heat as possible), allowing the oven to heat for about an hour.
9. If you don’t have a pizza stone, arrange the pizza dough on a baking sheet, and just preheat the oven to 500-550°F.
10 Once the dough has finished resting, on a floured surface, stretch it thinly to your preference (without breaking the dough).
11. Spread tomato sauce, topped with grated cheddar cheese, potato, bacon, ham & green onion. Once all your ingredients are placed, crack an egg on top of the pizza.
12. If using a baking sheet, bake at 500-550°F, if using a pizza stone, turn your oven to broil and cook the pizza for 5-10 minutes until desired doneness.

100x100_BS Carlene and Bob Deutscher are the dynamic sibling duo behind BS’ in the Kitchen. While Carlene leans towards the sweeter side of things, baking up delicious desserts, you can count on Bob to cook up something savoury! Aside from blogging on BS’ in the Kitchen, Carlene works in marketing & communications, and sidelines as a lifestyle & wedding photographer, while Bob operates his own media company, with a focus on food photography, and videography! Carlene and Bob Deutscher are part of the Lifestyle Blog Network.

Green Onion Parmesan Crepes with Ricotta, Spinach and Bacon

When it comes to crepes, I prefer the savoury over the sweet. My initial plan was to stuff it with ricotta, spinach, bacon and mushrooms, but in a stroke of genius, I decided to put some green onion and parmesan cheese in the crepe batter. Best decision ever! These things smelled so good while cooking, and taste incredible.

Green-Onion-Parmesan-Crepes-with-Ricotta-Spinach-Bacon-Mushroom-Filling-recipe

Green Onion Parmesan Crepes with Ricotta, Spinach, Bacon and Mushrooms

Prep Time: 20 mins
Cook Time: 30 mins
Total Time: 50 mins
Serves: 4

Crepe Batter Ingredients:

1 cup cold water
1 cup milk
4 eggs
1 tsp salt
2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
4 tablespoons melted butter
¼ cup chopped green onion
2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

Filling Ingredients:

2 tablespoons butter
2 cups sliced mushroom
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups packed spinach
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
¼ cup chopped cooked bacon
¾ cup ricotta cheese
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

For Filling
1. Add butter to a pan on medium heat. Once butter has melted, add mushrooms. Saute until mushrooms are tender, about 5-10 minutes, before adding spinach, add one tablespoon of olive oil.
2. Add spinach to pan, cover with lid for about 1 minute. Once spinach begins to wilt, add bacon, garlic powder, and salt and pepper to taste.
3. Stir to mix seasoning in, remove mixture to a bowl once spinach is cooked, add ricotta and mix ingredients together.

For Crepes
1. Combine water, milk, eggs & salt in blender or bowl if using a handle blender.
2. Add flour, butter, green onion, and parmesan, blend at high speed for about 1 minute until ingredients are combined. Mixture will be quite thin, just thick enough to coat a spoon. Refrigerate for at least one hour, or overnight.
3. To cook crepes, get a pan on medium heat. Spread a thin film of butter on pan.
4. Pour a ¼ cup of crepe batter into your pan, slowly rotating the pan with your wrist to spread the batter in a circle.
5. Cook for about 1-2 minutes until crepe begins to brown.
6. Flip and cook for another minute or until browned.
7. Place filling in middle of crepe and roll together, or if folding the crepe, place filling in one quarter of the crepe, fold in half once, and then fold in half once more (resulting in a triangle).

100x100_BS Carlene and Bob Deutscher are the dynamic sibling duo behind BS’ in the Kitchen. While Carlene leans towards the sweeter side of things, baking up delicious desserts, you can count on Bob to cook up something savoury! Aside from blogging on BS’ in the Kitchen, Carlene works in marketing & communications, and sidelines as a lifestyle & wedding photographer, while Bob operates his own media company, with a focus on food photography, and videography!

Carlene and Bob Deutscher are part of the Lifestyle Blog Network family.

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