Category Archives: Great Canadian Cookbook

Patriotic Pancakes Perfect for Canada Day

With a bright red maple leaf in the centre, these patriotic pancakes are perfect for Canada Day. Fresh red berries, whipped cream and maple syrup are great toppings, but you can switch it up with your favourite fruit, nuts, sauce and more.

canada-day-pancakes1

Maple Leaf Pancake Recipe

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Makes: about 12 pancakes

Ingredients:
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 Tbsp butter, melted
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
Pinch salt
22 ml Red food colouring
1/4 cup vegetable oil

Garnish:
Maple syrup
2 cups fresh raspberries
1/2 cup whipping cream, whipped

canada-day-pancakes2

Directions:
1. In large spouted bowl, whisk together egg, milk and butter, then whisk in flour, baking powder and salt until smooth. Let stand 20 minutes.
2. Measure 1/3 cup of the batter into shallow bowl, and thin with enough water turn into a creamy consistency. Tint red with food colouring.
3. Over medium-low heat, heat a nonstick skillet with 1 Tbsp oil per pancake. Brush 2-inch (5 cm) maple leaf-shaped cookie cutter with some of the oil. Place in skillet. Pour in enough red batter to fill, then cook 1 minute until set on bottom. Holding cutter with tongs, or hands, lift cutter away from maple leaf shape. Using a squeeze bottle or spoon, top each leaf with enough white batter to cover.
4. Cook until bubbles form on tops, about 3 minutes. Turn pancakes and cook until bottoms are golden, about 1 minute.
5. Working in batches and brushing pan with remaining oil as necessary, repeat with remaining batters, cleaning off cookie cutter when necessary.

Garnish:
Serve pancakes with maple syrup, raspberries and a dollop of whipped cream.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

The Ultimate Strawberry Rhubarb Pie for Canada Day

Every year July 1st, I catch some of the festivities of the Canada Day celebration in my city. They have a large open fire salmon barbecue at the centre of the festival grounds surrounded by many vendors selling lemonade, fresh kettle corn and cotton candy. My favourite part of the festivities is the pie-by-the-slice fundraiser inside the local community centre.

There’s always quite a large selection; pies made with plump local blueberries or Okanagan peaches are always popular choices. But my go-to has always been the strawberry-rhubarb. There’s just something so irresistible about the combination of the sweet and tangy pink filling and the (optional but mandatory) à la mode, that keeps me going back year-after-year. So here’s an ode to my favourite July 1st treat, with an added Canada Day-inspired touch.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Canada Day Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Chill Time: 60 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Makes: One double crust 9-inch pie

Ingredients:
Crust:
2 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 cup cold butter, unsalted, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 cup cold water
4 Tbsp cider vinegar
1 cup ice

Egg Wash:
1 egg
Coarse sugar

Filling:
5 cups chopped rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 1/2 inch pieces
3 cups strawberries, halved
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 cup cornstarch

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Directions:

Crust:
1. In a large bowl, stir together flour, salt and sugar. Set aside.
2. Add the butter pieces and coat with the flour mixture using a bench scraper or spatula. With a pastry blender, cut the butter into the flour mixture, working quickly until mostly pea-size pieces of butter remain (a few larger pieces are okay!).
3. Combine the water, cider vinegar and ice in a small bowl.
4. Add 2 Tbsp of the liquid mixture over the flour mixture. Mix and cut it in with bench scraper or spatula until fully incorporated. Continue adding the liquid, 1-2 Tbsp at a time. Mix until the dough comes together in a ball.
5. Shape the dough into 2 flat discs, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Filling:
1. Prepare the rhubarb and strawberries. Set aside.
2. In a separate bowl, combine sugars, cinnamon and cornstarch.
3. Toss together the fruit and dry mixture. Add lemon juice and combine.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Assembly and Baking:
1. Once the dough has chilled, roll out the dough in between two sheets of parchment and fit it on the pie plate.
2. Line pie pan with rolled out bottom crust.
3. Roll out top crust. Using a maple leaf-shaped cutter, punch out maple leaves into the rolled out top crust. Save all the maple leaf cut outs to use for decorating the edge of the pie.

4. Pour filling into the bottom crust, leaving behind any excess liquid from filling.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

5. Gently place on top crust. Take the reserved maple leaf cut outs to create a border around the pie.

6. Coat top crust with a simple egg wash and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Place pie on a baking sheet before putting it in the oven, just in case any juices bubble over.
7. Bake at 425°F for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the pastry is set and beginning to brown. Lower the oven temperature to 375°F and continue to bake until the pastry is a deep golden brown and the juices are bubbling throughout, 35 to 40 minutes longer.
8. If the top crust is starting to get a little dark too quickly, place a pie shield on the pie.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

9. Once ready, let pie set for at least 1 hour before cutting into it. Serve as is or with a big scoop of ice cream.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Looking for more inspiration? Try our 60 Great Canadian Recipes.

Watch this video to get Anna Olson’s top tips on baking fruit pies.

This Maple Waffle Ice Cream Sandwich is Your Ultimate Canada Day Dessert (or Breakfast)

These red and white ice cream waffle sandwiches make for a scrumptious Canada Day dessert or decadent brunch. They’re best eaten right away, but you can stretch the time before they melt a little bit by freezing them after assembling. If you’d prefer to enjoy them hand-held, just skip the whipped cream and maple garnish, and dig right in!

maple-nut-wafflewiches-2

Maple-Nut Wafflewich Recipe

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Makes: 6 sandwiches

Ingredients:
1 cup whipping cream (35 %)
3 cups maple walnut or vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup maple syrup

Maple-Nut Crunch
1 Tbsp pasteurized egg whites
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1/4 tsp vanilla
Pinch salt
1 cup finely chopped pecans
1/4 cup granulated sugar

Waffles
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp cocoa powder
1 tbsp each baking powder and granulated sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup sour cream
4 tsp butter, melted
1 Tbsp red food colouring

maple-nut-wafflewiches-1

Directions:
Maple-Nut Crunch
1. In large bowl, whisk egg white until foamy. Whisk in maple syrup, vanilla and salt. Add pecans and sugar, tossing to coat.
2. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment.
3. Bake in 225°F, stirring every 15 minutes, until crisp and coated, about 45 minutes. Let cool. (Tip: Store in airtight container for up to 1 week.)

Waffles
1. Meanwhile, in large bowl, combine flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, sugar, baking soda and salt.
2. In separate bowl, whisk egg, milk, sour cream and butter. Add to flour mixture, stir just until blended. Using food colouring, tint batter red.
3. Spray electric waffle iron with cooking spray. Heat iron to medium heat. Spoon amount of batter directed by manufacturer onto grids of waffle iron. Close lid quickly. (Do not open until waffle is done.)
4. Cook according to manufacturer’s directions. When done, lift waffle off grid with fork. Repeat with remaining batter. Let cool.
5. Meanwhile, whip cream to stiff peaks.
6. Place 2 scoops of ice cream onto 6 of the waffles. Top with remaining waffles, pressing to push ice cream to edges. Roll edges in maple-nut crunch. (Tip: Freeze for up to 1 hour.)
7. Transfer each sandwich to a dessert plate. Top each sandwich with a dollop of whipped cream and remaining maple-nut crunch. Drizzle with maple syrup.

trail-mix-in-a-bowl

Snacking Just Got a Little More Canadian with Butter Tart Trail Mix

Cottage canoe rides, road trips, relaxed barbecues and outdoor summer concerts all have one thing in common: they’re better with snacks! We’ve come up with a healthy staple trail mix that takes less than 5 minutes to make, along with a few fun Canadian twists to tickle your fancy and tantalize those taste buds, no matter where the summer takes you. Get out there and hike, paddle, cruise, grill and sway to your heart’s content – we’ll bring the snacks

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Basic Canadian Trail Mix Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Makes: 3½ cups

Ingredients:

1 cup roasted salted or unsalted almonds
1 cup roasted salted or unsalted cashews
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted sunflower seeds
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
½ cup dried cherries

Directions:

1. Mix together almonds, cashews, sunflower seeds, pepitas and cherries. Serve. Store airtight at room temperature, up to 1 month.  

nanaimo-bar-trail-mix

Take all your favourite flavours of Nanaimo bars into the woods with you by making some chocolatey trail mix. Not a fan of coconut? Our original trail mix is simply satisfying.

Nanaimo Bar Trail Mix Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Makes: 4 cups

Ingredients:

1 cup roasted  walnuts halves
1 cup toasted, shaved coconut
¾ cup dark chocolate chunks
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted cashews
¼ cup roasted salted or unsalted sunflower seeds
¼ cup roasted salted or unsalted pepitas
¼ cup dried cherries   

Directions:

1. Mix together walnuts, coconut, chocolate, cashews, sunflower seeds, pepitas and cherries. Serve. Store airtight at room temperature, up to 1 month.  

butter-tart-trail-mix

The choice is yours: candied pecans or candied bacon? There’s no wrong answer! Both our tasty butter tart trail mix and sweet and savoury bacon mix are satisfying.

Butter Tart Trail Mix Recipes

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Cooling Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Makes: 3½ cups

Ingredients:

¼ cup brown sugar
1 Tbsp water
2 tsp salted or unsalted butter
1 cup pecans
1 cup roasted salted or unsalted cashews
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted sunflower seeds
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted pepitas
½ cup raisins

Directions:

1. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment and set aside.

2. Melt brown sugar, water and butter in a large, non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add pecans and cook, stirring occasionally until the mixture foams and the pan starts to look dry, about 5 minutes. Spoon onto prepared sheet and cool completely, about 10 minutes.

3. Mix together candied pecans, cashews, sunflower seeds, pepitas and raisins. Serve. Store airtight at room temperature, up to 1 month. 

Candied Bacon Trail Mix Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Cooling Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Makes: 4 cups

Ingredients:

6 strips bacon
⅓ cup brown sugar
1 cup roasted salted or unsalted almonds
1 cup roasted salted or unsalted cashews
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted sunflower seeds
½ cup roasted salted or unsalted pepitas
½ cup dried cherries   

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Fit a rimmed baking sheet with a cooling rack. Spray rack with cooking spray. Set aside.

2. Place bacon in a shallow dish and sprinkle with brown sugar, turn to coat, pressing sugar onto bacon to adhere. Place on prepared cooling rack on baking sheet and bake 20 to 25 min, or until golden and crispy. Set aside to cool. Once cooled, crumble or roughly chop.

3. Mix together almonds, cashews, sunflower seeds, pepitas, cherries and bacon. Serve immediately.

More bites this way with our Best Road Trip Snacks made for traffic jams and car singalongs.

Pecan Whisky Butter Tarts are a Classic Canadian Treat, All Grown Up

Canada’s quintessential dessert, the butter tart, gets a grown-up twist with warming whisky, rich pecans and pure maple syrup. Canadian rye whisky adds a touch of warmth and natural spice notes, complementing the super-sweet buttery interior. It’s all balanced by the addition of pecans to add the perfect contrasting crunch. For the pastry, a mixture of butter and shortening helps to create those pretty frilled edges homemade butter tarts are known for – they also help to capture every bit of that sticky, just runny enough, spiked filling.

Canadian Pecan Whisky Butter Tarts

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Chill Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Bake Time: 18 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 3 minutes
Makes: 12

Ingredients:

Pastry Dough
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for shaping and rolling
1 1/2 Tbsp granulated white sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening, cut into 1-inch pieces, plus more for tin
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, chopped into 1-inch pieces
1/3 cup cold water
1 large egg yolk
1 1/2 tsp lemon juice

Filling
3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup dark corn syrup
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
5 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
2 large eggs
2 Tbsp Canadian rye whisky
1 tsp distilled white vinegar
1/4 tsp salt
2/3 cup pecan halves, roughly chopped 

Directions:

Pastry Dough
1. In a food processor, pulse flour, sugar and salt until combined. Add shortening and butter, and pulse until the mixture is crumbly. In a small bowl, whisk together water, egg yolk and lemon juice until combined. With the processor running, gradually add egg yolk mixture to the flour mixture, until dough just begins to come together.

2. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and briefly knead until dough comes together. Divide dough in half and shape into two discs. On a lightly floured piece of parchment paper, roll out one disc into a circle measuring 1/8-inch or so in thickness. Carefully transfer, with parchment paper intact (to keep it from sticking), to a baking sheet. Repeat this with the second dough disc (use two baking sheets or layer on top of each other using parchment to separate). Cover each rolled disc loosely with additional parchment paper to avoid drying out, and refrigerate for 1 hour, or until chilled and firm.

3. Preheat oven to 450°F. Lightly spray a 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick cooking oil or lightly grease with oil or extra shortening.

4. Using a round 4- to 5-inch round cookie cutter or wine glass, cut dough into 12 circles, re-rolling dough once if necessary. Gently press rounds into prepared pan allowing edges to fold up around each other and extend above the rim of pan. Freeze for 20 minutes to firm up. Meanwhile, prepare the filling.

Filling
1. In a medium bowl, preferably one with a pour spout, whisk together brown sugar, corn syrup, maple syrup, melted butter, eggs, whisky, vinegar and salt until smooth and sugar begins to dissolve.

2. Remove pastry shells from freezer. Divide pecans evenly in the bottom of each frozen pastry shell. Pour or ladle filling on top of pecans, filling 1/2-inch below the top of the pastry.

3. Bake in the bottom third of oven for 10 minutes at 450ºF. Reduce heat to 400°F and continue to bake for an additional 6 to 8 minutes, or until filling is set and puffed, covering with foil or parchment to prevent excess browning if necessary.

4. Transfer pan to wire cooling rack and let cool for 10 minutes. Run a sharp knife around edges of tarts and let cool completely in pan. Pop them out when you’re ready to enjoy them. Serve and store butter tarts at room temperature.

From cheesecake to ice cream, these fresh takes on Canadian butter tarts will satisfy every sweet tooth.

butter tarts on white plate

Butter Tart Spots to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Butter tarts are a uniquely Canadian dessert with a history as rich as the country itself. If you’ve never experienced the glory of these treats, they’re delightful pastries filled with a sticky, sweet, buttery filling. Raisins or pecans are popular additions to the filling while some bakers get creative with fruit, candy or other unique variations. Invented in Ontario, the province is also home to award-winning tarts and even has a festival that has transformed the dessert into a full-day experience. If you’re on a quest for butter tart bliss, here are Ontario’s top spots to indulge in this tasty treat.

Ontario’s Best Butter Tart Festival (Midland, ON)

The ultimate destination for butter tart buffs, Ontario’s Best Butter Tart Festival takes place in Midland every year. With more than 60 vendors and over 150,000 tarts for sale, it’s the perfect place for the entire family to try baked goods from across the province. Home to Ontario’s Best Butter Tart competition, bakers enter their finest classic and contemporary creations, and a panel of expert judges selects the best of the best! Another highlight of the day is the Butter Tart Trot, which includes a family-friendly fun run, as well as a 5K, 10K and half marathon.

Maple Key Tart Co. (Locations in Toronto and Northumberland County, ON)

Rachel Smith and Jean Parker, hosts of Food Network Canada’s The Baker Sisters, have been baking tarts since childhood when they helped their mother with her butter tart business. After they became mothers themselves, they co-founded their boutique butter tart company, taking their mother’s award-winning recipe and making a few tasty tweaks. Their rustic, handcrafted tarts are made with locally-milled flour and vegetable shortening and are available in four varieties: classic, raisin, pecan and maple walnut.

The Maid’s Cottage (Newmarket, ON)

Three-time winners at Ontario’s Best Butter Tart Festival, sisters Pam and Debbie got a young start helping their mother, Jackie, sell tarts and other baked goods on their front lawn. As word spread about Jackie’s baking, she opened their first shop on Main Street in Newmarket and expanded to a larger location nearby a year later. Jackie sadly passed in 2003, but Pam and Debbie have continued the tradition, making their famous butter tarts from a secret family recipe.

The perfect buttertart ❤️ #buttertartfestival #themaidscottage

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Bitten on Locke (Hamilton, ON)

Rebecca and Erica at Bitten conquered the cupcake game before venturing into butter tarts. They researched a number of recipes from cookbooks, friends and family to come up with a base for their tarts and spent many delicious months adjusting it until they landed on their current formula. Their traditional flaky pastry is made with lard and includes one secret ingredient that really sets them apart. While their cupcakes venture on the wild side, this duo considers themselves butter tart purists, offering only plain, raisin or pecan tarts.

Nana B’s Bakery (Merrickville, ON)

Owner Anne Barr created the award-winning maple rhubarb apple butter tart that took first place in the Pro All-Ontario Ingredient category at last year’s Ontario’s Best Butter Tart Festival. Anne’s tarts are proudly made with ingredients sourced locally, in Eastern Ontario, and while her bakery is popular with locals, it is also a destination for day-trippers, boaters and cyclists alike. Nana B’s is committed to helping keep the environment beautiful, reducing and recycling as much as possible, and sends its used vegetable oil to a local garage for biodiesel conversion.

The Sweet Oven (Barrie, ON)

This Barrie Bakery owned by Becky Howard and her family is known right across the country for their handcrafted tarts. Each tart is made from scratch from the highest quality ingredients and baked on site. With more than 20 flavours to choose from, there is something to please every palate. They have the classics like pecan and raisin, but chocolate chip, peanut butter, English toffee and their signature tart raspberry are other popular picks.

Carla’s Cookie Box (Toronto, ON)

Carla’s love of baking started as a kid while making traditional Italian cookies with her mom. As an adult, she started her butter tart journey at the request of her son after sifting through recipes from friends. None were quite right, so she experimented until she landed on her own recipe. Her handcrafted tarts are made in small batches, sometimes with help from her husband and kids, using the freshest maple syrup, flour, eggs and butter from Ontario farms and businesses. In addition to traditional fillings, she dabbles in fun flavours like nutella swirl and pina colada.

In honour of #TeamCanada and how proud they’ve already made us #pyeongchang2018

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Doo Doo’s Bakery (Bailieboro, ON)

It was a bittersweet beginning for Diane Rogers’ butter tarts. Newly widowed and raising a teen and a toddler; she started her late-night baking sessions while the kids were sleeping. A self-taught baker, she developed her signature pastry by experimenting with an old recipe. Her soft, hand-rolled pastry is made in small batches with the finest ingredients. The light, flaky tarts have a jelly-like filling that’s not overly sweet with a good filling-to-crust ratio. Diane’s best ideas still come at night, so that’s her favourite time to prepare for a competition or event.

Betty’s Pies and Tarts (Cobourg, ON)

Over 40 years ago, Betty sold homemade baked goods from a converted garage, using a butter tart recipe handed down from a bakery she worked at. Betty retired in 2001 and sold the business to Nancy Coady, who first moved it to Port Hope and then to its location on Highway 2. Current owner Ali Jiggins worked at Betty’s through high school, and after university, bought the bakery from Nancy. Ali still uses Betty’s award-winning recipe with a few tweaks. They have a slightly heavy crust with a runnier filling and comes in unique flavours like PB&J and raspberry-coconut.

Want to make your own tasty treats? Try this s’mores butter tart recipe.

ketchup chip seasoning feature image

How to Make Ketchup Chip Snack Seasoning (It’s Oh-So Canadian!)

Since the 1980s, ketchup chips have been one of Canada’s favourite chip flavours. While the origin of these much-loved, finger-staining chips remains unclear, there’s no denying their uniquely appealing aroma and ketchup-ish flavour. And if ketchup makes a good flavour for chips, you can bet it makes a great seasoning for many more delicious snacks. Learn how to make your favourite chip flavouring at home and go wild with this delicious, buttery topping. Add it to popcorn, roasted potatoes, parsnips, even squash for a sweet taste of nostalgia, minus the artificial flavours and colours of course.

Ketchup Chip Seasoning

Ketchup Chip Snack Seasoning

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Rest Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: ¼ cup of seasoning

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp butter or coconut oil
2 Tbsp sugar
2 Tbsp tomato paste
4 tsp white vinegar
½ tsp smoked paprika (or regular paprika)
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp onion powder
¼ tsp garlic powder
12 cups air-popped popcorn (about ⅓ cup kernels)

Directions:

1. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Whisk in sugar, tomato paste, vinegar, smoked paprika, salt, onion powder and garlic powder. Cook, whisking constantly, until sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute.

Ketchup Chip Seasoning

2. In large bowl, toss popcorn with tomato mixture to coat. Spread coated popcorn on large parchment paper-lined rimmed baking sheet.

Related: Tasty Nut-Free Snack Recipes

3. Bake in 300°F oven, stirring once, until coating is dry to the touch, 15 to 18 minutes. Let cool on pan for 10 minutes to crisp.

Published February 2, 2016, Updated March 27, 2018

Butter Tart Cheesecake

The Best Maple Butter Tart Cheesecake Recipe

The classic Canadian butter tart has many variations – pecans or raisins, firm or runny filling, crispy or flaky pastry — and everyone has their favourite combo. If there’s one thing that all Canadians can agree on, it is the fact that butter tarts are one of the most delicious desserts out there. So why not go one step further and combine your favourite Canadian sweet treat with another indulgent dessert — cheesecake. The result is a sweet and salty combination that gets topped with butter tart filling and lots of pecans for extra crunch!

Butter Tart Cheesecake

Maple Butter Tart Cheesecake

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cooking Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes + chill time
Makes: 10 slices

Ingredients:

Crust:
1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
5 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
3 Tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp salt

Cheesecake:
1 (250g) pkg cream cheese
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 eggs
3 Tbsp maple syrup
1/2 cup 35% whipping cream
2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1/4 tsp salt

Maple Pecan Sauce:
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp maple syrup
2 Tbsp 35% cream
1/8 tsp salt
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Butter Tart Cheesecake

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Butter an 8-inch round springform pan.
2. In a large bowl combine graham cracker crumbs, melted butter, sugar and salt. Firmly press graham cracker crumb mixture into bottom of greased pan and push 1 inch up the side. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.
3. In a large bowl combine cream cheese and brown sugar. Using an electric mixer beat until well combined and fluffy, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Beat in eggs one at a time. Beat in maple syrup, cream, butter and salt.
4. Wrap bottom of the pan with aluminium foil. Pour in filling and place in a roasting pan. Pour boiling water into roasting pan about 1 inch up the side. Bake until edges are set and middle still has a jello-like wobble, about 1 hour to 1 hour 10 minutes. Remove pan from water and let cool, about 1 hour. Remove from tin, cover and refrigerate for at least four hours or overnight to chill completely before serving.
5. When ready to serve, make the sauce. In a small saucepan combine brown sugar, maple syrup, cream, salt and pecans. Bring to a boil and let bubble for 2 minutes, until slightly thickened. Serve drizzled over cheesecake.

Butter Tart Cheesecake

Looking for more butter tart goodness? Try our Best Butter Tart Recipes.

The Cream Egg Brownie You Absolutely Need to Try

Who says cream eggs have to be round? Cake and Loaf Bakery has taken everyone’s favourite Easter treat and made it even better.

Inspired by Cadbury Creme Eggs, these Cream Egg Brownies are topped with a heavenly milk chocolate ganache, golden and white chocolate cream layered on top of a deep fudge brownie. In case your sweet tooth isn’t satisfied, there’s also a Cadbury Mini Creme Egg nestled inside the chewy brownie base.

It’s no wonder these beautiful bars have created a cream egg frenzy. The sweet squares have garnered a buzz around Hamilton, Ont., causing the bakery to quadruple production to meet the demand for their trendy treat.

Cream Egg Brownies

These tasty creations are the brainchild of bakery owners Josie Rudderham and Nicole Miller, who started Cake and Loaf Bakery in 2011 . You may remember Josie  from her winning appearance on Season 2 of  Donut Showdown, where she impressed us with her sweet skills.

The pastry pair pride themselves on sourcing ingredients locally and baking their creations from scratch. If you’re in the Hamilton area, you can try this deliciously creamy layered dessert yourself. While you’re there, you can also enjoy their handcrafted Cream Eggs made with fair trade organic chocolate.

Cream Egg Brownies

Unfortunately, the recipe for their Cream Egg Brownies is top secret, but you can make their Donut Showdown winning doughnuts at home.

Get the recipe for Sriracha Peanut Butter Crunch Donuts.

The Great Canadian Salad

Make this Canadian Summer Salad Packed with Home Grown Ingredients

In this salad, we’re combining classic Canadian ingredients, bacon and maple syrup, with two great Canadian-grown ingredients, lentils and mustard. Did you know Canada is the world’s largest exporter of lentils and mustard seeds? Really! Here, they come together in a great Canadian salad that’s a little bit sweet and a touch salty with a nice earthy crunch from grated beets and peppery bite from tender greens. Canadian pride never tasted so good.

Great Canadian Salad

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad With Maple Dijon Dressing

Total Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
Maple Dijon Dressing

3 Tbsp Dijon mustard
3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1½ Tbsp maple syrup
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper 

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad
2 cups cooked lentils (from 3/4 cup dry or canned)
100 g (approx. 1/2 cup) roughly diced cooked peameal bacon
100 g roughly chopped feta cheese
2 large handfuls greens, such as arugula
1/4 cup grated beets

Great Canadian Salad

Directions:
Maple Dijon Dressing:
1. Place all dressing ingredients a small jam jar, place the lid on and shake well. Refrigerate until ready to dress the salad.

Lentil, Bacon And Feta Salad:
1. In a large bowl, mix to combine lentils and bacon. Add the feta and stir gently to distribute evenly though the salad. Add the greens and beets and mix gently to avoid bruising the green leaves.
2. When ready to serve, dress the salad with your prepared dressing, to taste. Portion into bowls and serve.

Keep the Canadiana theme going and treat yourself to a little post-salad dessert in the form of butter tart monkey bread.

Ginger Beef

The Delicious History of Ginger Beef

There’s one iconic Canadian dish that’s a “must try” in Calgary and you won’t find it at the steakhouse. Instead, head straight to Chinatown — the birthplace of sticky-sweet ginger beef. Here, you can savour a plate of crispy and golden battered beef swimming in a sticky, spicy sauce, often served over rice. “It usually has deep-fried beef, ginger, peppers, carrots and onions and is served in a sweet sauce that is a bit like General Tso’s,” says Lenore Newman, food historian and author of Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey. “I see it as an excellent example of the early mixing of Canadian and Chinese tastes.” Food lovers have likely encountered this crunchy, satisfying dish in restaurants across Canada and abroad, but there’s nothing quite like eating ginger beef in Calgary.

Ginger Beef

Get the recipe for Ginger Beef With Carrots and Rice

“Whenever I go to Chinatown in Calgary, ginger beef is in the back of my mind,” says Ryan O’Flynn, chef at Calgary’s acclaimed The Guild Restaurant and Canadian Culinary Championship winner.  “It’s a staple. When the Chinese restaurants get ready for a busy night, they’ve got the 150 portions of ginger beef ready and probably 30-50 of everything else.”

Chinese food wasn’t always so popular in Cowtown. In the early-  to mid-20th-century, Chinese-owned restaurants struggled to popularize Peking-inspired dishes and instead served comfort fare like burgers, fries and grilled cheese sandwiches. In the 1970s, George Wong, chef at The Silver Inn in Calgary, was looking for ways to boost business and make his menu more appealing to Western patrons. Playing with a recipe from Northern China and inspired by British pub grub, George deep-fried shredded beef and then simmered the crispy strips in a spicy chili sauce. He dubbed the dish “deep-fried shredded beef in chili sauce” and began serving it to patrons.

“It had that fast food flavour,” says Ryan. “It’s kind of ingenious — George Wong was one of the first to adapt and push the boundaries in Calgary.” Turns out, George’s creative cooking instincts were bang on: customers gobbled up the newfangled dish, loving the zingy sauce and the beef’s crunchy texture. “It caught on and became known as ‘ginger beef,'” says Karen Anderson, president of Alberta Food Tours. “Because Canadians mistakenly believed there was ginger in the sauce.”

Today, ginger beef remains a staple on The Silver Inn’s menu and has become such an iconic dish that it was even included in the Royal Alberta Museum’s Chop Suey on the Prairies exhibition. Several decades later, there’s a growing appetite for this dish across Canada, with more chefs incorporating ginger beef onto their menus.

Related: Tasty Chinese Takeout Dishes You Can Master at Home

“To think that a dish from Calgary built in the 1970s can now be found in Victoria to Toronto to Halifax is pretty fantastic,” says Ryan. “It gained way for other Chinese restaurants to do a new style of Asian food.”

The original recipe has evolved over the years, to reflect changing tastes and ingredients. Some renditions include ginger and garlic, and it’s more common now to add sauteed onions, peppers and carrots into the mix before serving. Regardless of the fixings, the outcome is always tasty. “The result is tender morsels of beef in a crispy coating with sweet hot sauce and brightly coloured vegetables,” says Karen. “When it’s done right, it’s out of this world delicious.”

Some daring chefs are even playing around with this Canuck favourite, creating everything from ginger beef poutine to a sesame ginger beef burrito. The dish has even fuelled a “Ginger Beef Throw Down,” a one-time cooking competition between food trucks that was hosted by the Royal Alberta Museum.

Although you can make your own at home or try it at various restaurants across the country, Ryan says:  “You must go to The Silver Inn… You can’t have it anywhere else! Have it there first, so you know what it is, and then go and check out other renditions.”

Published January 5, 2017, Updated January 1, 2018

Pecan-Butter-Tarts

The Sticky-Sweet History of the Butter Tart

How do you like your butter tart — firm or runny? With raisins or bacon bits? Made with butter or shortening? There are a gazillion and one ways to make (and eat!) a butter tart, but only one truly great place to enjoy them: in Canada, the birthplace of this sweet, satisfying treat. “The butter tart is 100 per cent Canadian,” says Anna Olson. “It’s an individual tart, as opposed to a full-sized pie.”

In case you’ve been in hibernation, a butter tart is a flaky, round pastry shell filled with a gooey buttery filling that’s semi-solid, with a crunchy top. Taste testing is almost a patriotic duty, offering a delicious way to sink your teeth into Canadian history.

whiskey butter tarts

Get the recipe for Pecan Whisky Butter Tarts

Like many legendary dishes, the butter tart’s origins are fuzzy. It’s believed that filles à marier (“marriageable girls”) created a crude version in the 1600s. These newly arrived Québécois brides filled their French tarts with New World ingredients: maple sugar, freshly churned butter and dried fruit such as raisins.

“The idea of mixing a syrup with eggs and dried fruit to form a dessert is an old one — and was likely born out of necessity to make do with ingredients on hand,” says Dr. Lenore Newman, food security and environment director at the University of the Fraser Valley.

Others believe the butter tart has roots in pecan pie, brought to Canada by Americans or possibly is related to Québec’s sugar pie or even Scottish border tarts. And some experts credit pioneer cooks for creating the beloved version known today, tracing the earliest printed recipes back to the 1900s. Ultimately, no one knows for sure, but the tart’s origins are likely a combination of all of the above. “It just slowly evolved and appeared,” says Anna. “It looks like a lot of other tarts: like the French [Canadian] tarte au sucre or a treacle tart [a traditional British dessert].”

Four hundred years later, the butter tart has become the quintessential Canadian sweet treat. It was all the rage in the 1920s and 1930s, and it’s one of the few authentically Canadian recipes that exists on paper.

“The butter tart’s success in Canada is likely linked to our general love of sweet desserts,” says Dr. Newman. “However I do feel that the butter tart is being influenced ever so slightly by Canada’s cuisine with its dedication to local foods. British and French settlers loved sugar, but butter tarts also fit a model of early Canadian foods that needed to pack a really high calorie load into each bite. We worked outside in the cold and needed to eat a lot more than we do now.”

Related: Butter Tart Spots to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Today, the craze continues. There are even butter tart trails that dessert lovers can follow, with Ontario’s Kawarthas Northumberland Region and Wellington County offering maps and self-guided itineraries to explore local bakeries and cafes. What’s even more incredible is the butter tart has become an international superstar.

“No matter where I am travelling, I’m always asked to demonstrate a butter tart,” says Anna. “I have demonstrated butter tarts in Argentina, Moscow, Dubai, all over Southeast Asia. I just hosted a chef from the Philippines and the one thing on his checklist was trying a butter tart. Because the world knows the butter tart as ubiquitously Canadian.”

What makes an “authentic” Canadian butter tart? It’s a hotly debated topic within the baking community, especially when it comes to three aspects: should the tart’s filling be runny or firm? Should it contain raisins? And how far can you stray from the original recipe? According to Anna, there’s no clear answers: it really depends on the baker and the proof is, well, in the pastry.

“The butter tart has as many recipes as there are people who make them,” says Anna. “But whether it’s a filling made with maple syrup or corn syrup is very particular to the [baker]. Some swear by lard pastry, others by butter. To call it a butter tart, you can’t change the shape or syrupy filling.”

Nonetheless, bakers and pastry chefs are making endless and ever-evolving variations on this favourite Canuck dessert. Some stuff the flaky pastry cup with toasted pecans instead of raisins or even chocolate or bacon fillings.

The bacon butter tart has become a staple — it’s that salty crunch in the bottom,” says Anna. “I’m seeing more with chocolate melted into the syrupy filling. You could even put in marshmallows and chocolate chips for an s’mores butter tart!”

In recent years, some maverick chefs and bakers are even masterminding butter tart-flavoured foods, such as ice creams, cookies, cobblers and Butter Tart Cheesecake.

Butter Tart Cheesecake

“While you may not change the butter tart, you can integrate those flavours and textures elsewhere,” says Anna. “For my new cookbook, I want to do a butter tart swirl cheesecake that has that the same pastry crunch, butteriness and drifty caramel swirl.”

It’s worth taking a tantalizing tart trip across Canada to try all the variations and recipes, with Anna naming Niagara’s 13th Street Winery and The Pie Plate Bakery & Café as being among the best. If you’re feeling adventurous at home, try mastering Anna’s Pecan Butter Tarts. For holiday entertaining, you could even build a butter tart buffet that will entice guests to the table.

Pecan-Butter-Tarts

Despite her playful renditions, there’s one thing that Anna is old-fashioned about when it comes to making a classic Canadian butter tart. “Can you make a low fat butter tart? No way!” she says. “But you could make them miniature sized.”

Published November 14, 2016, Updated January 1, 2018

Maple Gingerbread Buche de Noel with Salted Praline Topping

Making your own yule log at home can be achieved in a few fun steps. In this take on the traditional bûche de noël, spiced gingerbread cake is filled and topped with a super-sweet maple frosting, and covered in a salted walnut praline for added crunch. Celebrate the season with this gorgeous centrepiece on your holiday dessert table — it’s sure to garner praise from guests!

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Final-Steps-Allison-Day-11

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cooking Time: 40 minutes
Cooling Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 9 hours, 10 minutes
Serves: 8

Ingredients:

Maple Frosting
1 cup unsalted butter
11/2 cups canned full-fat coconut milk
11/2 cups icing sugar, sifted, more for rolling
3 Tbsp maple syrup
3 Tbsp cornstarch, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/8 tsp maple extract (optional)
Pinch, salt

Gingerbread Cake
Oil, for pan
3/4 cup all-purpose flour, more for pan
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 tsp ground dried ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp five-spice powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
4 large eggs
3/4 cup packed light brown sugar

Salted Walnut Praline
1 cup raw walnuts
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1/4 tsp flaky sea salt

Assembly
1 tsp cocoa powder, for dusting

Directions:

Maple Frosting
1. Combine all icing ingredients in a medium saucepan, whisking constantly until mixture is bubbling and thick. Continue to whisk and cook for 1 minute.
2. Pour into a medium bowl and chill overnight.

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Allison-Day-9

Gingerbread Cake
1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.
2. Line a half sheet pan (18″ x 13″ x 1″ high) with parchment paper; oil and flour parchment, tapping out excess flour. Reserve.
3. Add a clean tea towel to counter and evenly dust over additional icing sugar.
4. In a medium bowl, whisk flour, cornstarch, cinnamon, five-spice, baking soda and salt.
5. In a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment or with a handheld mixer in a large bowl, beat eggs on high speed until tripled in volume. Add sugar and beat for 1 to 2 minutes, until thick and voluminous. Add flour mixture and beat until almost combined. Finish folding in by hand with a large spatula. Smooth batter into prepared pan.
6. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until cake springs back when you touch it. Immediately flip out onto tea towel and remove parchment. Starting at the end, use the tea towel to roll the cake into a log shape.
7. Tuck in ends, transfer to wire rack and cool completely in tea towel, about 4 hours. Reserve.

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Allison-Day-12

Salted Walnut Praline
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.
2. Combine walnuts, maple syrup and salt to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, until maple syrup is caramelized.
3. Cool completely (they crisp as they cool) and roughly chop. Reserve.

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Final-Steps-Allison-Day-2

Assembly
1. Whisk frosting until smooth (soften at room temperature for 30 minutes if required).

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Final-Steps-Allison-Day-4
2. Carefully unroll cake and spread 1/2 of frosting over interior, leaving a 1-inch gap around the edges. Sprinkle 3 Tbsp of walnuts praline. Carefully roll and ice the outside of cake with remaining frosting. Place cake on serving plate.

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Final-Steps-Allison-Day-5
3. Gently press walnuts onto exterior and dust with cocoa powder. Loosely cover (a large cake dome, box or oblong plastic container) keep chilled until ready to serve.

FNC-GCC-Buche-De-Noel-Cake-Holiday-Final-Steps-Allison-Day-7

The Boozy History of the Caesar Cocktail

Spiking a vodka and tomato juice with clam essence is cocktail bliss for Caesar-swilling Canucks, but the combination in this oh-so-Canadian cocktail wasn’t always so obvious. In fact, according to Alberta researchers, it took months for Calgary bartender and Caesar inventor Walter Chell to hit the perfect proportions.

A mixologist at the Calgary Inn before mixologist was a title, Walter was tasked with creating a cocktail to celebrate the 1969 opening of the inn’s new restaurant, Marco’s Italian. Inspired by his favourite Italian dish, spaghetti vongole, Chell set out to create a cocktail that would capture the pasta’s hearty clam and tomato flavours.

Three Caesar cocktails on wood countertop

Eventually he came up with the recipe Canadians have come to love: vodka mixed with clam-infused tomato juice, lime, hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce, with a delicious celery salt rim. If we’re being honest (and after a few Caesars, who can lie?), the thought of a clam-based cocktail is a little strange — even for those of us who know how good it is. But surprisingly, Walter Chell wasn’t the first to come up with the concept. As Michael Platt notes in an article for the Calgary Sun, a 1900 copy of Modern American Drinks contains a recipe for a clam juice cocktail, as does a 1951 Betty Crocker cookbook. “So then what did Calgary’s beloved father of the Caesar really do?” asks Platt. “That’s like asking what Henry Ford did for the motor car or The Beatles did for music.”

Simply put, Chell perfected the recipe, taking it from clammy outlier to a red hot hit. Soon after, Mott’s beverage company released what is arguably the world’s best-known clam-infused tomato juice, Clamato.

Related: Sensational Canadian Cocktails

Chell invented the Caesar, but widespread distribution of Clamato brought it to homes and bars across the country. According to an Ipsos-Reid poll commissioned by the company in 2009, the Caesar or Bloody Caesar, is the most popular cocktail in Canada; Mott’s estimates that more than 350 million are consumed each year.

But beyond the occasional American article praising the “Canadian Bloody Mary,” Chell’s blend of sweet, salty, sour, spicy and bitter notes hasn’t gotten much love beyond our borders. Never mind — here, it’s not only a source of pride, but it’s a symbol of Canada’s changing demography and Canadians’ expanding palates.

Modern variations reflect international influences, substituting or enhancing British Worcestershire sauce with horseradish, wasabi, kimchi, chipotle, sriracha, teriyaki, tandoori, jerk spice, Dijon mustard or any number of flavours. A staple at Canada Day celebrations and weekend brunches and a drink as red as our flag, the Caesar is a cocktail that can rightly claim that it came, it quenched, and it conquered Canada.

Craving a Caesar? Learn how to make these tasty cocktail garnishes.

Photo courtesy of Unsplash

ketchup-chips-history

The Crunchy History of Ketchup Chips

It’s no secret that Canadians love their ketchup chips. The crunchy, thinly sliced fried potatoes, doused in a tangy reddish powder, have been a favourite flavour since the early 1980s, sparking snack attacks and staining fingers across the nation. It’s bewildering that a Heritage Minute hasn’t been created for Canada’s signature snack.

But what’s the story behind ketchup chips? French fries and ketchup have gone hand-in-hand since the early 1800s, but the duo really became BFFs in the 1940s with the rise of fast food and drive-ins at the time.

Ketchup Chips

Inspired by this classic combo, adding ketchup-flavoured seasoning to potato chips came to be sometime in the 1970s. Each chip was dusted with tomato powder, garlic, onion and spices, infusing smoky, salty and sweet flavours with a tart bite into every crunch. Since then, millions of chip bags have been torn open and devoured by hungry hordes of Canadians, who can’t get enough of this quirky and addictive ketchup-y flavour.

Although a quintessential Canadian snack, the origins of ketchup chips are mired in mystery, with no one stepping forward to officially take the credit. At its simplest, it’s believed that this red-powdered snack was first invented by Hostess Potato Chips in the early 1970s, and sold exclusively to the Canadian market. The newfangled flavour was a huge hit in the Great White North, triggering a ketchup chip craze to erupt from coast-to-coast.

Digging deeper, it appears that the story could be more complicated. An American company in Pennsylvania, Herr’s Snacks, has reportedly been making ketchup-flavoured chips since the early 1980s. A decade later, the Heinz Ketchup company got on board with Herr’s, realizing that potato chips and ketchup seasoning makes a killer combo. They’ve since blended the brands to create Herr’s Heinz Ketchup Flavoured Potato Chips.

The bottom line? Although ketchup chips likely hold dual citizenship, it’s definitely a Canadian classic to the core. While the flavour tends to be scarce south of the border, Canadian store shelves are almost always well-stocked with bags of this favourite Canuck snack. Plus, smaller Canadian-owned companies are jumping on the ketchup wagon and making their own versions.

Ketchup Chip Seasoning

Featured on Food Network Canada’s Food Factory, the Covered Bridge Potato Chip Factory in New Brunswick uses their grandmother’s recipe to make their chips, but revamped the recipe to include Homestyle Ketchup Chips. Made with Russet Potatoes, these ultra crunchy chips are dusted with tomato powder and other goodness, making it a favourite Canadian brand.

Nowadays, Canadians can do more than rip open a bag, as chip lovers are taking ketchup-style snacking to the next level. For one, the ketchup-y powder makes a sensational seasoning for many other tasty snacks, and it’s easy to make in your home kitchen. With this homemade ketchup chip flavouring, you can spice up everything from popcorn to roasted potatoes to squash, without adding artificial flavours and colours.

Short on time? You can also buy ready-to-go ketchup seasoning from the Covered Bridge Potato Chip Factory (along with bags of chips too!). Or just crush up some ketchup chips and use the bits as a crunchy topping for hot dogs or other mains. For more adventurous home chefs, why not try making a batch of Ketchup Chips Chicken Strips? The crispy batter of crushed ketchup chips transforms routine pub grub into a tangy and sweet dish.

The verdict? Ketchup chips hold a special place in the history and hearts of our delicious nation — but we’re still waiting on that Heritage Minute!

For more Canuck eats, check out these 45 Canadian Comfort Food Recipes.

Jerk Chicken Wings

Turn Up The Heat With These Jerk Chicken Wings

If you’ve ever been to Toronto in July, chances are you’ve experienced Caribana. Since 1967, the festival has been a bright, colourful and delicious celebration of Caribbean culture. If you can’t make to the festival, you can still celebrate by making these spicy jerk chicken wings right at home.

The key to jerk seasoning’s delicious burn is the scorching Scotch bonnet peppers. Dial down the heat by removing the seeds and using as many or as few peppers as you desire.

jerk chicken wings

Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 30 min
Total Time: 2 hours 45 min
Serves: 1 to 2 people

Ingredients:
1/4 cup canola oil
2 Tbsp soy sauce
2 Tbsp lime juice
2 Tbsp brown sugar
6 garlic cloves
3 green onions
2 to 3 small Scotch Bonnets, seeds removed
1 1/2-in piece fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
1 Tbsp fresh thyme
1 Tbsp allspice
1/2 tsp cinnamon
3 lbs chicken wings

jerk chicken wings cooking

Directions:
1. Combine oil with soy sauce, lime juice, brown sugar, garlic, green onions, scotch bonnets, ginger, thyme, allspice and cinnamon in a blender. Purée until smooth, then pour into a large bowl.
2. Add chicken wings, then toss to coat. Let marinate, in refrigerator, for at least 2 hours, but preferably overnight.
3. Preheat oven to 500°F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Set a wire rack on prepared sheet. Spray rack with oil. Transfer wings to rack. Reserve marinade.
4. Roast wings in centre of oven, turning once and brushing with reserved marinade, until crispy and cooked through, about 30 minutes.
5. Remove pan from oven and let stand until cool enough to touch, about 5 minutes. Serve with lime wedges.

Tip: Enjoy these wings on their own or skewer them for an impressive garnish for a cool and refreshing Caesar cocktail.

jerk chicken wing caesar

Butter Tart Doughnuts

Treat Yourself With Canadian Butter Tart Doughnuts

We love Canada, so there’s no reason not to inject some of our classic recipes with a little extra patriotism. In this dessert, we (literally) inject light, fluffy, yeasted doughnuts with a gooey butter tart filling. This recipe celebrates our love of Canada, our love of doughnuts and our love of our classic Canadian dessert, the butter tart.

Butter Tart Doughnuts

Prep Time: 40 minutes
Rising Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Makes: 12 to 14 doughnuts

Ingredients:
Dough:
1 cup 2% milk
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1 (8 g) pkg quick-rise instant yeast
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 large egg, beaten
2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp salt
2 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
Oil for frying (amount depends on size of pot)

Filling:
1/2 brown sugar
1/4 golden corn syrup
1/4 cup unsalted butter
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp salt

Assembly:
1/2 cup icing sugar

Butter Tart Doughnuts

Directions:

Dough:
1. In a small saucepan, heat milk over low until temperature is slightly warmer than room temperature (should feel comfortable to touch). Stir in sugar and pour into the bowl of a stand-mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment. Sprinkle yeast over warm milk mixture and set aside until foamy bubbles appear on the surface, about 10 minutes.
2. After yeast is foamy, beat in butter, egg, vanilla and salt until smooth. Add in flour and beat on medium-high speed until a smooth dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl cleanly and climbs the dough hook, about 5 minutes.
3. Form dough into a ball and place in a well-oiled bowl. Cover with a dish towel and place in a warm place until dough doubles in size, about 1 hour.
4. Prepare a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Roll out dough onto a lightly floured surface until ¾-inch thick. Using a floured 3-inch round cutter, press into dough and twist to release dough from sticking to cutter. Place dough rounds on the prepared baking sheet. Reroll dough scraps one at a time and repeat. Cover dough rounds with kitchen towel and set aside in a warm place until dough doubles in size, about 1 hour.
5. Prepare a baking sheet lined with a few layers of paper towel. Pour enough oil into a large pot until 3- to 4-inches deep. Set pot with a clip-on thermometer and heat until temperature reaches 350ºF. Adjust heat to maintain 350ºF temperature.
6. Working in batches of 3 or 4, fry doughnuts until golden, about 1 minute per side, for a total of about 2 minutes. Using a spider or slotted spoon, carefully transfer fried doughnuts to prepared baking sheet. Cool.

Filling:
1. Combine all filling ingredients in a double boiler. Heat over high while stirring until mixture thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes. Place mixture in the refrigerator until chilled, about 2 hours.

Assembly:
1. Transfer chilled filling into a piping bag. Poke a hole in the side of one doughnut using the back of a wooden spoon until you reach the centre of the doughnut. Pipe filling into doughnut. Repeat with remaining doughnuts.
2. Dust doughnuts with icing sugar before serving.

Looking for more tasty recipes? Try these 20 Great Canadian Butter Tart Recipes.

Great Canadian Burger

Get Ready To Taste The Great Canadian Burger

This weekend, celebrate Canada’s extra-special birthday with a big, bold burger. Wildly delicious, moose is a lean meat endless in versatility. And this recipe brings the majestic animal out of the woods and onto your barbecue in the tastiest way possible. The key to juicy moose is to mix it with Alberta beef before it hits the grill. Slather in wild blueberry and red onion jam for a crave-worthy-burger that’ll make you proud to be Canadian.

Great Canadian Burger

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
1 Tbsp butter
1 cup thinly sliced red onion
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
2 Tbsp wild blueberry jam
1 lb(s) ground moose meat
1/2 lb(s) medium ground beef
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
4 ciabatta buns
1/4 cup full-fat Greek yogurt
1 cup baby arugula, lightly packed

Directions:
1. Heat butter in a small pan over medium. Add in red onion and cook until soft and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add in vinegar and continue to cook for another 2 minutes. Reduce heat to low. Stir in blueberry jam and simmer for 5 minutes or until mixture is thick.
2. Combine moose meat, ground beef and salt in a bowl. Divide meat into 4 portions and form patties using your hands. Pack tightly, but do not overwork meat.
3. Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium-high. Add in oil and gently place burgers down. Cook until a golden brown crust forms, about 4 minutes per side.
4. Cut ciabatta buns in half. Smear 1 Tbsp of Greek yogurt on to the bottom of each bun. Place burger on top of yogurt. Divide onion jam among burgers. Top with arugula and close with top bun.

Watch this Burger Edition of You Gotta Eat Here! where host John Catucci enjoys some of the craziest burgers out there.

Nanaimo bars

The History of Nanaimo Bars: A Beloved Treat

Located on the eastern shore of Vancouver Island, Nanaimo, B.C. is a verdant, broody kind of place; a typical Pacific coast town, washed out in foggy greys and steel ocean blues. But this misty city is also the namesake for what might just be the sunniest dessert square the world has ever produced: the Nanaimo bar, a soft layer of yellow custard sandwiched between rich chocolate ganache and a coconut-graham crust.

Nanaimo bar

Nanaimo bars’ history likely predates the first printed recipes.

The first known recipe for Nanaimo bars appeared in the 1952 Women’s Auxiliary of the Nanaimo Hospital Cookbook and was labelled “chocolate square.” One year later, a similar recipe was published in Vancouver’s Edith Adams’ Cookbook, this time going by the name “Nanaimo Bar.” These are the bar’s earliest known publications, but Nanaimo Museum interpretation curator Aimee Greenaway figures they’ve been around much longer.

Nanaimo bars in the 1953 Edith Adams cookbook

This display from the Nanaimo Museum features the Edith Adams’ Cookbook, the first to print the well-loved recipe under the name Nanaimo bar.
Nanaimo Museum

“What’s always interesting with Nanaimo bars is the folklore,” she says. “You could get any number of different answers from people in Nanaimo if you ask them about the history of the Nanaimo bar.”
Greenaway particularly likes the stories from Nanaimo’s coal mining era. “Nanaimo was founded on coal — that’s really what developed it into a settlement,” she says. “The story was that families were sending Nanaimo bars on sailing ships from England to Nanaimo. That was kind of interesting, but we haven’t been able to find anything to back that up.”

Chelsea Barr, destination marketing officer with Tourism Nanaimo has heard similar tales. “You get stories all the time from grandmothers saying, ‘That was something my mom used to make me and it was in the lunchboxes of all the miners going into the mines,’” she says.

It’s certainly easy to imagine miners carrying Nanaimo bars to work, transporting sparks of custardy sunshine in the darkness of the mines. But neither Nanaimo’s historical miners nor current residents have an exclusive relationship with the dessert; over the last century, similar sweets have popped up across North America, going by names like “New York slice,” “London fog bar” and “prayer bar.” Still, when it comes to branding, Nanaimo is the winner, bar none. “Of course, we know that Nanaimo Bars originated in Nanaimo, or they would be called New York Bars, or New Brunswick Bars,” boasts the City of Nanaimo website.

The city has been instrumental in promoting the dessert. In 1986, then-mayor Graeme Roberts launched a contest to find the ultimate Nanaimo bar recipe. In the years since, winner Joyce Hardcastle has enjoyed promoting the B.C. treat, appearing in numerous newspaper stories and even starring in a segment of Pitchin’ In with Lynn Crawford. “It’s kind of like being a celebrity, but for one item,” she says. The secret to her prize-winning recipe? “I wouldn’t say secret, because I say it all the time, but the trick is to use unsalted butter,” says Hardcastle. “It makes the bars a bit more mellow.”

Joyce Hardcastle and Nanaimo bars

Joyce Hardcastle pictured with her prize-winning Nanaimo bars,plus souvenir tea towels and mugs featuring her recipe, and a sampling from her collection of newspaper clippings.

Nanaimo bars are easy to make at home, but travellers with a sense of adventure (and a high-tolerance for sugar) can check out the Nanaimo Bar Trail, where sweet adaptations and variations abound. Tasting options include deep-fried Nanaimo bars and Nanaimo bar cupcakes, lattes, fudge and martinis.

For tired feet, sore from pounding the trail all day, Kiyo salon offers a Nanaimo-bar themed pedicure. “It is amazing,” says Barr. “Your feet will smell like chocolate for the entire day.”

Want to try Joyce Hardcastle’s ultimate Nanaimo bar? Get the winning recipe here!

lumberjack-breakfast-sandwich

The Lumberjack Breakfast Sandwich Delivers All Your Faves In One Bite

Behold, the Lumberjack Breakfast Sandwich! All the parts of a hearty start to the day — eggs, toast, sausage, bacon, pancakes and hash browns — in one nifty, stackable, portable package. (Don’t forget the napkins.)

lumberjack breakfast sandwich

Layers of breakfast meats, a hash brown patty and fried egg are interspersed with a key structural piece: the pancake. Akin to a traditional clubhouse, this middle starchy tier serves as both a condiment layer (douse it in syrup for a salty-sweet combination, slather simply with butter or spike with hot sauce for kick), while also soaking up those runny egg yolk, sausage and bacon juices.

After breakfast, you’ll be ready to tackle the woods…or a nap on the couch. Which would, again, be completely understandable.

Lumberjack Breakfast Sandwich

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
16 slices cooked bacon
4 cooked hash browns, prepared according to package directions
4 cooked pancakes
16 uncooked breakfast sausages
4 large eggs
8 pieces of toast
2 Tbsp butter, more as needed
maple syrup, for serving
hot sauce, for serving
ketchup, for serving

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 200ºF.
2. On a large baking sheet or large ovenproof dish, add bacon, hash browns and pancakes. Keep warm in oven while preparing the rest of the ingredients.
3. Remove the sausages from casings; discard casings. Take 4 uncased sausages and squash them into 1 thin patty, just slightly larger than the piece of bread you will be using for toast. Repeat with remaining uncased sausages for a total of 4 patties. In a large skillet, fry patties over medium heat, flipping once, until browned and completely cooked through, approximately 5-7 minutes. Transfer cooked patties to oven with other ingredients to keep warm.
4. Using the same pan with residual sausage patty fat, or a clean one with a bit of melted butter swirled around the bottom to reduce sticking, fry the eggs sunny side up until the whites have completely set and the yolks are cooked at the edge but still runny. Season eggs with salt and pepper.
5. To assemble, building from the bottom up, start with 1 piece of toast, buttered, if desired. Top toast with 4 slices of bacon, 1 hash brown, 1 pancake that has been dressed to your liking (with maple syrup, butter and/or hot sauce), 1 sausage patty and 1 fried egg. Top your stack with a second piece of toast. Repeat with remaining ingredients to make 4 sandwiches. Serve with maple syrup, hot sauce and ketchup. Enjoy!

Looking for more Canadian dishes? Try our 10 Perfect Peameal Bacon Recipes.