Category Archives: Chuck and Danny’s Road Trip

Chuck and Danny’s Perfect PEI Breakfast

It’s the end of the road for Chuck and Danny as their epic culinary trip draws to a close. Driving the RV across the Confederation Bridge (the longest one in the country), the chefs are on the search for seafood — and Prince Edward Island is home to some of the best that Canada has to offer. Chef Ross Munro of Red Door Oyster Co. points the chefs north to harvest some of the ocean’s bounty onboard Lester the Lobster boat. “We’re here to show them PEI’s best,” says Munro, who gives the chefs a surprise gift: a huge bag of local mussels for a true Maritime breakfast.

888x593-Chuck-and-Danny-With-Ross-Monro
Ross Monro (right) takes Danny and Chuck out lobster fishing.

Mussels are big business in PEI, producing 50 million pounds (22,730 tons, if you’re counting) per year, according to The Mussel Industry Council of PEI. Canadian mussels should be shiny and blue-black when you buy them from the store. “You know they’re fresh when they smell like the ocean,” says Chuck.

888x593-Acadian-Bread-Robert-Pendergast
Acadian bread from  ‘the weirdest baker on PEI’.

Since Chuck and Danny have got straight from the source, they want to show off their mussel power with a nontraditional eggs Benedict, Maritime-style. Even though they’re camping beach-side, Chuck and Danny are still chefs at heart — no store-bought English muffins, here. Friend and fellow chef Robert Pendergast (the self proclaimed “weirdest baker on PEI”) is camping at the same park with his family, and he stops by with some of his famous fresh-baked heritage bread, made Acadian-style with chunks of pork and potato.

888x532-Chuck-Danny-with-Robert-Pendergast
Danny and Chuck have a PEI breakfast with Robert Pendergast (center).

“Bread, mussels — it’s a PEI breakfast, no?” says Chuck. Danny offers to whip up a fast hollandaise in the trailer, while Chuck gets started on the mussels. The rule of thumb when cooking mussels is that they should be closed (or at least, close when you tap them.) Scrub them clean with a brush (no soap, obviously, says Chuck) and steam them in an inch and a half of seawater in a large pot with the lid closed for a few minutes.

See how Chuck and Danny make their Mussels Benedict:

For a classic hollandaise, Danny separates the eggs, using just the yolks for the emulsion. Since there’s no room in the camper for a full standup blender, Danny is using an immersion hand blender, which home cooks can emulate. Slowly adding the melted butter until the mixture is emulsified and thickened, Danny adds his own twist: white balsamic vinegar instead of the traditional lemon juice to complement the mussels with its sweetness. “This white balsamic is great and won’t change the colour of my hollandaise,” says Danny. A bit of salt and the hollandaise is ready to go.

Time to dig in — the chefs start popping the mussels out of the shells (and a few into their mouths while they’re working) and set them onto the bread. Their creation is finished with a healthy dollop of hollandaise, and a sprinkle of cayenne “for that extra little bit of spice to wake you up in the morning,” says Danny.

“Anybody who puts potato and bacon into their bread is okay with me,” says Chuck, taking a bite with a loud crunch.

“This is one of the best things I’ve eaten in a while,” says Pendergast.

888x593-Chuck-and-Danny-at-Sunset
The sun sets on this road trip;  PEI is Chuck and Danny’s final destination.

Bring mussels to your table with 25 Marvelous Mussel Recipes or for more inspired Benedict ideas, check out 10 Brunch-Worthy Eggs Benedict Recipes for everything from devilled eggs to pizza. Get Chuck and Danny’s recipe for their PEI breakfast of champions here and be sure to check out their most bromantic moments from the road.

Missed the episode? Catch it online at Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip.

Chuck and Danny Get Schooled On Acadian Caviar

This week, Chuck’s got a family connection to the chefs’ destination: his grandfather hailed from New Brunswick, and his best food memories stem from out east. “When I was growing up, we’d always have lobster and oyster parties,” says Chuck. “It has a lot to do with my love of food.”

bay-of-fundy-camp-site-chuck-and-danny
Chuck and Danny’s million dollar view of the Bay of Fundy.

Danny’s also excited about their campgrounds at Fundy National Park (“How did we score this campsite?” he says, surveying the incredible view) as well as meeting the local artisans behind the products they cook with on a daily basis. “A lot of what we use in the restaurants back home is from New Brunswick, so it’s fun to come here and connect with the guys that are bringing us the ingredients that we love,” says Chuck.

Cornel-Ceapa-with-Chuck-and-Danny
Caviar expert Cornel Ceapa talks to Danny and Chuck.

One of those producers, world renowned caviar expert from New Brunswick, Cornel Ceapa, founder and owner of Acadian Sturgeon and Caviar Inc., joins Chuck and Danny for breakfast — and he’s brought along a tasting of three caviars, an excellent start to the day. “He’s the king of caviar,” says Chuck. “He’s the doctor of caviar,” Danny corrects him, since Ceapa has a PhD in sturgeon studies.

Caviar can come from a variety of sources, but sturgeon eggs are particularly prized. Ceapa settled in New Brunswick — where sturgeon is native to the Saint John River — to farm it in captivity. “When you think of sturgeon, you think of Iran or Russia, not New Brunswick,” marvels Chuck.

Sturgeon-Skin-Chuck-and-Danny
That’s not a surfboard — it’s a sturgeon skin! Ceapa shows Chuck and Danny how large a sturgeon can get.

Similar to cheese, caviar changes from day one to the end of its life cycle as it matures into different flavours. Ceapa prefers an aged caviar, so he’s brought along two young wild caviars (one week old and two months old) and a third one from aquaculture for the lucky chefs to compare.

Caviar---Chuck-and-Danny's-Road-Trip

Ceapa walks Chuck and Danny through the finer points of enjoying caviar, with tips that you can use at home:

  • Caviar is delicate, so keep it on ice. Spoon a bit onto the back of your hand and tilt it to look at the shine, colour and shape.
  • Put it in your mouth and don’t swallow it right away — feel the eggs in your mouth and swirl it around a little bit to let the taste develop.
  • The taste will grow on you; the salt will be the first taste you register, as that is the first sensory element on the tip of your tongue. Then, the butteriness will build, as a base flavour, as the other tastes develop.

Acadian-Green-Caviar-Chuck-and-Danny

The two month caviar has more of a complex, ocean vibe, while the younger version is grassier, says Danny. Chuck prefers the feel of the eggs in the Acadian Green caviar from aquaculture, that has a vibrant dark green hue and slightly larger eggs with a nice shine, so they decide to use all three types in a classic egg-on-egg pairing: a caviar omelette.

Watch how Danny makes his omelette:

 

“Everybody has their own technique,” says Chuck, who is vigorous in his egg mixing. Chuck keeps the eggs constantly moving in an almost scramble, and then, instead of flipping the omelette out, uses a plate held over the pan to invert the omelette in one move — a method that home chefs may find less stressful.

Savouring their omelettes, topped with all three types of caviar, the chefs and Ceapa concede that these are “best omelettes I’ve ever had.” With the salty notes of the caviar playing counterpoint to the creamy eggs, the group finishes every bite of their caviar creations.

Caviar-omelette-chuck-and-danny
Here’s the recipe for the Caviar Omelette.

“This has ruined omelettes for me for the rest of my life,” says Danny.

Caviar is a luxurious treat for breakfast (you’re so fancy Chuck and Danny!) and can make a dinner très special. Kick off dinner with an hors d’oeuvre like a devilled egg with caviar or a blini made from buckwheat flour (another Acadian ingredient) and topped with caviar and crème fraîche. For the main event, serve this impressive plate of sturgeon two-ways: seared sturgeon with nori and sturgeon caviar.

Missed the episode? Catch it online at Chuck and Danny’s Road Trip.

chuck-and-danny's-rouge-park-bacon

Chuck and Danny Bring Home the Bacon

After a few weeks in the wilderness, Chuck and Danny are heading back to the big city for some urban renewal, along with a few expert tips from Toronto chef Elia Herrera, who shares some of the flavours and recipes from her native Cordoba, Veracruz. As they munch on Elia’s rajas poblanos tacos, she points the chefs towards the best purveyors in Southern Ontario, where they’ll gather bacon, onions and hot sauce for a Mexican-inspired campsite feast.

Chuck-Danny-Meet-Elia-Herrera
Chuck and Danny meet Chef Elia Herrera in Toronto.

At Frolic Acres Farm, the chefs meet Les and Terry Caswell to help them feed their prized pigs. The pigs’ feed is supplemented with buckwheat, which also gives the farm’s honey its buttery richness. The pigs roam the fields, rooting in the ground and playing with the  other animals on the farm, including the resident shaggy Scottish Highland cattle. “The flavour that you get from the pork is from what they eat outside,” says Terry. “It’s a fuller flavour.” Although Chuck and Danny have pork belly in mind to make porchetta, they’re tempted by the offer of maple-smoked bacon and pretend to mull it over — for almost a minute. “Yes, of course we want the maple-smoked bacon,” declares Chuck.

At Glen Rouge campground in Canada’s first urban national park, the chefs start assembling their bounty into a deluxe morning feast of maple-smoked breakfast burritos, made over the campfire with minimal fuss as a one-pan meal (someone’s got to do the dishes, after all). “That’s the thing about breakfast,” muses Danny. “People use four different pans, but if I could, I’d make the coffee in here, too.”

Chuck-Danny-Breakfast-Rouge-Park
Breakfast of champions: breakfast burritos with maple-smoked bacon.

The chefs start by crisping cubes of the maple-smoked bacon for a sweet and salty bite, then chop some onions they pulled from the ground at Willowtree Farm, where they learned to top and tail the locally grown alliums for market. “This is the smell of camping, right here,” says Danny. To top off their creation, and for an extra layer of velvety goodness, Chuck and Danny add in Oaxaca cheese — a semi-firm cow’s milk cheese with a squeaky texture — that will partially melt to bind the delicious ingredients together. Home cooks can substitute mozzarella and a sweeter-style smoked bacon (or make Chuck’s maple-glazed Big Time Bacon) if they want to try this playful take on bacon and eggs for an easy and hearty brunch or lunch.

Eager to dig in, the chefs wrap the mixture in tortillas — with a healthy sprinkling of some locally-made hot sauce they picked up from a roadside stand — and take a big bite. “The hot peppers aren’t hot at all,” deadpans Danny, whose bravado is interrupted with a coughing fit. “That’s going to wake me up.” Good thing he has the perfect antidote on hand: a glass of creamy horchata (a sweetened rice drink) made with the Caswell’s honey and the wild rice that the chefs gathered via canoe on Chemong Lake with James Whetung of Black Duck Wild Rice.

Chuck-Danny-Harvesting-Rice-Lake-Chemong
Harvesting rice on Chemong Lake

Watch the recipe video on how to make Breakfast Burritos.

As they sip and savour their Mexican/Canadian fusion meal, Chuck thinks about how the region’s ingredients have fit in so well with their theme. “Celebrating two nations through food is pretty special,” he says.

For more of Chuck’s better-with-bacon recipes, check out his Bacon Roasted Potatoes, Mussels with Bacon and Rapini, or Cobb Salad.

Missed the episode? Catch it online at Chuck and Danny’s Road Trip.

Chuck And Danny Discover a Salty Paradise on Salt Spring Island

 All aboard the ferry to Salt Spring Island, as chefs Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles head out to one of Canada’s premier growing destinations, 20 minutes off the coast of British Columbia.

Brooke-Winters-with-Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles
Brooke Winters, center, with Chefs Danny Smiles and Chuck Hughes

After meeting up with Brooke Winters, chef and owner of BNurtured Farm to Fork Food Trailer, to get the lay of the land, Chuck and Danny fall in love with the Salt Spring Island Saturday Market — in order to sell here, you have to have grown it, made it or raised it yourself — and immediately add it to their list of must-visit destinations in Canada.

Chuck-Danny-Salt-Spring-Island-Farmers-Market
Chuck and Danny enjoying the vibes at the Salt Spring Island Farmers Market.

Salt-Spring-Island-Farmers-Market-Vegetables
Gorgeous vegetables from the Salt Spring Island Farmers Market

The island’s specialty is sea salt, which comes from evaporated sea water. Fleur de sel is made from the prized salt flakes that form on the top of the water during the evaporation process.

The chefs learn some salty language from local expert Philippe Marill, owner of Salt Spring Sea Salt. “As a chef, as a cook, you’re nothing without salt. It boosts the flavours in all your ingredients,” says Chuck. Fellow francophone, Philippe, who hails from Montpellier in southern France, teaches them his method for salting food: holding your hand high, sprinkle the salt, rubbing it between three fingers to crumble the flakes. “Don’t touch it on the plate,” he warns. “Accept the chaos — that’s what you want to create, a little roller coaster of taste and also, emotion.”

Chuck is impressed. “Philippe is deep,” he says.

Philippe-Marill-Salt-Spring-Sea-Salt
Chuck’s salt guru: Philippe Marril, owner of Salt Spring Sea Salt

The salt will be a big theme for the dinner — with five different flavours, including  jalapeno-lime and blackberry, it’ll be a saltapalooza, promises Chuck.

The menu is ambitious, with Philippe’s salt in every dish. To take the edge off of people’s appetites, guests roast salt sprinkled spot prawns over a campfire, while the chefs stay hard at work, packing a salt crust around ling cod (thanks to Chuck’s fishing prowess), and working on the pièce de résistance: lamb three ways. Chuck and Danny are more than up to the task as they prepare rack of lamb with garlic sea salt, lamb loin chops and thinly sliced barbecued lamb for lettuce wraps.

Chuck-and-Dannys-Grilled-Lamb-Chops
Chuck and Danny’s grilled lamb chops with fresh herbs and lemon.

Danny shows how to make his smokey and creamy baba ghanoush.

 

A key component to their DIY lettuce bundles is a unique baba ghanoush, made Chuck and Danny style by placing the  eggplant directly onto the hot coals to pick up the smokey flavour and aroma. The chefs are using a few types of local eggplant, including a Turkish variety, from EcoReality Co-op — an organic permaculture farm in Salt Spring Island’s Fulford Valley — to lend a riot of colours, tastes and textures to the dish. Eggplants are widely varied in terms of bitterness, firmness, thickness of skin and number of seeds, and roasting them on a barbecue is a forgiving cooking method that allows home cooks to try an assortment of shapes and sizes. After roasting, the eggplants are covered with plastic wrap, which allows the steam to soften the flesh, making the eggplant skin easier to separate.

In the RV, Danny blends the eggplant with roasted garlic, tahini, cumin and Salt Spring’s smoked mesquite salt. Home cooks can steal Danny’s secret ingredient — a touch of plain yogurt — for a creamy consistency. “It’s almost like a cheat to add richness to it,” he says. A final drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of more salt to garnish, and the baba ghanoush is ready to pair with the lamb, lettuce and pickled garlic scapes for a sweet and savoury parcel.

Long after the salt celebrations come to a close, Chuck is still consumed with their new discoveries on Salt Spring Island. “I think you were even talking in your sleep about that salt,” teases Danny. “You’re obsessed with salt on this trip — it’s changed your life.”

Find out more about how sea salt is made.

Where to Find Chuck and Danny’s Favourite Canadian Ingredients

When it comes to shopping for ingredients, chefs are often looking for the same things as their customers: freshness, value (hey, restaurants have food costs, too), and local and sustainable products. Chefs Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles spill their sourcing secrets, from their best spot for vegetables to some must-have Canadian libations.

  1. Organic Ocean Seafood

BC-Spot-Prawns
When Chuck and Danny aren’t able to catch spot prawns off the coast of Salt Spring Island, B.C., they get them from Organic Ocean Seafood. 

Sustainable seafood has been a hot topic among chefs for years now, and Chuck and Danny take this issue very seriously. At their Montreal hot spot Le Bremner, the chefs use West Coast seafood sourced from independent fishermen at Vancouver’s Organic Ocean Seafood. “They’re dope guys,” says Chuck. “They’re amazing and they have great product. We get mostly halibut, but also tuna and British Columbia spot prawns when they’re in season.”

Try using Canadian seafood in this Pan-seared B.C. Halibut and Spot Prawns with Morel, English Pea and Chorizo Ragoût.

2. Birri at Jean Talon Market

Jean Talon Marche
Jean Talon Market photo credit: Creative Commons/@mouses_motor

Jean Talon Market has been a Montreal institution since 1933, and local shoppers and chefs can be found prowling its aisles looking for the best local produce, baked goods, meats and other amazing eats. Chuck and Danny’s favourite place to stop is the Birri brothers’ family-run produce stall. “We have a lot of great markets in Montreal, but my favourite is Jean Talon, and Birri has some of the best vegetables there,” says Chuck. “I love to get cherry tomatoes, and tomatoes in general — we don’t use them all the time, but in the summer, when they’re good, we get them from Birri. They have a selection of fresh herbs, and their zucchini is phenomenal. A lot of our stuff in the restaurants come from them.”

Try this sweet and savoury recipe for Colourful Cherry Tomatoes, glazed with apple cider vinegar and maple syrup.

3.  Norman Hardie Winery 

Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles-at-Norman-Hardie-Winery
Norman Hardie, centre, with Chuck and Danny

A former sommelier at the Four Seasons and a well-known champion of local product, winemaker Norman Hardie is no stranger to Canadian chefs from coast to coast. Chuck and Danny made a point to stop at his winery during their tour through Prince Edward County to snag some freshly made pizza from the wood-fired oven, and sip some of Norm’s chardonnay. “We’ve got to be proud of what he’s doing right now,” says Danny.

Watch Chuck and Danny scarf down some of Norm’s pizza, made with locally-produced water buffalo mozzarella, on the first episode of Chuck and Danny’s Road Trip.

4.  Walter Craft Caesar

the perfect caesar

Although the origin of the Caesar can be a hotly-contested issue, it’s safe to say that Canadians have claimed this cocktail for their own, spiking it with everything from chicken wings to grilled cheese. Chuck likes the all-natural Caesar mix from Walter Craft Caesar, a locally produced, small-batch, ready-made mix that’s even on the Ocean Wise partner list for approved suppliers. “Their Caesar mix is good stuff,” says Chuck.

Try this recipe for a classic version of the Caesar, perfect your mixing technique with this infographic, or take a cue from Chuck and top your libation with a snow crab claw for an ultra-luxe finish.

Discover Chuck and Danny’s Must-Visit Canadian Destinations.

Figs

Fun Ways to Eat Fresh Figs with Chuck and Danny

It’s a day of land and sea ahead as Chuck and Danny wheel into Vancouver Island. Briny, spiny sea urchins and 100-foot bull kelp seaweed pulled fresh from the ocean are saline superstars of tonight’s feast, but the chefs are thinking sweet thoughts for their morning repast — and for that, they head off to find fabulous, fresh figs.

Figs-on-a-Tree

Figs ripe for the plucking on ALM Organic Farm, Vancouver Island.

Within walking distance of their campsite at Goldstream Provincial Park, Chuck and Danny discover Mary Alice Johnson’s ALM Organic Farm , which operates year-round and has 15 acres of fruits, vegetables and flowers. Mary Alice is eager to show Chuck — who has never eaten a fig just off the tree — how to pick ripe figs off her precious plants. “When they’ve got a shine on, they’re ready. You don’t want to tear them at the top, so just give them a twist,” she advises. Sampling these “fruits of the gods”, the chefs are surprised by the texture and sweetness of the organic figs. “Usually the figs that you get are wet on the inside, but these are drier, with distinct pulp and are so tasty,” says Danny. Although quite perishable and easily bruised, this versatile B.C.-grown fruit is simple to use in a multitude of ways: fresh, dried, roasted, candied, preserved, paired with prosciutto or added to baked goods.

Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles

Not far from the tree, Chuck and Danny get ready to whisk up a batch of camping-style cardamom fig muffins to give to Mary Alice, pressing their trusty barbecue into service. They gather eggs from the happy hens at Jesse and Evelyn Pereira’s local farm Terra Nossa, and are using a few unexpected ingredients — cardamom, orange, mint and almond flour — for a unique twist on a breakfast staple. “The figs will add that floral, honey flavour,” says Danny, who adds chopped figs to the batter and places halved figs on top. All that fruit keeps everything moist, with a finished texture in between a cake and a muffin. Home cooks looking to make this recipe without a muffin tin can borrow a technique from the chefs by pouring the batter into ramekins, then placing them into the centre of a preheated barbecue with a closed top, which works as a makeshift oven. Served with creme fraîche and drizzled with dark buckwheat honey, these beautiful baked goods will be the star of your table, whether at home or to start out an outdoor adventure.

Cardamom Fig Muffins

Danny Smiles whipped up these fig muffins spiced with cardamom.

“This is the part of camping that I love,” says Chuck. “You may not have everything, but what you do have, you use in a unique way, so maybe you’ll discover something new.”

For more fun with figs, check out Chuck Hughes’ Sticky Fig Pudding With Candied Fresh Figs, Christine Cushing’s Fig and Armagnac Preserves, or Laura Calder’s Pistachio-Stuffed Figs.

Missed the episode? Catch it online at Chuck and Danny’s Road Trip.

Watch the recipe video below to learn how to make Cardamom Fig Muffins.

Chuck and Danny’s Guide to Cooking with Sumac

After a long day on the road in Hastings and Prince Edward Country, chefs Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles set out to create a succulent feast from the bounty of local Ontario ingredients they’ve gathered.

After foraging for wild juniper,  harvesting local beets and squash and securing tender buffalo mozzarella, plus a bone-on tomahawk ribeye roast,  the pressure’s on to create a campfire feast for the local farmers and purveyors.

With the help of a custom-made barbecue grill on loan from Enright Cattle Company, they’ve got the perfect vehicle to cook the 43lb ribeye roast. Sounds impressive, but the menu doesn’t end there. They’re also roasting Golden Nugget Cups, candy-sweet squash from Earth Haven Farms, halved and stuffed with Ontario buffalo mozzarella (a gift from winemaker Norman Hardie.) The squash holds another local secret: sumac foraged from chef and local resident Justin Cournoyer’s back woods.

This citrus-like star ingredient is widely used in Middle Eastern cuisine, which is why the chefs were surprised to find it growing in the wild in Ontario.

chuck-hughes-danny-smiles-golden-nugget-cups
Chuck and Danny’s sumac-spiced golden nugget squash cups. 

Neither Danny or Chuck are strangers to the flowering plant: Danny uses it in his homemade za’atar mix with sesame seeds and thyme, and it’s part of Chuck’s arsenal at his restaurants as a citrus substitute. “It’s like a Canadian lemon,” says Chuck.

Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles-Foraging-Sumac

Justin teaches them how to find the best plant by looking for a vibrant red hue in the berries, and to store it by drying it whole in the sun and making a powder, which can be used to braise beef or put on raw bread.

Chuck-Hughes-Holding-Suamc

Chuck and Danny use their collected sumac to sprinkle on the golden nugget squash, tempering its sweetness with a slight pucker. The cups rest just above the coals, collecting the succulent drippings from a 43 lb. bone-in tomahawk style side of beef rubbed and spritzed with juniper, and juniper branches are tossed onto the fire, creating fragrant smoke. The food’s so good, even a slight drizzle can’t dampen the mood, and the feast goes on under the stars for hours.

Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles-Cooking-Dinner-PEC
Chuck and Danny begin cooking the bone on tomahawk ribeye roast hours before their guests arrive.

Home cooks can take a walk on the wild side with sumac in their own kitchens. In the warmer months, ground sumac gives flavoured butter an extra kick, lending a slight tartness to balance out summer-sweet corn on the cob. Paired with juniper, sumac steeped in tea and poured over wild Canadian blueberries from British Columbia makes for a spread-worthy preserve to liven up breakfast at home or the cottage. And for lazy nights any time of year, a potent sumac infused potion, sweetened with maple syrup, uses whole sumac clusters — combine it with vodka for a Canadiana martini, a true sweet and sour sipper.

Missed the episode? Catch it online at Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip.
Watch video below to learn more about sumac.

Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles Cross Canada in Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip

Food Network Canada’s new series Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip brings together two best buds – Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles – on one epic Canadian culinary adventure.  In this six-part series kicking off Friday, March 3 at 9 ET/PT, these two chefs hit the open road in a fully loaded RV visiting Canada’s most spectacular regions with stops at national parks from Vancouver Island to Prince Edward Island.

At each destination they have a wild time sourcing local ingredients, from bagging seaweed in wet suits to digging for quahogs, harvesting wild rice in a canoe or foraging for juniper on ATV’s. Chuck and Danny then take these ingredients and cook up an unforgettable campground feast for the local chefs, farmers and artisans that introduced them to the region’s bounty.

Chuck-Hughes-and-Danny-Smiles-ATV-Chuck-and-Dannys-Road-Trip

Chuck-Hughes-And-Danny-Smiles-Chuck-and-Dannys-Road-Trip-Epic-Feast

Off the road, Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles are a Montreal-based culinary duo creating amazing dining experiences at Hughes’ critically acclaimed restaurant Le Bremner. This is Chuck Hughes’s return to Food Network Canada after appearing on the premiere season of Chopped Canada, and his series Chuck’s Day Off and Chuck’s Week Off. Danny Smiles was previously on the third season of  Top Chef Canada, claiming the title of first runner up.

Chuck-Hughes-and-Danny-Smiles-Norman-Hardie-Winery

Chuck-and-Dannys-Road-trip-Chuck-Danny-Camping-Salt-Spring-Island

Excited for their journey? For a list of Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip episodes, including details on their destinations and what they’re cooking up, visit the episode guide here.

Can’t get enough of Chuck and Danny? Check back here for recipes featured on the show, behind-the-scenes videos, plus exclusive articles and photos.

 

Meet the Local Chefs Adding Flavour to Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip

In Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip, premiering March 3 at 9 ET/PT, Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles are on a cross Canada hunt for amazing local ingredients and food experiences. From Vancouver Island to Prince Edward Island, they get help from local chefs to find and forage ingredients that represent that spectacular locale’s essence. Meet the local chefs who give Chuck and Danny a helping hand!

888x593-chef-Justin-Cournoyer-with-Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles
Chef Justin Cournoyer, pictured right, with Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles.

Chef Justin Cournoyer
Justin’s childhood was about the rosy cheeks, dirty hands and sun-bleached hair that came from spending each day outside in a small, one-time logging community in Eastern Ontario called Actinolite. Justin’s first job cooking was at a casual family restaurant. After high school he made the leap to formal cuisine, followed by a stint of travel to sharpen his taste for flavourful, thoughtful food. In 2000, he returned to Canada and spent a combined four years under Chef Susur Lee in Toronto, finding his place amount the city’s young and dynamic chef community. His experienced laddered up to Justin’s ultimate destination – the restaurant he had envisioned from the time he was 18 years old. Infused with childhood memories, senses and a connection with the land, he opened “Actinolite”, named after his childhood home.

888x520-Chef Elia Herrera
Chef Elia Herrera

Chef Elia Herrera
Hailing from Cordoba, Mexico, Elia’s recipes have been passed down through many generations of her family. She moved to Toronto in 2004 after attending the Instituto Culinario de Mexico. Elia worked as pastry chef in some Toronto’s finest restaurants, including Canoe, Scarpetta, Sassafraz, Ultra Supper Club and Mistura. She is now an executive chef at Los Colibris, which serves a high-end twist on traditional Mexican cuisine. She came to Canada with her family and says, “I fell in love with Canada…and everybody left except me.”

888x593-Chef-Brooke-Winters-with-Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles
Chef Brooke Winters, middle, with Danny Smiles and Chuck Hughes

Chef Brooke Winters
Being from Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Brooke is no stranger to the amazing abundance of locally and ethically grown and raised fruit, vegetables and meats. Starting at a young age, she worked around the Island, Vancouver’s Lower Mainland, as well as abroad, competing in international culinary competitions. Brooke realized her dream of serving locally raised food to people in a casual, affordable way, by opening BNurtured, Salt Spring Island’s first farm to fork food trailer.

888x590-Chef-Pierre-Richard
Chef Pierre A. Richard

Chef Pierre A. Richard
Pierre, of Moncton, New Brunswick, developed a taste for the culinary arts at an early age helping his mother with planting and harvesting on the family farm and using the farm’s bounty to cook family meals. He moved west to pursue culinary dreams and completed an apprenticeship in a well-known AAA/CAA Diamond restaurant in Canmore, Alberta and his Red Seal Chef Certification at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology.  Pierre returned to New Brunswick in 2006, first to St. John where he was the Chef de Cuisine at Opera Bistro, and then back to Moncton where he was the Sous Chef at Little Louis’, one of Atlantic Canada’s premier award winning restaurants. Pierre’s contributions with the then Chef Andrew Stevens earned Little Louis’ Four Diamond Restaurant status by AAA/CAA. When Chef Stevens departed, Pierre became Chef and with his leadership, has maintained the Four Diamond award at Little Louis’, for seven years running.

888x590-Chef-Dan-Hudson-with-chuck-hughes-danny-smiles
Chef Daniel Hudson, middle, with Chuck Hughes and Danny Smiles

Chef Daniel Hudson
Daniel’s career began 16 years ago in the UK where he worked in one of the finest kitchens, Eastwell Manor. He gained hands-on experience from Michelin Star chefs over the years. His motto in the kitchen is, “I do what I know and what I know, I do well”. Dan Hudson moved to Vancouver Island, British Columbia in 2005. He opened his award-winning restaurant Hudson’s on First in Duncan in 2012, and in 2014 won a Vancouver Magazine Best Restaurant award. He is now running Jake’s On the Road in Duncan. Chef Daniel also appeared on Food Network Canada’s Top Chef Canada and was a winner on Chopped Canada.

888x520-Chef Ross MunroChef Ross Munro

Chef Ross Munro
Ross started his culinary career as a teenager working in small restaurants eventually moving through some of Canada’s top dining spots and leading Canadian hotels – Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, The Westin Edmonton and the Hyatt Regency Calgary among them. In 2012, Chef Ross was named both Prince Edward Island Chef of the Year and Atlantic Canada Chef of the Year; the latter bestowed upon him by his chef peers from Atlantic Canada. Most recently, he’s been Director of Culinary for the Murphy Group of Restaurants and Resident Chef at Sims Corner Steakhouse and Oyster Bar in Charlottetown, PEI. He is currently the Owner/ Operator of Red Door Oyster Co. Chef Ross possesses a global perspective in his approach to food having traveled the world and knowing the culinary skills of many cultures. During the off-season, he leads tours around the globe to connect clients with international chefs.

Excited to hit the road? Watch the trailer for Chuck & Danny’s Roadtrip.

Hit the Highway with Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip Playlist

Chef Chuck Hughes and Chef Danny Smiles, tight friends in and out of the kitchen, hit the highway seeking great Canadian food and good times in Food Network Canada’s Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip, premiering March 3rd.

Chuck-and-Dannys-Road-Trip

On the road, they meet folks who care about food as much as they do, and cook up epic celebratory feasts for their new friends. This trip of a lifetime comes complete with a killer soundtrack of eight great Canadian bands adding their music to Chuck and Danny’s adventure. It doesn’t surprise us at all that Chuck Hughes’s latest show has such a stellar music line up. His Food Network Canada series Chuck’s Day Off also featured an amazing soundtrack, his Instagram (@chefchuckhughes) is peppered with music festival pics, and for the last seven years he and Danny Smiles have fed the music elite that play Montreal’s Osheaga Arts and Music Festival.

Chuck-Hughes-Danny-Smiles-Salt-Spring-Island

Tokyo Police Club adds three songs to the Chuck & Danny’s Road Trip soundtrack including “Boots of Danger (Wait Up)”, the raucous theme song to the show. “Young Leaves” by Attack in Black is a gem of a road trip tune. Wintersleep, originally from Halifax but who now call Montreal home, add “Santa Fe” from their latest album The Great Detachment.  The soundtrack also features the melancholy voice of City and Colour, heavy Hamilton-rockers Monster Truck, the hook-laden styles of Vancouver’s Yukon Blonde, the shimmering sounds of Twist, and a Stevie Wonder-influenced K-OS track “Dance In Yo Car.”

Take these bands along on your next adventure – or even  on your Monday morning commute. Listen to the show soundtrack on Spotify.