Category Archives: Shows

Ina Garten’s Fresh Whiskey Sours Will Be Your Go-To Cocktail

Although the holiday season might feel a little less celebratory this year, there’s no reason we still can’t raise a glass of Ina Garten’s refreshing and tangy whiskey sour concoction. This five-ingredient indulgence from the Barefoot Contessa is ready in 10 minutes – just don’t forget to top it all off with a Maraschino cherry!

Related: Ina Garten’s Classic Cocktail Recipes, From Margaritas to Mojitos

Ina Garten’s Fresh Whiskey Sours

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Yield: 4 cocktails

Ingredients:

3/4 cup Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (3 lemons)
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (4 limes)
2/3 cup sugar syrup (see below)
Maraschino cherries

See More: Dinner Etiquette Tips That Would Make Ina Garten Proud

Directions:

1. Combine the whiskey, lemon juice, lime juice and syrup. Fill a cocktail shaker halfway with ice and fill two-thirds full with the cocktail mixture. Shake for 30 seconds and pour into glasses. Add a maraschino cherry and serve ice cold.

2. Sugar syrup: Put 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Chill thoroughly before using.

Watch Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

When it comes to quick and easy five-ingredient meals, you can rely on The Pioneer Woman for a healthy and scrumptious weeknight option. With fresh cherry tomatoes, crunchy bell peppers and juicy cuts of boneless ribeye steaks, this bright and bold sheet pan wonder from Ree Drummond is everything you need in a well-balanced meat and veggie dish. *chef’s kiss*

Related: Simple and Satisfying Recipes That Use 5 Ingredients or Less

Steak Sheet Pan Supper

Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients:

2 red bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
2 yellow bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
1 large yellow onion, cut into thick rounds (large rings only)
2 cups whole cherry tomatoes
Two 12-ounce boneless rib-eye steaks, about 1 1/2 inches thick
4 tsp Montreal steak seasoning
4 Tbsp olive oil
4 Tbsp salted butter
1 loaf crusty, artisan-style French bread, for serving

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Directions:

1. Position an oven rack on the highest level in the oven. Preheat the broiler on high.

2. Arrange the peppers on a sheet pan in a single layer. Do the same with the onions and cherry tomatoes. This will create a bed of vegetables for the steaks to sit on.

3. Lay the steaks directly on the vegetables with an inch or two between the steaks so they aren’t touching. Season the top of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle the top of each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Top each steak with 1 tablespoon butter.

4. Broil until the tops of the steaks are nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and use a set of tongs to flip the steaks over. Sprinkle the other side of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil and top each with 1 tablespoon butter. Slide the pan back into the oven and broil the other side for 3 minutes.

5. Plate each steak with half of the veggies from the pan. Serve with a chunk of crusty French bread.

Watch the How-To Video for Steak Sheet Pan Supper


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Team Buddy featuring Buddy Valastro, as seen on Buddy vs Christmas, Season 1.

Cakes, Cookies or Pies? Buddy Valastro Reveals His Ultimate Holiday Treat

Christmas is kind of a big deal at the Valastro residence. Sure, this holiday season may look a little bit different than Christmases past as a result of the pandemic, but in a typical year Buddy and his wife Lisa go all-out when it comes to their holiday dinners. Would you expect anything less from the Buddy vs. Christmas personality?

In previous years the couple has hosted all of their extended family, which adds up to more than 100 festive people. Typically Lisa cooks (prime rib, eggplant parm, lasagna, shrimp, lobster and more), while of course, Buddy does the desserts. But don’t let him fool you — he doesn’t necessarily whip up 100 mini pastries or elaborate cakes at home for the occasion.

Related: Buddy vs. Duff: See Buddy Valastro and Duff Goldman’s Most Epic Cakes

“Well, I’m not gonna lie. I don’t want to take credit,” he tells us. “I just bring like a slew of stuff from the bakery. We bring cakes and pies and cookies and lobster tails and pastries. And you know, we still love cake. After all these years and all these holidays and all these desserts, we still love cake.”

 

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While cake may be a year-round hit, Buddy adds that Christmas feels like an especially great time to indulge in pasties. He and his family specifically dive into Italian classics like cannoli and lobster tails (AKA sfogliatelle) because, let’s face it: when else do you have as much room for dessert as you do come the holidays?

“As big as the meal is that my wife makes, I swear it is just as important when we eat dessert,” he laughs. “No matter how stuffed everyone is — ‘oh, I can’t get up, I’m so full’ — they wind up all eating dessert. Every single one of them.”

Related: Ina Garten’s Best Desserts for the Holidays

For those fellow dessert-lovers out there, the host adds that around the holidays Carlo’s Bakery typically offers a red-and-white sponge cake that’s festive and crowd-pleasing — and they have a few other goodies in store for December too. This year that’s extra exciting for Canadians since the shop has expanded into Canada. In fact, Buddy says his Oh Canada Baby! cake would be the perfect thing for Christmas dessert this year.

“That would be a great Christmas cake on anyone’s table because it’s pretty and it’s delicious,” he says. “It’s also made with love. I want the Canadian people to know this is only the beginning of the plans for Canada because every time I come there fans are just so receptive and great. I’ve always felt so loved there and now it’s time for me to do some more in Canada.”

Related: Buddy Valastro’s Coolest Celebrity Cake Creations

For now Canadians can catch Buddy in his latest holiday-themed series, Buddy vs. Christmas. In each of the four episodes the baker and his team come together to face off against highly specialized artists (Broadway set designers, expert glassblowers and more) to see who can create the best life-sized Christmas displays to be presented at high-profile events.

 

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“These four creations are some of the best work — I was so blown away by what we did,” Buddy reveals. “When you see what we made, it’s just to another level. This was less about a competition because we’re all artists. Whether you’re a glassblower or whether you’re a brick artist and you make Legos or you’re a Broadway set designer or you’re someone who does animatronics in the windows, we’re all using different art forms to express our medium,” he continues.

“I love Christmas. My house is like the Griswolds at home with the decorations and stuff. And I gotta tell you, we just turned it on for this. It’s really cool.”

Watch Buddy vs. Christmas Mondays at 10EP and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Kardea Brown's Gullah Red Rice

Kardea Brown’s Smoky West African-Inspired Gullah Red Rice

As Kardea Brown shows us time and time again on Delicious Miss Brown, truly crave-worthy comfort food features a few common characteristics: it’s inspired by tradition, it’s simple to prepare and it’s packed with distinctive flavour — just like her colourful, devourable Gullah red rice.

Kardea’s red rice takes a flavourful staple of West African cuisine — jollof rice — and gives it an intensely delicious, sure-fire spin that’s influenced by her Gullah culture and her contemporary cooking style.

At its base, any red rice dish is just as it sounds — it’s rice cooked in some form of tomato, typically with an element of smoked meat added. To help keep her rice from getting soggy, Kardea uses parboiled rice (which has been dried and steamed in its husk). The result? Rich, fluffy red rice that’s so good, there won’t be any leftovers.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Gullah Red Rice

Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 8 to 10

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked parboiled rice
¼ cup vegetable oil
8 oz smoked pork sausage, finely diced
1 large onion, finely diced
1 bell pepper, finely diced
Two 6-oz cans tomato paste
4 tsp granulated sugar
1 Tbsp garlic powder
1 Tbsp kosher salt
1 Tbsp fresh cracked black pepper

Related: The Best Rice Recipes for Dinner, and Even Dessert

Directions:

1. Rinse the rice until the water becomes slightly clear. (This removes the starch).

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the sausage, onion and pepper and cook, stirring, until the vegetables soften and start to brown at the edges, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, sugar, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Stir rice into the tomato mixture and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

3. Transfer to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish and spread into an even layer. Add just enough water to cover the rice (about 2 cups). Tightly cover with a lid or foil and bake for 30 minutes without uncovering the baking dish. Turn off the oven, remove the rice, fluff the rice, then cover and return to the oven for 10 minutes more.

Craving a main course that has enough flavour to pair with Kardea’s red rice? Her warm, hearty beef and okra stew is up to the challenge.

Watch Delicious Miss Brown by streaming Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

When it comes to quick and easy meals, you can rely on Ree Drummond for an instant classic family staple. With a plethora of diverse palate-pleasing spices and hearty beans and cheeses, this one-pot wonder from The Pioneer Woman is everything you need from an easy chicken-forward chili recipe. Bon appetit!

Related: Ree Drummond’s Best Holiday Desserts (From Cookies to Cheesecake)

The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Yields: 6 servings

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp ground coriander
1 Tbsp ground cumin
2 tsp dried oregano
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp kosher salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp olive oil
4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts (1 ½ to 2 pounds total)
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
½ cup heavy cream
2 Tbsp masa harina
Two 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
Two 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, drained
One 10-ounce bag frozen corn
2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese
1 avocado, diced
4 to 6 lime wedges

Related: 100 Popular Chicken Breast Recipes You Need to Try

Special Equipment: Pressure cooker

Directions:

1. Mix the coriander, cumin, oregano, paprika, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper together in a small bowl.

2. Add olive oil to a pressure cooker, set to saute and add the chicken. Sprinkle the spice mix over the chicken and toss. Cook until the chicken has started to sear on the outside, then add the broth.

3. Place the lid on the pressure cooker, set the valve to sealing, and cook on manual for 6 minutes. Release the steam using the quick-release cycle. Remove the chicken to a board and shred with two forks.

4. Put the heavy cream and masa harina in a small bowl and mix until smooth with a whisk or fork.

5. Switch the pressure cooker to saute and return the chicken to the pressure cooker along with the masa and heavy cream mixture, cannellini beans, green chiles and corn. Let cook, stirring occasionally, until the chili has thickened and the corn is warmed through, about 10 minutes.

6. Ladle the chili into 6 bowls. Top with cheese and avocado. Serve with lime wedges.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Watch the How-To Video:


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

A heaping bowl of Kardea Brown's pan fried collard greens studded with thick cut bacon bits

Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Can a side dish really be a star? As Kardea Brown shows us with her cravaeble Southern recipes on Delicious Miss Brown, you can elevate any dish with a touch of heart, respect for tradition, quality ingredients — and her distinct and delicious penchant for making comfort-food classics her own. That’s where these delectable pan-fried collard greens come in.

A staple side dish in Southern homes, collard greens slather savoury flavour on any dinner plate — and Kardea’s recipe takes these essential greens to the next level with mouth-watering thick-sliced bacon bringing the “more, please” umami flavour. Cooked in a low-and-slow-style (but ready in 30 minutes), Kardea’s pan-fried collard greens are tender, garlicky and just a tiny bit sweet thanks to a hint of honey.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Pan-Fried Collard Greens

Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:
6 thick bacon slices, chopped into large pieces
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 lbs. collard greens (about to 2 large bunches), stems discarded, leaves washed and chopped
1 Tbsp honey
A few dashes of hot sauce
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

Directions:

1. Add bacon to a large skillet over medium heat. Cook bacon, stirring occasionally, until crispy, about 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the bacon from the pan and set aside, leaving the fat in the pan.

2. Add the onion to the bacon grease and cook, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in garlic and cook, stirring, for another 30 seconds or so, until fragrant. Add the greens, honey, hot sauce and a few pinches of salt and pepper. Cook the greens, stirring occasionally, until greens are nice and tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Taste and add more salt and/or pepper if necessary. Serve hot with bacon on top.

Related: Top 48 Sweet and Savoury Bacon Recipes

Looking for a Southern-style finish to your meal? Kardea Brown’s Caramel Apple Cake should hit the (sweet) spot.

Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


 

Overhead shot of Molly Yeh's spinach and feta rugelach, sprinkled with salt and laid out attractively on a large platter

Molly Yeh’s Spinach and Feta Rugelach Are a Savoury Twist on a Classic

There’s something sweetly satisfying about a savoury spin on a classic dessert. While Girl Meets Farm’s Molly Yeh is certainly an expert when it comes to creating craveable desserts, she’s also got a knack for finding yummy new ways to pay homage to time-honoured tastes. Take these cheesy rugelach: traditionally, crescent-shaped rugelach are a sweet treat starring on Hanukkah and Jewish-holiday dessert tables. With this veggie-filled twist, however, Molly transforms the cookies into flavourful bites for the dinner table.

Savoury and simple to make (especially if you use store-bought, pre-rolled pie crusts as a time-saving hack), these delectable pastries are filled with a sumptuous mix of spinach, feta and garlic.

Related: 15 Sweet and Savoury Ways to Use Leftover Pie Dough

Molly Yeh’s Spinach and Feta Rugelach Recipe

Active Time: 45 minutes
Total Time:  1 hour 15 minutes

Yield:16 pieces

Ingredients:
10-oz frozen chopped spinach
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 small onion, finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 to 4 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
3/4 cup crumbled feta
3 Tbsp heavy cream
1 tsp lemon juice
A few shakes hot sauce
One 14.1-oz box refrigerated rolled pie crusts (2 crusts total) or 2 homemade rounds pie dough
1 large egg yolk, beaten with a splash of water
Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling

Related: The Most Delicious Chocolate Babka with a Healthy Twist for Your Hanukkah Party

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. Set the frozen spinach out on a plate at room temperature to soften slightly.

3. Melt the butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring often, until the onion is soft and translucent, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and a few turns of black pepper and cook until fragrant, 1 more minute. Add the flour and stir to combine, then stir in the spinach and a good pinch of salt. Cook, stirring, until the spinach is heated through and the mixture is combined. Stir in the feta, heavy cream, lemon juice and hot sauce, then remove it from the heat. Taste and adjust seasonings as desired.

4. Roll out half of the pie dough on a lightly floured surface until it is a large round, about 1/4-inch thick. (If using store-bought pre-rolled dough, simply unroll it onto your surface.) Spread on half the spinach mixture in an even layer so that it covers the dough. Using a pizza cutter or knife, cut the dough like a pizza into 8 triangular wedges. Roll up each section starting at the wide end. Transfer the rugelach to the lined baking sheets, placing them 1 inch apart. Repeat with the other half of the dough and spinach filling.

5. Lightly brush the tops with egg wash and sprinkle with sea salt.

6. Bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Let cool slightly and enjoy. Store leftovers in the fridge and reheat in a toaster oven.

Related: Molly Yeh’s Flaky Dill Bread: The Perfect Use for Leftover Herbs

Want to learn more about the Girl Meets Farm star? Here are 12 fun facts about Molly Yeh!

Watch Girl Meets Farm and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Wall of Chef’s Christine Cushing Looks Back at 20 Years of Cooking on TV

Christine Cushing had an accidental career. Or at least that’s how she looks back at her past two decades as one of the most prominent food personalities in Canada. The chef was a master of all trades, so to speak, 20 years ago when she was feeding hungry hotel guests, punching out fresh dough, catering swanky parties, and hustling in a restaurant. But it wasn’t until she was hired to do a live product demo that a producer realized her big personality and infectious love of food belonged in homes across Canada.

Chef Christine Cushing smiles in her chef's whites on the set of Wall of Chefs

“I had to do a five-minute audition,” Cushing recalls. “From that moment, it really tapped into something for me. When the camera light went on I realized this is what I love to do. Inspiring people and sharing what I know about food and getting them excited about it.”

Related: See What Made These Chefs Worthy of “The Wall”

Taking Her Shot

Of course at the time Cushing thought she had bombed. She’d been given a laundry list of dos and don’ts heading into the audition, such as what to wear or how to act. Her brain bypassed all of that and honed in on the cooking aspect, to the point that she recalls showing up in jeans, “the ugliest green army t-shirt,” and zero makeup.

“I remember thinking, ‘Oh God, this is so done,’” she says. “But I decided to just do my thing. It was all about the food.” In the end that approach resonated with the decision-makers in the room. The formally trained chef’s ability to explain the Greek pizza recipe she had decided to make—and the fact that she offered customization options for different family members—convinced them to hire her for Dish it Out.

See More: Inside Christine Cushing’s Fridge

If that show allowed Cushing to become comfortable with cooking in front of the cameras, and taught her how to read from a teleprompter or work with producers, her next gig—Food Network Canada’s Christine Cushing Live—was a masterclass in TV on the fly. The series featured call-in questions from viewers and guest chef appearances as Cushing and her sous-chef, Juan Salinas, whipped up delicious dishes. Cushing admits she prefers to live in the moment, so the show was actually a perfect fit for her. And even better than that, doing the series made her learn to trust in herself and her abilities.

“For four years, four nights a week, we basically had to run a restaurant,” Cushing recalls. “There was so much learning, so much collaboration. But from a culinary standpoint, you just didn’t know what was going to happen. You didn’t know what would go up in flames. Which pan wouldn’t fit in the oven. It was really live—people were kind of shocked by that.”

Christine Cushing sits cross legged wearing all denim with a bowl and whisk on her lap in a promotional photo for Christine Cushing Live

Continuing to Find Inspiration

After Christine Cushing Live wrapped in 2005, the chef remained a constant TV presence with series like Cook With Me, Fearless in the Kitchen, and a Chinese travel series, Confucius was a Foodie. She admits that travelling inspires her in the kitchen, but with the current pandemic she—like many others out there—has turned to comfort foods. She’s currently baking bread and crafting Italian classics and Greek favourites with a twist, like moussaka with grilled eggplant and zucchini, which she was prepping for dinner the day we spoke with her.

“In Greece, food is more of a shared experience,” she explains. “There are very few dishes that are singularly plated. You don’t necessarily do a portion of anything. It really is nourishing, it’s nutritional, but it’s [also] comforting and it has beautiful flavour.”

Those kinds of dishes also remind Cushing of her father, whom she calls one of her original culinary heroes. She recalls him being the kind of guy who would start thinking about what’s for dinner before they’d finished lunch (a trait she inherited), and she puts him up there with two of her other culinary heroes: Julia Child and Anthony Bourdain.

Headshot of Anthony Bourdain smiling

Image Credit: Getty Images
Getty Images

“Bourdain was one of my favourite guests on Live. He had kind of gotten huge television-wise and everybody had an impression about him and what he was going to be like,” Cushing recalls. “He was very energetic, just so articulate and fantastic. It was a very memorable night. Although he wasn’t a troubled individual, you could see those kind of dark moments in him throughout. I could sense it. But he wanted to go to a place and really find that truth. Just find it—not create it in advance. He was lucky to have had the freedom to do that because so often now, yes there is some latitude, but not too much latitude.”

Looking Towards the Future

These days, Cushing finds inspiration as one of the pros on Wall of Chefs. She’s of the mindset that you can learn from anybody, and the home cooks featured on the series are certainly proof of that. Even more specifically though, she’s impressed by some of the women in their early twenties that have come on the show, and with how well they’ve been able to think and react on their feet given everything the show throws at them.

“It happened a few times, actually, that all the chefs looked at each other and said, ‘I would hire her tomorrow,’” Cushing reveals. “That was super impressive. You think it’s experience that brings you to a level where you can impress a chef, but sometimes it’s youth and fearlessness.”

Christine Cushing and Noah Cappe check in with a home cook on the set of Wall of Chefs

That’s exactly the type of feel-good programming that Cushing believes we’ll see in the next couple of years as the effects of the pandemic continue to play out. As we shift away from straight-up instructional shows and more into the collective experience of cooking, Cushing sees more of those personal journeys and connecting stories coming down the pike in her imaginary crystal ball.

“If anything, the past eight months or so have shown us [how to] connect, find meaning, collectively know that we’re all in this together as a planet,” she says. “We’ve really seen that in spades, and when we don’t experience that it erodes us as a planet. People want to be inspired and uplifted.”

Christine Cushing should know. She was, after all, one of our original inspirations.

Watch full episodes of Wall of Chefs online. You can also stream your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Molly Yeh’s Ghost Hand Pies Are a Spooky and Savoury Halloween Appetizer

Although the days are getting shorter and the air crisper, it’s hard to begrudge the changing season when it brings us all the spooky fun of Halloween. Although the annual tradition of dressing up and trick-or-treating might look a little different this year, that hasn’t stopped Girl Meets Farm‘s Molly Yeh from conjuring up one of the best ghoulish hand pie recipes we’ve ever seen.

Homemade pie dough, sharp Cheddar and Dijon mustard form the crux of this mouth-watering savoury treat that will become an instant Halloween classic in your household.

Related: Spookylicious 2020: These Are the Hauntingly Entertaining Shows Coming to Your Screen

Ghost Hand Pies With Honey Dijon

Active Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes
Yields: 8 small pies

Ingredients:

Pie Dough:
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cubed

Ghost Pies:
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 lbs pie dough (homemade is best, but store-bought will work too), recipe follows
All-purpose flour, for dusting
4 oz sharp Cheddar, finely chopped (1/4-inch cubes or smaller) or shredded
1 large egg, lightly beaten with a splash of water (for the egg wash)
3/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp honey

Related: Our All-Time Favourite Pie Recipes, From Classics to Clever Twists

Directions:

Pie Dough:
1. To make the dough, combine the cider vinegar and 6 tablespoons water in a measuring cup and stick it in the fridge (or the freezer even) to get really cold. In a large bowl or food processor, combine the flour, sugar and salt. Add the butter and either use your hands to toss it with the flour and pinch the butter into flat sheets, or pulse in the food processor, incorporating the butter so that about 75 per cent of the mixture is mealy. The rest of the mixture should have some slightly larger, pea-sized bits of butter. Drizzle in the vinegar and water and mix with your hands or continue to pulse in the food processor just until the mixture comes together to form a dough. If it seems dry or is having a hard time coming together, add a bit more water a few drops at a time until it comes together. Turn it out onto a clean surface, using your hands to press on any stray crumbs, and divide the dough in half. Pat the halves into discs, wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

See More: Molly Yeh’s Flaky Dill Bread, The Perfect Use for Leftover Herbs

Ghost Pies:
1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions with a good pinch of salt and a few turns of pepper and cook, stirring, until very soft, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium low, add 1/4 cup water and cook, stirring occasionally, until the water is evaporated and the onions are lightly caramelized, 25 to 30 minutes.

2. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

3. Divide the pie dough into 8 equal parts and shape into balls (keep half of the dough balls covered in the fridge while you aren’t working with them to keep them cold). On a lightly floured surface, roll out the balls to ovals that are 8 inches long and about 6 inches wide. Top the bottom half of each dough piece with a pile of cheese and a pile of onions, leaving a 1-inch border. In the top half of each dough piece, punch out an upside down ghost face with piping tips or tiny round cookie cutters (it’s upside down so that when you fold it over on top of the filling, it’s right-side up). Brush the edges with egg, fold the top down over the filling and fold the sides in on themselves so that you have ghost shape. (Or, rather, a shape of a tiny kid in a bedsheet ghost costume that’s lying down.) Press around the side and bottom edges to seal, transfer to the baking sheets, brush the tops all over with egg wash and sprinkle with a little salt.

4. Bake until golden brown; begin checking for doneness at 20 minutes. Let cool slightly.

5. Mix together the Dijon mustard and honey in a small bowl. Serve the hand pies warm or at room temperature with the mustard sauce.

Watch Girl Meets Farm and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Close up shot of Christa Bruneau-Guenther

Chef Christa Bruneau-Guenther Brings Her Home Cooking and Indigenous Roots to Wall of Chefs

Since childhood, chef Christa Bruneau-Guenther has cared for others in her extended family and community, using food to share stories and sustenance. Born in Winnipeg, Christa is a member of Peguis First Nations but grew up partially removed from her traditional Cree and French Métis roots. “The disconnect came from being brought up in an urban city and also the effects of residential schools,” she says. “Growing up in poverty, it’s just about survival every day.”

Christa Bruneau-Guenther on the set of Wall of Chefs

Although an aunt taught her to make bannock and homemade jam and there were the occasional fishing and foraging trips, Christa’s food journey really began in her 20s when she began to transition from home cook to chef. “Since I had 32 cousins and all I ever did was babysit from when I was eight, I was really good at taking care of others,” she says. At the age of 23, Christa opened up an Indigenous holistic licensed family daycare that helped inner-city children with trauma and other health concerns. She applied for government funding and began developing recipes in accordance with the newly released Canada’s Food Guide for First Nations, Inuit and Métis. 

See More: 12 Canadian First Nations Recipes

It was an eyeopener for Christa. “For the first time, I saw ingredients that were related to my Cree culture, such as squash, or pine nuts, and began incorporating them into our food program, getting the children involved in the food culture as well,” she says. “For myself and my staff, who were also Indigenous, we had this new sense of pride and self-worth and an understanding of where we came from.”

In her decade running the daycare, Christa continued her research into recipes and ingredients from her Indigenous heritage, which brought the challenges of recording recipes passed down through oral recounting and the lack of subject-specific recipe books in her local libraries. She began tapping into the community of Indigenous elders, as well as sharing her knowledge with local universities and residents. As a home cook with no restaurant experience or training other than a brief career as a server, Christa eschewed the traditional culinary school path. “Most of my learning was through Food Network, actually. I would watch and write down simple recipes from chefs such as Giada de Laurentiis and Christine Cushing and experiment in my own kitchen,” she says.

When an open space in the Ellice Café and Theatre — formerly a community-subsidized cafe meant to help homeless or displaced people — became available, the owners were looking for someone who would bring a similar aesthetic to the space. Christa opened Feast Café Bistro in Winnipeg’s West End in December 2016, showcasing the simple and affordable recipes that she brought from her home kitchen. The restaurant is already a fixture in providing aid to the homeless through donation initiatives of leftover food and “pay it forward” programs.

Related: 12 Tasty Canadian Indigenous Restaurants

Key to Christa’s efforts is accessibility of Indigenous ingredients — which can be a challenge given that the food costs of some harder to find foraged items can be higher than others. Feast uses these ingredients to maximize their flavour while keeping them affordable, such as incorporating sweetgrass, juniper and cedar for a dry rub for bison, sumac or bee pollen for pickling, and bannock as a pizza or sandwich base.

Christa Bruneau-Guenther on the set of Wall of Chefs

Christa also uses this accessibility ethos in her judging for Wall of Chefs, wanting to promote home cooks and their skill sets, bringing them into her shared community of those who cook for love. “Home cooks may have an advantage: they’re used to looking in their fridge and come up with something that’s healthy and that your family will love,” says Christa. “I want viewers to see that you can do this too, and even though you’re not a highly trained chef, it doesn’t mean that you can’t cook a delicious, pretty looking plate of food that feeds your soul.”

Watch full episodes of Wall of Chefs online. You can also stream your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Ina Garten's Red Wine Braised Short Ribs served with a crusty baguette

Ina Garten’s Braised Short Ribs Have a Boozy Secret Ingredient

The Barefoot Contessa’s hearty stew may be time-consuming, but it will be well worth the hours of braising when you taste the rich flavours. Perfect for a special-occasion supper or to make-ahead for a week’s worth of dinners, Ina’s braised short ribs are full of secret ingredients and absolutely bursting with flavour.

Related: Ina Garten’s Classic Cocktail Recipes, From Margaritas to Mojitos

Ina Garten (The Barefoot Contessa) holding a bowl of her red wine-braised short ribs served with a crusty baguette

Ina starts this rich main by braising short ribs on a sheet pan instead of a stovetop. No need for a messy oil splatter sear with this method that cooks up her four pounds of short ribs without the time or mess. Ina then starts with a mirepoix of celery, carrots and onions before adding her secret weapon to the dish – an entire bottle of red wine (Ina’s pick is a Cotes du Rhone which she likes for the full-bodied flavour).  After adding in beef stock, crushed tomatoes and thyme, Ina finishes the stew with a bottle of Irish stout beer. The yeasty, hoppy flavour complements the red wine to add incredible depth.

See More: Dinner Etiquette Tips That Would Make Ina Garten Proud

Red Wine-Braised Short Ribs

Total Time: 3 hours and 15 minutes
Yields: 6 servings

Ina Garten Red Wine-Braised Short Ribs

Ingredients:

5 lbs very meaty bone-in beef short ribs, cut into 2-inch chunks
Good olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 cups chopped leeks, white and light green parts (3 leeks)
3 cups chopped celery (5 to 6 ribs)
2 cups chopped yellow onions (2 onions)
2 cups chopped unpeeled carrots (6 carrots)
1 1/2 Tbsp minced garlic (5 cloves)
1 (750-milliliter) bottle Burgundy, Cotes du Rhone, Chianti, or other dry red wine
4 cups beef stock, preferably homemade
1 cup canned crushed tomatoes, such as San Marzano
1 (11.2-oz) bottle Guinness draught stout
6 sprigs fresh thyme, tied with kitchen string
Toasted baguette, for serving

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Place the short ribs on a sheet pan, brush the tops with olive oil, and sprinkle with 1 1/2 tablespoons salt and 1 1/2 teaspoons pepper. Roast for 20 minutes and remove from the oven. Reduce the temperature to 325°F.

2. Meanwhile, heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a large (12-inch) Dutch oven, such as Le Creuset, over medium heat. Add the leeks, celery, onions, and carrots and cook over medium to medium-high heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and cook for one minute. Add the wine, bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer over medium heat for 10 minutes, until the liquid is reduced. Add the stock, tomatoes, Guinness, thyme, 1 tablespoon salt, and 1 1/2 teaspoons pepper.

Overhead shot of bowl of Ina Garten's red wine braised short rib stew

Related: Ina Garten’s Best Soup and Stew Recipes

3. Place the ribs in the pot, along with the juices and seasonings from the sheet pan. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook in the oven for one hour. Uncover and cook for one more hour, until the meat is very tender.

4. Remove the short ribs to a plate with a slotted spoon and discard the thyme bundle and any bones that have separated from the meat. Simmer the sauce on the stove for 20 minutes, until reduced. Skim some of the fat off the top and discard. Return the ribs to the pot, heat for 5 minutes, and taste for seasonings. Serve hot in shallow bowls, with a toasted baguette and extra sauce on the side.

Watch Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Buddy Valastro on the set of Big Time Bake

Buddy Valastro Gives Us the Scoop on Big Time Bake

We’re used to seeing cake master Buddy Valastro create masterful concoctions and larger-than-life gateaux, but in his latest series he’s trading in his apron for a scoreboard. In each episode of Big Time Bake Buddy hosts and judges as four bakers create cookies, cupcakes and a showpiece cake in just six hours.

So what’s the twist? Unlike other competition series the clock never stops on this showdown. So bakers not only have to plan out their time wisely, but they have to prove they’re as good at multitasking as they are at creating. We sat down with Buddy to get his hot take on what impresses him in the kitchen, what he misses about competing, and how, despite his impressive resume, he’s really “not a cake snob” at all.

See More: 10 Moments From Buddy vs. Duff That Had Us On the Edge of Our Seats

After doing Buddy vs. Duff, is it nice to be on the other end of the judging table with Big Time Bake?

I love to compete. For years, I really didn’t compete. I just kind of did my own show. I did Cake Boss. And I wasn’t competing with anyone, but it was a way to push myself to the limits, right? And then when you go into a competition, I think that even upped the ante even more. It pushes you even further. So when I’m judging, I’m also rooting. I’m the kind of guy that’s like, ‘Oh, man, I wish I could help’ or, ‘I wish I could give them a piece of advice.’ Just like a lot of people at home. I’m sure a lot of people watch at home and are kind of like ‘Oh, why did you do that,’ or, ‘Why did you use that colour?’ So it’s nice to judge but if you said to me, like gun to the head, ‘What do you want, to compete or judge?’ I would compete.

What is it that you love about competing?

I love to make, to create and it’s just kind of what I like to do. And it’s less about winning or losing. It’s more about challenging myself. Kind of like breaking a new record or making a another favourite cake or, just sparking the ideas. I have the mind of an eight-year-old-boy when I cake design, because I think the ending is possible. Why can’t this cake move, or why can’t it spin, or why can’t it be, you know, five thousand pounds or whatever. Whatever the obstacles are. And when you’re able to look at things that way, and you become successful at it, you look at life that way. So I look at life, I look at business and I go, ‘Why can’t I open a bakery in Canada?’ Or, ‘Why can’t I have vending machines?’ or whatever it is. You’re not afraid to dream big and make things happen. And I feel like a lot of my successes is because of that. I attribute a lot of that to my whimsical daydreaming and cake design to success in business.

Does watching these competitors spark your creativity at all?

Oh, absolutely. You pick things up from the competitors, too. I’m a student and I’m always learning. I see a good idea or a good technique or a good thing and I’m always putting that in my back pocket and trying to do different things with it. And I don’t want you to take what I said before wrong in the sense where, I do love to judge. I still love to encourage people and I still love to give my critique.

Related: The Evolution of Buddy Valastro

How would you describe your judging style?

I’m a pretty open book, I call it the way I see it. If I love something I’m going to tell you I love it. If I don’t like something I’m going to tell you I don’t like it. I gotta tell you, watching this show, you’re rooting and trying to coach and it’s amazing. What I love about this show in particular that’s different than a lot of the older formats that we did, was this show is kind of like non-stop action the whole time. Meaning the clock never stops.

Is that an advantage or a disadvantage?

It might seem like a disadvantage to the competitors for the audience at home, but it’s quite the contrary, it’s the opposite actually. Because when you work in your bakery or you’re doing your thing, you’re making cookies and cakes and pies and everything is happening at the same time. I actually feel like this is more of a baker’s natural habitat. And because we combine the six hours into one, versus having the two-hour cookie round, the two-hour cupcake round, and the two-hour cake round, we’ve been so successful with the level of difficulty in the beauty of the final products throughout. It’s been amazing. I mean, some of these cakes are the best cakes I’ve seen on these types of competition shows. I was totally blown away.

See More: Buddy Valastro’s Coolest Celebrity Cake Creations

What does it take to impress you in that kitchen?

The thing is, I am so impressed. Like, I’m not a cake snob by any means, because I’m the Cake Boss or because I can do some crazy things. I never belittle anybody’s work. Everybody works to their own level, or their own creativity. Everybody marches to the beat of their own drum, right? And I see the beauty in everything. It’s why I’m creative when I dream of cakes. Like if I’m driving to work and it’s fall and I start to see the foliage? Cakes and colours and schemes pop into my mind. Or, if I’m in the Middle East and I’m looking at architecture, I’m inspired. Or if I’m in an old Victorian house and I’m looking at moldings and trims, I can apply that to what I do. To me the world is my inspiration. And by seeing other people’s work and other people’s talents, I learn a lot. I’ve seen a couple of things from watching the show and from seeing competitors compete using different techniques. It was really good.

Watch Big Time Bake Mondays at 10ep and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

 

Williamsburg Pizza Margherita Pizza

Pizza Lovers: Here’s Where to Find the Best Pizza in 2020

If we know one thing to be true, it’s that everybody loves pizza. Whether it’s eaten fresh from a woodburning oven, straight out of a cardboard delivery box, or reheated on a bleary-eyed Sunday morning, pizza is always satisfying. And luckily for us, pizza is one of the ultimate takeout foods, making it the perfect dish right now.

And while it’s been said that even when it’s bad, it’s still good, John Catucci knows when a pizza is truly great. Like a giant slice topped with mini pizzas, a meta creation of epic proportions, this 26-inch slice brings you what you didn’t know you wanted- pizza on pizza. Or for the true original, maybe Willamburg Pizza’s Apple Bacon Grandma Pie is more your speed, a delicious ‘za topped with thinly slices apples, bacon, walnuts and four different varieties of cheese. 

Whatever your preferred pie style, get ready to add a few more to check off your very own Big Food Bucket List.

At Descendant Detroit Style Pizza, one of the first things pizza lovers will notice is that Detroit-style pizza is served in a square, with the sauce on top rather than providing a base for toppings. The Truff-Ghi starts with a thick Sicilian crust, chewy but never heavy. Topped with roasted garlic cremini mushrooms, caramelized onions, double-smoked bacon and heaps of mozzarella, this square is chock full of flavour. If you weren’t already drooling, the added drizzle of white truffle aioli will surely seal the deal.

See more: The Top 5 Pizza Recipes From You Gotta Eat Here!

The best part, John says, is the crust, while diving into a crunchy corner, “it’s light, it’s airy, it’s crispy.” A true testament of lasting love, John declares that “yes, I’d take it home and introduce it to my mother.” What more could you ask for? The Pugliese style pizza at Toronto’s Bar Buca keeps mixes things up with the addition of potatoes to the dough. Chef Rob Gentile says “the potato and the starches and the natural sugars create a beautiful, airy dough.”

See More: The Best Toronto Pizza Spots

“I’ve made a lot of pizza dough in my life, never using these ingredients,” says Catucci, flabbergasted. When it comes to ingredients, Italian tomatoes, virgin mozzarella and pepperoni make this dish, as John put’s it, “just so pretty.” A pizza so good, it’ll bring tears to your eyes.

Over at Connie’s Pizza, they’re making deep-dish like you’ve never seen before. Handcrafted, thick dough fully encases meaty chunks if Italian beef, giardiniera, and a blend of mozzarella and provolone,  making this slice a true “pie“.

It’s no surprise that the windy city is obsessed with this joint, known for their ooey, gooey, Italian classics, with one customer calling it the “pizza you dream about.”

This pie is spicy, with flavour all the way through, made with thin slices of Italian beef and giardiniera, a pickled blend of carrots, cauliflower and jalapeno, held in soybean oil. The dish holds 3lbs of pizza and cooks for 45 minutes- but hey, good things come to those who wait. After taking his first bite, John says “if that’s not bucket list, I don’t know what is!” We’re happy to follow owner Mike Stolfe’s advice, who laughs and says ” it’s good for you.”

Meanwhile, pizzaiolos at Williamsburg Pizza in Brooklyn are speaking a love language specifically for the pizza purists at heart, with their Margherita pizza.

If you’re looking to master the proper pizza fold, you’ll be happy to choose this slice as your test subject, which one customer says delivers a “slap of flavour.” “The sauce is tangy and sweet at the same time,” says John. “And the dough has flavour! It’s the “best Margherita slice I’ve ever had” he says, giving ultimate praise to the power of this pie.

Watch full episodes of Big Food Bucket List onlineYou can also stream your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

 

 

Headshot of Ree Drummond set against a close-up of her broccoli and rice casserole

The Pioneer Woman’s Broccoli Rice Casserole is a Comforting Twist on a Classic Side

There are a few things we all crave when we’re sitting down for that iconic Thanksgiving meal: fall flavours, harvest-inspired platters and plenty of soul-warming, comforting options. With that said — as much as we can’t get enough of seasonal classics like stuffing and cranberry sauce — there’s also plenty of room at the table for new spins on savoury side dishes. Enter the queen of home-cooking comfort food, The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond, and her latest perfect-for-Thanksgiving casserole recipe. 

Made from a delectable mix of long-grain rice, broccoli and a plethora of cheeses, this easy-to-prepare casserole is creamy and oh-so comforting — making it a delicious addition to your Thanksgiving (and everyday, really) dinner table.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Must-Try Casserole Recipes

Ree Drummond holding her cheesy broccoli and rice casserole

Best Broccoli Rice Casserole

Total Time: 50 minutes
Serves: 10 to 12

Ingredients:

4 Tbsp (1/2 stick) salted butter
1 medium yellow onion, finely diced
1 clove garlic, grated
4 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp dry mustard
1/4 tsp cayenne
3 cups whole milk
4-oz cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp paprika
8-oz processed cheese, cubed
3 cups grated sharp Cheddar
8 cups small broccoli florets
6-oz diced pimentos, drained
2 1/2 cups cooked long-grain rice

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Ultimate Comfort Food Recipes

Directions:

 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

 2. In a large skillet, melt the butter. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Sprinkle over the flour, dry mustard and cayenne and stir to mix it in well. Continue to cook for 1 minute.

 3. Next, add the milk, stirring constantly; cook until thickened, about 2 minutes. Add the cream cheese and Parmesan, stirring until totally combined. Stir in the pepper, salt and paprika. Add the processed cheese, stirring until completely melted. Next, add 1 1/2 cups of the Cheddar and stir until melted. Then, fold in the broccoli and pimentos.

 4. In a large baking dish, create a base with half of the rice. Top with half of the broccoli cheese sauce. Repeat with the remaining rice, then the remaining sauce. Sprinkle the rest of the Cheddar evenly over the top of the casserole. Bake until bubbly, about 30 minutes.

Looking for more of The Pioneer Woman’s easy comfort-food meals to warm your dinner table? Try one of these recipes from Ree Drummond this week!

Watch The Pioneer Woman and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


Chef Suzanne Barr Will Make You Think About Your Dinner Plate Differently

If you read her bio, Suzanne Barr is described as a Toronto-based chef and restaurateur, a judge on Food Network Canada’s Wall of Chefs and a committed social advocate. Talk to her, and she’s all of these things, but it’s the more intimate details about her life and the refreshing perspective she brings to her work that will make you wish you could share a meal with her weekly. We caught up with the chef to learn about her culinary influences, her role in the fight for food justice and equality, and ultimately what she contributes to the world with every plate she creates.

Chef Suzanne Barr posing at True True Diner (now closed)

Photo courtesy of Samuel Engelking

Culinary Roots

Suzanne remembers growing up and crafting Jamaican beef patties in her parents’ kitchen alongside her mother, father and siblings. The flaky, fragrant pastries made for a coveted after-school snack or light Saturday supper (being of Jamaican descent, it’s long been a family staple for Suzanne). Today, her focus remains on paring a plate back to its essence, taking every opportunity to showcase local, seasonal ingredients.

“My cooking style has gone on a massive journey,” she says. “Right now, I’m really inspired by preservation, using old traditional techniques to store food and then use at later dates.” This past summer, Suzanne, along with her husband and five-year-old son, travelled to Montreal for a few days, and came back with a massive case of locally grown tomatoes, which she pickled whole with garlic and fresh basil. “It’s all about getting access to really incredible vegetables and elevating them to give them their shining moment of just being what they are.”

Related: 15 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Pickle, From Avocado to Okra

Jar of pickled whole tomatoes

Honing Her Craft and Mission

After over a decade in the film and television industry, Suzanne endured hardship when her mother was diagnosed with cancer. She became her mom’s caretaker, often contemplating the role food plays in health and community.

“After losing my mom, I needed something that was more healing and connective, that brought me back to the most essential things in life, which is eating and breaking bread and having community around food,” she says. “I rediscovered this passion that was such a big part of me, but had lay dormant for far too long. It was now my duty to follow it and walk away from everything I had known and worked toward,” she says.

Growing up and witnessing her mother as a vivacious force who saw the value in voicing her opinion and beliefs instilled in Suzanne the courage to do the same. “Having my mom as such a matriarch in my life really pushed my passion and drive to fight for women and folks who look like me.” Suzanne attended her first protest in 1997 when she was in her early 20s. It was The Million Woman March in Philadelphia. She was moved and inspired by the act of travelling to another city for a day-long celebration of being a woman of colour. Advocating for women and the BIPOC community is woven into her work, shining light on issues of inequality and structural racism that too often go unheard.

“It’s become a big part of the mission in the work I do: feeding and healing folks with food, all the while educating people on the importance for BIPOC folks to be connected, and having a voice that can stand and fight for the people who don’t always have those same opportunities,” she says.

Related: What is Food Insecurity? FoodShare’s Paul Taylor Explains (Plus What Canadians Can Do About It)

Chef Suzanne Barr critiquing a dish on the set of Wall of Chefs

Suzanne was the head chef and owner of Toronto’s True True Diner, an Afro-Caribbean restaurant and community space that paid tribute to the civil rights movement. She also paid her staff living wages, and believes tipping should be removed from every restaurant. Even if menu items become pricier,  if you’re transparent with your customers about your values, Suzanne believes enough people will stand behind you and support your mission.

“It’s important to pay people real living wages, to understand that when we speak about sustainability, it doesn’t stop with the food that we’re utilizing as restaurateurs and chefs. The sustainability of your staff, of the people who are working in these establishments, that to me is one of the most valuable resources that we have overlooked for far too long.”

True True permanently shuttered its doors this past July, and Suzanne was blindsided (she wrote a heartfelt statement about the experience). “I wanted to share that it’s okay to be vulnerable, it’s okay to share some of those not-so joyful stories that are part of being a business owner, and being a person of colour trying to compete in this industry that doesn’t always recognize the importance of having these faces for other POC and other non-POCs,” she says. “We’ll do it again in another space. True True lives within everyone who experienced it, and I’m grateful for that.”

Related: What It’s Honestly Like Dining out Right Now ⁠— and What I’ll Never Take for Granted Again

Recipe for the Perfect Dish

“I always tell my staff: No matter what you do, no matter where you end up working, make sure that when you’re creating a dish, a part of you is on that plate,” she says. “Because that same intention and love and commitment can spread, and it gets shared over and over again. It becomes a new memory for someone else in a different way. Even different from what you intended when you put it on that plate in the first place.” For Suzanne, the plate represents her Caribbean descent, her personality, her joy, and sharing that experience with others, from the first moment a diner sees the dish to their very last bite.

Pasta made by a home cook on Wall of Chefs

That’s Suzanne’s advice to home cooks and budding chefs, including those inspired to try out for Wall of Chefs someday. And with that comes embracing the fear of the unknown: “Being a little scared in the kitchen can actually inspire you to make some of the most incredible foods you’d never imagined you could make. Because you push yourself,” she says. And really, that’s the beauty of Wall of Chefs, too – it connects people to their own experience of cooking, and inspires fans to try their hand at making something new, whether it’s chicken cordon bleu or a first attempt at making pasta or bread from scratch. If it doesn’t pan out the first time, simply try again.

Watch full episodes of Wall of Chefs online. You can also stream your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Molly Yeh’s Flaky Dill Bread: The Perfect Use for Leftover Herbs

Our favourite Girl Meets Farm recipes often include Molly Yeh’s mouth-watering baked goods – think cake and cookies – and this flaky, herb-alicious bread is no exception. Whether you’re looking for a warm mid-day snack or flavourful dinner side, this eight-ingredient masterpiece is your best bet.

Make use of all that luscious dill growing in your herb garden by combining it with your homemade dough and enjoy the soothing scents. Serve hot for optimal deliciousness. Find more tips and recipes with our ultimate herb guide.

Related:  Molly Yeh’s One-Pot Wonder Taco Hot Dish

Molly Yeh’s Flaky Dill Bread

Total Time: 2 hours
Yields: 6 servings

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
3/4 cup pastry flour
2 tsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
Oil, for greasing the bowl
3/4 cup (12 tablespoons) butter, very soft
1 cup chopped fresh dill

Related: Your New Favourite Dish Starring Avocado: Molly Yeh’s Guacamole Salad

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, pastry flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Create a well in the center and add 3/4 cup water. Mix until you have a shaggy dough.

2. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead, adding additional flour as needed, until smooth, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer the dough to an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and rest for 30 minutes.

3. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and divide into 6 balls. Keep them covered with plastic wrap when you’re not working with them. Using your hands, spread 1 tablespoon butter on a large work surface, top one of the balls of dough with another tablespoon of butter and pat out into a flat circle. Put the buttered dough ball on top of the spot of butter on the work surface. Using a flat hand, gently massage the dough in circular motions (as if you’re washing a window) to flatten it out into a very large translucent circle. It’s OK if it tears and is not perfect just try to get it as thin as possible!

4. Top with a sprinkling of the dill and then roll it out into a long, skinny log. Roll the log into a coil and transfer to a plate. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Related: Molly Yeh’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Cake is a Birthday Treat to Remember

5. Roll out the coils into 7-inch-round circles by placing them between two pieces of wax paper and flattening with a rolling pin. The dough will probably want to stick to the wax paper, but it’s ok if it tears while you’re peeling it off. Alternatively, you can stick the rolled-out coils in the fridge for about 30 minutes, which will make them slightly easier to handle.

6. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and cook one at a time until golden brown, about 3 minutes per side. Serve hot!

Get to know the cookbook author and blogger behind Girl Meets Farm with 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Molly Yeh.

Watch Girl Meets Farm and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Close-up headshot of a smiling Chef Nuit Regular

Chef Nuit Regular Brings a Warm Heart and a Keen Eye to Wall of Chefs

For as long as she can remember, Chef Nuit Regular has always found happiness by fostering it in others — although her happiness didn’t always start in the kitchen. As a young child growing up in Phrae, Thailand, she remembers hating to cook. “I wanted to go out to ride bicycles with my friends, but I had to help to make curry paste, even when I was little. My mother would grow her own vegetables and sell satay in the laneway outside the house,” says Nuit. “And I wanted to help my mother, because I loved her.”

When Nuit later trained as a nurse in Pai, Thailand, she made extra money for herself and her family by selling food in class, and then eventually worked in nursing by day and ran Curry Shack restaurant during the evening hours with her husband, Jeff Regular. “I wanted to become a nurse and help the poor people in my village to make them comfortable and ease their worry and pain,” she says. “And when I started cooking in the restaurant and the guests said they loved the food, it made me feel happy in the same way.”

Related: Inside Chef Nuit Regular’s Fridge

Close up shot of Chef Nuit Regular smiling

Photo courtesy of Michael Graydon and Nikole Herriott

She and Jeff brought different flavours of Thailand to Toronto’s restaurant scene, including the northern Thai flavours at Sukothai, Pai Northern Thai Kitchen, Sabai Sabai and elaborate royal Thai dishes at Kiin. Trying to do something new has often presented its own challenges, both in sourcing authentic ingredients and in changing preconceived notions. Although many people were curious and wanted to learn, Nuit clearly remembers a customer who insisted her pad thai was made incorrectly. “He wanted me to add ketchup to the pad thai and I had to tell him, ‘I am sorry, but even though I won’t make any money here, I can’t give you the dish that way’,” says Nuit. “In the beginning, it was really hard because people didn’t understand, but now there’s a lot of diversity in Toronto.”

Related: 18 Ingredients the Wall of Chefs Stars Love to Splurge on

A plate of pad Thai noodles

Nuit Regular’s pad thai dish at Pai, which remains ketchup free.

Today, Nuit is a successful chef and restaurateur, responsible for over 200 staff members across her restaurant empire (with a second Pai location set to open this year) and her first cookbook, Kiin: Recipes And Stories From Northern Thailand, set to hit the shelves on October 20. As a judge on this season’s Wall of Chefs, Nuit enjoys the histories and backgrounds of the dishes that contestants set before her. “I want to see the story behind the dish, and those techniques from different households,” she says. Competitors looking to impress her discerning palate should be prepared to present a balanced, colourful and creative dish (she has even been known to sniff the food in front of her to check the aroma when judging). She also wants cooks to remember their portion sizes. “Don’t try to make a lot,” she advises. “You only have to make four plates, which is more manageable: the cooking time will be shorter, and your flavours will be more intense.”

Nuit Regular and Noah Cappe at a home cook's station on the set of Wall of Chefs

Nuit Regular on the set of Wall of Chefs

See More: Watch Full Episodes of Wall of Chefs

And as one former home cook to another, Nuit sympathizes with the stress of the competition (she still admits to some nervousness herself when she cooks in front of people). “I pause, take a step back and breathe,” she says. “And I tell myself, ‘You’re doing something that you’ve made for your family before that they love’. If you cook, follow your heart.”

Pot of Valerie Bertinelli's chicken cacciatore with olives, capers and tender chicken thighs

Celebrate Fall With Valerie Bertinelli’s Cozy Chicken Cacciatore

Valerie Bertinelli is always excited to share treasured family recipes for classic Italian meals.  Over the years on Valerie’s Home Cooking,  viewers have joined her in the kitchen as she prepared dishes passed down from her mother, Nancy. A standout is this chicken cacciatore, or hunter-style chicken, made with plump chicken thighs, earthy cremini mushrooms, and a double shot of briny goodness from black olives and capers, all finished with a rich tomato sauce. It’s a simple, comforting dish that can be served with creamy polenta, mashed potatoes, or a bed of egg noodles. Once you’ve tried it, don’t be surprised if you keep returning to it whenever you’re looking for hearty, warming fare this fall.

Related: Valerie Bertinelli’s 20 Best Chicken Recipes

Valerie Bertinelli’s Mom’s Chicken Cacciatore

Total Time: 1 hour and 15 minutes
Serves:
4 to 6

Ingredients:
6 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, skin removed
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 lb sliced cremini mushrooms
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 tsp finely chopped fresh oregano
1 tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
1 28-oz can whole tomatoes, cut up with kitchen shears
3/4 cup halved black olives
2 Tbsp drained capers
1/4 cup torn fresh basil leaves

Related: 50 Cozy Comfort Food Recipes to Warm You Up This Fall

Directions:
1. Sprinkle the chicken thighs with salt and pepper, then toss them in a bowl with the flour to lightly coat.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large, wide pot over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the thighs and cook, turning once, until golden brown on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Remove the thighs to a plate.

3. Add the onion and mushrooms to the pot and cook, stirring, until the onion is softened and the mushrooms are lightly golden, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and bell peppers and cook, stirring, until the peppers are just starting to soften, about 1 minute. Add the wine and bring to a boil, then cook, scraping up any brown bits, until reduced by about half. Add the oregano and rosemary. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a simmer. Add the olives and capers. Return the chicken to the pot, nestling in the sauce. Reduce the heat to keep the sauce at a gentle simmer and cook until the chicken is cooked through, about 25 minutes.

4. Sprinkle with the basil. Serve immediately.

Want to add more cozy homestyle dishes to your rotation? Look no further than Valerie Bertinelli’s Best Italian Recipes, From Lasagna to Cannoli.

Watch Valerie’s Home Cooking and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Pot of beef and Okra tomato-based stew

Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Food and family go hand in hand, and Kardea Brown pays tribute to her mother and grandmother with the dishes they’ve passed down to her. Each delectable recipe on Delicious Miss Brown is inspired by West African cuisine and has a distinct coastal South Carolina flair.

With a crispness in the air and leaves turning brilliant shades of gold and red, we’re all craving warming meals. Celebrate autumn with this comforting beef stew featuring tender, melt-in-your-mouth morsels of top sirloin and earthy, fiber-rich okra. It’s the perfect fall dinner to enjoy with your family as the days grow shorter and cooler.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Fried Chicken Po’ Boy

Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew Recipe

Total Time: 55 minutes
Serves:
4 to 6

Ingredients:
2/3 cup canola oil
1 lb beef top sirloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
1 beef bouillon cube
1 large white onion, chopped
6 cloves garlic, minced
Two 8-oz cans tomato sauce
1 cup beef stock, plus more as needed
2 Tbsp tomato paste
1 1/2 Tbsp ground ginger
1 to 2 Tbsp sugar
1 10-oz package frozen okra

Related: Top 15 Make-Ahead Beef Recipes Perfect for Any Day of the Week

Directions:

1. Heat the oil in a large pot over high heat. Sprinkle the beef with salt and pepper (about 1/2 teaspoon of each). Add the beef to the hot oil along with the beef bouillon, onion and garlic and cook until the beef is seared, about 5 minutes; reduce the heat to medium. Continue to cook, stirring, until the beef is browned, about 3 more minutes. Remove the beef to a plate and set aside.

2. Stir the tomato sauce, beef stock, tomato paste, ginger, sugar, 1 teaspoon freshly cracked pepper and 1 cup water into the pot. Bring to a boil; season with additional salt. Return the beef to the pot and add the okra. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the okra is tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Add additional stock or water if the stew is too thick; the okra will thicken the stew as it cooks.

Excited to try more delicious South Carolina cuisine from the Delicious Miss Brown?  Give Kardea’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich a try!

Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Molly Yeh Taco Hotdish

Molly Yeh’s One-Pot Wonder Taco Hot Dish

Enjoy all the flavours of a taco bar in just one warm and flavourful dish (because who needs all those dishes?). Molly Yeh takes spiced ground beef, beans and salsa and tops it with corn chips. After a quick trip to the oven to bake, she tops it all with the classic taco fixings. Corn and radishes add sweetness and crunch, while queso fresco and salsa verde finish it off with bold flavour. Garnish with cilantro (if that’s your jam) and limes for the perfect family-style taco meal.

Molly Yeh Taco Hotdish

Related: Molly Yeh’s Bagel Salad Recipe is an Instant Brunch Classic

Molly Yeh’s Taco Hotdish

Total Time: 50 minutes
Active Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 6-8 servings

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp canola or vegetable oil
1 bell pepper, chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded and chopped
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
Kosher salt
One 1-oz packet taco seasoning
2 lbs ground beef
One 14-oz can black beans, rinsed and drained
9 oz corn kernels (frozen, canned or fresh)
3 cups mild salsa
One 9-oz bag corn chips, such as Fritos
5 oz queso fresco, crumbled
Chopped fresh cilantro, for serving
Sliced radishes, for serving
Lime wedges, for serving
Salsa verde, for serving

Related: Molly Yeh’s Chicken Shawarma Tacos

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the bell pepper, jalapeno, onion and a pinch of salt and cook until softened, 7 to 10 minutes. Add the taco seasoning and cook for another minute. Add the ground beef and cook, breaking it up with a spoon or spatula, until browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in the beans, corn and mild salsa. Transfer to a casserole dish and cover with the corn chips.

3. Bake until the casserole is heated through and the corn chips are lightly toasted, about 20 minutes. Top with the queso fresco, cilantro, radishes and a squeeze of lime. Serve with salsa verde.

Molly Yeh Taco Hotdish

Get to know the cookbook author and blogger behind Girl Meets Farm with 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Molly Yeh.

Watch Girl Meets Farm and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

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