key lime pie cupcakes on serving tray

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at Home With These Key Lime Pie Cupcakes

These Baking Therapy key lime pie cupcakes are the perfect little treat to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day! Sweet and tangy flavours of key lime pie topped with a fluffy cream cheese frosting. Did I mention they’re also stuffed with a luxurious lime curd? These cupcakes are guaranteed to satisfy any sweet tooth. OK, now let’s get baking!

key lime pie cupcakes on serving tray

Key Lime Pie Cupcakes

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Rest Time: 2 hours
Bake Time: 30-40 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 12 cupcakes

Ingredients:

Lime Curd
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 egg yolk
½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice (about 3 limes)
Pinch salt
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cubed
Green food gel colouring

Cupcakes
1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup graham cracker crumbs
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 large egg
1 egg white
¼ cup sour cream
⅓ cup milk
¼ cup lime juice
2 tsp lime zest
1 tsp vanilla extract

Frosting
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
8 oz cream cheese, room temperature
5 cups icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 Tbsp lime juice
Gel food colouring (optional)

Equipment:

Muffin Pan, Amazon, $35.

Baking Cups, Amazon, $6.

key lime pie cupcake ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. First, you’ll make the lime curd. In a medium saucepan on medium-high heat, whisk together the sugar, eggs, egg yolk, lime juice and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. When the mixture starts to bubble, whisk in the butter, one Tbsp at a time. Bring the mixture to a boil again and let it bubble for 1 minute.

2. Remove from heat and strain the lemon curd. Mix in gel food colouring (if using) — it’ll make the curd brighter. Place plastic wrap directly on the curd and refrigerate until it sets, at least 2 hours.

Related: Anna Olson’s Very Best Cupcake Recipes

3. Now, for the cupcakes. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a muffin pan with paper liners, set aside.

4. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, mix together the flour, graham cracker crumbs, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Add the butter and mix until the mixture resembles wet sand, make sure not to over-mix. Add the egg, egg white, sour cream, milk, lime juice, zest and vanilla. Mix until the batter just comes together. Scrape down the sides and mix for another 10 seconds.

Related: Classic Irish Eats That’ll Bring the Emerald Isle to Your Kitchen

5. Divide the batter among the 12 cups, filling until ⅔ of the way full. Bake in the oven for 25-35 minutes until the edges are just golden and a toothpick when inserted in the centre comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes then transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

key lime pie curd next to baked cupcakes

6. Now for the frosting. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and cream cheese until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. Gradually add the icing sugar and cream until smooth. Add the vanilla extract, lime juice and food colouring (if using), mix for 1 minute. Transfer to a piping bag.

7. Use a paring knife to scoop out the centres of the cooled cupcakes. Spoon about 1 Tbsp of the lime curd into the centre of each cupcake. Ice the cupcakes with the cream cheese frosting. Pipe on four-leaf clovers or add sprinkles to make it festive. Enjoy!

key lime pie cupcakes being filled with curd on wire rack

key lime pie cupcakes on wire rack

Like Sabrina’s key lime pie cupcakes? Try her no-bake key lime pie icebox cake or her easy gluten-free quinoa chocolate cake.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Ree Drummond’s Buffalo Chicken Totchos Are the Food Mash-Up You Didn’t Know You Needed

We love a heaping pile of nachos as much as the next person — but if you’re looking to up your meal planning game and get adventurous in the kitchen, make this mouth-watering crispy Buffalo chicken– and tater tot-friendly version from The Pioneer Woman herself.

One pound of potato tots and chunks of boneless chicken breasts are are seasoned and crisped. Although it might take a little longer than a traditional nacho platter, you’ll still savour every last bite of this comfort food mash-up you’ll want to make on repeat.

Related: Ree Drummond’s 30-Minute Vegetarian Pasta Makes Peppers the Star

The Pioneer Woman’s Buffalo Chicken Totchos

Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes
Yields: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

1 lb frozen potato tots
1 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp ground cumin
2 Tbsp salted butter
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 ribs celery, sliced thin, leaves reserved
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 green onions, sliced thin
1 1/2 cups cayenne hot sauce, such as Frank’s RedHot
1 1/2 cups shredded pepper jack
Blue Cheese Ranch, recipe follows

Blue Cheese Ranch:
2 cups ranch dressing
1/4 cup blue cheese crumbles
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Close-up of Buffalo Chicken Tatchos

Related: Your New Favourite Fish Dish: The Pioneer Woman’s Crispy Cerveza Battered Cod

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.

2. Toss the tots with the chili powder and cumin in a large mixing bowl until evenly coated. Arrange the seasoned tots on a baking sheet. Bake until golden and crisp, about 35 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Melt the butter in the skillet and add the chicken pieces. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper and cook for 3 minutes. Add the celery, garlic and half of the green onions. Continue to cook, stirring, until the chicken is cooked through, another 2 minutes. Add the hot sauce and allow to simmer and thicken slightly, 1 additional minute.

4. When the tots are crisp, remove from the oven and set the oven to broil. Top the tots with half of the cheese. Spoon the chicken over the tots. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top of the chicken. Place the baking sheet under the broiler and broil until the cheese has melted and begun to brown, about 3 minutes.

5. Carefully remove the pan from the broiler. Drizzle over the Blue Cheese Ranch and any remaining sauce from the skillet. Garnish with the celery leaves and remaining green onions. Serve on the baking sheet.

6. Add the ranch dressing and blue cheese crumbles to a bowl. Season with a pinch of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir until combined.

For more inspiration, check out The Pioneer Woman’s 16-minute dinners.

Watch the how-to video here.


Watch The Pioneer Woman and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

The Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Menu With 5 Ingredients Per Meal

Have you ever looked at a gorgeous recipe photo and thought: “I’m definitely making that!” only to become way less enthused when the instructions call for 20 ingredients or more? We’ve been there. So, we’re giving you the opposite: a day’s worth of 5-ingredient meals. From breakfast to lunch to easy dinner recipes, they’re all easy to make — and the lunch dish is particularly quick (because We Know You Have 10 Minutes!). One rule: oil, salt and pepper don’t count toward the five ingredients. Okay, that’s it. It’s time to get cooking!

Breakfast: Maple Quinoa Breakfast Bowl

Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 12-15 minutes
Total Time: 17 minutes
Servings: 1

Maple quinoa bowl


Ingredients:

¼ cup quinoa
¾ cup non-dairy milk
¼ – ⅓ cup toasted walnuts or almonds, roughly chopped
¼ cup blueberries (or your favourite fruit of choice)
Splash of maple syrup, to taste

Directions:

1. Place the quinoa and non-dairy milk in a saucepan, bring to a boil and simmer for 12-15 minutes until fluffy and all the milk is absorbed.

2. Pour the quinoa into a bowl, top with walnuts or almonds, blueberries and a hearty drizzle of maple syrup. Feel free to add more non-dairy milk.

Note: You can replace the quinoa with brown rice or oats. If you already have these grains pre-cooked, simply toss them in the saucepan with just a bit of non-dairy milk to heat up.

Lunch: Quickie Grains, Greens & Beans Bowl

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 1

Ingredients:

½ cup cooked brown rice or cauliflower rice
½ cup chickpeas
1 cup baby kale, mesclun greens or baby spinach
½ green apple or avocado, sliced
2 Tbsp creamy tahini
2 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt and pepper

Directions:

1. If you’re using brown rice and it’s not cooked yet, do so according to package instructions. For a grain-free option,  use cauliflower rice.

2. Place the rice or cauliflower on the bottom of a wide bowl or reusable to-go container if you’re taking this lunch with you.

Related: Healthy 5-Ingredient Lunch Ideas You Can Make Quickly

3. Pile the chickpeas together in one area of the bowl. Place the greens in another area of the bowl. Then add the apple or avocado on top.

4. Drizzle tahini, olive oil, salt and pepper, then mix. If you’re taking this lunch to-go, you can dress it beforehand or place the dressing components in a container on the side.

Watch the how-to video here:


Dinner: Sheet Pan Miso Salmon

Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 18 minutes
Servings: 2


Ingredients:

1 bunch broccoli, chopped in florets
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Pinch of sea salt and pepper
2 ½ oz pieces of salmon
2 Tbsp white miso
3 tsp maple syrup
1 Tbsp sesame oil

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2. Place the broccoli florets on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Toss with extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper.

3. Push some florets to the side and place the salmon in the middle of the baking sheet, so the flesh is facing up. Season the salmon with salt and pepper. Place in the oven to roast for 15 minutes.

4. While the broccoli and salmon are baking, prepare the miso marinade by whisking miso, maple syrup and sesame oil.

5. Take the salmon out of the oven when it’s done (you know it’s done when a fork gently flakes it apart) and immediately brush or spoon the miso marinade over top.

Like Tamara and Sarah’s 5-ingredient meals? Try their spicy sauteed cauliflower and chickpeas or their blackened trout with green beans.

Published January 8, 2020, Updated March 11, 2021

Buffalo stew in a boat next to bread

This Buffalo Beef Stew is Classic Comfort Food in a Bowl

This warm and hearty stew filled with chunks of buffalo stew meat, vegetables, potatoes, corn and peas will fill you up and keep you happy! A Dutch oven or heavy saucepan is the best way to cook this buffalo beef stew: which is classic comfort food served in a bowl.

Buffalo stew in a boat next to bread

Buffalo Beef Stew

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

¼ cup canola oil or olive oil
¼ cup butter
2 lb(s) buffalo stew meat, cubed
1 splash red wine
2 onions, chunky slices
2 clove garlic, diced
4 cups beef broth
1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
2 Tbsp steak spice
Few sprigs fresh thyme and rosemary
1 bay leaf
4 medium carrots, peeled and sliced
4 medium potatoes, peeled and diced chunky
4 stalks celery, diced
2 cup corn
2 cup peas
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Using a large pan, heat oil and butter.

2. Add the buffalo meat and brown the meat on all sides.

3. Add red wine, onions and garlic and cook until translucent.

Related: Warm and Comforting Beef Stew Recipes

4. Add beef broth, Worcestershire sauce, steak spice, thyme, rosemary, bay leaf and bring to a boil.

5. Add carrots, potatoes, celery, corn and peas.

6. Continue to simmer until vegetables are tender, approximately 1-2 hours.

Related: Canadian First Nations Recipes You’ll Love

7. Remove bay leaf.

Tip: To thicken the stew, shake 1 part flour to 1 part cold water in a covered shaker. Add slowly into the buffalo stew until desired thickness is reached.

8. Serve with fresh hot baked bannock or buns of your choice!

Buffalo stew in a boat next to bread

This recipe was originally featured on You Gotta Eat Here! Check out more of John Catucci’s foodie adventures on Big Food Bucket List.

Vegan eggplant casserole

Classic Middle Eastern Eggplant Casserole With a Vegan Twist

This eggplant casserole is a classic Middle Eastern dish common in Iraq. It is usually made with layers of kofta (beef patties), eggplant, potatoes, onions, peppers and tomatoes. But in this Can You Vegan It? dish, just skip the kofta and bake up the veggies using the same method. The result? A light and deeply flavourful casserole served alongside rice, with some yogurt on the side. Traditionally, all the vegetables are fried before they are layered together and smothered in sauce, then baked in the oven. But you can also roast them instead of frying, which is quicker and yields so much flavour.

Vegan eggplant casserole

Middle Eastern Eggplant Casserole

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour, 40 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

2-3 large eggplants
3-4 medium potatoes
5 Tbsp vegetable oil, divided
1 ½ tsp salt, divided
1 large white onion
1 red pepper
5 Tbsp tomato paste
1 Tbsp pomegranate molasses (skip this if you don’t have it)
2 ½ cups hot water
1 tsp salt
½ tsp black pepper
1 ½ large tomatoes

Vegan eggplant casserole ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Start by preheating your oven to 400°F.

2. Wash the eggplant and peel it in a zebra pattern down the length, peeling every other stripe. Then cut it into ½ inch circular slices.

Peeling eggplant casserole

3. Peel and wash potatoes and cut them into ¼ inch circular slices.

4. Put 3 Tbsp of the vegetable oil on the potatoes and eggplant, sprinkle with 1 tsp of salt, then place on a parchment lined baking sheet and bake for 40 minutes.

eggplants roasting on baking tray

5. Meanwhile, peel the onions and wash the pepper, then cut them both into thin slices. Heat a skillet with remaining vegetable oil, add the onions and peppers and sprinkle with remaining salt, then cook them on medium heat until softened.

Related: Easy Vegan Weeknight Dinner Recipes

6. Mix together tomato paste, pomegranate molasses, water, salt and pepper. Slice the tomatoes into ¼ inch thick slices.

7. Assemble the casserole by layering the eggplant, potato, onions and peppers, tomatoes and then pour the tomato sauce on top.

Vegan eggplant casserole being made

8. Bake covered for 45 minutes, then uncover and broil for 15 minutes. Serve with rice and a side of yogurt.

Middle Eastern vegan casserole being served onto a light blue plate

Like Amina’s vegan casserole? Try her 20-minute glazed salmon or roasted cauliflower with tahini.

How to Melt and Temper Chocolate for Perfect Candy Making

Dreaming of divine chocolate decorations but terrified of losing your temper? For many baked items, such as fluffy frosting or creamy cake fillings, you can get away with simply melting chocolate to take it from a solid to liquid form like in these Chocolate Divinity Candies. When you get into the world of bonbons and confectionary, however, that’s another matter entirely. Tempering chocolate is a mandatory step if you want both the shiny gloss and the distinctive snap of a well-made candy or decoration like in Anna Olson’s Chocolate Dipped Marzipan — and that’s where you have to pay some attention to technique in order to achieve success.


L-R: Anna Olson’s Chocolate Divinity Candy and Chocolate Dipped Marzipan

Related: Chocolate Making Tools Every Home Chocolatier Needs

If the thought of working with molten chocolate (and even worse, the dangers of it seizing or splitting) has you clutching your (baking) pearls, we’ve got you covered. Read on to find out the best, and easiest, ways to work with chocolate, even if you’re a novice chocolatier.

How to Properly Melt Chocolate

For melting chocolate, each method has its advocates: some cooks prefer the double boiler method (or just setting a glass bowl on top of barely simmering water), while others turn to the microwave for an easy fix. Both methods involve the same basic principle: chopping chocolate into chunks for faster, more even melting, and applying gentle heat until most of the distinct shapes have disappeared.

If the unthinkable happens and your chocolate separates into a greasy, gritty mess, due to over-vigorous stirring or too-high heat, you can try Anna Olson’s ingenious trick to add moisture to return the mixture to molten glossiness (note: this fix is only for melting — even a single drop of water is the enemy of well-tempered chocolate).

See More: Desserts That Prove Peanut Butter and Chocolate Are a Perfect Match

How to Properly Temper Chocolate

For this technique, you’ll need to pull out a few items, namely a candy thermometer, a sturdy glass bowl and a silicon spatula that can handle some heat without melting. Depending on the method you use, you may also need a few more pieces of equipment, such as a marble board and wax paper.

The initial stage of tempering looks much like the melting process — use a glass bowl set over barely simmering water (not a rolling boil; there shouldn’t be any bubbles) to melt the chocolate chunks, or place the bowl in the microwave and use short bursts, checking often.

Where tempering differs, however, is the next step, where the chocolate mixture is cooled and warmed within precise ranges of temperature in order to achieve a smooth, shiny surface when it hardens (the temperature you need to hit depends on the type of chocolate you plan to use).


Anna Olson’s Chocolate Covered Caramel Bars

See More: Easy Chocolate Garnishes With Steve Hodge

This varying of temperature can be accomplished in a couple of ways: by adding other ingredients such as more chocolate (seeding) or cocoa butter to the mixture, or by pouring two-thirds of the hot chocolate mixture onto a marble board and mixing it with putty knives to cool it manually (see Anna Olson’s step-by-step description for more on this method).

Inquiring scientific minds among us may be intrigued by more gear-driven approaches, including Alton Brown’s combination of the friction of a food processor’s blades plus liberal use of a hair dryer to create heat, or J. Kenji Lopez-Alt’s sous-vide circulator method over at Serious Eats.

Decoding Seed Tempering

For the easiest method using the least equipment, however, seeding chocolate is probably the best approach for a chocolate novice (for a visual demonstration, check out the video below from Great Chocolate Showdown judge Steve Hodge, pastry chef and chocolatier at Temper Pastry in West Vancouver.) With a few simple steps, this process can be achieved without too much stress (on both the chocolate and the cook).


 

Using the glass bowl over simmering water method, melt chunks of chocolate to the desired temperature (remember that they vary depending on the chocolate and are very narrow ranges, so use that candy thermometer.) We’ll use dark chocolate for this example, which should be heated to 45 to 48 degrees — milk and white chocolate, with higher milk and sugar contents, may react differently. 

Take the chocolate off the heat (leave the burner on…you’ll need it again shortly) and add prepared small pieces of chocolate (the “seeds”), which will help cool the mixture down quickly as they melt into the warmed chocolate.

Stir with a spatula until the overall temperature comes down to about 27 degrees Celsius (again, there may be some variation depending on the type of chocolate you use).

Next, quickly warm the chocolate back up by putting it into the double boiler until it hits 32 degrees Celsius and a thick and glossy texture — perfect for piping into a pretty design on waxed paper that will set up beautifully. If you aren’t sure if you’ve tempered the chocolate correctly, you can test it out by piping a small bit onto the waxed paper (or a metal sheet pan set over an ice pack).

Working quickly, swirl and create chocolate garnishes to your heart’s content: the designs should set up to a delicate decoration with the signature snap when you bite into it (try and leave a few decorations for dessert!)

Watch Great Chocolate Showdown Mondays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Watch and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Molly Yeh’s Pretty Almond Tarts Are the Perfect Spring Dessert

Many of us have turned to at-home baking projects in recent months, finding comfort in the nostalgia that comes with revisiting classic desserts – and, with spring around the corner, we’re craving bright, bold treats that’ll satisfy our sweet tooth. Enter: Molly Yeh.

Almond meal, granulated sugar, fresh raspberries and colourful sprinkles with sliced almonds come together beautifully in this gorgeous, mouth-watering dessert you can enjoy year-round.

Related: Molly Yeh’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Cake is a Birthday Treat to Remember

Molly Yeh’s Almond Tarts

Total Time: 3 hours, 25 minutes (includes chilling and cooling time)
Yields: 12 servings

Ingredients

1/3 cup (67 grams) granulated sugar
1 3/4 cups (228 grams) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 tsp kosher salt
3/4 cup (168 grams) unsalted butter, cold and cubed
2 large eggs, separated
Nonstick cooking spray, for the pan

Filling:
1 cup (120 grams) almond meal
3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
1/2 tsp kosher salt
6 Tbsp (85 grams) unsalted butter, softened
1 tsp almond extract
1 large egg

Glaze:
About 1 cup (120 grams) powdered sugar, or more as needed
1/4 cup (60 milliliters) heavy cream, or more as needed, or 2 ounces fresh raspberries
1/4 tsp almond extract
To decorate: sprinkles, sliced almonds

Related: Molly Yeh’s Carrot Cake With Spiced Cream Cheese Frosting is Simply Show-Stopping

Directions

1. For the shells: Pulse together the granulated sugar, flour and salt in a food processor to combine. Add the butter and continue to pulse until mealy. Add the egg yolks (reserve the egg whites for the filling) and pulse until the dough comes together. Press the dough into a disc, then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour, or up to overnight.

2. To mold the shells, grease a muffin tin with nonstick spray. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to 1/4-inch-thick, dusting with more flour as needed. Cut out 3-inch circles and press them into the muffin cups so that the dough comes all the way up the sides. (No worries if the dough tears; just patch it up with additional dough.) Freeze the shells for 15 minutes.

3. For the filling: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

4. Combine the almond meal, granulated sugar, salt, and butter, either by blending it in the food processor (no need to clean it out after making the dough, you can just use it immediately for this step), or by stirring it together in a large bowl (I find it’s easiest to get in there with my hands). Add the almond extract, egg and the reserved egg whites from the shells, and continue to blend/stir until smooth and combined.

5. Fill the frozen shells with the filling so that it comes up about 1/4-inch from the top. Bake until the tops and edges are lightly browned; begin checking for doneness at 30 minutes. Let cool in the pans for 10 minutes, then use a small offset spatula or a knife to remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

6. For the glaze: If making the glaze with heavy cream, combine the powdered sugar, heavy cream and almond extract in a bowl until smooth. Add additional powdered sugar or liquid to thicken it up or thin it out so that you get the consistency of a thick glue.

7. To make the glaze with the raspberries, place the raspberries in a fine-mesh sieve and give them a rinse. Place the sieve over a bowl and use a stiff rubber spatula or wooden spoon to smash them through the sieve into the bowl until you’re just left with seeds in the sieve. Be sure to scrape the underside of the sieve to get the stuff that’s sticking to it. (You should be left with about 2 tablespoons seedless puree. If it’s a tiny bit more or a tiny bit less, that’s fine.) Add the powdered sugar and almond extract and mix to make a thick glaze. If it’s too thick, add a few drops of water to thin it out, and if it’s too thin, add a few more spoonfuls of powdered sugar. It should be the consistency of a thick glue.

8. Spread the glaze over the cooled tarts and decorate with sprinkles, almonds and anything else you’d like! These will keep for several days at room temperature or in the fridge.

Related: These Gorgeous Desserts From Molly Yeh Deserve a Standing Ovation

Watch Girl Meets Farm and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Watch the how-to video here:


Leftover Fried Chicken + Pineapple + Nacho Chips = The Game-Day Meal of Your Dreams

When life gives you leftover fried chicken, make nachos! Inspired by the flavours of Toronto-based The Heartbreak Chef’s Dutty Chicken Sandwich, these Dining In chicken and pineapple nachos with jerk sour cream pairs leftover spicy fried chicken with the sweetness of pineapple — and is then finished with red onion, jalapenos and loads of cheese. It’s a quick and simple dish for a late-night snack or game-day meal!

Leftover fried chicken nachos

Leftover Fried Chicken and Pineapple Nachos With Jerk Sour Cream

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

½ cup sour cream
2 tsp jerk sauce
6 cups tortilla chips
3 cups medium cheddar, grated
2 cups leftover spicy fried chicken (or leftover chicken tossed in jerk sauce), cubed
1 cup pineapple, cubed
½ small red onion, diced
2 jalapeno peppers, sliced
2 green onions, thinly sliced

Leftover fried chicken nachos ingredients on countertop

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. In a small bowl, combine sour cream and jerk sauce. Set aside until serving.

Jerk sour cream in bowl

2. Layer about of the tortilla chips on a round baking tray or skillet. Top with about of cheese, fried chicken, pineapple, red onion and jalapeno peppers. Then repeat with another layer — of the tortilla chips, cheese, chicken, pineapple, onion and jalapenos. Place the nachos in the oven to bake for 5 minutes, until the cheese is melted.

Leftover fried chicken ingredients on countertop

3. Remove the nachos and make another layer using the remaining ingredients, forming a pyramid. Return to the oven for an additional 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbling and tortilla chips are beginning to brown.

Leftover fried chicken nachos

4. To serve, spoon a large dollop of the jerk sour cream on the top of the nachos and sprinkle with green onions. Enjoy!

Watch the how-to video here:


Like Philip and Mystique’s leftover spicy fried chicken nachos? Try their eggplant parm dip!

I Tried Meghan Markle’s “Filthy, Sexy” Zucchini Pasta Sauce — Here’s How It Stacked Up

Long before she married into royalty, Meghan Markle extolled the virtues on healthy eating on her now-defunct blog, The Tig. During her seven years living in Toronto filming the legal drama Suits, the now Duchess of Sussex carved out her own online space to write about health and wellness, often sharing quick cooking tips.

But it was an interview she did with Delish in 2018 that garnered the most attention: she said she loved making a three-ingredient zucchini pasta sauce. A veggie-forward Bolognese, if you will. Using only zucchini, bouillon cubes and water, she said it was a “filthy, sexy mush” that she loved. With the duchess in the news as of late, this dish has recently been trending on the Internet all over again. It doesn’t exactly sound delicious, but I thought I’d give it a shot.

So, go ahead, cook like a duchess with this messy, mushy, sexy, filthy three-ingredient slow cooker concoction. For personal preference, I’ve added one more ingredient (an onion: I couldn’t resist) and options for additional seasonings, if desired. (Spoiler alert: it’s a lot more delicious than it looks, I swear!).

Related: Meghan Markle and the Struggle Among Black Women Everywhere

Meghan Markle’s Slow Cooker Zucchini Pasta Sauce

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 4 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients

5-6 medium zucchini, roughly chopped
1 yellow onion, chopped (optional)
2 bouillon cubes
½ cup water
Salt and pepper (optional)
1 package penne or rigatoni
Pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)
Parmesan cheese (optional)

Directions

1. In one large slow cooker (or Dutch oven), add zucchini, onion, bouillon cubes and water. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

2. Set timer to cook for four hours on low heat, stirring once or twice in that timeframe. The zucchini will start to get nice and mushy – that’s what we want!

Related: A Peek Inside Meghan Markle’s Former Toronto Home

3. At the 3 hour and 40 minute mark, cook the pasta in a separate pot according to package instructions.

4. Season the zucchini sauce with salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and Parmesan cheese, if desired. Serve immediately over pasta.

Related: Here’s What the Royal Family Really Eats

Verdict

It’s simple, it’s hearty (I didn’t need more than one serving before I felt full) and it smells surprisingly delicious as it simmers away in the slow cooker.  Was it tasty (read: sexy)? Absolutely. Would I make it again? Probably. Was it worth the nearly five-hour wait? Not really.

We also tried the feta tomato pasta TikTok trend and Popeye’s famous Chicken Sandwich — are they worth the hype?

Photo of Meghan Markle courtesy of Getty Images.

quinoa chocolate cake icing

This Easy Gluten-Free Quinoa Chocolate Cake Recipe Requires Just 10 Ingredients

If you’re looking for a gluten-free dessert that’s rich, moist and chocolatey, look no further! This Baking Therapy quinoa chocolate cake checks all the boxes. It has the texture of a classic chocolate cake and it’s made without any special flours. It might seem strange to add quinoa in a cake, but it is so delicious and adds to the perfect tender cake. It’s the perfect birthday dessert. All you need is a food processor or blender and you are on your way to chocolate heaven.

quinoa chocolate cake with icing

Gluten-Free Quinoa Chocolate Cake

Prep Time: 40 minutes
Bake Time: 25-35 minutes
Rest Time: 2-4 hours
Total time: 3-5 hours
Servings: 8

Ingredients:

Cake
2 cups cooked quinoa
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
¼ cup whole milk
1 cup sugar
4 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup cocoa powder
1 ½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt

Frosting
2 cups heavy cream, divided
¾ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Equipment:

Food Processor, Amazon, $100.

quinoa chocolate cake ingredients

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line and grease two 9×9-inch round pans, set aside.

2. Cook the quinoa to package directions, set aside to cool. Melt the butter and chocolate chips either in a double boiler or in the microwave and set aside to cool slightly.

Related: Birthday Cake Recipes That Will Make You a Dessert Person

3. In a food processor, blend the quinoa, milk, sugar, eggs, vanilla extract and chocolate-butter mixture until the quinoa has broken down and the mixture is smooth, about 1-2 minutes.

quinoa chocolate cake batter

4. In a large bowl, sift the cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Create a well in the centre and pour in the wet ingredients. Whisk until fully combined. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans and smooth out the tops. Bake for 25-35 minutes until a toothpick inserted comes out clean, a few crumbs are OK.

5. Let cool in the pan for 20-30 minutes then invert and let cool completely on a wire rack.

quinoa chocolate cake in pan

6. For the frosting, heat 1 cup heavy cream on the stove until it just comes to a boil. Pour directly over the chocolate chips, let sit for 1 minute, then stir to combine. Mix in the remaining 1 cup heavy cream, cover and chill for 2-3 hours. Dividing the cream helps chill the mixture quicker. When ready to serve, whip the cream on high until stiff peaks form. Spread between cake layers and on top. Enjoy!

quinoa chocolate cake being iced

Like Sabrina’s quinoa chocolate cake? Try her matcha and raspberry mochi doughnuts or her 7-ingredient Basque cheesecake.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

This Zingy Edamame Tofu Brings the Fresh Flavours of Japan to Your Table

You already know that tofu is an incredibly versatile ingredient, but did you know how easy (and delicious) it is to make at home? With this surprisingly simple, flavour-packed Taste Of recipe, chef Yoshi Okai combines edamame beans, gelatin and soy to create a super-light and creamy homemade tofu. Topped with ginger, ponzu and cherry tomatoes, this beautiful dish is like a portal to summer days in Kyoto.

“This dish reminds me of summers of my childhood,” says Yoshi. “The fresh tofu made from green soybeans can be dressed up by serving it topped with luxury ingredients, or a simpler version, like this one, can easily be prepared at home. It can be served as a meal in itself, or as an appetizer for a larger meal. Mushimono means ‘steamed’ in Japanese, but here refers to the way the tofu cools and sets.”

Related: The Most Creative Ways to Increase Your Protein Intake This Month

Edamame Tofu Mushimono

Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:
200 g shelled edamame
200 mL dashi (or other broth)
3 g agar-agar powder
7 g powdered gelatin
400 mL soy milk, at room temperature or a little warm
12 whole cherry tomatoes, sliced
Small piece fresh ginger, grated (about 1/2 tsp)
Leaves from 1 bunch cilantro, for serving
Ponzu, for serving
Olive oil, for serving
Flaked sea salt, for serving

Related: Fried Pork Belly Pairs Perfectly With Crunchy Papaya Salad in This Traditional Thai Dish

Directions:

1. To make the edamame tofu, combine the edamame, 100 milliliters broth and 50 milliliters water in a blender and puree. Set aside.

2. Combine the remaining 100 milliliters broth, agar-agar and 100 milliliters water in a pot and bring to a simmer, stirring to combine and activate the agar. In a cup, combine 50 milliliters water and the gelatin. Add that gelatin solution to the pot; keep the mixture at a simmer. Add the soy milk to the pot. Add the edamame puree to the pot. Keep simmering until the mixture thickens, about 15 minutes.

3. Pour the mixture into a shallow rectangular 8-by-8-inch dish and let sit until room temperature, about 30 minutes. Refrigerate until set, about 1 hour.

4. After the tofu has set and is firm, slice it into 16 portions and garnish with tomato, ginger and cilantro leaves. Finish with a drizzle of ponzu, olive oil and flaked sea salt.

Cook’s Note: Have all the ingredients at room temperature before starting this dish. If the tofu is not cooked long enough, it won’t firm up. Allow it to firm up fully before cutting it!

Looking for more easy meat-free meal ideas? These make-ahead vegetarian recipes will liven up your dinner table.

Composite image of the season 9 cast of Top Chef Canada

This Year’s Top Chef Canada Contestants (Plus Season 9 Predictions!)

We all need nice things in our lives right about now, and what’s nicer than a brand new season of Top Chef Canada? The ultimate culinary competition is back for an anticipated ninth season, with a whole new batch of chefs ready to slice and dice their way to the top.

But first, this diverse group (which for the first time includes a married couple competing against each other) will have to cook their way into the hearts of a notoriously tough judging panel. This year that includes returning judges Mark McEwanMijune PakChris Nuttall-Smith and Janet Zuccarini, along with host-with-the-most Eden Grinshpan. Who will rise to the challenge, and who will fall faster than a collapsed soufflé?

We have a few first-look thoughts and impressions to get you started heading into the brand new season before it premieres on April 19 at 10p.m. ET/PT. Call it our amuse-bouche for all of the fierce competition to come.

Aicia Colacci, Montreal

Previous Gig: Chef de Cuisine at Impasto

First Impressions: This chef is going to bring the heat this season, and probably more than a few plates of spaghetti, rigatoni and raviolis in between. Aicia reveals that growing up food was always at the center of everything, and after getting her start in advertising she completely switched gears to the culinary world. Naturally, she’s never looked back.

Our Predictions: Passion in the kitchen can never be understated, but here’s hoping that this pepperoncino can keep her cool when the competition really heats up. As for her penchant for pasta? Well, that will definitely impress the judges at the start, but Aicia will need to prove that she has other bold plates that she can bust out too in order to rise to the ranks of Top Chef Canada.

Alex Edmonson, Calgary

Current Gig: Personal Chef and Owner of AE Chef Services

First Impressions: As a former model and current social media star, Alex is used to all eyes on him. But now he’s out to prove that he’s more than a pretty face (or a pretty food picture on Instagram), by showing that his flavours and techniques are just as impressive. The chef knew he wanted to be in the kitchen ever since he saw the movie Ratatouille in his teens, and now as a personal chef, he brings the restaurant to the people.

Our Predictions: Alex isn’t the least bit nervous about entering the Top Chef Canada kitchen, but maybe he should be. While his multitasking experience as a business owner could serve him well, not being in the pressure cooker environment of a working kitchen for a while could ultimately be a disadvantage.

Andrea Alridge, Vancouver

Current Gig: Chef de Cuisine at CinCin

First Impressions: Being a young chef at a renowned restaurant can come with its share of challenges, but that also means that Andrea is hungry to prove. Meanwhile, although this chef cooks a lot of Italian at her regular gig (where she fell in love with cooking with fire), she is also eager to showcase tons of other flavours—including those from her Filipino-Jamaican heritage.

Our Predictions: Andrea may be our chef to beat in terms of best fusion flavours this season. After all, she herself has said that she’s a rule breaker. But her desire to grow and passion for food could also mean that she will learn from any potential stumbles along the way, which makes her a strong contender in our books.

Emily Butcher, Winnipeg

Current Gig: Chef de Cuisine at Deer + Almond

First impressions: Emily grew up with a strong awareness of the magic that cooking can conjure up. After all her grandfather ran a butcher shop, her grandmother had a pie business, and her dad is “a pretty awesome home cook.” This chef sees cooking like a dance, and is very much looking forward to the day when the magic of dining returns following the pandemic.

Our Predictions: Emily seems fairly driven to become the first Top Chef Canada winner from Winnipeg. But first she may need to loosen her perfect standards just a smidge in order to keep up with the tight timelines and pressure cooker challenges featured on the show. She may also need to take the judges’ criticism to heart without letting it weigh her down, a challenge for any passionate chef on this show.

Erica Karbelnik, Toronto

Current Gig: Head Chef, Elmwood Spa

First Impressions: This fierce competitor is here to prove herself to everyone. That includes her former mentor Mark McEwan, her family, and her husband/fellow Top Chef Canada competitor, Josh. Erica definitely brings a lot to the table this season, but we’re especially excited to see her cooking, which she says will be a mix of Polish, Israeli and Moroccan influences.

Our Predictions: How will husband and wife competitors fare in this kitchen? It’s hard to say because that’s definitely a Top Chef Canada first, but we can’t wait to see how they compete with each other. Meanwhile, we’re even more jazzed to see some of the new flavours and fusion fare that Erica promises to bring—something tells us it’s going to be spicy.

Galasa Aden, Calgary

Current Gig: Executive Chef, Cliffhanger Restaurant

First Impressions: Galasa is all about infusing his plates with heart and soul, whether he’s making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich or whipping up a dinner party for 20. The young chef is excited to showcase his Canadian-Ethiopian cooking style in the competition, a style he started refining as a young guy cooking with his mother in the kitchen.

Our Predictions: Galasa is aware that some of the other chefs may underestimate him because he’s the chef at a golf course, but where you cook is really only a matter of geography. This chef is definitely here to inspire and prove himself, and as a result, the other chefs may pick up a thing or two from this young star along the way.

Jae-Anthony Dougan, Ottawa

Current Gig: Owner, Chef Jae Anthony Pop Up

First Impressions: This seasoned chef has owned restaurants across Canada and cooked for basically every Canadian celeb possible (think Drake and The Weeknd). Now he’s ready to crush it on Top Chef Canada. Jae-Anthony wants to represent underrecognized Black chef talent, and he’s all about changing the game for his community… not to mention for his son.

Our Predictions: Winning this competition is quite personal for Jae-Anthony, so we’re fully expecting him to be one of the fiercest chefs out of the gate. His array of Caribbean flavours will be game-changing, and we have a feeling he’ll unknowingly push some of the other competitors to put their own passion and flair on the plate too.

Josh Karbelnik, Toronto

Current Gig: Chef de Cuisine, The Broadview Hotel

First Impressions: This fierce competitor (and former Chopped Canada winner) is all about bringing luxurious and refined plates with big flavours. He saw the power of perseverance firsthand as a young kid when his single mom would work three jobs to take care of the family. And he himself has had to push through, having lost two fingers nine years ago in an ice cream machine accident.

Our Predictions: If anyone can persevere through tough challenges this season it may be Josh. However let’s not forget that one of the people he’s competing against is his high school sweetheart and wife, Erica. Josh seems pretty sure that he and his partner will be the last chefs standing, so if that dream doesn’t come true it will be interesting to see how this couple rebounds.

Kym Nguyen, Vancouver

Current Gig: Sous Chef at Pidgin

First Impressions: Kym is here to put themselves on a plate, whether that means an Asian twist on a Shepard’s Pie or coating everything with soy sauce. The non-binary chef is all about interesting flavour combinations and mixing different culinary experiences together. And, although they didn’t go to culinary school, they definitely represent a new wave of chefs—chefs that leave aggression and anger behind in the kitchen in order to bring light into the industry that they love.

Our Predictions: Kym may seem quiet compared to some of the other competitors, but their food will speak for itself. The former architect student made a commitment when they first started their culinary career to practice civility in the kitchen, so we can probably expect that next-level outlook to be on full display on the show.

Siobhan Detkavich, Kelowna

Current gig: Demi Chef de Partie at Terrace Restaurant at the Mission Hill Family Estate Winery

First Impressions: At 21-years-old Siobhan may be a young competitor, but that doesn’t mean she won’t bring experience. So far in her culinary career, she’s turned heads winning over competitions and palates alike, and she’s definitely not one to be underestimated when things get tough in the kitchen.

Our Predictions: As a young, Indigenous competitor Siobhan admits she feels a bit of pressure to represent. This chef knows what she wants, and what she wants is to win. Even if she doesn’t make it all the way to the finale, it seems like she’ll be taking in every single learning opportunity along the way, which means she has everything to gain from doing this series.

Stéphane Levac, Nova Scotia

Current Gig: Chef, Maritime Express Cider Co.

First Impressions: This self-proclaimed casual-to-fine-dining chef is self-taught and tends to whip up comfort fare in his taproom, but he’s ready to take his bagels and foraged plates to the next level on Top Chef Canada. For him, food is a way of reconnecting with his Indigenous roots, and now he’s ready to share those plates with the rest of Canada.

Our Predictions: Stephane may be this season’s biggest wild card, as self-taught chefs typically are on this show. That isn’t a bad thing—sometimes it’s the chefs that think outside the box that come up with some of the most show-stopping plates. In that vein, we can’t wait to see what tricks Stephane may possibly have up his sleeve.

Watch Top Chef Canada April 19 at 10ep and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Beautiful shot of fresh pastries

5 Expert Food Photography Tips to Show Off Your Baked Goods

The true hero of every food photo is, without a doubt, the food itself. Since you’ve nailed creating the perfect baked goodies, here are my five tips to take the most enticing photos of them, whether you wield a camera or a mobile phone!

Related: Steve Hodge’s Best Tips for a Successful Bakery

Good Light or Bust

This is my first tip for good reason! The light you shoot your subject in is the biggest determinant between a flat, mediocre photo and a stellar one.

• Natural Light: The good news is, natural sunlight is a great light source for food photos and costs nothing—but you must know how to use it right. Study the light available in your home, bakery or studio and observe how the light looks at different times of day, including intensity, colour temperature (cool versus warm) and shadows. If you have windows facing different directions, compare how the light looks next to each of those too.

• Direct Light:  Strong, direct light can be edgy and dramatic, but it’s trickier to master.

• Diffused Light: Indirect light is the easiest to make food appealing. What is “diffused indirect light”?  Think of the light that comes in through your window mid-morning before the sun’s position and intensity casts shadows inside, or an overcast day when clouds disperse its rays. Another element of light is the direction from which it hits the subject: from the side, behind or above. In general, the most forgiving natural light for a beginner photographer is diffused indirect sunlight coming from the side of the subject i.e. placing your subject at or near table-height beside a window where there are no shadows or harsh sunlight.  A north-facing window, if you have one, is favoured by food photographers because of the softer, bluer light.

• Artificial Light: Be sure to turn off every artificial indoor light. No food looks good with even the faintest bit of icky yellow cast.

Related: Explore Bakeries From Project Bakeover

Gotta Hit Them Angles

There are three commonly-used angles to shoot food:  straight-on from the front, three-quarter downward angle, or overhead.  A good exercise is to look through your camera lens or screen as you move around the subject to figure out which angle showcases the attributes you want to highlight. Below are general rules with practical examples, but be sure to explore all three (and angles in between) to find the best one.

• Straight-On: Ideal to showcase height and/or interesting layers for cupcakes, layered cakes, stack of cookies or bars.

• Three-Quarter: Best for showing off items with layers or fillings in bars, macarons, filled tarts, profiteroles, doughnuts, cinnamon rolls.

• Overhead: Perfect for flat foods or foods with interesting shapes, surfaces or toppings e.g. pizzas, galettes, pop tarts, cookies, doughnuts, macarons, cinnamon rolls.

Overhead shot of a cauliflower pizza
Photo courtesy of Sonia Wong

See More: Here Are Our Favourite Bakeries Across Canada

Bring Images to Life

Composition: How elements are arranged in your shot to be aesthetically pleasing. Keep in mind:

Rule of Thirds: Imagine overlaying a grid of nine boxes over your image, then place your points of interest at the four intersecting points of the grid.

Leading Lines: Use lines to lead a viewer’s eye to the focal point e.g. a cake knife pointing toward the confection.

Repetition: Place multiples of the same item or items of similar shape. Grouping in odd numbers is ideal.  

Symmetry and Asymmetry: There is beauty and balance in symmetry, but be careful it doesn’t look boring or manufactured. Asymmetry can evoke interest. Try using negative space as well, in practicing asymmetrical composition.

Layers: Photos are two dimensional. Introducing layers creates depth and texture. Layers can take the form of the backdrop, linens, plate, cooling rack, a sprig of mint atop a cupcake or a sprinkling of powdered sugar on a tart.

Shot of a cupcake with pink buttercream icing on a plate with a mint green
Cupcake from Bluegrass & Buttercream bakery. Photo courtesy of Project Bakeover

• Colour: Different hues evoke different emotions or impressions. Blue feels calm, orange feels warm, green feels fresh and brown feels earthy. There’s also established guidance for mixing colours in visually appealing ways such as complementary, monochromatic and analogous combinations. Complementary tones sit opposite on the colour wheel i.e. pink cupcake set on a green surface. Monochromatic combos use hues, tints and shades of the same colour i.e. red strawberries on pink frosting. Analogous combo involves three adjacent colours i.e. red, orange and yellow heirloom tomato slices arranged on a vegetable tart. Think about the impression you want your food to make and choose your colours intentionally for the props and elements in the frame.

• Props: Anything that helps your image tell a complete story is a prop. You may use glassware, napkins, plates, pinch bowls, baking tins, cake stands, cutlery, etc. to add interest by way of texture, shape and height. You can also use raw ingredients from the recipe as a prop to convey freshness, such as juicy berries, vibrant herbs, a dribble of maple syrup or a dusting of flour on the table. Scatter bits of the food around it to hint at its texture, such as streusel crumbs or bits of chopped nuts. You can place utensils used in preparation, serving or enjoyment of the food to make the viewer feel part of the experience, such as a used whisk or spoon shattered through the sugary crust of a crème brulée tart. Be sure the prop makes sense and relates to the hero food.

Capture Food At Its Freshest

With some exception, many baked goods look their best when freshly prepared. Think about the shine of chocolate chips on a just-baked cookie, the glisten of freshly dripped glaze on a cake or gooey cheese on a hot pizza. These details make them inherently more drool-worthy! This means you should prepare as much of your set up as possible before the food is ready. Pull the table next to the window, set up any surfaces or backdrops, grab all the props you might need, fire up your playlist, and if you’re using one, have the tripod set up with the camera. Arrange props (sans the hero food) in a way you think will look good, and once the hero food hits the scene, ideally you only need to make a few final adjustments before you click away.

Beautiful shot of various pastries
Photo courtesy of Sonia Wong

Editing Magic

Brightness, colour saturation, white balance, contrast, shadows: these are some of the basic adjustments you can tweak in editing software to create a more professional and polished result. You don’t need to be an expert photographer or to shell out big money for software. There are powerful mobile editing apps available, some free to download (Lightroom and Snapseed for example). Taking an excellent photo straight out of camera is always #goals, but that rarely happens. Image editing can save a photo or enhance an already strong one. That said, I caution the impulse to over-edit. It’s easy to get carried away and end up with harsh, fake-looking results, so use a gentle touch!

Tune into Project Bakeover Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Watch and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Punjabi cha straining in glass

Classic Punjabi Cha (Not Chai) Straight From a Punjabi Mom

Some say chai, others say chai tea, which is completely wrong as it translates to tea-tea. People from Punjab called it cha (not chai). Every Indian family has their own way of making cha, but this is the real deal — an authentic cup made by my mom, which is the backdrop of many childhood memories for me. My mom grew up in a small village in Punjab in the ’60s. Back then, simple spices such as cardamom pods were a bit of a speciality item used in tea when guests came over, as the pods would perfume the house. Note this isn’t masala cha, just an everyday cha that is so flavourful and easy to make.

Punjabi cha straining in glass

Punjabi Cha

Prep Time: 3 ½ minutes
Cook Time: 3 ½ minutes
Total Time: 7 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients:

1 tsp fennel seeds
4 cardamom pods
1 ¼ cup water
1 Tbsp loose leaf black tea
1 Tbsp jaggery
½ cup homogenized milk

Punjabi cha ingredients

Directions:

1. Crush the fennel seeds and cardamom pods together in a mortar and pestle, until pods open up and their aroma is released.

2. Over medium heat, pour water into the pot and simmer, not boil. Add spices to the water. Simmer for about 1–2 minutes. Add tea. Simmer for 30 seconds.

Related: Sweet and Savoury Matcha Recipes to Give Your Plate a Boost of Green

3. Add jaggery. Turn up the heat to boil for 45 seconds. Add milk. Boil for 30 seconds. Watch to make sure the cha doesn’t boil over.

Punjabi cha boiling on stovetop

4. Using a mesh strainer, strain cha directly into two teacups evenly.

5. With the back of a spoon, squeeze out the extra spices and tea flavour from the strainer directly into the individual cups.
Enjoy!

Punjabi cha in two glasses

Like Deepi’s cha recipe? She tried a $45 takeout meal that comes in a jewellery box.

5 Unconventional Chocolate Pairings That Steve Hodge Loves

From sweet and delicate white chocolate to rich, indulgent dark chocolate and everything in between, it’s no secret that chocolate is incredible on its own. But this sweet favourite also makes for the perfect flavour pairing in dishes of all kinds: savoury, sweet or spicy. Just when you think you’ve been around the block and tried all the possible complementary cocoa combinations, a new trend that’s as surprising as it is delicious comes out. Steve Hodge shares five new chocolate pairings that will shock you with how much they just work.

Steve Hodge on the set of Great Chocolate Showdown

Related: Chocolate Pairings: 10 Unexpected Flavours That Are a Perfect Match

Parmesan Cheese and Chocolate

Chocolate and cheese are both beloved flavours, so why not try them together? The saltiness and texture of the cheese and the bitterness of the chocolate are an amazing combo. Bonus: if the chocolate is in temper, it adds a satisfying crunch.

Matcha Tea Powder and Chocolate

The bitterness and earthiness of the matcha work well with semi-sweet chocolate. The flavours of the chocolate and tea complement each other — and that little added sweetness from the chocolate balances out the matcha well.

Contemporary chocolate mini mousse cakes with matcha green tea cream insert and mango jam, covered with chocolate velvet spray and chocolate gourmet glaze, decorated with whipped chocolate ganache, on a texture background.
Credit: Getty Images

Related: Expert Chocolate Techniques to Master Now

Crickets and Chocolate

This pairing is all about texture and earthiness. Crickets will pair best with semi-sweet chocolate — and if you don’t tell anyone what it is, they’ll say, “I know that flavour…”.

See More: Tasty Food Trends We’ll Be Devouring in 2021

Salt and Vinegar Chips and Chocolate

It’s no secret that salt and chocolate work very well together, but the added acidity and tang from the salt and vinegar chips gives the chocolate pop, plus the crunch adds the perfect texture.

The Pioneer Woman recipe for chocolate-covered ruffled potato chips

Get the recipe for Chocolate-Covered Potato Chips

Beef Jerky and Chocolate

You’ve heard of a chocolate mole sauce, but this pairing takes savoury chocolate to the next level. The sweet and salty flavours work surprisingly well together and the texture is similar to fruit leather, enrobed in chocolatey goodness.

Watch Great Chocolate Showdown Mondays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Watch and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

The Sweet Prairie History of Girl Guide Cookies

When the Girl Guides of Canada come a-knockin’, the gut reaction for many Canadians is to pull out their wallet and loosen their belts. Few Canucks can resist a box (or two) of Girl Guide cookies, famed for their chocolate and vanilla icing, squeezed between crunchy cookie layers.

But did you know that the now famous cookies were invented on the Canadian Prairies? It started in 1927, when one Girl Guide leader in Regina, Saskatchewan baked and packaged batches of cookies for her troupe to sell, hoping to raise funds for uniforms and camping equipment. Little did she know that her tasty treats would kick off a feeding frenzy spanning close to a century! Seeing the sales of the Regina troupe, Girl Guides of Canada joined the party in 1929, making  cookie sales the official fundraising activity for the organization.

However, the types of treats have evolved throughout the decades, starting with vanilla creme, maple cream and shortbread cookies in 1946. It wasn’t until 1953 that the classic chocolate and vanilla-flavoured sandwich cookies first made a cameo on the sweets scene. Finally, in 1995, a new kid on the block was born: crunchy, chocolatey cookies with a cool mint filling. But one thing hasn’t changed; the cookie craze across Canada continues almost 100 years later, with several million boxes of cookies sold in Ontario alone. If the boxes were laid down on a road, it would reach from Windsor to Timmins. That’s a lot of cookie love!

DIY vegan Girl Guide thin mints

Get the recipe for Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Vegan Thin Mint Cookies

Ever since Girl Guides started selling door-to-door, Girl Guide cookies have become one of Canada’s best-loved food traditions — one that’s held a special place in Canada’s culinary history. During the Gulf War in the 1990s, every Canadian soldier was given a box of cookies upon arrival in Saudi Arabia and there are photographs of Canadian astronaut (and former Girl Guide) Roberta Bondar juggling vanilla and chocolate cookies in space.

The best part? Snacking on these crunchy and creamy cookies benefits more than your belly. The dough (no pun intended) goes towards supporting Girl Guides of Canada’s programming, which provides opportunities for girls to discover, explore, be adventurous and make a difference, while building the leadership and life skills.

Do you want more delicious Canadian food history? We roundup the history of Classic Canadian foods, from poutine to Hawaiian pizza.

Published March 16, 2017, Updated March 1, 2021

Just another msblogs site