chocolate and PB skillet cookie in cast iron pan

Date Night at Home Isn’t Complete Without This Chocolate Peanut Butter Skillet Cookie

Imagine the perfect cookie. For me it would be crisp on the outside, chewy on the inside and loaded with chocolate. Then take it to the next level with salty, nutty peanut buttery goodness. Decadent chocolate + peanut butter make for the ultimate dream team in this delicious skillet cookie recipe. Don’t forget to top it with a scoop of ice cream! The perfect decadent dessert for a date night at home.

chocolate and PB skillet cookie in cast iron pan

Chocolate Peanut Butter Skillet Cookie

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 to 40 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 ⅓ cup all-purpose flour
¾ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
¾ stick butter, room temperature
¼ cup smooth peanut butter
¼ cup granulated sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 large egg
1 tsp espresso powder
1 tsp water
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate, chopped or chunks
Flaky sea salt

Equipment:

6 ½ Inch Logic Pre-Seasoned Skillet, Amazon, $23.

chocolate and PB skillet cookie ingredients on kitchen countertop

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°F.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

3. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together butter, peanut butter, sugar and brown sugar for about 2 minutes. Add the egg and cream until light and airy, about 3-5 minutes. Dissolve the espresso powder with water and add to the stand mixer, along with the vanilla extract.

Related: Our Most Popular Cookie Recipes of All Time

4. With the mixer on low, add the flour mixture and mix just until the dough comes together. Fold in the chopped chocolate.

chocolate and PB skillet cookie dough

5. Divide the cookie dough amongst two 6.5-inch cast iron skillets or one 10-inch skillet. Sprinkle flaky sea salt on top of the dough. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the edges are golden. Serve warm with a scoop of ice cream.

chocolate and PB skillet cookie in cast iron pan

Like Sabrina’s cast iron cookie recipe? Try her 8-ingredient warm salted caramel lava cakes or caramel apple cheesecake fried wontons.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Carolina Smothered Chicken with Creamy Mustard Sauce, as Seen on Delicious Miss Brown, Season 3.

This Kardea Brown Creamy Carolina Smothered Chicken Recipe is a Must-Try

As Kardea Brown has proven time and again on Delicious Miss Brown, truly crave-worthy comfort food involves a familiar favourite (chicken, chicken and more chicken) combined with a thick, mouth-watering sauce that will make you want to lick your plate clean. Trust us, you’ll want to introduce this hearty dish into your regular meal rotation.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Kardea Brown’s Carolina Smothered Chicken with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes
Yields: 4 servings

Ingredients

Chicken:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp House Seasoning, recipe follows
4 bone-in chicken thighs
1 cup canola oil

Sauce:
1 medium onion, diced
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
4 cloves garlic, minced (about 1 tablespoon)
1 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried rosemary
1/3 cup low-sodium chicken stock or broth
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1/2 cup Dijon mustard
1 tsp ground mustard
2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

House Seasoning:
1/4 cup garlic powder
1/4 cup onion powder
1/4 cup sweet paprika
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup freshly ground black pepper

Related: Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Host Kardea Brown, Carolina Smothered Chicken with Creamy Mustard Sauce, Roasted Broccoli Salad with Bacon Dressing, as Seen on Delicious Miss Brown, Season 3.

Directions

1. For the chicken: Whisk together the flour and House Seasoning in a large bowl. Add the chicken and toss to coat.

2. Add the oil to a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Remove the chicken from the flour mixture, shaking to remove any excess, and add to the hot oil. Fry until the chicken is golden brown on all sides, about 5 minutes per side. Remove to a plate and set aside.

3. For the sauce: Add the diced onions to the hot oil in the skillet and cook until the onions are slightly softened and translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the butter, garlic, thyme and rosemary and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute more. Whisk in the stock, scraping up any bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer until thickened, 3 to 4 minutes. Whisk in the cream, Dijon and ground mustard and bring to a simmer again until thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the chicken, turning to coat with the gravy. Cover and cook, turning the chicken occasionally, 25 to 30 minutes. Sprinkle with the parsley before serving.

4. House Seasoning: Yields 1 1/4 cups. Stir together the garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Keep in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Watch the how-to video here:


mushroom plant-based jerky on yellow serving tray

Everyone’s Favourite Snack is Made Vegan With This Spicy Plant-Based Jerky

If you’re craving a delicious plant-based jerky with a kick, this mushroom jerky is for you. This Can You Vegan It? recipe takes traditional mushroom jerky up a notch by adding the flavourful and spicy addition of jerk marinade. All of the delicious flavours of scotch bonnet pepper, thyme and allspice are concentrated in that spoonful of store-bought marinade and make this recipe super, super simple and easy to prepare. Whether you’re plant-based or not, the flavours are sure to make you a fan. The best part is a dehydrator is not essential to get a delicious jerky. All you need is a baking tray and some parchment paper. Serve up this mushroom treat with your grain bowls, breakfast sandwiches, salads or on its own as a snack!

mushroom plant-based jerky on yellow serving tray

Spicy Mushroom Jerky

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 6 hours
Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes
Total Time: 7 hours, 40 minutes
Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp liquid aminos or soy sauce
3 Tbsp maple syrup
2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp jerk marinade
1 tsp smoked paprika
8 medium portobello mushrooms

mushroom plant-based jerky on baking tray

Directions:

1. In a bowl, whisk together the liquid aminos, maple syrup, apple cider vinegar, jerk marinade and smoked paprika. Then set aside.

2. Clean portobello mushrooms and slice into ½-inch pieces.

Related: Healthy (and Tasty) Snacks to Avoid Getting Hangry

3. Place the mushrooms into a bowl and pour marinade over the slices. Mix to ensure that each slice is evenly coated. Cover and refrigerate overnight or for at least 6 hours.

4. Preheat oven to 250°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place marinated mushroom slices on the sheet, ensuring the slices are not crowded.

mushrooms in bowl and on roasting pan

5. Bake mushrooms for about 1 ½ hours, be sure to check on it halfway through and adjust time if needed.

6. Enjoy in your next grain bowl, breakfast sandwich or on its own as a snack.

Like Eden’s plant-based jerky? Try her vegan sloppy Joe sliders or her cardamom teff apple muffins.

duck ragu on serving plate

This Pappardelle Duck Ragu is the Winter Comfort Food You Deserve

What is the most delicious comfort food you can make at home to fight the dropping temperature outside your cozy kitchen? This pappardelle duck ragu! With luxurious fall-apart duck legs, yummy pasta and plenty of veggies, this may be your go-to recipe all winter long. Also, this is a hearty make-ahead dish: it improves over time and lends a richness to the noodles that keep you wanting more.

duck ragu on serving plate

Pappardelle Duck Ragu

Prep Time: 5 minutes (but you can prep all your ingredients while the duck is browning)
Cook Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 ½ tsp kosher salt, divided
2 duck legs, pat dried
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 sweet bell pepper, chopped
1 celery rib, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 bay leaves
1 tsp cracked black pepper
3 Tbsp tomato paste
½ cup red wine
1 can (796 ml/28 oz) San Marzano tomatoes or plum tomatoes, chopped
1 cup chicken broth
400 g pappardelle pasta or other pasta
Grated Parmesan

duck ragu ingredients

Directions:

1. Sprinkle duck legs all over with 1 tsp of the salt. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-low heat and arrange the duck, skin side down. Cook and render the fat for 10 to 12 minutes so the skin browns and crisps, flip and cook until browned on the other side. Transfer to a plate and drain all but 2 Tbsp fat from the pot.

Tip: The remaining rendered duck fat should be saved and refrigerated or frozen to make the most gloriously crispy potatoes or brushed on a whole chicken for a succulent roast chicken.

2. Add the onion and cook on medium, stirring for 5 minutes. Stir in bell pepper, celery, garlic, bay leaves, remaining ½ tsp salt and pepper; cook until translucent, about 5 minutes.

duck ragu cooking in pot

3. Push vegetables to one side and stir in tomato paste, cooking for 30 seconds. Stir in the wine and cook for 1 minute to allow alcohol to evaporate. Add the tomatoes and broth. Bring the mixture up to a simmer and return the duck legs (with any juices) to the pot.

4. Cook partially uncovered over low heat, making sure the sauce is simmering until the duck meat falls off the bone, about 1 ½ hours. Skim excess fat using a spoon if desired.

Related: Quick and Easy One-Pot Recipes

5. Remove duck legs and using two forks, shred the meat off bones, discarding the skin if unwanted. Stir shredded duck into the sauce.

Tip: Make the ragu up to 4 days ahead of time, refrigerate covered and warm in a pot over medium-low heat.

duck ragu cooking in pot

6. Cook pasta according to package instructions; drain and stir into duck ragout. To serve, sprinkle pasta with Parmesan.

Like Soo’s duck ragu? Try her pan-fried pork chops and Chinese stir-fried eggplant.

Joshna Maharaj standing in a professional kitchen, holding an apple and smiling

Joshna Maharaj on Tackling Food Security, Inclusion in Canada’s Hospitality Industry + More

For an industry that celebrates multiculturalism, Canada’s hospitality and food-service sectors still have a long way to go when it comes to authentically reflecting the country’s diversity. Here is how chef, author and community activist Joshna Maharaj is working to change that, one meal at a time. 

Chef, author and community activist Joshna Maharaj standing in professional kitchen, holding an apple

Can you tell us about your work as a chef, author and food activist?

I’ve never been a restaurant chef and I’ve never been excited about being a restaurant chef. My work really focuses on the grassroots experiences of people. I do a lot of community food security work. For the last nine years, I’ve been working to rebuild food systems in public institutions. I’m sure you have some connection to institutional food — for example, either you’ve been in hospitals or someone you love has been in a hospital and you must have seen this sort of dismal offering. That needs some rethinking and some new priorities. This has been my focus.

What are the biggest diversity and inclusion gaps you see currently in the hospitality industry?

[The gaps] are mega and they exist from the micro-level to the macro-level. My friends and family have sort of giggled that I decided to jump into an industry predominantly populated by white guys. And it’s not even just that I went in there as a woman of colour to do this work, but that I decided I wanted to do this a completely different way. I would just hit a wall all the time… everything from the way we teach people to be a chef, to the actual on-the-ground experience that chefs have in the kitchens, it’s all about a white male standard.

One of the things that I hope to do before my last breath is to really untangle our culinary curriculum; I believe that right now, the way we are as cooks, the way we are as eaters, the current context of the culinary curriculum is really an instrument of colonization [based on a French standard]. So the gaps are many and they’re on a number of levels.

Example of a commonly-experienced fine dining experience with a server setting tables next to a window

How does this gap impact consumers? 

I think perhaps the most glaring example of this is how we understand fine dining and that restaurant experience. BIPOC chefs and cooks who are cooking food from their traditions — it seems as though there’s an expectation from eaters that the food of Brown people will continue to be cheap and available cheaply. There’s resistance to that connection [to fine dining] being made.

There’s a number of reasons why that’s a problem, but one of the great comparisons is a Chinese noodle dish versus an Italian pasta dish. Because you can get an Italian pasta dish for $25 for three ravioli and we’re cool with it. For an arguably more complex noodle dish, we won’t tolerate paying more than $9 for that. And it comes in a Styrofoam container and it’s cheap and it’s fast. We’ve really locked this model in and that perhaps is one of the biggest experiences that an eater has in all of this. Because they’re also complicit in this to some degree.

Chinese noodle dish in white bowl

But this idea that a European table is the fine dining table and kind of everything else is just trying to be “something.” The trickle down of that messaging can be super, super damaging.

These restaurants have lower average sales. They really are struggling because there’s no safety room — those margins are so, so narrow. The pandemic has just exasperated what has been a longstanding phenomenon.

Related: Metis Herbalist and Educator Lori Snyder on Urban Foraging and Food Sovereignty

How do racism and inequality translate into the food service and hospitality space? 

From the perspective of the BIPOC cook, that’s obviously the one I’m mostly connected to, I know the biggest frustrations are about being taken seriously. What am I going to do? How am I going to grow? Do I need to get the endorsement of some white person to come in so that people see that light face and then get excited about paying more money for this food?

From the perspective of the eater, eaters are just a bit clued out and they get a bit frustrated themselves about not really knowing how to navigate all of this.

Related: 10 Facts That Will Shock You About Racial Injustice in Canada

What local businesses or organizations are doing it right in this space? 

Some of our non-profit organizations are really leading the way. FoodShare and The Stop are two that are really pushing this conversation forward. Because I come from a grassroots community food security background, it really is meaningful to me that this conversation is happening there. There needs to be a really radical shift in our understanding around privilege, particularly when we talk about food security and vulnerable people, poverty, social assistance, you know, all that kind of rolls in, because BIPOC people are disproportionately affected and finding themselves in a line at a food bank or a dining car.

I think that as an industry, we could learn a lot by paying more attention to grassroots organizations. There’s a bit more connection to justice there. We are in a moment right now where we have a chance to rebuild [hospitality and food service] and we really have a very cool opportunity to see the way grassroots food organizations are doing things.

And if our restaurant vibe looked a little bit more like our community food security vibe, I would be very, very happy to see that… this sort of radical inclusion and accessibility… everything from how dining rooms are set up to how buildings are built to how you build menus so that they are as inclusive as possible while still [serving] locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. Hospitality is ultimately about maintaining people’s dignity.

Related: Ren Navarro on Diversity in the Beer Industry – and How Companies Can Improve

What could the average consumer do to help support greater diversity in the food-service industry? 

Some self-reflection and awareness are the first step, because not everybody has money to give financial support. I do think a lot of the challenges exist in our attitudes.

Take a look at the landscape around you and take a look at the restaurants. Take a look at how you understand prices on the menu and what you see when you see a $25 dish. And then, if you’re able, seek out BIPOC-owned restaurants and really think about under-accessed spots.

Related: A Haitian Chef Reveals the Secret Ingredient to His Toronto Restaurant’s Success (Even During COVID)

If everybody just paused for a moment, took a few deep breaths and confronted their own attitudes about where they are willing to spend their money and how they understand just who is a chef — who looks like a chef — very often this [describing herself] is not the image that comes up when they imagine the chef.

(Editor’s Note: If you question that, just try doing a Google image search on the word “chef” yourself and see the images that come up for you).

What are you personally looking forward to in the food-service space?

We have a beautifully emerging population of Black farmers in and around the city, which is super exciting to see. Organizations like FoodShare are actually working to make the product of that work accessible to people; they have a social justice Good Food Box with food sourced exclusively from Black-owned farms or Black-led farms. And those are the changes we can affect with our purchasing to be more supportive.

Fresh food in cardboard box

I’m actually really, really hopeful that there’s a renewed appreciation and a valuing of all of the elements in our food system, from farmers to cooks to the people who drive the trucks in-between. I’d hope [consumers] can really appreciate that this food system exists so we have a broader, more accurate understanding of what it takes to make that happen. This was an industry that was wholeheartedly taken for granted, but we also have a wonderful opportunity to rethink it.

Related: Ranking Canadian Retailers Offering Grocery Delivery Right Now, by Price

Can you tell us a bit more about your book Take Back the Tray?

Take Back the Tray book coverTake Back the Tray is half-story and half-narrative about my work in overhauling three major institutions’ food systems: two hospitals and a university. Hopefully, it also provides some solid marching orders for change. I want a blueprint for the revolution as well as a compelling story. It really identifies the weakest of the failings of the industrial food system and our reliance on it. Our collective deprioritization of food has really resulted in some solidly damaging impacts to our lives, the planet and our economy. But there’s a very viable, delicious, chewy way forward. I am very excited about that.

This interview has been edited and condensed.

Photo of Joshna Maharaj courtesy of Joshna Maharaj; food box photo courtesy of Getty Images; book photo courtesy of ECW Press; remaining photos courtesy of Unsplash

how-to-get-jar-stuck

6 Simple Ways to Open a Stubborn Stuck Jar Lid

It’s dinnertime: you’ve got a pot of spaghetti boiling on the stove and a pan of onions and ground beef simmering beside it. You grab a jar of tomato sauce from the pantry, but when you try to unscrew the lid, it feels awfully tight. Maybe it’s because your hands aren’t completely dry? You place the jar down, wipe your palms on a kitchen towel and try again. No luck. What are you supposed to do now?

Cancelling dinner plans due to a stuck jar lid might sound a little dramatic, but we’ve all had that thought after minutes of struggling to get a stubborn lid open. The truth is, jars can be hard to open for a variety of reasons and it’s not necessarily because you’re not strong enough. Here, we offer some tried and true tips on how to get that just-won’t-budge jar open, every single time.

Related: Your Ultimate Guide to Cooking and Baking Conversions

open jar pickles

Add Traction

Glass jars can be slippery, so something that could help is added traction. Try wrapping a small towel around the lid to twist it open. If the towel moves while you’re trying to open the lid, wet the towel with water and then wrap it around the lid. Rubber dish gloves and rubber bands also work well to create traction. Put on those gloves to grip the lid or try wrapping a thick rubber band around the lid before you give it a go.

Related: Here’s How to Organize Your Tupperware Drawer Once and for All

Break the Seal

New jars often have a tight vacuum seal and by breaking that seal, it takes less force to open the jar. Some people swear by the “baby bum” pat. Turn the jar on its side, then with the palm of one hand, give the bottom of the jar a few strong pats. You may hear a pop, which indicates the vacuum seal has been broken. Another method for breaking the vacuum seal is by targeting the lid. Use an object with some weight to it, such as the back of a heavy kitchen knife or a wooden rolling pin and give the sides of the lids a few taps, rotating the jar as you go. This might help break the seal, making it much easier to twist open the jar.

Run it Under Hot Water

You’ve tried adding some traction and breaking the vacuum seal, but the lid is still stuck. Now, you’ll want to try running the lid under hot water. Depending on the contents of the jar, you may want to be careful not to place the entire jar under hot water (after all, nobody likes warm pickles). Let the hot water run from the tap until it’s piping hot and then turn the jar on its side and carefully dip the lid under water. Rotate the jar so that all sides of the lid get wet. The hot water helps the metal expand, therefore loosening the lid and making it easier to unscrew.

Related: Can I Freeze This? How to Freeze Fruit, Cheese, Leftovers and More

tomato sauce jar

Tap the Lid

This method is more useful for jars that have already been open before. Perhaps there’s some food trapped around the rim of the jar, or a sticky sauce causing the lid to get stuck on the jar. Tapping the lid on top and around the edges, again using a heavier object such as the back of a chef’s knife or wooden rolling pin, can help dislodge the food, eventually loosening the jar.

Break out the Tools

Believe it or not, there are tools you can buy that are made specifically for opening jars. New technology enables these tools to grip, twist and open stubborn jar lids with the simple press of a button. You can purchase them at most kitchen stores and online. You may feel silly for using one, but it will undoubtedly save you time, pain and future frustration!

Related: The Top 5 Kitchen Utensils Every Home Cook Needs

Brute Force

Sometimes, it’s really a matter of strength. It’s tough to wrap your hands around jar lids depending on the size, and jars themselves can be awkward to hold in one hand. If you have another person around, ask them to hold the jar with both hands, then use both hands to twist the lid open. If you’re alone at home, opening the jar may simply require a few tries, with breaks in between to rest your hands. As a last resort, you might want to visit a neighbour’s home for assistance.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

Published April 27, 2019, Updated January 24, 2021

Several bao buns in steamer basket

Make These Soft and Fluffy BBQ Pork Bao Buns for Lunar New Year

Growing up, my dad made a big batch of baos once a year. He filled them with the traditional Vietnamese bao filling of ground pork, egg and Chinese sausage. My other memory of baos are enjoying them at Chinese restaurants on weekend mornings, the soft and pillowy outside, filled with a sweet and saucy pork filling — they’re seriously delicious! These BBQ pork bao buns are super easy and fun to make and all the reason you need to pick up that steamer basket you’ve been eyeing. Stuff them with your favourite fillings like ground chicken, beef and even tofu! Make a big batch, your future self will thank you.

bao buns in steamer basket

BBQ Pork Bao Buns

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Rest Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 14 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 14 minutes
Servings: 12 bao buns

Ingredients:

2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup cornstarch
3 Tbsp sugar
2 tsp instant yeast
½ tsp salt
1 Tbsp neutral oil
150 ml + more warm water
1 ½ cups store-bought BBQ pork, diced
3-4 Tbsp store-bought Char Siu sauce (Chinese BBQ Sauce)
2 Tbsp sliced scallions (about 2 stalks)
2 Tbsp vinegar

Equipment:

Kitchen Bamboo Steamer, Amazon, $59.

Bao bun ingredients

Directions:

1. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the dough attachment, add the flour, cornstarch, sugar, yeast, salt, oil and water. Mix on medium speed until the dough is smooth and forms one ball, about 5-8 minutes.

Roll of bao bun dough

2. Remove and place the dough on the counter and cover with the bowl for 5 minutes to rest. Cut 12 parchment paper square at 3 x 3-inches. Set on a baking sheet.

3. Dice the BBQ pork into ¼-inch bits. Place in a bowl and toss with the Char Siu sauce (just enough to coat the pork) and sliced scallions.

Bao bun filling in white bowl

4. Divide the dough into 12 equal portions and roll each piece of dough against a non-floured surface to create smooth round dough balls. Starting with one ball, keeping the rest covered, roll into roughly a 4-5-inch round.

Related: Our Most Popular Dinner Recipes That’ll Stand the Test of Time

5. Hold the dough piece in your hand, add a heaping Tbsp of the pork mixture into the centre. Start by folding the dough onto itself and pinching the dough together. Work in a circular motion, all the way around. Close the bao by gathering and pinching the dough together at the top. Place on the parchment paper square. Repeat with the rest of the dough balls.

bao bun filling inside bao bun dough

Person holding bao bun with three bao buns in the background

6. Place a damp towel over top of the bao buns and place in a warm area to proof until doubled in size, about 20-30 minutes.

Uncooked bao buns on baking tray

7. In the meantime, fill a large pot with 1 inch of water and the vinegar and place the steam basket overtop. About 5 minutes before the baos are ready, bring the water to a boil on high.

8. Once the baos have doubled in size, place in the steam basket about 1 inch apart. Cover with the lid and lower to a medium heat. Let steam for about 14 minutes. If you’re unable to fit all 12 baos in the steamer, place a piece of plastic overtop of the remaining and refrigerate to prevent the dough from further proofing.

Bao buns in steamer basket

Like Sabrina’s bao buns? Try her coconut buns or caramel apple cheesecake fried wontons.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. For more products handpicked by our editorial team, visit Food Network Canada’s Amazon storefront. However, when you buy through links in this article or on our storefront, we earn an affiliate commission.

Spicy sautéed chickpeas on white plate

You Can Whip up This Spicy Sauteed Cauliflower and Chickpeas Recipe in Just 10 Minutes!

Who says simple meals can’t still be fancy? This quick We Know You Have 10 Minutes recipe is plate-lickingly good. In our opinion, you can never go wrong combining chickpeas and cauliflower, especially when they’re sauteed and caramelized with a splash of balsamic vinegar. A pro-tip: to get the cauliflower to cook quickly, cut into very, very small florets. The lemony yogurt is really the star of the dish. It’s tart and acidic flavours amplify the subtle sweetness and earthiness of the other ingredients and honestly, we could just eat the yogurt alone, it’s so, so good. You can use any plain yogurt, but if you want to really explode the flavour of this dish, choose a thick Greek variety. Then top with mint to add a bit of freshness. It’s shocking a dish that tastes this good only takes 10 minutes to make!

Spicy sautéed chickpeas on white plate

Spicy Sauteed Cauliflower and Chickpeas

Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 2 to 4

Ingredients:

Chickpea Cauliflower Saute
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
½ tsp granulated garlic powder
½ to 1 tsp red pepper flakes (depending on spice preference)
1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1 small or ½ large cauliflower (about 4 cups), chopped into very small florets
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper

Lemony Yogurt
½ cup plain, unsweetened yogurt (dairy or non-dairy)
¼ lemon, squeezed
Splash of extra virgin olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper

Toppings
Few mint leaves
Squeeze of lemon

Ingredients for spicy sautéed chickpeas on countertop

Directions:

1. Place a large, wide skillet over medium-high heat. Add in the oil, swirl around the pan to coat the bottom, then toss in the granulated garlic powder and red pepper flakes. Saute for 30 seconds until fragrant.

2. Add in the chickpeas and cauliflower. Shake the pan so they’re coated in the oil. Pour in the balsamic vinegar, sea salt and pepper. If the pan seems too dry, add in another Tbsp of oil. Toss well to coat.

Related: Healthy 10-Minute Meals When You Just Don’t Feel Like Cooking

3. Leave the chickpeas and cauliflower undisturbed and let everything saute for 3-5 minutes. Seriously — no stirring — let them do their thing! After 3-5 minutes, toss and saute for another 3 minutes until the chickpeas and cauliflower are slightly browned.

Spicy sautéed chickpeas in frying pan

4. If the cauliflower still seems too hard and hasn’t quite cooked yet, add about ⅓ to ½ cup water and cover to soften the cauliflower. This will take about 5-ish minutes.

5. While the chickpeas and cauliflower are cooking, combine the yogurt, lemon, oil and salt and pepper, then spread it on the bottom of a platter or plate.

Three white plates next to a pan full of spicy sautéed chickpeas

6. Place the chickpeas and cauliflower on top of the lemony yogurt, squeeze a bit of lemon and add fresh mint leaves over to garnish.

Spicy sautéed chickpeas on three white plates

Like Tamara and Sarah’s spicy sauteed cauliflower and chickpeas recipe? Try their 10-minute vegan antipasto skewers or their 5-ingredient slow cooker beef Bolognese.

Get the how-to recipe here:


 

Glazed salmon on top of bed of asparagus

This 20-Minute Pomegranate Molasses Glazed Salmon is the Perfect Weeknight Meal

You have probably heard of honey glazed salmon… but have you heard of pomegranate glazed salmon? Pomegranate molasses is an ingredient commonly used in Middle Eastern cuisine and has both sweetness and tanginess that adds so much depth and flavour to any dish. It is the star ingredient in this glaze, along with garlic, honey and chilli flakes for some heat. You can typically find pomegranate molasses in the international aisle at your local grocery store, but if you can’t find it, you can make your own at home. Simply mix together pomegranate juice, a bit of lemon juice and sugar (to your preference) and reduce it down until it looks like a thick glaze.

Glazed salmon on top of bed of asparagus

Pomegranate Molasses Glazed Salmon

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Salmon
½ kg salmon fillet (or 4 pieces)
Salt and pepper to taste
1 ½ Tbsp olive oil (or any vegetable oil)

Glaze
2 large garlic cloves, crushed
2 ½ Tbsp pomegranate molasses
2 ½ Tbsp honey
½ tsp salt
½ tsp chilli flakes (more or less per preference)
Squeeze of lemon juice
Spring onions for garnish

Glazed salmon ingredients on table

Directions:

1. Season the salmon fillets with salt and pepper on both sides.

Four raw salmon filets on white plate

2. Heat up a cast iron or non-stick skillet on medium high and add the olive oil. Wait until pan is hot, then lay the salmon skin side down and cook for 3-4 minutes. Make sure you don’t crowd your pan.

Four salmon filets cooking in pan

3. Flip the salmon to sear on the other side for 2 minutes until golden. Remove and set aside.

Two salmon filets cooking in pan

4. Decrease the heat to low and add in the crushed garlic. Cook for 30 seconds until fragrant.

5. Add the pomegranate molasses, honey, salt, and chilli flakes and stir for a minute. Add the squeeze of lemon.

6. Place the salmon back into the pan and cook for 5 more minutes or until cooked through (depending on thickness of the salmon).

Related: Easy Grilled Salmon Recipes You’ll Love

7. Plate the salmon (recommended on a bed of roasted vegetables) and spoon the glaze on top. The glaze thickens when it cools down, therefore it is recommended to serve immediately. If it does cool down, you can heat it back up and add a splash of water to loosen it.

8. Garnish with spring onions and additional chilli flakes.

Like Amina’s glazed salmon recipe? Try her curried Brussels sprouts or roasted cauliflower with tahini.

vegan cassoulet in white dish

This Cozy Weeknight Cassoulet is Given a Spicy Vegan Makeover

A cozy weeknight favourite with a vegan spin, this French-inspired dish is booming with flavour and wholesome ingredients, while topped with a light panko crumb crust to add a nice crunch. While cassoulet traditionally contains meat, this Can You Vegan It? recipe gives the classic a plant-based twist. This recipe calls for harissa paste for a bit of a spicy kick, but if heat isn’t your thing, substitute black pepper in place of the paste. Plus, an added bonus: this meal all comes together in one pot and it takes just an hour to whip up!

vegan cassoulet in white dish

Spicy Vegan Cassoulet

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes
Servings: 6-8

Ingredients:

3 medium leeks
¼ cup + 2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
3 large carrots, chopped
1 zucchini, chopped
4 garlic cloves, chopped
3 parsley sprigs
2 bay leaves
¼ tsp ground cloves
1-1 ½ tsp sea salt
1 tsp harissa paste
3 (19 oz) cans cannellini (white kidney) beans, rinsed and drained
4 cups of water
1 ¾ cups organic panko crumbs
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp dried thyme

vegan cassoulet ingredients on kitchen countertop

Directions:

1. Cut and discard the green part of the leeks, leaving only the white and pale green parts to work with. Halve leeks lengthwise, then chop crosswise into 1-inch pieces. Place chopped leeks in a bowl or large strainer and rinse thoroughly until the sandy particles are gone.

2. Place a large Dutch oven pot over medium heat and add ¼ cup olive oil. Once heated, add leeks, carrots, zucchini, garlic, parsley, bay leaves, cloves, salt and harissa. Stir occasionally until veggies are semi soft and golden, about 15 minutes; then add in beans and water. Cook covered for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s One Pot Recipes That Will Make Dinner a Breeze

3. In the meantime, preheat your oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a bowl, toss panko bread crumbs, 2 Tbsp olive oil, garlic powder and thyme. Place it on the prepared baking sheet and bake for 7-9 minutes until toasted and light brown, stirring occasionally. Set aside and let it cool.

panko breadcrumbs roasted on cookie sheet

4. When the cassoulet is ready, discard bay leaf and parsley sprigs and season with more salt and pepper if needed. Top with toasted garlic panko before serving.

vegan cassoulet in white dish

Like Valerie’s vegan cassoulet? Try her low-carb vegan ramen or her healthy Sriracha-honey oven-fried chicken.

Bannock butternut squash pizza

Christa Bruneau-Guenther’s Butternut Squash Bannock Pizza = Perfect Comfort Food

Just when you thought comfort food couldn’t get any better, this bannock pizza crust — from Christa Bruneau-Guenther of Feast Café Bistro — makes for the perfect canvas. It is layered with mouth-watering roasted butternut squash, lots of cheese and a maple chipotle white sauce.

Bannock butternut squash pizza

Butternut Squash Bannock Pizza

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 1 large pizza or 4-6 servings

Ingredients:

Bannock Dough Pizza Crust
3 cups  unbleached all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp sea salt or kosher salt
¾ tsp yeast
1 Tbsp olive oil (canola oil or vegetable oil)
1 ½ cups warm water

Maple Chipotle Lime Sour Cream White Sauce
¼ cup sour cream
2 tsp mayonnaise
1 tsp chipotle paste (or 1 Tbsp finely minced from a can of chili in adobo sauce)
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1 Tbsp fresh squeezed lime juice (or use 1 tsp lime juice from concentrate)

Other Pizza Ingredients
½ butternut squash, peeled, cored and thinly sliced
2 Tbsp olive oil, avocado oil, vegetable oil, canola oil or grapeseed oil
1 tsp chili powder
½ tsp sea salt or kosher salt
1 tsp pine nuts
1 cup shredded mozzarella
½ cup shredded Cheddar cheese
2 green onions, thinly sliced for garnish

Related: Chef Christa Bruneau-Guenther Brings Her Home Cooking and Indigenous Roots to Wall of Chefs

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, make the dough: combine flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Then make a well in the middle of the flour mixture.

2. In a separate bowl, add yeast and oil to warm water and mix with a fork. Gently pour the liquid mixture into the flour hole or well.

3. Using a fork, spoon or hands, fold or work the flour into the water. Knead the dough into a ball, don’t over knead. Let dough sit for 10-15 minutes covered with a kitchen towel.

Related: The Best Homemade Pizza Recipes (Including Dough From Scratch)

4. For the sauce: in a mid-sized bowl, mix all ingredients together until well combined. Reserve for later.

5. Pre-heat oven to 400°F and place squash on a baking sheet. Add oil, chili powder and salt, mix well. Scatter squash into a single layer. Bake for 12-16 minutes or until squash is cooked through and soft. Set aside.

6. On a lightly floured surface, roll out reserved bannock dough with a rolling pin,  and place on a sheet pan. Prick dough with a fork.

Related: Canadian First Nations Recipes You’ll Love

7. Add white sauce to dough and generously place squash over dough. Sprinkle squash with pine nuts and various cheeses. Bake at 425°F for 15-17 minutes or until cheese is bubbly and crust is golden brown.

8. Remove from heat. Add a smattering of green onions and top with drizzle of white sauce. Enjoy.

This recipe first appeared on an episode of Big Food Bucket List, which you can watch here. Big Food Bucket List streams Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Two grilled tuna tacos filled with a mix of veggies and fresh salsa sit atop a crispy homemade corn tortilla

The Best Tacos in North America in 2021: John Catucci’s Bucket List Picks

Originating in Mexico sometime in the 18th century, today’s taco craze proves these simple tortilla snacks have serious lasting power. And with good reason; tacos are cheap, versatile and undeniably delicious. This hand-held street food packs intense flavour in just one bite and boasts the ability of entirely new tastes depending on your salsa of choice.  Whether you’re grabbing some late-night eats off the street corner or indulging in the diverse flavours at a high-end restaurant,  a taco simply never disappoints.  Why not make your New Year’s resolution to try the best tacos with one of food expert John Catucci’s picks of 2021!


See More: Browse the Restaurants Featured on Big Food Bucket List

Al Pastor Tacos with refried beans and a salad

Based on the lamb Shwarma brought to Mexico by Lebanese immigrants, the Al Pastor taco combines aromatic Middle Eastern spices with those indigenous to South America. A mainstay staple, this beef or pork-based taco can be found at just about any authentic taqueria, but for the ultimate plant-based take you’ll want to head to Tumerico in Tucson, AZ.  Prepared with smashed jackfruit, deep-fried then sauteed with pineapple for a sweet, caramelized finish. Top it all off with fresh corn, pico de gallo, onion, cilantro, a drizzle of cashew cream, and restaurant signature – a dusting of Tumeric. Beloved by meat-eaters, vegetarians and vegans alike for it’s spicy, smokey flavour.

Get the recipe for Al Pastor Tacos

 

Over at Tacos Chiwas, Chef Nadia Holguin shares the flavours of her families home state of Chihuahua, Mexico. The smoked brisket Deshebrada Roja Gorditas is the supreme hand-held food; slow-cooked shredded beef and refried beans fill a homemade flour tortilla pocket. Chef Nadia makes the 12-hour trip home each month to bring in the dried red hatch chile used to make the savoury Roja sauce, so you know she is passionate about bringing her guests the absolute best.

Related: 50 Tasty Taco Recipes You’ll Crave Every Day of the Week

 

John Catucci and Chef Nick Liu smile at one another while cooking in the kitchen at DaiLo

At the height of their popularity, the traditional taco took on a whole new delicious dimension when chefs began cooking them in a fusion style. At Toronto, Ontario’s Dailo, Chef Nick Liu creates predominantly Chinese fare with signature flair, including his exquisite Crispy Octopus Tacos.  The self-titled Ninja Chef begins by substituting your standard corn tortilla with thin slices of crunchy, sweet jicama and follows up with layers of salty pork belly, crispy fried octopus and an Asian vegetable garnish. The result, as John demonstrates, is a bite worthy of three first pumps of pure joy.

 

Related: From Competitor to Judge: Nick Liu Returns to Food Network Canada on Wall of Chefs

If you’re intrigued by a new blending of flavours but aren’t ready to give up a corn base, Primal Kitchen & Bar has you covered with their Tuna Tacos.  This Halifax kitchen fills their tortilla with a seared, pink tuna steak, topped with avocado crema, pickled vegetables and delicate shavings of dried seaweed.  Not that it needs selling, but John Catucci does call it “the best fish taco” he’s ever had.

Get the recipe for Tuna Tacos

 

Now that you’ve dipped your toes in the experimental side of things, it’s time to up the ante with a true original; Abe Fisher’s Veal Schnitzel Taco, found in the heart of Philadelphia. These decadent tacos are uniquely prepared with chunks of braised veal, which are then breaded and deep-fried. Finished with a salty anchovy mayo and sweet and spicy pickled red cabbage for the perfect bite every time.

Get the recipe for Veal Schnitzel Tacos

 

If you’re looking to really surprise your taste buds, Hamilton’s own Rapscallion Rogue Eatery is slinging sweetbread tacos, made with a less conventional, but seriously amazing, buttermilk fried pancreas. This buttery, rich meat is complemented by a drizzle of smokey, poblano aioli, spicy mango salsa and garnish with pickled red onion and fresh cilantro. Meat lovers everywhere- add this to your bucket list!

Watch full episodes of Big Food Bucket List onlineYou can also stream your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

hot dog fried rice in black wok

Your Kiddos Will Not Stop Asking You to Cook This Hot Dog Fried Rice Recipe

It’s pretty much a fact that all kids (and many of us adults) love hot dogs. It’s also a fact that they are devoid of any meaningful nutrition. But alas, they find redemption in this hot dog fried rice recipe, alongside eggs, green beans and tofu. Tofu skeptics: this might just be your gateway tofu dish! This has long since been a family favourite at my house and I think it could be at yours too. (This dish can be enjoyed by everyone from age 3 and up). Be sure to cut hot dogs into small ⅛-inch slices so they’re not choking hazards for very young children. For a gluten-free version of this Kindred Kitchen recipe, opt for gluten-free hot dogs and tamari in place of soy sauce.

hot dog fried rice in black wok

Hot Dog Fried Rice

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 4-5

Ingredients:

6 cups cooked rice (2½ cups uncooked rice), cooled and refrigerated 1-2 days
4 large eggs
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
Kosher salt to taste
High-heat neutral oil
4 hot dogs, thinly sliced to ⅛-inch pieces
1 package (400 g) extra-firm tofu, drained and patted dry, cut into ⅓-inch cubes
1 ½ tsp soy sauce (or tamari for gluten-free), divided
½ lb green beans, stem trimmed and cut into ⅓-inch pieces
2 tsp finely minced ginger
3 tsp finely minced garlic (from 4-5 medium cloves)
3 scallions, finely chopped (reserve a little bit for garnish)

hot dog fried rice ingredients on kitchen counter

Directions:

1. Take cooked rice out from the fridge and break up any clumps of rice thoroughly with your hands. Set aside. Then whisk eggs with sesame oil and a pinch of salt in a small mixing bowl. Set aside.

person fluffing rice in black bowl

2. Prepare all other ingredients. The key to any stir-fry is to not crowd the pan, cooking and seasoning every ingredient separately.

3. Preheat a wok or large heavy-bottomed sauté pan over medium heat. Drizzle oil and add whisked seasoned eggs, moving it around constantly with a spatula until eggs are starting to set. but still quite runny. (They will cook more at the end). Scoop out and set aside.

Related: Easy and Tasty Ways to Use Leftover Rice

4. Turn heat up to medium-high. Drizzle a tiny bit of oil and add sliced hot dogs. Stir-fry until heated through and edges are just starting to brown and even crisp up if you like. Scoop out and set aside, leaving behind any oil that came out of the hot dogs.

5. If needed, drizzle a bit more oil and add the tofu cubes. Stir-fry gently so as not to break them. Let the tofu heat through and get a little brown on the edges. Season with ¾ tsp soy sauce (or tamari) and salt to taste. Cook for 30 seconds, scoop out and set aside.

cooking cubes of tofu in black wok

6. Next, drizzle a bit of oil and stir-fry the cut green beans until tender, but still crisp, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and ¾ tsp soy sauce (or tamari). Again, scoop out and set aside.

7. Heat 2-3 Tbsp of oil and add the minced ginger. Move it around and cook for 5-10 seconds. Add the minced garlic and cook for 5-10 seconds or until the garlic is just turning golden, being careful not to let it burn. Stir in most of the chopped scallions, remembering to reserve some for garnish. Add 1 Tbsp more oil and make sure the oil is heated and quite hot at this point (but before smoking) before adding the chilled cooked rice. Stir everything to distribute everything evenly. Cook until rice is fully heated through.

Related: How to Cook a Perfect Pot of Rice on the Stove

8. Add back the hot dogs, tofu and green beans. Mix well and allow to heat back through for a minute. Finally, add the runny eggs and stir to distribute. Stir-fry another minute to cook eggs fully. Turn heat off and taste. Add salt if needed. Garnish with scallions. Enjoy!

hot dog fried rice in black wok

Like this hot dog fried rice recipe? Try this vegetarian mujadara!

Two glasses with healthier banana pudding

This Healthier Banana Pudding is the Perfect Make-Ahead Dessert

If you have bananas in your kitchen at this very moment, this recipe is for you. This healthier banana pudding is creamy, rich and delicious without being over sweet. It’s an easy dessert that layers in vanilla wafers (that soften to the perfect cake consistency), sweet bananas and vanilla pudding (which is naturally sweetened with just maple syrup). Seriously, make this now, so you can enjoy it later! And an added bonus? This recipe only requires eight simple ingredients.

Two cups of healthier banana pudding

Healthier Banana Pudding

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 4 hours or overnight
Total Time: 4 hours, 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp cornstarch
1 ½ cups 2% milk
⅓ cup maple syrup
3 egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla extract
½ cup Greek yogurt
1 box vanilla wafer cookies
3 bananas, sliced

Healthier banana pudding ingredient on countertop

Directions:

1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together cornstarch, milk, maple syrup and egg yolks, breaking up any clumps. Heat over medium-high heat, whisking constantly until the mixture begins to thicken. Remove from heat and whisk in vanilla extract. Strain through a fine sieve, cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and chill in the fridge for 2-3 hours.

White pot cooking pudding, with bananas next to it

2. Once the pudding has chilled, give it a good whisk to loosen the mix. Add in Greek yogurt and whisk to incorporate.

Related: These Banana Bread Recipes Will Provide All The Comfort You Need

3. At the bottom of a glass, break up a few vanilla wafers, next layer the sliced bananas and finally the vanilla pudding. Repeat the layering until the glass is full. Place back in the fridge for another 2 hours or overnight. The wafers will soften and become cake-like. Enjoy!

One cup of healthier banana pudding

Like Sabrina’s healthier banana pudding? Try her 8-ingredient warm salted caramel lava cakes or her healthy apple oatmeal cookies.

Your New Favourite Fish Dish: The Pioneer Woman’s Crispy Cerveza Battered Cod

We love a classic fish and chips recipe as much as the next person — but if you’re looking to up your kitchen (and seafood) game, make this crispy, battered fish dish from Ree Drummond herself.

Two pounds of fresh cod is simmered in Mexican lager-infused spicy seasonings, while homemade charred lime crema is the perfect topper in addition to the napa cabbage, onions, flour tortillas and lime wedges. Although it might take a little longer than the average dish, go ahead and break out that deep-frying thermometer and get started! Bon appetit!

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Tex-Mex Recipes Will Satisfy Your Cheesy, Meaty Cravings

The Pioneer Woman’s Crispy Cerveza Battered Fish

Total Time: 1 hour
Yields: 6 servings
Special Equipment: a deep-frying thermometer

Ingredients:

Crispy Battered Fish

Vegetable oil, for frying
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup cornstarch
1 Tbsp kosher salt
2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
Two 12-ounce bottles Mexican lager
2 lbs cod, cut into 1/2-by-1 1/2-by-3-inch sticks

Related: This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

Serving

12 flour tortillas (7-inch)
2 cups shredded napa cabbage
1 cup finely diced red onion
1 cup fresh cilantro sprigs
1 cup lime wedges
Charred Lime Crema, recipe follows

Charred Lime Crema

2 jalapenos
1 small white onion, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch rounds
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, plus more for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup Mexican-style crema
1 lime, zested and juiced ‘

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

Close-up of Crispy Cerveza Battered Fish

Directions:

1. For the crispy battered fish: Preheat the oven to 200°F. Fit a wire rack in a baking sheet; set aside.

2. In a large pot, heat 2 inches of vegetable oil over medium-high heat to 375°F.

3. Make the batter: In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch, salt, cayenne, paprika, baking powder and pepper. Add the beer and whisk until smooth.

4. Working in 2 to 3 batches, coat the fish in the batter. Carefully transfer the battered fish to the hot oil. Fry each batch for 4 minutes, flipping halfway through. Remove the fried fish to the wire rack on the baking sheet to allow the oil to drain away. This will ensure it stays crispy. Transfer the baking sheet with the fish to the oven to keep warm while you get everything else ready. The fish can sit in the oven up to an hour staying warm.

5. For serving: Wrap the tortillas in foil and place in the oven to warm for 10 minutes.

6. Unwrap the tortillas and serve alongside the fish and all the fixings: cabbage, red onion, cilantro, lime wedges and Charred Lime Crema.

Charred Lime Crema

1. Heat a grill or grill pan over medium-high heat.

2. Toss the jalapenos and onion rounds in the olive oil in a bowl. Grill the jalapenos and onion rounds until charred all over, turning as needed, about 5 minutes total. Place the jalapenos in a bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap for 10 minutes. Set the onions aside.

3. Cut the jalapenos in half, remove the stems and seeds and gently scrape off the charred skin. Roughly chop the grilled onion rounds.

4. Combine the jalapenos, onion, cilantro and some salt and pepper in a food processor. Pulse in 2-second increments until finely minced.

5. Whisk together the crema and lime zest and juice in a medium bowl. Add the jalapeno-onion mixture to the bowl with the crema and fold everything together until fully incorporated.

6. Pour into a serving dish and garnish with cilantro leaves. Serve as a flavorful topping on your favorite tacos.

Watch the full how-to video:


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Plate of healthy fried chicken

This Healthy Sriracha-Honey Oven-Fried Chicken is Simply Delish

For all the fried chicken lovers out there who are looking for a much healthier way to enjoy delicious chicken — this paleo Sriracha-honey oven-fried chicken is right up your alley. It’s spicy, sweet and savoury, extremely flavourful and there’s no deep frying or oil required.

Plate of healthy fried chicken

Healthy Sriracha-Honey Oven-Fried Chicken

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Serving: 4

Ingredients:

2 cups almond flour
1 tsp flaky sea salt
½ tsp black pepper
2 eggs
1 lb chicken breasts or thighs (4-5 pieces)
⅓ cup Sriracha hot sauce
⅓ cup pure honey
1 tsp garlic powder
Fresh chives or parsley, for topping

Ingredients for healthy fried chicken on countertop

Directions:

1. Preheat your oven to 425°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a large bowl, combine almond flour, salt and pepper. In a smaller bowl, whisk eggs.

Related: Our Best Budget-Friendly Chicken Recipes to Have on Rotation

3. Dip each chicken breast in the whisked eggs, then coat with almond flour mixture and place on the lined baking sheet. Store any leftover almond flour mixture in an airtight container and place in the refrigerator. This can be reused within 3 days.

Healthy fried chicken in batter on baking pan

4. Transfer the chicken to the oven and bake for 20-25 minutes.

5. In the meantime, combine Sriracha hot sauce, honey and garlic powder in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until the honey is melted and mixture is smooth. Turn off the heat and set the sauce aside.

Sauce for healthy fried chicken in pot

6. When ready, take the chicken out of the oven, then turn the oven settings to broil. Using a pastry brush, brush the Sriracha-honey sauce on the surface of the chicken until coated. Place the chicken back in the oven and broil for 3-5 minutes.

Pan full of healthy fried chicken

7. When ready, top with fresh chives or herb of choice. Serve immediately.

Like Valerie’s healthy Sriracha-honey chicken? Try her low-carb mint lamb burgers or her low-sugar persimmon creme brulee.

Vegan egg salad on baguette

This One Ingredient Will Change Your Vegan Recipes Forever (Plus a Vegan Egg Salad Recipe!)

Kala namak AKA black salt is the secret ingredient to many vegan recipes. It is a kiln-fired rock salt with a similar texture to a pink Himalayan salt, but with a strong hard-boiled egg flavour. Often used in South Asian cooking, it is the perfect way to add egg flavour to any eggless dish. It is amazing in this Can You Vegan It? egg salad sandwich recipe — serve it between two slices of your favourite bread or on a toasted sourdough baguette (my preference!).

Black salt

Vegan Egg Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4 sandwiches

Vegan egg salad on baguette

Ingredients:

16 ounces medium or firm tofu, pressed
¼ cup celery, finely chopped
¼ cup chives or green onion, thinly sliced
¼ cup vegan mayonnaise, store-bought or homemade
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
¼ tsp turmeric
½ teaspoon kala namak
Freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
Sourdough baguette, for serving

Vegan egg salad ingredients

Directions:

1. Press the tofu before using to drain out any excess liquids and ensure it soaks up the ingredients.

Tofu chopped up on cutting board

2. In a mixing bowl, toss together the tofu, celery and green onion. Set aside.

Vegan egg salad mixed in bowl

3. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice, turmeric, kala namak and pepper.

Related: Healthy Vegan Snack Ideas Featuring 10 Ingredients or Less

4. Pour mixture over tofu and toss to coat. Scoop mixture over bread, garnish with chives and enjoy!

Vegan egg salad mixed in bowl

Like Marcella’s vegan egg salad recipe? Try her vegan eggnog recipe or her six different recipes from one humble can of tomatoes.

Kardea Brown’s Big Apple Crumb Cheesecake is the Dessert You Deserve Right Now

Kardea Brown’s hearty, creamy, apple-forward cheesecake may be a little more time-consuming than the average baking session, but it’s absolutely worth the wait. From the graham cracker crust and cream cheese filling to the tart and tangy apple crumb topping, there’s no need to wait for a special occasion to relish every last bite.

Related: Our Most Excellent Cheesecake Recipes for Total Dessert Bliss

Related: Kardea Brown’s Pan-Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Kardea Brown’s Big Apple Crumb Cheesecake

Total Time: 5 hours, 10 minutes (includes cooling and chilling time)
Yields: 8 to 10 servings

Ingredients:

Nonstick cooking spray, for the pan
15 graham crackers (or 2 cups crushed graham cracker crumbs)
3 Tbsp packed light brown sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
5 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Apple Crumb Topping:
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp kosher salt
1 stick unsalted butter, melted and cooled
1 tart apple, peeled, cored and diced

Cheesecake Filling:
1 cup granulated sugar
2 Tbsp cornstarch
Pinch kosher salt
Three 8-ounce packages cream cheese, at room temperature
1 cup sour cream
3 large eggs plus 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
2 tsp vanilla extract
Store-bought caramel sauce, for serving

Related: Kardea Brown’s Beef and Okra Stew is the Warming Dinner You Didn’t Know You Were Craving

Directions:

1. For the graham crust: Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly spray a 9-inch springform pan with nonstick cooking spray and place on a baking sheet.

2. Add the graham crackers to a food processor and pulse until fine, then add the brown sugar and salt and pulse until well combined. Drizzle in the melted butter and stir until the mixture resembles damp sand. Press the crumbs into the bottom of the prepared springform pan in an even layer. Bake the crust until firm, about 10 minutes, then let cool.

3. For the apple crumb topping: Stir together the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt in a medium bowl. Drizzle in the butter and stir until the mixture resembles wet sand, using your hands to form some clumps. Fold in the diced apple.

4. For the cheesecake filling: Stir together the granulated sugar, cornstarch and salt in a small bowl. Pulse together the cream cheese and sour cream in a food processor until smooth. With the processor running, add the sugar mixture 1/2 cup at a time until the mixture is smooth. Add the eggs and yolk one at a time, pulsing until well combined, then add the vanilla, scraping down the sides of the processor and giving it another pulse to make sure everything is incorporated. Pour the cheesecake filling over the top of the graham cracker crust.

5. Sprinkle the crumb topping over the filling. Bake the cheesecake until it is mostly set but still has a bit of a jiggle in the center, 60 to 70 minutes. Turn off the oven and leave the oven door slightly open for 1 hour. Remove the cheesecake from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature, about another hour, then refrigerate for 1 hour more. Run a paring knife around the outside before unmolding and slicing. Serve drizzled with the caramel sauce.

Watch the how-to video here:


Watch Delicious Miss Brown and stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Meet the Canadian Women Helping to Bring Gender Equality to the Wine World

It’s clear within minutes of our three-way phone chat that Emily Pearce and Jennifer Huether love talking about wine, from the terroir to the nitty-gritty details of winemaking. In a traditionally male-dominated industry, there’s something refreshing about hearing two women at the top of their game speak passionately about the grape. Not only do the Toronto-based entrepreneurs boast an encyclopedic knowledge on the subject, but they’ve also enjoyed massive success with Femmes du Vin — a  non-profit organization that launched less than five years ago.

“The story of Femmes du Vin is really about grassroots growth. It started in 2016 in my backyard in Toronto,” says founding president Pearce. “I got this idea to have a social event that was a safe space for women in the wine industry to come together to have a place to network, discuss successes and analyze challenges.”

What started as a small gathering has since transformed into the massively successful Harvest Seminars where speakers and attendees tune in from around the world to talk wine and culture.

For decades, women sommeliers or wine enthusiasts have been few and far between, with men dominating the conversation and top positions. Now, Pearce and Huether, master sommelier and  director of education at Femmes du Vin, are pushing for more inclusion of women in the wine world.

Related: Ren Navarro on Diversity in the Beer Industry – and How Companies Can Improve

Emily Pearce

Tell us about the genesis and evolution of Femmes du Vin and why it’s needed in the wine industry today.

Emily Pearce: “Eventually, [the backyard event] outgrew me setting up a tent and making homemade sushi in my backyard. We had our first brick and mortar event [in 2019] and it continued to grow out of community demand to what it was [in 2020] — which was an amazing virtual event with speakers and attendees from across the world. It speaks to the hunger in our industry for these safe places in our community for women to connect. While there are still challenges women face — be it wage discrepancies that still exist or issues around discrimination or harassment — I really just wanted to create a place where women could build stronger networks.”

Related: What is Food Insecurity? FoodShare’s Paul Taylor Explains (Plus, What Canadians Can Do About It)

What were your earliest experiences in an industry dominated by men?

Jennifer Huether: “That’s a great question. Personally, I started out in the wine business about 22 years ago. I fell in love with wine, started taking some courses and became a sommelier. I can honestly say to you that, back then, I would look around and I could name maybe two other women sommeliers in Toronto — a massive, metropolitan city. And that certainly felt like the case wherever I went — whether I was flying to England for exams or on wine trips that were led by different countries, we [women] were always a very small minority in the group. At that time it was also a bit surprising for people to come across you, so they would unintentionally start mansplaining wine to you because they didn’t understand that you’d studied it or worked in it for several years.”

Related: Celebrating 10 Female Chefs That We Love, From Anna Olson to Molly Yeh

What shifts have you started to see since starting Femmes du Vin in 2016?

EP: “It’s two steps forward, one step back. I look at the top positions in our area [of Toronto] and we’re seeing a proliferation of women in top positions. But, on the other side, you see a continuation of discouraging things — whether that’s discrimination against women or perhaps harassment or other obstacles that still exist. I’ve worked very hard and I’m grateful for the positions I’ve held in the wine industry, but I’ve been on the other side of the table. I still think there are clear obstacles facing women. Having a family, for a woman in our industry, is tremendously challenging [for example].”

Jennifer Huether

How can Canadian wineries work toward including more women?

JH: “Some confidential conversations I’ve had with [female] winemakers said it was a really, really tough road for them. What they’ve done, sort of like what we’re doing, is create a bit of a community for each other where they’ll get together and chat and support each other.”

Related: Metis Herbalist and Educator Lori Snyder on Urban Foraging and Food Sovereignty

EP: “And what Femmes du Vin is doing is we’re working on a really exciting project with two wineries [The Grange from Prince Edward County and Benjamin Bridge from Nova Scotia] and we’re going to be doing a private label Femmes du Vin wine which is very exciting. We’re working with a local winemaking school to offer internships for women — hopefully BIPOC women — to work with head winemakers for these custom private labels for Femmes du Vin. It will provide them with professional one-on-one experience with head winemakers that they can actually put on their resumes to make them more professionally competitive when it comes to the market… It’s a small thing that might only help a handful of women each year, but we’re really excited to be able to leverage our network and work toward change. A portion of the proceeds from the sales of those wines will also be going into our scholarship fund for women in wine.”

Related: 10 Facts That Will Shock You About Racial Injustice in Canada 

What is your favourite wine?

JH: “Can we give you a wine region or a style? [laughs] For me, we’ve got to go to France and we’ve got to go to Burgundy. Then we have to go with white wine — a Chardonnay. They’re the most intriguing wines in the world.”

EP: “I would have to concur — a beautiful Chardonnay from Burgundy. Anything with the word Montrachet in it. It’s so expressive with its terroir [the natural environment where it’s produced] and it’s versatile with food. It’s something that is a treat — a desert island wine that is irresistible.”

Related: Top Pinot Gris Wines to Sip Right Now

This interview has been edited and condensed.

Feature photo courtesy of Unsplash; second and third photo courtesy of Emily Pearce and Jennifer Huether.

Host Jeff Mauro arrives, as seen on Kitchen Crash, Season 1.

Getting to Know Kitchen Crash’s Jeff Mauro: From Comedy To Cooking

Jeff Mauro’s worn a lot of hats during his career — from a chef’s toque to a ball cap — but he’s best known for his cooking shows. From the love of the humble sandwich to a hard-won place in the Food Network Canada roster, Jeff’s sampled a smorgasbord of skills on his way up. Here are 10 things you may not know about the host of the new Food Network show Kitchen Crash.

He’s Been a Comedian From Childhood

Born and raised in Chicago, Jeff’s been joking around since he was a kid — he started doing plays and comedies in the second grade and began honing his improv chops at Second City youth classes the next year. He even did standup comedy (briefly) in his 20s.

He’s Studied the Art of Television

Jeff’s ease with the camera comes through some serious studying: he has a degree in communications, radio, and television production from Bradley University in Peoria, Ill. and was the valedictorian of his graduating class in 2000.

He Cooked His Way Through College

As the kitchen steward at the Sigma Chi fraternity house at Bradley, Jeff paid for his room and board by practicing his cooking skills on his fellow students. “I remember making everyone sit down and enjoy a nice dinner with wine,” he said in an interview with Spoon University. “It was pretty funny turning this crazy animal house into a place where we enjoyed a civil supper.”

 

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He Has Professional Training in Cooking

During a stint in Hollywood pursuing his comedy and cooking career, Jeff made his bones the old school way — by enrolling in Le Cordon Bleu culinary program to hone his cooking chops, according to his bio.

Deli Runs in His Blood

After moving back to his hometown of Chicago, he opened up Prime Time Deli & Catering in Westmont, Ill., with his older cousin Dave, a chef. Jeff was also behind the now-defunct Pork ’n Mindy’s and now builds sandwich kits for his brand, Mauro Provisions.

Chef By Day, Actor By Night

Jeff split his time between slinging sandwiches and singing on stage at Piper’s Alley Theatre as Tony in the Chicago production of the interactive and kitschy musical, Tony and Tina’s Wedding. “I auditioned as a waiter and worked my way up to the Tony role,” he told Love In The Time Of Coronavirus.

He Has a Podcast With His Sister, Emily

One of four siblings, Jeff gets in lots of family time — especially with his sister Emily, with whom he does the podcast Come On Over (which has recently been spun off into a cookbook). Jeff jokes about the high ratings amongst his family members: “We are the ‘#1 New Podcast hosted by siblings’ as voted on by at least 6 of my 9 Aunts,” he posted on Instagram.

 

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He’s No Stranger to the Food Network Canada Audience

Although Jeff auditioned three times for The Next Food Network Star before ultimately winning season 7, he’s making up for lost time. He’s made appearances on Chopped, Beat Bobby Flay, Guy’s Grocery Games, and judged Chopped Junior and Cupcake Wars. He also spun off his niche from The Next Food Network Star into three seasons of Sandwich King and currently co-hosts The Kitchen and his new show, Kitchen Crash.

He Has Two Mini Golden Doodles Called Jojo and Pinot G

Jeff’s fallen in puppy love with his two tiny doggos, who have their own Instagram account (@jojoandpinot) which currently sits at over 6,300 followers. The pups apparently prefer yak bones and turkey to sandwiches, however.

 

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His Family Sometimes Acts As His Camera Crew

During pandemic times, Jeff’s wife Sarah and son Lorenzo helped out with camera and styling duties during socially distanced filming for some of his television appearances.

 

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And Once More With Feeling: Jeff Loves to Belt Out the Classics

Whether he’s serenading a ballpark with an enthusiastic version of “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” during a Cubs game or taking a happy birthday wish to operatic heights, Jeff isn’t afraid to attack each song with gusto.

Watch Kitchen Crash January 10 at 10ep and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

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