Good Eats: The Return

Alton Brown is Back With Good Eats: The Return 

Fans of the original Good Eats may remember all the elements that made the show great: quirky puppets, costumes and power tools all wielded by a friendly neighbourhood mad genius named Alton Brown who showed a generation how to cook, and cook right.

Now, Good Eats: The Return (airing on August 31 at 10 PM E/T) is bringing back the zany fun — and sound scientific principles — to the screen, two decades later. We caught up with Alton to spill the secrets on the new season of Good Eats: The Return, and how the show has developed through the years.

Host Alton Brown, as seen on Good Eats: The Return, Season 15.

Host Alton Brown, as seen on Good Eats: The Return, Season 15.

Premiering on Food Network in 1999, the original Good Eats ran for 13 seasons, covering off cooking techniques, gear, and gadgets all the while providing home cooks with a road map to explore the best way to tackle detailed recipes. Don’t think for a minute that Brown has been taking it easy since then: with host duties on Cutthroat Kitchen, Iron Chef Gauntlet and a live tour showing off his prodigious musical chops, he’s been as busy as ever. 

Still, he couldn’t let the Good Eats concept alone for too long, revisiting his favourite episodes with Good Eats: Reloaded last year. Reloaded looked at essential topics such as roast chicken, chocolate, pie and burgers. “I had always planned on bringing Good Eats back, but when I realized I had the opportunity to go back and fix old shows with Reloaded, It got me started about a new visual language and working with the crew I had worked with for so many years,” says Alton.“It was a refresher course in certain ways.”

Now, with Good Eats: The Return, Alton is putting those key skills he’s learned to work on brand new episodes. He promises everything from a bread episode straight out of science fiction (“We’re doing a wild sourdough show that is set in a post-apocalyptic world, but it’s still in my kitchen. It’s after a zombie apocalypse and a nuclear blast and the reawakening of a giant dinosaur,” he says), to a new take on classics such as steak tartare. “We tell stories about food, and we tell stories about a very wide array of foods. And we won’t do a recipe if a story can’t drive it,” he says.

Alton Brown on the set of Good Eats: The Return

Alton Brown on the set of Good Eats: The Return

Fans can also expect a return of the tried and truly-tested recipes that made the original Good Eats a success. “I think that what people like with me is that they know that everything’s been vetted to death,” says Alton. “We’ve looked at the information six ways from Wednesday.”

To kick off the season, Alton visits a classic chicken parmesan recipe, based on high demand from the fans. He applied his trademark methodical approach, delving into the history of not just the dish, but the idea of Italian-American cuisine in general. “What we believe to be Italian food is 100 percent an American thing, which came out of a very specific immigrant experience. Chicken parmesan was an immigrant upgrade of eggplant parmesan, based on availability,” he says. “The problem is, if you treat chicken like eggplant, it becomes a very different kind of dish. So to get the most out of the chicken, you’ve got to reengineer the dish, which we did. But I never would have come to that unless I had understood the evolution, not only of the dish, but of the Italian American immigrant experience and the birth of Italian food.”

Good Eats: The Return is also coming back at a new time in food culture, where online sourcing and savvy viewers are changing how the show is made. “We used to have to call grocery stores to see if they had certain ingredients and now, we don’t have to worry about that anymore,” says Alton. “And because of things like the internet and social media, people know more about food.”

With this season’s episode on shakshuka, for example, this viewer knowledge meant that Alton could approach the topic differently. “A few years ago, no-one knew what shakshuka was — they thought it was a basketball player,” he jokes. “Now, everybody knows what shakshuka is, so there’s a lot more acceptable avenues that one can take telling culinary stories.”

One thing that hasn’t changed with Good Eats — and never will — is Alton’s desire to make family-friendly viewing for everyone to enjoy. “There are people that watched this show with their parents in 2003 who are now introducing their children to the show,” he says. “The highest honour is when people come up to me and say, ‘this was the one thing we watched together as a family’. I want to still make media that can connect generations under a roof. I always want this show to be viewed by people from age 4 to 400.”

Watch the first two episodes of Good Eats: The Return on Food Network Canada on August 31, 2019, starting at 10 PM E/T.

Don’t Toss ‘Em! 5 Seriously Delicious Ways to Use Broccoli Stems

Food waste is a big issue here in Canada, yet there are plenty of easy, commonly overlooked things you can do at home to dramatically reduce your own waste footprint. For instance: finding creative (and tasty!) ways to eat the often discarded parts of fruits and veggies. Most people are quick to toss away leaves, peels, stems and stalks, when really, these are delicacies that can lend flavour, texture and vibrancy to so many dishes (proof: these delicious uses for leftover food scraps).

One of our favourite neglected ingredients is broccoli stems. Once peeled, they’re sweet and crunchy, and when cooked, they’re incredibly tender. Broccoli stems are also quite versatile: you can shred them into rice, spiralize them into noodles, blitz them into hummus or pesto, add them to broths, blend them into soups and even roast them into french fries! Read on to learn how it’s done.

1. Broccoli “Rice”

Broccoli rice can be used as a wonderful substitute for white rice, brown rice or cauliflower rice. Use it to make fried rice, add it to mac and cheese, bake it into a savoury casserole with other veggies, or simply add it to a salad.

Ingredients:
4 broccoli stems

Directions:
1. Using a paring knife or peeler, peel the tough skin of the stem.
2. Run the stems along a grater, or if using a food processor, install the grating blade and run the stems through the feeder tube.
3. Squeeze out any excess moisture.

2. Broccoli Slaw

You may have seen broccoli slaw in ready-to-go bags at the grocery store, but it’s so easy and quick to make at home. Broccoli stems hold up in a slaw, they’re hearty and retain dressing really well so they don’t get soggy. Like any slaw, you can add whichever veggies you love and make different style dressings to go along with it, like soy sesame, yogurt dill or citrus and honey.

Ingredients:

Slaw
2 broccoli stems, julienned
2 carrots, julienned
1 cup sliced purple cabbage
½ cup roughly chopped mixed herbs (basil, mint, cilantro, parsley)

Dressing
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp honey
1 Tbsp whole-grain mustard
Pinch of sea salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Using a paring knife or peeler, peel the outer tough skin of the broccoli stem and then thinly julienne it. If using a food processor, install the grating blade and run stems through.
2. Julienne the carrots, thinly slice the purple cabbage and roughly chop the herbs. You can also grate the carrots with the grating blade on the food processor.
3. Toss everything together in a bowl.
4. Whisk the dressing in a separate dish, then pour over the slaw. The slaw can be kept in the fridge for up to 4 days.

3. Broccoli Noodles

If you’re looking for low-carb options, broccoli noodles can replace traditional pasta (read: 10 satisfying weeknight recipes where veggies replace carbs). The best broccoli noodles are made using a spiralizer, but if this isn’t a kitchen gadget you own, opt for a veggie peeler instead!

Ingredients:
2 broccoli stems

Directions:
1. Using a paring knife or peeler, peel the outer tough skin of the broccoli stem.
2. If using a spiralizer, run it through to create noodles, or use your peeler, and continue to peel until you have flat, long tagliatelle-style noodles.

4. Broccoli Hummus

When broccoli stems are lightly steamed, it takes the bitter edge off. The stems are also more mild in flavour than the florets, so the broccoli taste in this hummus recipe doesn’t overpower. Combining with other classic ingredients makes for a unique twist on an already fantastic snack staple. Smear it onto sandwiches, use it to dip fresh veggies and crackers, or have it act as dressing for pasta salad.

Ingredients:
3 broccoli stems
¼ cup tahini
½ lemon, juiced
1 garlic clove
¼ cup fresh parsley (optional)
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
2-3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Directions:
1. Using a paring knife or peeler, peel the outer tough skin of the broccoli stem. Lightly steam until tender.
2. In a food processor, add all ingredients, except olive oil. Begin to blitz, then add 1 Tbsp of oil at a time through the feeder tube until creamy and perfectly blended. If the mixture is too thick, you can add a few spoonfuls of water as needed.

4. Broccoli Fries

This is one of our favourite ways to devour broccoli stems. They have a firm texture, which makes them perfect for roasting into a french fry. When roasted, the stems become slightly sweet, and soften on the outside, while the middle still retains its satisfying crunch. You can eat these as is or dip them into hummus, pesto or even ketchup.

Ingredients:
4 broccoli stems
1 to 2 Tbsp avocado oil
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
¼ tsp granulated garlic

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Using a paring knife or peeler, peel the outer tough skin of the broccoli stem, then slice into french fry shapes.
3. Place the “fries” on a baking sheet, drizzle with oil and season with salt, pepper and garlic. Ensure the pieces are spread out so they have a chance to crisp.
4. Roast for 25-30 minutes until lightly browned.

Don’t stop there. Here are 15 veggies to regrow in your kitchen, genius tips to make food last longer and the 10 most wasteful cooking habits to kick.

College Grocery List: The Only 5 Ingredients You Need to Make Multiple Meals

Headed to college this fall? Wondering how you’re going to feed yourself with a limited budget, equipment and facilities? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with this list of five ingredients you’ll want to keep on hand, so you’ll only be 30 or so minutes away from an ultra-tasty meal. You can stretch these ingredients into a multitude of simple dishes that’ll keep you well-fed and satisfied throughout the school year (no cafeteria required).

1. Spaghetti

A staple item in most households, spaghetti is something you’ll want to always have on hand because it’s so versatile. Worried about the dishes? Did you know that with many pasta dishes you can cook the spaghetti right in the sauce? Less cleanup is always a good thing!

● Make Cacio e Pepe, a classic dish where all the ingredients are cooked together in one pot, and the sauce reduces while the pasta cooks, no draining necessary. You don’t even need to wait for the water to boil!

● You can’t go wrong with Spaghetti and Meatballs, a dependable dinner staple that’ll fill you right up. Do yourself a favour and make a big batch of Meatballs and Sauce to keep in your freezer, so you’ve got a proper meal at your fingertips any time!

● Looking for something different? This Spaghetti and Meatball Bake lets you eat spaghetti and meatballs by the slice instead of the bowl! Each slab of this easy-to-prepare casserole has tiny meatballs and pockets of cheese. Change it up by using cooked sausage slices, or add extra veggies if you have them on hand.

● Got extra cooked spaghetti? No problem – this Genius 20-Minute Spaghetti Frittata is a great way to disguise leftovers as a completely new meal!

2. Eggs

If you’re going to keep one “fresh” food on hand, it has to be eggs. They’re so versatile: you can use them in breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes for an easy, tasty protein fix. Hard or soft-boil them, fry them or use them in these recipe suggestions – the possibilities are endless!

● A classic way to use eggs and all the “bits and pieces” in your fridge is in a Veggie-Filled Frittata. Not only are they simple to make, it’s a “one and done” dish that cooks up in less than 30 minutes. It also makes for tasty leftovers.

● Looking for something a little more substantial? Whip up a Quick Quiche. If you use store-bought pie crust, this meal could not be any easier. Once again, you can customize the filling according to which ingredients you have on hand. It’s excellent to make on the weekend for meals throughout the week, and pairs perfectly with a Simple Green Salad.

● Eggs are also a staple ingredient for brunch. Dishes like Eggs Benedict that you might enjoy in a restaurant are actually fairly simple to make at home. Got eggs? Got English muffins? You’re halfway there! Even that fancy sounding Hollandaise sauce is simple to make at home.

● Lastly, all students need a reliable on-the-go meal that can stand-in for breakfast, lunch or as a healthy between-class snack hack. These Prosciutto-Wrapped Egg Cups are here for you.

3. Canned Tomatoes

Canned tomatoes should be a staple in anyone’s pantry, but particularly in a college student’s, because of how versatile they are. A simple can of tomatoes can transform into any number of dishes. Bonus? If you have an immersion blender or mini blender, you can make your own tomato juice!

● Are you a fan of breakfast for lunch or dinner? Shakshuka should be a go-to meal of yours. Stewed veggies with poached eggs makes an excellent quick, healthy meal for one, but it’s easy to batch up if you’re cooking for a crowd! Use a Quick Ratatouille as a base for even more flavour. You can also make the Ratatouille on its own for a quick and easy meal to serve over rice, or with crusty bread to soak up the sauce.

● A foolproof way to transform a can of tomatoes is to make Tomato Soup (with grilled cheese, obviously). This tasty version features mini bacon grilled cheese sandwiches, taking things up a notch to create the ultimate comfort food pairing.

● Get inspired by the flavours of Middle Eastern cuisine and whip together a Moroccan Vegetable Couscous Dish in just 30 minutes. Canned tomatoes are used as the base, together with frozen squash and a can of chickpeas.

● Why let a can of tomatoes sit untouched on your shelf, when Skillet Chicken Parmesan could be in your future? Use crushed canned tomatoes, or tomato puree for the base for a quick, comforting dinner that certainly beats the cafeteria.

4. Frozen Mixed Vegetables

Trying to eat healthy on a college student’s budget isn’t always easy, especially when you factor in the cost of fresh fruits and vegetables. One way around this is to substitute frozen veggies where possible. Flash frozen when in season, they’re the next best thing compared to fresh, and also budget friendly. If you have these in your freezer, there are so many ways you can feed yourself!

● A classic way to use frozen vegetables is in a Quick Fried Rice. Add a splash of soy sauce for flavour and you’ve got yourself a healthy meal in a flash. Incorporate chicken, beef or tofu for extra protein if desired, or simply make a Plain Omelette and chop it into the rice and veggies for a restaurant favourite that’s easy to replicate at home.

● Looking to batch cook a recipe to enjoy throughout the week? If you’ve got frozen veggies on hand, you’ve got the makings of a tasty Vegetable Soup. Add cooked leftover turkey or chicken for a complete meal in a bowl!

● Hankering for some comfort food? Ramp up your Casserole game by adding a medley of frozen veggies into the mix. This drool-worthy recipe by Alton Brown is a creative (and easier) take on chicken pot pie.

● Grill your frozen vegetables, then add them to hearty Vegetarian Burritos. Serve with rice or salad on the side for a satisfying meal in a flash!

5. English Muffins

While you might not always have fresh bread on hand,  if you have a small freezer, store English muffins, which are the perfect base for so many great recipes! The obvious way to use these is toasted with butter and a sweet or savoury topping, but there are plenty of creative ways to fancy them up and make them all the more meal-worthy.

● We’ve already seen how muffins can be used for Eggs Benedict, but how about for a proper Breakfast Sandwich or even in place of a Burger Bun? They’re arguably the most versatile bread product there is, so keep an extra frozen pack in the fridge for when you’re in a meal pinch!

● Craving French Toast, but don’t have any bread on hand? Opt for English muffins instead, served alongside fresh fruit, eggs and bacon for a hearty meal that’ll keep you full and energized through all your morning classes.

● We’re a bit obsessed with these Easy English Muffin Pizzas (read: no need to worry about wasting precious time making the dough!), which can be assembled ahead and kept in the freezer for a satisfying anytime snack or meal. They’re perfect for those late-night study sessions.

● Other creative uses for English muffins include subbing them to make a sweet Bread Pudding, using them as the base for Tuna Melts, or even chopping them and drizzling with oil to make Crispy Croutons!

For more quick cooking tips and hacks, see these 35 budget-friendly recipes with canned beans, our best affordable chicken dinners and 25 cheap dinner ideas for two that won’t break the bank.

Anna Olson’s Best Recipes for a Successful Bake Sale

Making treats for a school bake sale (or an office bake sale, for that matter) can end up feeling like dreaded homework. But with a little planning and some good ideas, you’ll be all set for an A+ when it comes to Bake Sale 101.

First rule of thumb: make sure you’re mindful of food allergies. If you can, try to display the ingredient list of each of your goodies — it will definitely be appreciated! Here are some tips and recipes to ensure your treats will be a hit!

Try Anna Olson’s School-Safe Granola Bars

 1. Steer clear of all nuts, not just peanuts, with school-safe recipes

Anna’s Granola bar recipe uses seeds to add that expected crunch. You can always personalize your granola bars by swapping out the dried fruits or seeds, depending on your preference, and adding little extras like chocolate chips or mini marshmallows.

Get the recipe for Raspberry Peach Fruit Leather.

2. Make homemade versions of sugary snacks

Turn addictive snacks like fruit leather into a healthy treat by making them at home. Then package up your homemade fruit roll-ups in little bags with ribbons and tags for an office bake sale. Bonus: they’re super easy to make! And make sure to save some for yourself — I like to keep some in a jar at my desk for that mid-afternoon craving.

3. Try quick alternatives to bake sale favourite recipes

Want to make a cupcake, but not actually bother with a cupcake? These Pumpkin Spice Cake Cookies are portioned on to a regular cookie tray using an ice cream scoop. Then they are topped with a slather of cream cheese frosting taking them over the top. Take it to the next level á la pumpkin spice latte, and stir in a teaspoon of espresso powder into the frosting.

4. Make sure there are alternatives for those on special diets

There are also those occasions when a cupcake is exactly what is needed (no matter your dietary restrictions). These pretty cupcakes are gluten-free, substituting in coconut flour. And they are absolutely delightful! While I decorate each with a buttercream rosette, you can top your cupcakes however you choose. Get the recipe for Flourless Mini Cupcakes.

Looking for more baked goods from the Queen of Baking? Find a little inspiration with Anna Olson’s Very Best Cupcake Recipes and Anna Olson’s Best New Dessert Recipes.

The 5 Best Sustainable Seafood Options to Eat (Plus Recipes!)

Seafood is a staple in the Canadian diet, but choosing sustainable options can be confusing. According to the Ocean Wise Seafood Program, sustainable seafood is defined as farming or catching species of fish in a way that ensures their long term health and the health of the greater marine ecosystem. Right now, 85-90% of the world’s fish stocks are over-exploited, so organizations like Ocean Wise, Seafood Watch and Marine Stewardship Council are working hard to ensure we make the right choices when it comes to our seafood, not only to preserve future generations of fish, but also to protect our oceans and our health. Here, we break down the best sustainable seafood for you to buy and start cooking.

1. Arctic Char (Farmed)

Arctic char may look similar to salmon or rainbow trout with its pinky flesh, but its texture is more delicate with a milder flavour. You can cook it simply with a little lemon, salt and pepper, or get creative and smear a rich miso glaze on top. Arctic char is farmed in indoor recirculating tanks in the US, Canada and Iceland, which are considered one of the most environmentally responsible designs. This method of raising fish ensures the water is treated and filtered, decreasing the risk of pollution, and minimizing any negative impact on other aquatic habitats.


Get the recipe for Pan-Seared Arctic Char with Miso Gastrique

2. Cod (Pacific)

Cod is a buttery, delicate option that’s often touted as the “not-so-fishy” fish (so seafood skeptics may find it more palatable). Cod was a large part of Canada’s history, but unfortunately, in the 1990’s the cod industry off the shore of Newfoundland collapsed, and the stocks were depleted. Now, the best cod to buy is caught just off the coast of Alaska, using either long-line, pots or bottom-trawl methods. All of these methods impact the ocean, either by damaging the ocean floor or harvesting non-targeted fish species, but these Alaskan cod fisheries are so incredibly well-managed that they ensure regulations exist to evaluate fish stocks and reduce negative impacts to the seafloor.


Get the recipe for 30-Minute Cod with Lemony Braised Fennel

3. Albacore Tuna (B.C. & Atlantic)

It may shock you to see tuna on our list of the most sustainable seafood, but tuna that has been pole or troll caught, using lines off the coast of British Columbia and the Atlantic, are great choices. These methods reduce the rates of by-catch (unintentionally catching other species of fish), and if non-targeted fish species are caught, they can be released. Fishing this way also prevents damage to habitats, since these methods don’t touch the ocean floor. You can find albacore tuna fresh, frozen or canned. It’s most commonly known as the “white meat” tuna, and it’s the heart of a delicious tuna sandwich.


Get the recipe for Albacore Tuna Crumpwich

4. Shellfish: Clams, Mussels, Oysters, Scallops (Farmed)

Shellfish are a popular part of Canadian cuisine, from seared scallops to steamed mussels and clams to freshly shucked oysters. They’re farmed mainly in Eastern Canada and British Columbia using the off-bottom method, meaning they use floating rafts, bags or suspended ropes to raise the shellfish. Off-bottom farming doesn’t touch the ocean floor, and there is minimal by-catch, if any, so it’s incredibly sustainable. Shellfish are also known as filter feeders, because they eat particles found in the water, which actually filters and cleans it, allowing other marine life to thrive.


Get the recipe for East Coast Summer Scallops with Pea Puree 

5. Sablefish (Alaska & B.C.)

Sablefish, also known as black cod, is a true delicacy. It’s buttery, velvety, mild and oh-so delicious, and luckily, it’s also sustainable. Sablefish is most commonly found along the pacific coast, especially near British Columbia and Alaska where the stocks are healthy. These fisheries are well-managed and have strong regulations that assess stocks, fishing levels, by-catch rates and restrict gear and entry in certain areas. This ensures there is no over-fishing or depletion of non-targeted fish.


Get the recipe for Roasted Sablefish in Dashi Broth 

Fore more handy pointers, we’ve rounded up the best chef-approved tips when it comes to buying and cooking fish.

15-Minute Gluten-Free Tabbouleh Pasta Salad You’ll Make Weekly

It’s important to have quick, healthy and crowd-pleasing recipes in your dinner rotation that can be tossed together when you’re in a pinch, or even when you’re not! This vibrant tabbouleh dish is the perfect lettuce-free salad to whip up when you’re looking for something fresh with minimal prep involved. The only real cooking is boiling gluten-free pasta before combining with vibrant, zesty, raw ingredients.

Gluten-Free Tabbouleh Pasta Salad

Prep Time: 7 minutes
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked gluten-free fusilli
4 cups water
1 cup fresh parsley, minced
½ cup fresh mint, minced
2 mini cucumbers, diced
1 cup diced tomatoes
3 Tbsp diced red onion
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 small clove garlic, minced
¼ cup lemon, squeezed
¼ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp pepper

Directions:

1. Add lots of water and salt to a pot, allow to boil, then toss in the pasta and cook according to the package directions. When cooked, drain, rinse and cool slightly.
2. If you’re using a food processor, install the “S” blade, place the herbs inside and blitz until they’re minced – but do not over blitz into an herby paste! Alternatively, you can chop them with your knife until minced. 

3. Dice the cucumbers, tomatoes and red onion.
4. Place all ingredients in the bowl and season with extra-virgin olive oil, minced garlic, lemon, sea salt and pepper.
 

Looking for more quick and painless meal ideas? We’ve got 20 easy 15-minute dinner recipes and a 15-minute cheesy one-pot pasta. If you’re gluten-free, these delicious dinner ideas and party appetizers are here to please your palate.

anna-olson-icing-a-cake

Anna Olson’s Best Fixes for Your Biggest Baking Fails

When it comes to baking, nobody is perfect. Even expert bakers  have bad days in the kitchen, but the best part about messing up is learning from those mistakes.

Whether you’re baking a cake, whipping up a batch of cookies, or trying your hand at homemade pie dough, the next time you head into the kitchen, let Anna Olson show you how to fix your biggest baking fails.

Classic-Chocolate-Chip-Cookies

Make Anna Olson’s Classic Chocolate Chip Cookies.

1. Why do my chocolate chip cookies spread too much when baking?

There are two main reasons why your cookies all meld together into one giant sheet while baking. The first is that your butter could be too soft. An easy fix for that is to scoop the dough onto a pan, and then chill it for an hour before baking.

Your cookies could also fall flat if you use too much sugar or not enough flour. Even a seemingly harmless extra tablespoon of sugar could cause the cookies to spread because sugar liquefies as it bakes. Be sure to use measuring spoons and cups and follow the instructions for the best results.

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Luscious Lemon Coconut Cake.

2. How do I stop my cake from sinking in the centre?

A common culprit that causes your cake to sink is an incorrect oven temperature. Just because your oven beeps and the display indicates that it’s 350ºF doesn’t mean that the temperature is accurate. An oven that runs too hot may make your cake look done when it really isn’t, or if the temperature oscillates, your ingredients can’t set at the right time and the cake sinks. The best solution is to purchase an oven thermometer and manually adjust how you set your oven.

Another cause is inactive baking powder or baking soda. If you don’t bake on a regular basis, always be sure to check the expiry date on your baking powder. For baking soda, replace it every three to four months and use the older box in the fridge as a deodorizer.

3. What causes my cheesecake to crack in the centre?

There are a few key steps to remember when baking a cheesecake. First, when adding eggs to your batter, mix them in on a low speed to prevent air working into the batter. Second, run a palette knife around the inside edge of the pan within 15 minutes of the cheesecake coming out of the oven. That way, if the cheesecake contracts, it will easily pull away from the sides without causing it to crack or tear in the centre. Finally, be sure to cool the cheesecake completely to room temperature before chilling. Your cheesecake can be refrigerated when the bottom of the pan is cool to the touch, not the sides.

Making a cheesecake? Try Anna Olson’s recipe for Classic New York Style Cheesecake.

Try Anna Olson’s Chocolate Banana Muffins.

4. How do I prevent peaked tops on muffins?

When your muffins come out of the oven with peaked tops, this is a sign of overmixing. To get those perfect muffin tops, mix your batter by hand instead of using electric beaters. When hand mixing, use a gentle stirring motion until the point where flour is no longer visible.

5. Can I still use curdled custard?

Curdled custard means that the eggs in the custard have overcooked, but don’t throw it away and start over. While still hot, put the custard into a food processor or blender, and puree on high speed. Strain the custard into a dish, cool and chill as usual, and no one will even know – it’ll be smooth and perfect!

Put your baking skills to use with Anna Olson’s Peach Raspberry Custard Tart.

6. What is seized chocolate, and how do I avoid it?

If your chocolate has seized, it will take on a dull, curdled look, it will not be smooth, and some oil (which is actually cocoa butter) will be floating. To prevent seizing, melt your chocolate in a metal bowl placed over a pot filled with an inch of barely simmering water while slowly stirring. The steam from the water gently melts the chocolate. Try and avoid using the microwave to melt your chocolate, but if you must, use a lower heat setting.

If your chocolate seizes, remove it from the heat and add a few drops of tepid water. Stir slowly and gently with a spatula where the water was added, then increase the radius of your stirring motion to return the chocolate to its smooth state.

Anna Olson’s Chocolate Fruit Truffles are a must-try for chocolate lovers. Still not enough chocolate? Check out Anna Olson’s best chocolate recipes.

Lemon-Meringue-Pie-anna-olson

Get the recipe for Anna Olson’s Lemon Meringue Pie.

7. Why does my pie dough crack when rolled or shrink when baked?

Dough cracking while rolling may not be a sign of anything wrong with the dough itself. It is often that the butter within the dough is too cold, causing the cracking. To prevent this, try pulling out the dough 30 minutes before rolling. It will roll out with less cracking (and far less effort).

If your dough shrinks when rolled or after baking, it’s a sign that it needed “relaxing.” The proteins (gluten) in flour become elastic when “exercised,” i.e. making and rolling the dough, and time is the only fix. If your dough springs back when rolling, pop it back into the fridge to rest for 20 to 45 minutes. To avoid a crust that shrinks when baking, chill the lined pie shell for 30 minutes before baking.

8. Is there a way to prevent a cake from breaking when it’s turned out of the pan?

All baked goods, including cakes, tarts, cookies and muffins, are fragile directly out of the oven. Be sure to wait 15 to 20 minutes before turning them out to cool.

If you suspect that the problem may be caused by the pan (cake will stick to a scratched pan even if it’s greased), then line the pan with parchment paper. Have the parchment hang just above the edges of the pan so you can use it to easily lift out the cake.

Test your baking abilities with Anna Olson’s Carrot Cake.

9. Is there a secret to preventing butter tart filling from bubbling over or sinking in the centre?

Butter tart filling bubbles over or sinks in the centre due to over-mixed filling. The eggs hold in the air which rises in the oven, causing the filling to overflow while baking and then sink immediately when taken out of the oven. The secret is to whisk the filling by hand until it’s evenly blended.

Sugar crystals in the bottom of the tarts are also caused by over-mixing, causing the sugar to separate from the eggs as the filling bakes. Adding a teaspoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to the filling ensures the sugar will completely dissolve as the filling bakes.

Anna Olson shows you how to impress your guests with a butter tart buffet.

 

10. How can I avoid lemon square filling from seeping under the crust base?

The key to making squares with a fluid filling poured over a base, such as lemon squares, is how you mix the base. It should feel crumbly, so don’t over-mix it. Gently press the base into the pan, and make sure a bit of it comes up the edges and goes into the corners. Do not pack it in firmly or it will pull away from the edges while it bakes, leaving a gap for the fluid lemon filling to seep underneath.

Give Anna Olson’s Lemon Meringue Squares a try.

Looking for more? Try Anna Olson’s Best New Desserts.

Easy 20-Minute Leftover Pasta Frittata With Radicchio Salad

Often, we end up cooking more pasta that we can chew on a giving evening, which means: extra helpings for the week ahead! But before you lather those leftover spaghetti noodles in tomato sauce and call it a meal, think outside the pan. This creative 20-minute dish gives leftover pasta a delicious makeover, resulting in a comforting, cheesy frittata. Top with fresh basil and tomatoes, and serve alongside prosciutto and a simple salad for a complete bacon and egg Italian mash-up!

Leftover Pasta Frittata with Quick Radicchio Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Frittata
2 slices prosciutto or thick sliced bacon
5 eggs
⅓ cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
¾ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
4 cups leftover cooked spaghetti or other long pasta
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
⅔ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish
Basil leaves

Radicchio Salad
1 head radicchio, torn
1 Tbsp olive oil
Balsamic vinegar (optional)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Cook prosciutto or bacon in a 10-inch heatproof skillet or cast-iron pan over medium heat, turning once, until crisp. Set aside. Wipe pan clean.
3. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with sour cream, and salt and pepper until blended. Toss in pasta and 1/3 cup of the cheese.

4. In same pan, heat 2 Tbsp of the olive oil over medium, add pasta mixture and cook without stirring, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining 1/3 cup cheese. Transfer to oven.
5. Cook until puffed and slightly jiggly, about 5 minutes. For a crispy browned top, broil 2-3 minutes. Top with tomatoes and basil, and serve with bacon/prosciutto (or chop in pieces to scatter on top).

6. Tear radicchio and toss with olive oil and balsamic vinegar (if desired), garnish with shaved Parmesan.

Tip: Radicchio lettuce is slightly bitter and lends itself easily to a good olive oil and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and Parmesan cheese for the quickest and elegant weeknight salad.

Tip: The centre will look slightly loose, puffed and jiggly, the hot pan will continue to cook the frittata with residual heat called carryover cooking.

How long do leftovers last in the fridge? We break it down. Plus, 30+ meals that taste better as leftovers, and tasty ways to use leftover rice.

5 Incredibly Delicious Ways to Make Pesto Without Basil

Pesto is a summer staple, whether it’s tossed over a fresh pasta salad, used as a dip or drizzled over grilled veggies. While it’s commonly made with basil, we thought we’d shake it up, get creative and swap in some other unique ingredients like kale, roasted red peppers, peas and even avocado. We may be straying from the classic, but dare we say these basil-free recipes will make you fall even deeper in love with pesto!

1. Avocado Parsley Pesto

Serving: 1 cup

Ingredients:
½ avocado
1 cup parsley
1 garlic clove
1 Tbsp lemon
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper or ¼ tsp pepper
2-3 Tbsp water to thin out

Directions:
Place all ingredients except for the water into the food processor, blitz and add 1 Tbsp of water at a time until you reach the desired creamy consistency.

2. Kale Macadamia Nut Pesto

Serving: 1 cup

Ingredients:
3 cups kale
½ cup toasted macadamia nuts
4 Tbsp grated Parmesan (optional)
2 small garlic clove
2 Tbsp lemon juice
⅔ cup extra-virgin olive oil
½ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper

Directions:
Place all ingredients in a food processor and blitz until desired consistency, smooth or slightly chunky.

3. Pea Pistachio Pesto

Serving: 1 cup

Ingredients:
1 cup peas, cooked from frozen or fresh
2 Tbsp fresh mint
¼ cup pistachios
¼ cup Parmesan (optional)
1 garlic clove
2 Tbsp lemon
1 tsp lemon zest
⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper or ¼ tsp pepper

Directions:
1. Pulse the pistachios in the food processor until a crumbly texture forms.
2. Add in the rest of the ingredients and blitz until smooth.

4. Roasted Red Pepper Sunflower Pesto

Serving: 1 cup

Ingredients:
1 cup roasted red peppers (about 1 ½ peppers)
¼ cup toasted sunflower seeds
⅓ cup parsley
1 garlic clove
1 tsp balsamic vinegar
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper

Directions:
Place all ingredients in a food processor and blitz until desired consistency, smooth or slightly chunky.

5. Mixed Herb Walnut Pesto

Serving: Heaping ½ cup

Ingredients:
½ cup mint
½ cup cilantro
1 cup parsley
⅓ cup toasted walnuts
1 garlic clove
2 Tbsp lemon
⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
A few cracks of pepper

Directions:
Place all ingredients in a food processor and blitz until desired consistency, smooth or slightly chunky.

Don’t let your fresh herbs wilt away. Here are 10 genius ways to use them this season, another must-make summer condiment and our best recipes featuring 10+ garlic cloves.

 

Bento Lunch Boxes: How to Make Colourful Back-to-School Meals Your Kids Will Devour

Packing healthy school lunches that your kids won’t challenge can be just a little stressful, especially if you have a picky eater on your hands. The foods you prep need to energize, nourish and keep your child focused throughout the school day. Luckily, gone are the days of the sad brown bag and that same soggy ham and cheese sandwich. That’s partly thanks to the bento lunch box, which has changed the game, giving parents a far easier method for meal prepping, and kids a way more enjoyable way to eat. Read on for eight genius tips on packing the ultimate back-to-school lunch, plus three bento box ideas you’ll be quick to replicate.

1. Pack the Rainbow

Pack as much colour as you can into your kid’s lunch box. This means lots of vibrant fruits and veggies, so they can get the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients they need to grow healthy and strong. Everyone eats with their eyes first, so when something looks colourful and appetizing, the process of digestion begins. Kids also take eating cues from how food looks, rather than from how it tastes.

Main: Chicken salad sandwich with cucumber, carrots, spinach (or stuffed in a pita or tortilla)
Side: Roasted sweet potato cubes
Snack 1: Blueberries with strawberries sliced into hearts or stars
Snack 2: Edamame beans or green peas
Dessert: Mini chocolate chips with pumpkin seeds

2. Get Creative

Many kids like what’s familiar to them, and if they enjoy eating the same thing every day, one way to change it up is to get creative with how the food is displayed. If your youngster love strawberries, cucumbers or melons, try slicing them into stars one day, cubes the next and hearts the following week. Thread their favourite fruit through a stick to transform them into skewers. Take their sandwich ingredients and roll them into wraps, stuff them into mini pitas or thread them through to make sandwich kebabs.

3. Cover Your Macro & Micronutrients

Ensure your little ones remain fueled throughout the day by sending foods packed with fibre, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals. If you’re already filling lunch boxes with fruits, veggies, seeds, beans/legumes or animal protein and a whole grain, you’re covered. Packing a sweet treat is also a must, so think of more nutritious options like homemade granola bars, better-for-you cookies or healthier muffins. Remember to limit the refined sugar, which can impact your child’s behaviour, energy, focus and mood.

Main: Pesto pasta noodles with sliced cherry tomatoes
Side: Steamed green beans with sesame seeds on top or raw snap peas
Snack 1: Skewered mango and grapes
Snack 2: Cubes of cheese or crispy chickpeas
Dessert: Mini cookies or strawberries with chocolate chips

4. Repurpose Leftovers

Packing school lunches can be a lot of work, so if you can, repurpose dinner leftovers from the night before. If you have leftover chicken, make the lunch box Mexican themed and pack the chicken with avocado, corn and salsa. If you have extra lasagna, cut a square and pack that. You don’t need to start from scratch if you have foods to work with. Also, do your best to pack the night before, and avoid adding another stressful task to an already busy morning!

5. Be School Safe

Nut allergies are quite common these days, and most schools are now nut-free. Keep this in mind when you’re packing back-to-school lunches, and replace classics with nut-free alternatives. For example, if you were going to pack a peanut butter and jam sandwich, swap the PB for sunflower butter. For something like trail mix, ensure it’s made with seeds. If you’re buying snacks, there are loads of allergen-free options out there.

6. Get Your Kids Involved

Studies show that if kids have a hand in helping grow, prep or cook food, they’re more likely to eat it. So involve your children in the packing process. Have them decide what they want to eat – you can even ask them to come up with a meal plan schedule to paste on the fridge. If possible, ask them to help with the prep: maybe they can skewer fruit, or slice strawberries with a kid-safe knife.

Main: Protein pancakes
Side: Heirloom carrots, sliced + dollop of hummus to dip
Snack 1: Crispy chickpeas or raisins
Snack 2: Raspberries and kiwi
Dessert: Orange slices dipped in chocolate or with chocolate chips

7. Keep it Clean

Don’t pack foods that have a strong, offensive smell, or something that’s going to leak all over the rest of the meal. This will pretty much guarantee that your kid will pass on eating his or her lunch!

8. Lunch as an Afternoon Snack

There may be times when you open your child’s lunch box after school, only to discover the meal you lovingly prepared is still sitting there. When your kids come home, they’re usually starving and desperate for a snack. This is the perfect time to offer up these lunch leftovers to ensure the food you spent time making isn’t wasted.

Here, a nutritionist reveals meal prep tips to avoid a sad desk lunch (plus two 10-minute recipes) – because parents deserve inspiring lunches, too!

The Best Restaurants That Are Open Late in Montreal

Canada’s famed culinary city is known for its fresh seafood, thought-out plates, and a smorgasbord of international influences. In short, dining out in Montreal tends to be a memorable experience.

It’s also one that goes late. As Late Nite Eats host Jordan Andino proved on the Montreal episode, The City of Saints has many great after-hours joints worth exploring. Here are 10 of our top picks.

Isle de Garde

1039 rue Beaubien Est

If you’re craving some craft beer and delicious snacks, this hot-spot offers both until 3 a.m. from Thursdays to Saturdays (and it’s open until 1:30 a.m. the rest of the week). That means you can indulge in elevated hot dogs, savoury tarts, and creative cheese concoctions until the break of dawn.

Rouge Gorge

1234 Avenue du Mont-Royal E

If it’s late and you’re in the mood for a good glass of wine and some delicious accompaniments, Rouge Gorge has you covered until 3 a.m. daily. Take your time with a curated cheese or charcuterie board, sample some duck tartare with fried wontons, or dig into a little popcorn shrimp served with wasabi mayo and maple.

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Majestique

4105 Boul St-Laurent

Looking to shuck some late-night oysters while sipping on champagne and living your best life? Or perhaps you just want to keep it real with a foot-long hot dog complete with spicy mustard and salad. Whatever your fancy, this spot serves up food for all kinds of hungry patrons until 3 a.m. daily.

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See More: How to Serve Oysters Like Chef Michael Smith

Pullman

3424 Avenue du Parc

Snacks, platters, classics, and seasonal items grace the menu at this restaurant, which is snuggled into a three-story townhouse. There, servers offer more than 300 wines (50 by the glass), and plates like salmon gravlax, stuffed arancini, or deboned quail until 1 a.m. Thursdays to Saturdays. The rest of the week? You can still get your fill before midnight.

Otto Yakitori

1441 Rue Saint Mathieu

Skewers, skewers, and more skewers are on the late-night menu at this Japanese Shaughnessy Village hot spot, which is open until 1 a.m. weeknights and 2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays (it’s closed Tuesdays). Not in the mood for meat (or tofu) on a stick? The eatery also offers up comforting bowls of ramen and rice bowls, which can sometimes be the perfect late-night snack.

Foeigwa

3001 Rue Notre-Dame Ouest

It’s hard not to feel fancy when dining out at this French-American eatery, which offers plates like tartare with truffles, cheeseburgers with foie gras, and scallops glistening with sherry butter. Add in a menu of boozy floats and milkshakes that are available until 2 a.m. daily, and you basically never want to pass up an opportunity to eat here.

Chez Victoire

1453 Avenue du Mont-Royal E

If your craving goes beyond snack territory, this spot has you covered. Diners that arrive after 10 p.m. have access to a hearty three-course menu with an appetizer, main and dessert, starting at just $25. Because who doesn’t want access to dishes like mushroom risotto, spicy tuna albacore, or molten chocolate cake well into the night?

Chez Lévêque

1030 Avenue Laurier O

Fancy French fare is all over this brasserie’s late-night menu, from stuffed mussels Provencal style and snail puff pastry, to salmon and beef tartare or veal liver in raspberry vinegar sauce. The $25 seatings for an appetizer and main start at 9 p.m., making this some of the most affordable late-night French food in the city.

Monkland Tavern

5555 Avenue de Monkland

Whether it’s a bowl of fresh tagliatelle or rigatoni, a colourful salad of glazed cauliflower and sweet potatoes, or a hearty main of braised short rib or bone marrow, this Tavern has your late-night cravings well covered. Visit the restaurant until 11 p.m. Mondays to Fridays, and stay for a couple of cocktails until 1 a.m. Wednesdays to Saturdays.

Moishes Steakhouse

3961 Saint-Laurent Blvd

A fan-favourite steakhouse with a central European twist, Moishes features an entire “After 9” menu from Wednesdays to Saturdays until midnight. Look for unique offerings like chopped liver and Monte Carlo potatoes, or late-night staples like steak frites and the Moishes hamburger.

Looking for new culinary hot spots to check out? Check out the best late night eats in Toronto or see the restaurant guide for Big Food Bucket List.

This Sweet Honeycomb Cake Involves a Genius Decorating Technique

This un-bee-lievably cute cake is a total show-stopper, and is actually easy to execute, whether served at a birthday party, summer backyard bash (like afternoon tea!) or even a baby shower. The secret decorating tool this cake requires? Bubble wrap! It’s used to create the playful honeycomb decor that embellishes the dessert.

Melted yellow candy or coating chocolate is transferred to a sheet of bubble wrap to cool, creating a large sheet of chocolate with little pockets. Once the “honeycomb” has set, a hexagonal cookie cutter is used to punch out each honeycomb before adorning the cake. This technique can be applied to any cake of your choice, but it’s especially fitting for a tender lemon almond version with honey cream cheese frosting. Trust us when we say this darling dessert will be the buzz of any occasion.

Lemon Almond Cake with Honey Cream Cheese Frosting

Ingredients:

Lemon Almond Cake
1 ½ cup granulated sugar
Zest of one lemon
¾ cup unsalted butter, room temperature
4 eggs, room temperature
1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
¾ cup almond flour
2 ½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
¾ cup sour cream
½ cup fresh lemon juice
1 tsp pure vanilla extract

Honey Cream Cheese Frosting
12 Tbsp cream cheese, room temperature
¾ cup unsalted butter, room temperature
4-5 cups confectioners sugar
¼ cup honey
1-2 Tbsp whole milk
2 tsp vanilla extract

Honeycomb Candy Decor
1 cup yellow candy melts/coating chocolate
Oil-based food colouring (optional)
Bubble wrap

Directions:

Honeycomb Candy Decor
1. Melt candy melts as directed but instructions on packaging in a microwave-safe bowl.

2. While the melted candy melts are still warm, use a spatula or spoon to carefully spread a thick even layer of the candy onto the textured side of the bubble wrap.

3. Let candy layer harden before using a hexagonal cookie cutter to cut out the honeycomb pieces. Alternatively, you can break the honeycomb pieces into shards by hand.

Honey Cream Cheese Frosting
1. Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese and butter together until smooth. With the mixer on low, mix in the remaining ingredients until just combined. Beat on high until fluffy. Add more or less milk until desired consistency is reached.

Lemon Almond Cake
1. Preheat oven to 350°F and grease three 6-inch cake pans.
2. In a medium sized bowl, rub together the lemon zest and sugar with your hands, until sugar becomes fragrant. Set aside.
3. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar until mixture becomes light and fluffy. Add in the eggs, one at a time, and mix until well-combined.
4. In a separate bowl, combine flour, almond flour, baking powder and salt. Whisk together.

5. In large measuring cup, combine the sour cream, lemon juice and vanilla extract.
6. Add half the dry ingredients and half of the wet ingredients to the butter-sugar mixture. Mix together lightly. Add the remainder of the ingredients and mix until combined.
7. Bake the 3 separate cake layers for 33–35 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the middle of each comes out clean.
8. Allow cake layers to cool completely before assembling, frosting and decorating. Then slice, and serve!

Don’t let your cake baking skills stop there. Try your hand at this easy berry, lemon & tahini pound cake or master one of these 25 summer desserts from The Pioneer Woman.

30-Minute Harissa Tofu, Broccoli and Carrot Sheet Pan Dinner

Sheet pan dinners are unfussy and virtually mess-free, with no pots and pans to deal with after a long day. The trick to cooking an entire meal on a baking sheet is choosing the right vegetable and protein combination for even cooking. All that’s left to do? Sit back, relax and dig right in. This 30-minute healthy dinner, that’s vegan-friendly and jam-packed with flavour, will have you doing just that. We even paired it with a tangy cucumber salad that can be whipped up while the tofu, broccoli and carrots get all crispy in the oven. Dinner is served.

30-Minute Harissa Tofu & Broccoli Sheet-Pan Meal with Sumac Cucumber Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Sheet Pan Meal
350g firm tofu, patted dry and cut in 8 slices
5 carrots, halved or quartered lengthwise
¼ cup olive oil, divided
4 Tbsp jarred harissa
4 Tbsp white wine vinegar or cider vinegar
¾ tsp kosher salt or flaked sea salt, divided
1 head broccoli, trimmed and cut into quarters with stem
¾ red onion, cut in wedges
Half lemon, halved

Sumac Cucumber Salad
5 baby cucumbers, cut in chunks
¼ tsp kosher salt or coarse sea salt
½ cup parsley leaves or mint leaves
¼ cup thinly sliced red onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
Half lemon
¾ tsp sumac + more

Directions:

1. Position racks in top and bottom thirds of oven. Preheat to 425°F.
2. Lay tea towel or double layered paper towel on work surface. Layer with tofu; top with another tea towel or double layered paper towel. Press with a baking sheet to absorb liquid.
3. Whisk together 4 Tbsp of the olive oil, harissa, vinegar, and all but the pinch of salt, in a casserole dish.
4. Add tofu and marinate for 5 minutes, turning often. Remove, and arrange on one side of a baking sheet. Repeat with carrots; arrange to other side of baking sheet. Reserve remaining harissa mixture.

Tip: Harissa, a spicy chili condiment, is widely used in North African and Middle Eastern cuisine. Made of crushed chilies, garlic, cumin, coriander, caraway, mint and olive oil, it can be purchased as a paste in a tube or as a jarred sauce. Harissa paste is concentrated, to use in this recipe, reduce to 2 Tbsp and whisk in remaining ingredients.

5. Add broccoli and red onion to another baking sheet. Brush with remaining 2 Tbsp oil, turning to coat and sprinkle with remaining pinch of salt. Roast tofu and vegetables, switching racks after 15 minutes; flip tofu and vegetables and roast until vegetables are tender crisp, about 5 minutes.

Tip: Cut your vegetables into even pieces or you’ll end up with mixed tender and mushy results.

6. Sumac Cucumber Salad: Meanwhile, make the salad. In a medium bowl, sprinkle cucumbers with sumac and salt; stir to combine. Add onion, parsley and squeeze lemon over top. Drizzle with olive oil.
7. Transfer to serving plate and sprinkle with more sumac and parsley if desired.

8. To serve, brush broccoli and tofu with reserved harissa mixture and serve with additional prepared harissa. Divide tofu and vegetables among plates and serve with Cucumber Salad.

Keep the summer sheet pan meals coming with this 25-minute citrus rainbow trout recipe, paired with broccolini and bok choy. We’ve also rounded up 15 sheet pan breakfast bakes to feed a crowd.