Chefs Test Their Grilling Skills Against All-Star Judges in New Show, Fire Masters

Ready, set, GRILL! Food Network Canada’s all-new BBQ series, Fire Masters, is the epitome of trial by fire. The sizzling grilling competition premieres Thursday, March 21 at 10 E/P.

Each week, with the clock ticking, three chefs will have their grilling skills put to the ultimate test as they embark on a fiery three-part culinary challenge that requires them to create a variety of mouthwatering dishes. One chef is eliminated during each of the first two rounds, with the last remaining chef going head-to-head against one incredibly formidable opponent — one of the Fire Masters judges! In the thrilling final round, with a championship title and $10,000 cash prize on the line, the chef and judge fight fire with fire to create a sumptuous three-course meal — with only one victor.

Hosted by Canadian chef Dylan Benoit, who will supervise the grill masters during their challenges and add his expertise to the judges’ deliberations, Fire Masters highlights culinary talent from across North America, including competitors from Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton and Mount Pearl, among others.

The  judges appearing in the inaugural season of Fire Masters are:

  • Kevin Bludso, Los Angeles, CA (Bludso’s BBQ)
  • Mike Callaghan, London, ON (International Pitmaster)
  • Connie DeSousa, Calgary, AB (CHARCUT Roast House, charbar, Alley Burger, Rooftop Bar @ Simmons, Top Chef Canada, Season 1 and All-Stars)
  • Tiffani Faison, Boston, MA (Sweet Cheeks, Tiger Mama, Fool’s Errand)
  • Nicole Gomes, Calgary, AB (Nicole Gourmet Catering, Cluck N’ Cleaver, Top Chef Canada, Season 3 and All-Stars winner)
  • Andy Husbands, Boston, MA (The Smoke Shop)
  • Eddie Jackson, Houston, TX (Rose Hill Beer Garden, Fit Chef Studio, Food Network Star, Christmas Cookie Challenge)
  • Ray “Dr BBQ” Lampe, St. Petersburg, FL (Dr. BBQ)
  • Dale MacKay, Saskatoon, SK (Ayden Kitchen & Bar, Little Grouse on the Prairie, Sticks and Stones, Avenue Restaurant, Top Chef Canada, Season 1 winner)
  • Hugh Mangum, New York City, NY (Mighty Quinn’s Barbeque)
  • Amy Mills, Murphysboro, IL (17th Street Barbecue, OnCue Consulting)
  • Andrea Nicholson, Toronto, ON (Butchies, Top Chef Canada, Season 1 and All-Stars)
  • Devan Rajkumar, Toronto, ON (ChefDev Catering Company)

Fans of other Food Network Canada series will spot a few familiar faces among the judges. Watch for Top Chef Canada alumni such as Le Cordon Bleu-trained culinary master Connie DeSousa, Calgary restauranteur Nicole Gomes and Saskatoon chef Dale MacKay, among others, as they weigh in with their decades of culinary expertise as guest judges.

If you can’t get enough of watching competitors blaze their way to the top, read on to meet the talented chefs who will be taking on the scorching challenges this season.

The Pioneer Woman's Chicken Skillet Lasagna

The Pioneer Woman’s Top Cooking Tips for Easier Weeknight Dinners

Let’s face it: you’ve got enough on your plate during busy weeknights. While we’d all love to be a master chef, the last thing you need at the end of a long day is to improvise an elaborate meal that sucks up your time and energy. Luckily, The Pioneer Woman has some tips and tricks for making weeknight suppers a cinch.

Get the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Skillet Chicken Lasagna

Simple Supper in a Skillet

Making a scratch-made lasagna can be a grueling day-long affair that blows through an array of pots, kitchen utensils, and cutting boards. Forget that hassle, and instead, make The Pioneer Woman’s Skillet Chicken Lasagna in a skillet! This one-pot, one-pan Italian favourite not only minimizes mess but cuts the prep time to 10 minutes. Plus, the dish reheats beautifully – just throw the leftovers in the fridge or freezer and it’s ready to go for weeknight meals. For another inspiring skillet dish that can be pulled together in 16 minutes flat, try Ree Drummond’s Pepperoni Chicken recipe.

The Pioneer Woman's Perfect Pot RoastGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Perfect Pot Roast

One and Done

One-pot meals are a lifesaver! It only takes 15 minutes to prep The Pioneer Woman’s Perfect Pot Roast, and then just “set it and forget it” on the stovetop.  Using a large pot or Dutch oven, let beef simmer in wine, fresh thyme, and rosemary for 3-4 hours until tender. Then, serve pulled or sliced alongside a savoury side, like Grilled Taters with Onion and Garlic. Freeze the leftover meat and make The Pioneer Woman’s Hot Hawaiian Beef Sandwiches for another meal!

DIY Dinner

The Pioneer Woman’s Beef Tacos makes meals easy and fun! Put a tasty taco bar on the table, featuring ground beef sautéed with spicy seasoning and fixings like Cheddar Jack cheese, tomatoes, and lettuce. Then start an assembly line and let the family create their own taco masterpieces.

The Pioneer Woman's Kale Pasta Mason JarGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Kale Pasta Mason Jar Salad

Mason Jar Salad

Take 15 minutes to prep The Pioneer Woman’s Kale Pasta Mason Jar Salad and you’ve got a speedy side for weeknight dinners. It’s easy: just layer pasta, kale, tomato, pine nuts, mozzarella, and olive oil dressing in a mason jar. When it’s time to dig in, shake up the jar, pour into a bowl, and serve family-style. It also makes a fun, portable lunch that the kids will love.

Make the Slow Cooker Your BFF

Slow cookers make cooking a breeze: just plug it in, flip a switch, and watch dinner cook while you take care of other business (like relaxing!). For a  crowd-pleaser, try The Pioneer Woman’s Slow-Cooker Bolognese. While you’re at the office, let the rich, tangy meat sauce braise for 6 hours in the crockpot, and then all you have to do is serve a scoop over spaghetti and add grated Parmesan, basil, and parsley. It’ll be ready when you get home, and you can freeze the leftovers for future weeknight dinners.

Hot Hawaiian Beef SandwichesGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Hot Hawaiian Beef Sandwiches

Cook Once, Eat Twice

If you’re making a meal, why not cook once but eat twice? Turn pot roast leftovers into The Pioneer Woman’s Hot Roast Beef Sandwiches. A comfort classic, each sandwich is layered with provolone, sliced beef, and Ree Drummond’s homemade dressing. Pro tip: assemble a batch the night before and refrigerate for the next day’s dinner. Eating with your hands is a guaranteed hit!

Get the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Spanish Baked Salmon

Sheet Pan Supper

Meals that use multiple pots and pans make kitchen clean-up a hassle. Minimize mess with The Pioneer Woman’s Spanish Baked Salmon: this lightning-fast feast only requires one sheet pan to turn salmon fillets, croutons, red peppers, and green olives into a Spanish-inspired feast. It’s so easy that you’ll be tempted to use a sheet pan every night.

Breakfast For Dinner

Who says you can’t have breakfast for dinner? The Pioneer Woman’s Potato Hash makes a mouth-watering meal anytime and takes only 5 minutes to prepare. Topped with fried egg, russet and sweet potatoes are mixed with red bell peppers, yellow squash, onion, and zucchini. This tasty hash is everything!

The Pioneer Woman's Potato HashGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Potato Hash

Save the Scraps

Don’t toss the scraps – save ‘em for your next recipe! With The Pioneer Woman’s Roasted Potato Peels, turn russet potato peels into a roasted side dish, salad topper or snack. Or upcycle pie scraps into crunchy Cheese and Chipotle Scrap Crackers. A cost-saving and green-friendly kitchen hack!

Overnight Cooking

The Pioneer Woman’s Overnight Chicken Broth is so simple that you can make it in your sleep – literally. Before bedtime, put chicken bones, carrots, celery, parsnips, bay leaves, thyme, onion, salt and pepper into a large slow cooker. Cover with water by 2 inches and then cook on low for 10-12 hours overnight. The next morning, strain the broth through a fine-mesh strainer and refrigerate in mason jars. You’ve got ready-to-use chicken broth for soups and stews.

Make and Reheat Meal

With The Pioneer Woman’s Brie and Broccoli Quiche, no one will guess that this dish is a reheat. This rich, flavourful quiche uses thick slices of chopped Brie, giving the dish a velvety smooth texture that’ll have everyone swooning. Make it ahead of time and then store in the freezer or fridge until you’re ready to serve it.

The Pioneer Woman's Make-Ahead Thanksgiving TurkeyGet the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Turkey

Make-Ahead Turkey

Turkey isn’t just for Thanksgiving! It makes a healthy and hearty weeknight meal with Ree Drummond’s ingenious hack: cut the bird into six sections, which will expedite the roasting time, and cook the night before. The next day, just reheat the bird for an hour and you’ve got a gourmet dinner on the table. Save the leftovers for turkey sandwiches, soups,  stir-fries, or casseroles. Get the recipe for The Pioneer Woman’s Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Turkey.

For more great recipes, watch The Pioneer Woman Saturdays at 12:00 PM E/T.

5 Genius Ways to Use Cornbread Mix (Hint: Buttermilk Pancakes)

It’s always best to have a few easy-peasy dishes in your recipe arsenal to rely on in a pinch. One product we can’t get enough of is cornbread mix. Classic cornbread is oh-so-delicious and perfect to accompany fried chicken, macaroni and cheese or your favourite chili recipe, but with a couple of flourishes, you can whip up a myriad of creative and easy dishes that will have you using this convenient product all the time!

1. Jalapeno and Bacon Cornbread Muffins

This simple recipe involves using the mix as you normally would, and adding one diced jalapeno (keep in the seeds if you want extra spice) and ½ cup (about 6 slices) of cooked, crumbled bacon. Portion into 12 lined muffin cups and bake at 375°F until golden, about 20 minutes. For a cute decoration, top each muffin with a thin slice of jalapeno before baking.

Read More: 45 Totally Awesome Ways to Use a Muffin Tin

2. Maple Pecan Cornbread Cake

A surefire winner, this simple skillet cake can be made by adding 1/2 cup maple syrup and 1 cup chopped pecans to the mix and pouring into a well-buttered cast iron skillet. Bake at 350°F until a cake tester inserted in the centre comes out clean, about 25 to 30 minutes. Once out of the oven, poke the top of the warm cake with a toothpick and brush with a bit more maple syrup. Kick it up a notch by serving warm with a scoop of maple pecan or vanilla ice cream.

3. Savoury Buttermilk Pancakes

This recipe is bound to become your new favourite savoury brunch dish. Make these pancakes by adding 1 cup buttermilk, 1/2 cup shredded old cheddar cheese, 1 egg, 2 Tbsp melted butter to 1 cup of mix along with 3 finely sliced green onions and 1/2 cup of thawed frozen corn kernels. Cook in batches in a non-stick skillet brushed with butter over medium-low until bubbles appear on surface; flip and continue to cook until golden on both sides, about 6 minutes.

Read More: 70 Pancake Recipes That Will Make You Drool

4. Mexican Spiced Cornbread

An exciting twist on regular cornbread, stir 2 Tbsp adobo and 3 chopped chipotle peppers into the batter along with ¼ cup finely chopped cilantro stems, 1 tsp each chili, garlic and onion powders and ½ tsp cumin. Bake as directed on the package until a cake tester inserted in the centre comes out clean.

5. Cornbread Crab Cakes

These delicious cakes will have you coming back for more! Mix together 2 cups crab meat with 2/3 cup cornbread mix, ¼ cup mayonnaise, 1 egg, 2 minced green onions, 2 Tbsp each minced parsley and cilantro, 1 tsp lemon zest and ½ tsp salt. Form into ¼ cup patties and fry in batches in a generously oiled non-stick skillet until golden on both sides, flipping halfway, about 4 to 6 minutes.

Looking for more life-changing cooking hacks? Here are 5 Ways to Fix Over-Salted Food, 5 Tasty Ways to Use Hummus (That Aren’t Dip!) and 5 Make-Ahead Chicken Marinades to Freeze Now.

Vegan tuna melt on a plate

A Classic “Tuna” Melt Sandwich With a Clever Vegan Twist

There is something so comforting about a classic tuna melt, but if you’re vegan or paleo – or better yet,  pegan! – then you’re likely thinking your tuna melt days are over… well, not anymore! We’ve created a pegan-friendly tuna salad that is so delicious, your taste buds will think you’re eating the real thing. Luckily, there are a plethora of non-dairy alternatives at your grocery store – from cheeses, to sour creams, to milks and yogurts – so that topping the tuna with a gooey-melted vegan cheese is simple, easy and satisfying. You can use your favourite bread of choice, buy or make a paleo or keto bread, or skip that all together and opt for sweet potato “toast”.

Servings: 4 sandwiches
Prep Time: 20 minutes (plus additional soaking time)
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

vegan tuna melt spread

Pegan “Tuna” Salad Sandwich

Ingredients:
1 cup walnuts (soaked for minimum 15 minutes up to overnight)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds (soaked for minimum 15 minutes up to overnight)
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds (soaked for minimum 15 minutes up to overnight)
⅓ cup vegan mayo
1 cup cucumber, diced
1 cup celery, diced
¼ cup green onions, chopped finely
2 tsp dulse or kelp flakes
2 tsp fresh dill, chopped finely
1/2 lemon, juiced
½ tsp sea salt
4 slices or 1 cup vegan shredded cheese (like Daiya, Chao or Earth Island)
8 slices of your favourite bread or sweet potato “toast”

vegan tuna melt ingredients

Directions:
1. Soak walnuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds in water, then drain and rinse.
2. Pulse the walnuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds in a food processor until smooth but partially crumbled (don’t over-blend into a paste).

vegan tuna melt blend
3. Place the nut mixture into a bowl, stir in the mayo and, once combined, add in the rest of the ingredients.
4. Scoop the tuna onto the bread, layer with vegan cheese, then add the second slice of bread on top.
5. If you have a sandwich maker, oil it, then pop the sammie in there, close the lid and let it heat for about 5-7 minutes until the cheese melts.

vegan tuna melt on a plate
6. Alternatively, place a skillet on medium-low heat, oil it, then add your sandwich and place a small lid over the sandwich to press it down. Let the sandwich heat for about 4 minutes, then flip it over for another few minutes until the cheese melts.
7. The paleo bread and sweet potato “toast” will be more delicate than the vegan one, so you may want to use the skillet method instead.

Craving more healthy midday meal inspiration? Try these 20 Healthy High-Protein Lunch Ideas to Bring to Work, plus a must-make Vegan Edamame Mash Sandwich!

Irresistible No-Bake Vegan Strawberry Cheesecake Bites

I’m over chocolate on Valentine’s Day, which is why we created this sultry two-bite dessert you can whip up for yourself, your sweetheart, or all your single gal pals! They’re vegan, raw and gluten-free, giving you just the energy boost you need for some alone time — or, staying up all night gawking at Tinder.

strawberry-cheesecake-bites

No-Bake Vegan Strawberry Cheesecake Bites

Ingredients:

Crust (makes 24 mini cheesecakes)
1 cup pecans
6 medjool dates
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 tsp sea salt

Filling
1 cup raw cashews (soaked for 3 hours)
1/2 cup frozen strawberry slices
1/4 cup agave nectar
1/4 cup coconut oil (melted)
2 Tbsp lemon juice

Swirl/Topping
1/2 cup frozen strawberries, melted

strawberry-cheesecake-bites3Read More: Lauren Toyota’s Fail-Safe Tips for Eating Plant-Based (And Loving It)

Directions:

Crust
1. Remove the pits from the medjool dates and soak them in warm water for 10 minutes. Drain the water from the dates and place in a food processor along with the remaining ingredients. Process until the nuts are crumbled and the crust is sticking together on its own.
2. Press about 1 1/2 tsp of the mixture into the bottom of each mini muffin cup.

Tip: To remove the cheesecakes easily from the tray, cut 4-inch strips of parchment paper and place those in the bottom of each cup. Press the crust mixture on top of these. Then when the cheesecakes are done setting in the freezer, you can pull on the parchment tabs to lift the cheesecakes out.

strawberry-cheesecake-bites2

Filling
1. Drain cashews from the soaking water and rinse under fresh water. Then add them to a high speed blender or Vitamix along with frozen strawberries, agave nectar, melted coconut oil, and lemon juice. Blend until smooth.
2. Pour this mixture into a bowl and set aside. Clean out the blender to make the strawberry puree for the swirl.

Swirl/Topping
1. Allow these strawberries to melt at room temperature or heat over low heat in sauce pan for a few minutes until soft. Then blend this in a blender into a smooth purée.
2. Take a scant Tbsp of the cashew filling and pour on top of the pressed crust. Then take 1/2 tsp of strawberry purée and dollop on top of the cashew filling. Take the end of a toothpick and swirl the two mixtures around to make a fun artsy pattern!
3. Freeze the cheesecakes for 1-2 hours until solid. Remove them from the mini muffin trays and allow to thaw for 10-15 minutes before biting into them.

Craving more plant-based Lauren Toyota recipes? See here for her Buckwheat Pancakes with Brandied Strawberries and Coconut Whip (pictured) and her Easy 2-Ingredient Vegan Peanut Butter Cups.

A Slow Cooker Lasagna You Wouldn’t Believe is Gluten- and Dairy-Free

If you can’t eat gluten or dairy, it can be a little difficult to find a lasagna that you are able to eat. Look no further! This delicious vegan recipe will leave you feeling satisfied  even without the cheese! To make it even better, it’s easy to prep the ingredients and is completely hands-free once the slow cooker is turned on. While it cooks, the noodles remain tender and soft so they are less likely to dry out. Plus, you get to skip pre-cooking the noodles altogether. Make this recipe on days when you need some comfort food that tastes delicious and leaves you feeling healthy.

Prep Time: 30 minutes (plus soaking time for the nuts)
Cook Time: 3 hours
Servings: 6

Vegan and Gluten-Free Slow Cooker Lasagna

Ingredients:
1 package gluten-free lasagna noodles
1 jar marinara sauce
3 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced
1 medium zucchini, sliced into thin pieces
3 cups butternut squash, cut into cubes
½ box of baby spinach

Dairy-Free “Cheese”
1.5 cups cashews, soaked in water
1 tsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
¼ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp garlic powder
¼ cup water
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Directions:
1. Prep the dairy-free cheese first. Soak the cashews in a bowl of water for 4 hours. If you’re short on time, soak them in very hot water for 30 minutes.
2. Drain the cashews and add them to the food processor with lemon juice, nutritional yeast, sea salt, garlic powder, water and extra virgin olive oil. Blend on high until the cashews are chopped up well and the mixture is soft, similar in consistency to ricotta cheese.
3. Prep the vegetables next. Slice the cremini mushrooms. Slice the zucchini into thin pieces, about 2 inches in length. Chop the butternut squash into small cubes.


4. Place the mushrooms in a large skillet with a few spoonfuls of extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of sea salt. Turn heat to medium and let the mushrooms sit for about 5 minutes, without stirring them. This helps remove the excess liquid from the mushrooms, so they don’t become too mushy. Give them a stir and then remove from the skillet.
5. Next, saute the butternut squash with a spoonful of extra virgin olive oil and pinch of sea salt for about 5 minutes, to lightly cook. Remove from the skillet.
6. Rub the slices of zucchini with some extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of sea salt.

7. To compile the lasagna, it’s easiest to place all of the ingredients on the counter. Put the squash, mushrooms and zucchini on separate plates. Place the baby spinach on the counter as well. Have a spoon ready to ladle out the marinara sauce and the cashew “cheese.”
8. Start with spooning out a layer of marinara sauce on the bottom of the slow cooker.
9. Then place a layer of lasagna noodles. Since the slow cooker is not shaped as a rectangle, you’ll have to break some of the noodles into smaller pieces to fit in the curved places.
10. Add a layer of the cashew “cheese” using ⅓ of it and spread out ⅓ of the veggies over top. Place a layer of lasagna noodles on top and then spread some more marinara sauce over them.
11. Repeat this again twice to make additional layers. Pour marinara sauce over the top layer of noodles. Extra sauce is good to prevent the lasagna from drying out.
12. Cook on high for 3 hours.

For similar recipes, see our 20 Best Dairy-Free Dinners and 15 Extra-Creamy Vegan Pasta Recipes.

7 Probiotic-Rich Foods You Need to Be Eating (And 3 Myths to Avoid)

Fermentation is far from a new fad, dating back to 6000 BC; and yet, it’s at the height of popularity right now. What began as a means of food preservation has turned into a nutrition phenomenon. It often begins with a few vegetables, some water and salt or a starter. Good bacteria break down sugars in the food being fermented to create lactic acid; this kills off any bad bacteria, leaving you with a tangy, sour, delicious food product that is literally bursting with nutrition. Fermentation makes food more digestible, it enhances its protein and mineral contents and it removes anti-nutrients like lectins found in grains. Most importantly, it’s rich in probiotics, which are live microorganisms that confer health benefits on the host (i.e. you). Fermentation has powerful effects on your immune system, digestive system and even your mood.

But, there’s confusion when it comes to fermentation, so here are three things to watch out for:

1. Yogurt May Not Actually Be the Best Source of Probiotics

Canadian yogurt is made with the active bacterial cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, but these are actually not considered to be probiotic by Health Canada, although they do have a range of health benefits. Look out for cultures such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus johnsonii on the ingredient list to find yogurt that is probiotic-rich.

2. Pickling and Fermenting Are Not the Same

Simply because something is pickled, does not necessarily mean that it’s fermented or rich in probiotics. For a food to be fermented, it needs the presence of live bacteria that also provide health benefits. Many foods are pickled using vinegar or “quick pickled”, which doesn’t allow for this probiotic presence.

3. Not All Fermented Foods Have Probiotics

Case and point: sourdough bread. The dough is fermented by bacteria, but once heated the probiotics are eliminated. Sourdough still has wonderful health benefits, probiotics are just not one of them. Other examples are beer and wine that have undergone fermentation but no longer have probiotic bacteria.

On the flip side, here are seven probiotic-rich foods you should incorporate into your diet:

1. Kimchi

Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish composed of pickled vegetables, mainly cabbage, and spices. It’s crunchy, hot and a delicious side addition to many meals. You can buy it at the grocery store or easily make it at home with this recipe.


Get the recipe for Chuck Hughes’ Cabbage Kimchi

2. Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is another fermented cabbage dish, but this one was popularized in Eastern Europe. It’s got tons of Vitamin C and A, both important for keeping the immune system strong. Eat it as a side dish, in salads, or on top of a sausage. Like kimchi, you can buy sauerkraut at the grocery store and farmers’ markets, or make a batch in your kitchen.


Get the recipe for Vegan Sweet Potato and Sauerkraut Perogies

3. Kefir

Kefir is like a yogurt drink, but it’s slightly thinner and tangier with more bacterial presence. It’s often recommended to people who have digestive issues since it’s really rich in probiotics. It also has folic acid, so it’s a fabulous beverage to incorporate into your diet if you’re pregnant. Drink it by the glass or transform it into a delicious coleslaw dressing.


Get the recipe for Homestyle Kefir Coleslaw

4. Tempeh

Tempeh is a fermented soy cake originating from Indonesia. If you’ve never eaten it before, that description may sound odd, but it lends itself well to marinades and sauces and it makes for a fabulous mock bacon. The fermentation process not only provides probiotic richness, but it also helps eliminate phytates found in soybeans: these are anti-nutrients that bind to important minerals, like calcium, and prevent your body from absorbing them.


Get the recipe for Coconut Crusted Tempeh Skewers with Mango Salsa

5. Miso

Miso is one of the most versatile condiments: stir it into hot water to make miso soup, make it into a salad dressing, spread it over fish, chicken or cooked vegetables or even use it as an ingredient in baking cookies! It originates from Japan and is made from a combination of fermented soybeans, rice or barley.

Get the recipe for Glazed Salmon Miso Soup Rice Bowl

6. Kombucha

Kombucha is a fermented tea that is delightfully fizzy like pop. It’s brewed using a starter often called a mother or scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeasts). This naturally carbonated beverage is rich in probiotics, antioxidants and B vitamins. Find it in the fridge at your grocery store or make it yourself at home.


See here for How to Batch Brew Kombucha

7. Preserved Lemons

If you’ve ever eaten a dish with preserved lemon, you know how tangy, tart and delicious they are. The really nutritious parts of lemons, such as the rind and pith (white part), are typically not eaten because of their bitterness, but after fermentation they become edible and tasty. A preserved lemon is a wonderful addition to Moroccan and Middle Eastern flavoured dishes; after fermentation, its concentration of vitamin C is heightened as well as its probiotic population.


Get the recipe for Chuck Hughes’ Preserved Lemons