Here’s How Long You Can Eat Your Thanksgiving Leftovers

Once you’ve enjoyed a couple days of hot turkey sandwiches, and maybe made some turkey soup,  how long can you keep eating those Thanksgiving leftovers before it is time to toss? Here’s your ultimate guide for how long you can keep Thanksgiving leftovers like potatoes, turkey, stuffing, how to store them properly and how to know if they’ve gone bad.

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How Long Leftover Turkey Lasts

Leftover turkey needs to be stored in the fridge within two hours of cooking in order to minimize the chance of bacteria growth. The meat should be cut and deboned from the bird before being placed into shallow storage containers and cooled completely in the fridge. Once it’s cool, seal tightly and store in the refrigerator for two to four days. If you’re not sure if leftover turkey is safe to eat, check for a rotten egg smell or a slimy texture. If you notice either of these things, discard the meat immediately.

How Long You Can Keep Leftover Mashed Potatoes

Mashed potatoes should easily last three to five days in the fridge if stored correctly and within two hours of cooking. This means ensuring there isn’t any moisture buildup under the lid that could encourage the growth of bacteria. If your leftover mashed potatoes have an off smell or appearance, throw them out without tasting. Cooked potatoes can be frozen in an airtight container for up to one year.

Oven Baked Stuffing

How to Store Leftover Stuffing

Because stuffing is moist and slow to heat up and cool down, it provides an ideal place for bacteria to grow and is best consumed within two days of cooking. If you want to enjoy stuffing long after the main event, you can easily freeze it for up to four months and reheat when you’d like a festive side of comfort food.

How Long  You Can Keep Leftover Gravy

Gravy has a short shelf life at just three to four days, but like stuffing, it can be frozen for up to four to six months for increased enjoyment. In order to maintain food safety, gravy should be brought to a rolling boil before serving in order to properly kill any bacteria that may have started growing.

How Long You Can Keep Leftover Sweet Potatoes in the Fridge

Just like regular potatoes, leftover sweet potatoes are safe to eat for three to five days after your Thanksgiving meal, whether they’ve been baked, boiled, or cooked in a casserole. Again, refrigerate within two hours of cooking, and store your cooked sweet potatoes in shallow airtight containers or resealable plastic bags. They can also be frozen for up to a year, just be sure to sprinkle them first with a small amount of lemon juice in order to prevent discolouration. If they smell strange or are discoloured (some browning is fine and is just the result of oxidation) you’re best off tossing them.

How Long You Can Keep Leftover Cranberry Sauce

Homemade cranberry sauce should keep in the refrigerator for anywhere from 10-14 days, so long as it’s stored in a covered glass or plastic container. You can also pour the sauce into freezer-safe bags and freeze for use later in the year. If you’re using canned sauce and open the can only to discover brown or black bits inside, do not eat the sauce. If your homemade cranberry sauce has an off smell, flavour, or appearance, or you see any mould on top, toss it.

Blue-Ribbon-Apple-Pie-slice

How to Store Leftover Apple Pie

Pie made with fresh fruit, such as apples, usually only lasts a day or two in the fridge, so it’s best to gobble up any leftovers (or share with friends and family) as soon as you can. Un-cut apple pies can stay on the counter for about two days, so you should be good to make dessert ahead of time. You can tell your leftover apple pie has gone bad if the crust is soggy, which is a sign that it’s absorbed the moisture released by the fruit, or if it’s discoloured in any way.

How to Freeze Leftover Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin pie is generally safe for two to four days in the fridge, and should be covered loosely with aluminium foil or plastic wrap. Leftover pumpkin pie can last for about six to eight months in the freezer if stored properly. Store bought pies will keep for longer on the counter than homemade versions. Because pumpkin pie is an egg-based dessert, it is best eaten within an hour of cooking or being removed from the fridge, and can cause serious health issues if eaten after being left out for too long.

Have lots of leftovers? Try these great recipes for leftover turkey.

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The Lip-Smacking History of Split Pea Soup in Canada

When the first chill creeps into the air, the knee-jerk reaction for many Canucks is to get soups simmering on the stove. While we love our minestrone and hearty stews, it’s hard to beat dipping your spoon into a steaming bowl of split pea soup.

This classic stick-to-your-bones soup has been a  Quebecois favourite for over 400 years. For good reasons, too: pure comfort made from easy-to-preserve ingredients.

“Split pea soup is made of yellow split peas, ham hock, vegetables, and thyme, and it’s usually served with bread,” says Ottawa Chef Marc Miron, who is an expert on the dish. “Split pea soup is a dish that can be served as a starter or as a main.”

split-pea-soup-parkersGet the recipe for Parker’s Split Pea Soup

But where exactly did this hearty soup come from in the first place? Miron has an inkling, based on his own extensive research tracing the roots of “habitant soup.” Although he’s headed up kitchens around the world and cooked for celebs like Chef Gordon Ramsay and the Rolling Stones, this busy chef was drawn to explore the history of this delicious Canadian dish.

“It’s a beautiful staple in the Canadian cuisine, not only in Quebec,” says Miron.

The soup’s origins are murky, but Miron believes today’s recipe is likely a distant relative of soup made aboard explorer Samuel de Champlain’s ships from France. On long journeys, the ships would be stocked with ingredients that preserve for lengthy times, such as vinegar, honey, cheese, rice, legumes, and salted meats and fish.

“All of those ingredients were on board that they made soup with,” says Miron. “It was probably not the split pea soup as we know now. But it was a [salted] ham-broth with some peas in it and some vegetables.”

As more habitants – or Canada’s first settlers – arrived from France and landed on Canadian soil, the soup served on ships gradually evolved and came to include game meats, pork, and locally grown ingredients.

“The habitants depended on the forests for their meat, but they farmed pigs along with vegetables, fruit, peas, and beans,” says Miron. “Soup was always part of the meal. Looking at the setup of the table, the spoon would always be there for the soup. They had to get creative with it: basically finding out that the peas matched very well with the ham hock.”

Whether called habitant soup or soupe aux pois cassés or split pea soup, this early settler soup with many names became a staple item on the menu for Quebec’s settlers. For starters, it was a filling and nutritious meal that helped them survive harsh Canadian winters.

“Going through the winter, times were pretty hard,” says Miron. “Pea soup is something that gave them everything from vegetables to legumes to protein. It’s a meal by itself.”

Most habitant farmers also had bread ovens, partly explaining why today’s version of the soup is usually paired with a slice of warm, crusty bread.

“Bread is always part the tradition,” says Miron. “When times were rough for the habitants, you needed a full meal and bread provided for that.”

Of course, the original habitant-style soupe aux pois cassés has changed over the centuries, swapping out salted meats for ham hock, but the soup has become a Canadian classic that has spanned generations.

“My grandmother is 96 and she told me that pea soup was served every Friday,” says Maxime Constantin, the owner of Cabane à sucre Constantin in Quebec where they serve a mean bowl of split pea soup. “So it’s become a traditional meal served in every family.”

In terms of regional variations, Miron says that most recipes still “respect the basics,” adding split peas and vegetables to the soup. The wildcard that he’s witnessed in the culinary world involves the broth.

“The consistency in the soup is where you see the most difference,” says Miron. “Some have it more ‘brothy,’ and some have it thicker.”

As the dish became popular across the country, dry and canned versions of the old school recipe popped up, with the first emerging in the late 1800s, according to Miron.

“They did an instant pea soup around 1867,” says Miron. “When you invent a soup dry, it’s because it’s popular.”

Pig-and-Pea-Soup

Get the recipe for Split Pea Soup.

If you’re not in a hurry, skip the ready-made varieties, and try your hand at creating a homemade batch of delicious split pea soup. There’s the traditional recipe for Québécois-Style Pea Soup made with unsmoked ham hock, but also Slow Cooker Split Pea Soup using a smoked turkey leg, leeks, and green split peas. Or follow Ina Garten’s recipe for Parker’s Split Pea Soup, which uses chicken stock instead of ham hock.

Short on time? Whip up a batch of Chef Michael Smith’s recipe Speedy Split Pea Soup using dried split peas, bacon, and frozen peas. Or if you’re not in a rush, try his more traditional recipe for Pig and Pea Soup with a ham hock broth.

For a soup with a zing, there’s this recipe for Split Pea and Ginger Soup from The Burnt Tongue in Hamilton, Ont. A warming soup with a kick of ginger spice, this dish is hearty to the core without being too heavy.

The food experts have a few tips for making split pea soup at home. At Cabane à sucre Constantin, Maxime Constantin regularly cooks up a colossal cauldron of pea soup that serves 700 people at their family-owned sugar shack. His secret to soup success? Soak the peas overnight.

“At the start, you have to soak the peas a night before,” says Constantin. “After we roast the piece of pork with carrot and onion, we add broth and peas. It has to boil about 2 to 3 hours until the peas are soft.”

For Miron, making split pea soup is a two-step process, which starts with the broth and then the soup. While the other ingredients are important, “the ham stock has to be very good.”

“It’s like roasting a chicken – the leg doesn’t cook the same way,” says Miron. “So I always de-bone and cook it separately. The pea soup is the same. To do a good ham stock, you would need 2-3 hours, depending on the size of your ham hock, to make sure the meat is cooked and falls off the bone.”

Once the broth is complete, Miron adds vegetables and chunks of ham to the rich, flavourful stock, and simmers the concoction on the stove for 30 to 45 minutes.

No matter which split pea soup recipe you choose or how you cook the broth, take pride in the fact that you’re slurping up a Canadian classic that been trending since the days of Samuel de Champlain. Now that’s definitely worthy of a Canadian Heritage Minute!

Apple-Brie Pumpkin Soup Season is Here

Now that soup season is upon us, we’re looking to jazz up our old fall favourites, like classic, creamy pumpkin soup. In this mouthwatering version, we’ve added Gala apples to give the soup just a hint of sweetness, then we gave it the full French onion treatment, with a beautiful topping of crispy baguette and melty Brie. This stick-to-your-ribs soup is just what you need to feel like you’re living your best fall life.

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Photo by Lindsay Guscott
Lindsay Guscott

Baked Brie Pumpkin and Apple Soup Recipe

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp. butter
1 small onion, sliced, about 1 1/2 cups
3 cloves garlic, smashed
1 small pie pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-in pieces, about 6 cups
2 Gala apples, peeled and cut into 1/2 pieces, about 3 cups
1 sprig rosemary, plus more for optional garnish
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp cayenne
1/2 cup dry hard apple cider
900 ml vegetable stock
1/2 cup whipping cream
8 slices baguette
150g double cream Brie, rind removed and thinly sliced

sugar-pumpkins

Photo by Allison Day
Photo by Allison Day

Directions:
1. Melt butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Cook until softened, 5 to 7 min.
2. Increase heat to medium-high, then stir in pumpkin and apples. Season with salt. Sauté until vegetables are lightly golden-brown, 5 to 7 min.
3. Add spices and cook until fragrant, 1 min.
4. Pour in cider. Using a wooden spoon, scrape up any brown bits from bottom of pan. Allow cider to evaporate, 1 to 2 min.
5. Add stock and rosemary sprig. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, until vegetables are tender, about 15 min. Remove and discard rosemary.
6. Working in small batches, purée soup in a blender. Return to pot. Stir in cream and cook until heated through, 1 to 2 min.
7. Ladle into oven-safe bowls, then top each with 2 slices of baguette and 2 slices of cheese. Broil on high until cheese has melted and is just starting to brown, about 1 to 2 min.
8. Sprinkle with finely chopped rosemary, if desired, and serve immediately.

pumpkin-apple-soup-with-brie-crouton

Photo by Lindsay Guscott
Photo by Lindsay Guscott

Tip: If you don’t own oven-proof bowls, assemble your Brie toasts on a foil-lined baking sheet instead. Once broiled, simply transfer the toasts to your bowl.

Looking for more fall recipes? Try our Brilliant Ways to Use Butternut Squash.

This Vegan Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk Takes Less Than 30 Minutes

A warming bowl of Thai coconut curry soup is made even better with the addition of pure canned pumpkin. A fiery twist on the many squash soup recipes out there, this robust vegan pumpkin version is layered with flavour, coming through with a delicate balance of salty, sour, citrusy, sweet and savoury tastes. Both pumpkin and coconut milk provide dairy-free creaminess to the vegan soup base, which is super satisfying on its own, but can be quickly made into a heartier meal with cubes of firm tofu and shredded bok choy stirred in until heated through. For additional heft, a few spoonfuls of natural peanut butter or a handful of unsalted roasted peanuts would be delicious.  Make this easy vegan pumpkin soup recipe your own, experimenting with the Thai-inspired tastes you find most appealing.

Vegan Spicy Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup with Coconut Milk

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
2 Tbsp coconut oil
1 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp vegan Thai red or yellow curry paste
1 Tbsp peeled minced fresh ginger
1 (3-inch) stalk lemongrass, bruised
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth, plus more to thin as needed
1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin puree or 2 cups fresh pumpkin puree
2 Tbsp tamari or soy sauce
1 (14 oz) can coconut milk, 1 Tbsp reserved for garnish
2 Tbsp lime juice, plus more for serving
1/3 cup shredded Thai basil or fresh cilantro
3 red Thai chilis, sliced or minced

Directions:
1. In a large pot, heat coconut oil and sesame oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion, garlic, curry paste, ginger and lemongrass, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook until onions are softened, about 10 minutes.

2. Add broth, pumpkin and tamari or soy sauce. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Remove lid and discard lemongrass. Stir in coconut milk and lime juice. Using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth, or transfer to a blender and puree soup in batches. If soup is too thick for your preference, thin with additional broth until desired consistency.

3. Reheat soup over low heat, ladle into bowls, swirl over reserved coconut milk and top with basil or cilantro and chili. Serve with additional lime juice.

Want more easy pumpkin recipes to make this autumn? See here for 12 Incredible Ways to Hack a Pumpkin and 35 Creative Pumpkin Recipes to Try This Fall.

pumpkin-spice-cookie-cups-with-caramel

Caramel Pumpkin Spice Cookie Cups Are a Fall Must-Bake

Pumpkin spice season is short and sweet, which is why we’re excited to make the most of it. Filled with pumpkin spice — the irresistible combination of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and clove, these soft and chewy cookie-cupcake hybrids are a must-bake this fall. Perfect for entertaining, these two-bite cookie cups are filled with salted caramel and topped with a light, whipped cream cheese frosting. Serve with a piping hot latte and you’ve found pumpkin spice perfection.

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Recipe: Pumpkin Spice Cookie Cups with Cream Cheese Frosting

Prep Time: 40 minutes

Chill Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 10 minutes
Makes: 24 cookie cups

Ingredients:
Cookie Cups
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
3/4 cup granulated sugar, divided
1/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/3 cup pure pumpkin puree
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ tsp pumpkin pie spice
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon

Caramel
1 ¾ cups granulated sugar
1/4 cup water
2/3 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp salt

Frosting
1/2 (250 g) package cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
1 ¾ cups icing sugar
2 tsp heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Garnish: ground cinnamon

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Directions:

Cookie Cups
1. In a large bowl, whisk together butter, 1/2 cup granulated sugar and brown sugar until smooth. Whisk in pumpkin, egg yolk and vanilla extract until combined.
2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, pumpkin pie spice, baking powder, cream of tartar and salt. Gradually stir into butter mixture until combined. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes, or until chilled.
3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 24-cup mini muffin tin with nonstick spray.
4. In a small bowl, combine remaining 1/4 cup sugar and cinnamon. Scoop dough one tablespoon at a time and roll into balls. Roll in sugar mixture and place in muffin cups. Gently press back of 1/2 teaspoon measure into centres of dough balls to flatten slightly.
5. Bake 10 minutes, or just until lightly golden brown. Press 1/2 teaspoon measure once again in the centre to maintain the hole. Let cool 10 minutes, transfer to wire rack and sprinkle with remaining cinnamon sugar. Cool completely.

Caramel
1. For the caramel, combine water and sugar in a small heavy-bottomed saucepan.
2. Bring to a boil over medium heat, without stirring, until the sugar turns a medium amber brown, about 5 to 7 minutes.
3. Remove from heat, carefully and gradually stir in cream. Stir in vanilla and salt. Let cool completely.

Frosting
1. For the frosting, beat the cream cheese and butter until smooth. Add half of the icing sugar and beat until smooth. Beat in the heavy cream and vanilla until combined. Beat in the remaining icing sugar until light and fluffy.
2. To assemble, fill frosting into a piping bag fitted with a star tip. Fill another piping bag with cooled caramel (slightly heating if too thick). Fill cookie cups with caramel and pipe with frosting. Drizzle with additional caramel and sprinkle with cinnamon. Best served the same day.

Need your pumpkin spice fix? Try these tasty recipes.

This Butternut Squash and Goat Cheese Galette is the Perfect Meatless Main

Thanksgiving and the holiday season can often be a challenge if you’re a vegetarian – or if you’re entertaining vegetarian guests.  I always like to make sure my non meat-eating company is offered more than a “meal” consisting of a bunch of side dishes. The good news? This hearty and appetizing galette is sure to please. An all-butter pastry filled with roasted butternut squash, onions, sage and goat cheese is both filling and festive, and would make the perfect addition to any holiday table. It’s actually a wonderful main dish for both vegetarians and meat-eaters alike! It’s also great to prepare ahead of time – and to make things even easier, you can substitute a store-bought shortcrust pastry.

Roasted Butternut Squash and Goat Cheese Galette

Prep Time: 15 minutes (plus chilling time)
Cook time: 65 minutes
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

Pastry:
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
Pinch flaky sea salt
1 stick (8 Tbsps) unsalted butter
1 large egg
2-3 Tbsps ice cold water

* You can also substitute for store-bought pastry crust

Filling:
1 lb (450g) peeled and cut into 1-inch (2 cm) cubes butternut squash (approx. 1/2 medium butternut squash)
3 Tbsps olive oil
Flaky sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 large onions (approx. 200 g each), thinly sliced
6 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped

Assembly:
150 g firm goat cheese, sliced into 1/2 cm rounds
1 large egg, lightly beaten, for egg washing the edges of the tart
1 cup baby arugula, loosely packed
4 Tbsps pine nuts
Olive oil, for drizzling

Directions:

Pastry:
1. Whisk the flour and salt in a large bowl. Add the cubed butter and, using your fingertips, lightly rub the butter into the flour until it resembles large breadcrumbs with some pieces the size of small peas. You can also use a pastry blender for this job.
2. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture and add the egg. Using a wooden spoon, mix the egg into the flour until completely combined.
3. Add the water and mix until the dough is firm enough to form a ball when you press it together with your fingers—it might be a little crumbly, but form the dough into a disk and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap.
4. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or up to 3 days in the fridge. You can also freeze the dough, tightly wrapped in plastic for up to 3 months. Thaw it overnight in the fridge before you roll and bake.

Filling:
1. Pre-heat the oven to 425˚F.
2. Line a large baking tray with parchment paper and spread the butternut squash in a single layer on the tray.
3. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil and season with the flaky sea salt and pepper.
4. Bake for 15-20 minutes until the squash starts to brown.
5. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
6. In a small skillet, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat.
7. Cook the onions for about 5 -6 minutes until they start to soften and colour slightly.
8. Stir in the chopped sage and allow to cool.

Assembly:
1. Preheat oven to 400˚F. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
2. Remove pastry from the fridge and let it sit for about 10 minutes so it’s easier to work with.
3. Roll out the pastry to approximately 14-inches (35 cm) in diameter. Place the pastry on the parchment-paper lined baking tray.
4. Spread the cooked onions evenly around the pastry base, leaving approximately 2-inches (5 cm) around the edge.
5. Layer the cooked squash in a single layer over the onions.
6. Tuck the goat cheese rounds around the tart (some of them underneath the squash).
7. Fold the pastry up and around the edges of the filling, crimping slightly with your fingers as you go, and brush the edges of the galette with the egg wash.
8. Bake until the cheese is melted, the edges of the tart are golden brown and the bottom is cooked through, 45 minutes.
9. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly on a wire cooling rack. Serve warm or at room temperature topped with the arugula, pine nuts and a drizzle of olive oil.

Looking for more crowd-pleasing vegetarian dishes? See these 24 Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes (Including Stuffing!). And since the holidays are nothing without dessert, we’ve got you covered with these Vegan Thanksgiving Desserts Everyone at Your Table Will Love.

maple-butter-tart-pie

Maple Butter Tart Pie is a Canadian Classic with a Tasty Twist

Canadians are kind of obsessed with butter tarts and there’s a good reason. The light and flaky pastry holds a gooey, sweet, and slightly runny filling that is sometimes studded with pecans or raisins.  The buttery treats are so beloved that they’ve garnered an annual festival in their honour, where fans can get their butter tart fill.

Needless to say, this dessert has a big place in the hearts of Canadians. But we’ve taken it to new heights with a family-sized maple butter tart pie that is so good, everyone will find room for dessert.

This larger tart celebrates our love of the Ontario favourite with inspiration from Quebec’s maple-filled  dessert “tarte au sucre.” Our version starts with a light cream cheese pie crust, baked with an addictive filled that’s a combination of brown sugar and maple syrup – no corn syrup here! As the pie cooks the sugar caramelizes to create a light crunchy top with a custard-like interior. Bake it up for your next get together and see for yourself!

butter-tart-pie-with-crust

Maple Butter Tart Pie Recipe

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Chill Time: 2 hours
Freeze Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Makes: 1 (9-inch pie)

Ingredients:
Cream Cheese Pie Crust
2½ cups all-purpose flour
3 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 tsp salt
½ cup cold unsalted butter, cubed
¼ cup cold cream cheese
½ cup cold water

Maple Butter Tart Filling
2 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
¼ cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup maple syrup
3 egg yolks
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
½ tsp kosher salt
1 1/3 cups whipping cream
¼ cup unsalted butter
Confectioners’ sugar

sliced-butter-tart-pie

Directions:
Dough
1. In the work bowl of a food processor, place flour, sugar, and salt, and pulse to combine. Add butter and cream cheese, and pulse until mixture is crumbly. Add ice water, 2 Tbsp at a time, just until the dough comes together. You may not need to use all of the water. Shape 2/3 of dough into a disk, and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Repeat with remaining dough. Refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours, or overnight.
2. On a lightly floured surface, roll large disk of dough to ¼-inch thickness. Transfer to a 9-inch pie plate, pressing into bottom and up sides. Trim excess dough, and fold edges under. Roll remaining disk of dough to 1/8-inch thickness. Cut out leaves with a leaf-shaped cookie cutter. Brush each leaf with water and press onto edges of crust. Freeze for the crust for 30 minutes.
3. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C).
4. Place a piece of parchment paper on top of pie crust, letting ends extend over edges. Fill with pie weights. Bake until edges are set, about 10 minutes. Remove pie weights and bake for an additional 2 minutes, or just until bottom crust is set. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F (180°C).

pie-crust-leaf-detail

Filling
1. In a large bowl, whisk together brown sugar, flour, maple syrup, egg yolks, egg, vanilla and salt until smooth.
6. In a small saucepan, combine whipping cream and butter over medium-high heat. Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and slowly pour into egg mixture, whisking constantly. Strain through a sieve, discarding any pieces. Pour filling into prepared pie crust.
7. Bake in bottom third of oven, until golden brown and the filling is set (center should still tremble), about 1 hour 10 minutes. Loosely cover with aluminium foil halfway through baking to prevent excess browning, if necessary. Let cool completely before serving. Garnish with confectioners’ sugar if desired.

Can’t get enough butter tarts? These Butter Tart Recipes will satisfy your sweet tooth.

The Creamy Gluten-Free Kabocha Squash Gnocchi You’ll Crave This Fall

Gnocchi always sounds like one of those challenging homemade meals, when in reality it’s pretty simple to make, and you will certainly feel like an accomplished home-chef once you prepare it! What’s so special about this particular gnocchi is it uses nutrient-rich Japanese kabocha squash instead of the typical white potato, adding gorgeous colour, bold flavour and a natural sweetness you often don’t find in the traditional version of this dish. This recipe is also completely gluten-free, there is no white flour here; rather a delightful mix of brown rice flour and buckwheat flour. Pairing it with a garlic sage cream sauce makes this meal complete!

Creamy Gluten-Free Kabocha Squash Gnocchi

Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Gnocchi:
3 cups kabocha squash, peeled and cut into large cubes
1/2 cup brown rice flour + extra for rolling
1 cup buckwheat flour
1 egg
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1/2 tsp sea salt

Cream Sauce:
3 tsp tapioca starch
3/4 cup plain, unsweetened almond milk or dairy milk
2 Tbsp butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
8 fresh sage leaves
1/2 tsp lemon juice

Directions:

Gnocchi:
1. Peel the kabocha squash (you can use a sharp knife, as a peeler mostly likely won’t do the trick). Once peeled, cut into large pieces, steam it until it’s soft and a fork can easily puncture through the squash pieces.
2. Mash it by hand or in the food processor and allow it to cool.
3. Once cooled, mixed the squash mash with brown rice flour, buckwheat flour, an egg, cheese and salt. Use your hands to combine and form a dough.
4. Flour a clean surface with extra brown rice flour and divide the dough into 3 separate balls.
5. Roll each ball out into long, thin logs and add extra flour if the dough becomes too sticky.

6. Cut into 1/2 inch cubes and then roll the gnocchi down the fork tines to make indentations.
7. When the gnocchi is ready, boil a large pot of water and salt it.
8. Add the gnocchi to the water. When it floats to the surface, it’s cooked. Remove it with a slotted spoon. Don’t overcrowd the gnocchi in the pot, work in batches if you need to.

Cream Sauce:
1. Whisk together the tapioca and the milk until it’s smooth.
2. Place a saucepan over medium heat, add the butter, then drop in the garlic for a few seconds before adding the sage. Once the sage crackles slightly in the butter, add the milk and tapioca mixture.
3. Take this down to a simmer to allow ingredients to infuse together and for the sauce to thicken.
4. Once thicker, add the lemon juice.
5. Take off the heat and drizzle the sauce over the gnocchi. Top with extra cheese, if you please!

For more heavenly gluten-free recipes, check out these 30 Delicious Gluten-Free Dinners and 18 Great Gluten-Free Party Appetizers.

An Easy, No-Bake Pumpkin Trifle That’s Right at Home on Your Thanksgiving Table

This lovely layered dessert is complete with all of the spice and flavours of pumpkin pie, minus the hard work of rolling, crimping and baking. Layers of rum-soaked ladyfingers, spice-infused pumpkin, sweetened whipped cream, crunchy toasted walnuts and white chocolate come together for delicious flavours and perfect textures. Simple to toss together for the everyday but special-occasion-worthy, this showstopper pumpkin dessert is a spectacular recipe to make for Thanksgiving.

This dessert doesn’t stop at the end of pumpkin season. It can easily be made into a springtime treat by folding ½ cup lemon curd into the whipped cream in place of 1½ cups pumpkin puree; and omitting the cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and allspice. Add 1 cup raspberries or blueberries (or a mix) to each layer instead of 1½ walnuts, and you’ve got an entirely new dessert!

Pumpkin Trifle

Pumpkin Pie Trifle Recipe

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Chill Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Serves: 12 to 16

Ingredients:
1 L 35% heavy whipping cream
⅔ cup icing sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
1½ cups pure pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)
½ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
⅛ tsp allspice
2 (150 g) pkgs ladyfinger cookies
3 Tbsp rum
1½ cups chopped toasted walnuts
1½ cups shaved or grated white chocolate

Directions:
1. In a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat cream until it holds soft peaks. Slowly add icing sugar and continue to beat until stiff peaks form. Using a rubber spatula, fold in vanilla. Transfer 3 cups of whipped cream mixture into a separate large bowl and fold in pumpkin puree, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and allspice. Reserve pumpkin cream mixture and plain whipped cream mixture.

Trifle prebuild

2. In a 9-inch trifle dish, arrange one-third of the ladyfingers on the bottom of dish and brush with 1 tbsp of rum. Layer with about a third of the reserved pumpkin cream mixture, ½ cup (one-third) of the walnuts, one-third of the plain whipped cream mixture and ½ cup (one-third) of the white chocolate shavings. Repeat this process twice, finishing with chocolate shavings. Cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least one 1 hour before serving.

Love to layer? There are more seasonal trifle recipes right this way.

classic-brisket-sliced-with-sauce

An Easy, Tender Brisket Recipe That is Sure to Impress

Brisket is a staple dish for many Jewish celebrations, with recipes that can differ from family to family. While some families prefer a sweet sauce, others love savoury. Some use brine; some don’t bother. Some prefer to sear their meat before braising, while others put their brisket straight into the oven. No matter your family’s preference, the most important part of brisket is that it is cooked low and slow, which is the key to juicy, melt in your mouth meaty goodness.

My recipe is a crowd-pleaser, being a little sweet and a little savoury. It can be made with ingredients you likely already have in your pantry, but that doesn’t mean you can rush this no-fuss recipe. The key to great flavour is giving the brisket the time to marinate and then to cook. It takes about 20 hours from start to finish, so make sure you plan ahead when embarking on this Jewish classic.

brisket-cut

How to Make a Classic Brisket

Ingredients:
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 cup ketchup
1 cup water
1 cup apricot preserves
4-5 lb brisket
3 onions, quartered

classic-brisket-recipe

Directions:
1. Mix the soy sauce, ketchup, water, apricot preserves in a bowl. Pour into a roaster or casserole dish large enough to fit the brisket. Place brisket in roaster or dish and coat with marinade. Place onions in the dish. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
2. Remove brisket from the refrigerator. Preheat oven to 325F. Place in oven covered with lid or aluminium foil. Cook for 3 hours then remove foil. Continue to cook uncovered for 30 minutes.
3. Remove from oven and let cool on the counter. Once cool, place in refrigerator until completely chilled, about 1 hour. This will help slice the brisket. Skim the fat off the surface of the sauce and discard. Slice the brisket into thin slices and place back into the dish with sauce.
4. When ready to serve, preheat your oven to 350F. Place brisket with sauce back in the oven and cook uncovered until heated through about 30 minutes. Spoon sauce over slices every 10 minutes.

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Cups with Coconut Whipped Cream

Pumpkin-flavoured everything defines the fall season, and pumpkin pie, the original, is no exception. This vegan version (in mini, bite-sized form!) uses coconut in a few different ways – flour, milk and sugar – to achieve a tender dairy-free crust, trademark custardy interior and must-have whipped cream topping. But rest assured, even with all of that coconut, the flavour is loud and clear: pumpkin pie with whipped cream!  The coconut is used for butteriness and richness, which vegan desserts require in order to achieve the familiar texture, taste and appearance of traditional baked goods. Spelt flour lends a nutty, wholegrain note to the pastry, but doesn’t have a too-strong flavour, like whole-wheat flour can. Spelt flour is also lower in gluten (not gluten-free), which means a more tender, flaky pie crust, naturally.   

Prepare the pastry the day before so it’s ready to take form in your muffin tin the day you want to serve these miniature vegan treats. Leftover pumpkin pie cups will last for one day at room temperature, or for a few days in the refrigerator. 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Cups with Coconut Whipped Cream

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Chilling and Cooling Time: 8 hours 20 minutes
Total Time:
 60 minutes (not including chilling and cooling time)
Servings: 10 to 12 pie cups

Ingredients:

Spelt Pastry:
1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups light spelt flour, plus more for rolling
1 Tbsp coconut sugar
Pinch, salt
1/3 cup cool coconut oil (solid but still scoopable); or cold unsalted vegan stick butter, cubed
2 tsp distilled white vinegar
1 to 5 Tbsp ice water

Pumpkin Pie Filling:
1 (15 oz) can pumpkin puree
3/4 cup coconut sugar or dark brown sugar
2 Tbsp coconut flour
2 tsp pumpkin spice, plus more to garnish
Pinch, salt
1 cup canned coconut milk (not light or reduced fat)

Coconut Whip:
1 (14 oz) can coconut milk, refrigerated for 24 hours, unshaken
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Garnish:
1/4 cup crystallized ginger pieces

Directions:

Spelt Pastry:
1. In a food processor, pulse 1 1/2 cups flour, sugar and salt until combined. Distribute pieces of coconut oil or butter over top of flour and pulse until incorporated and a coarse meal forms. Sprinkle over vinegar followed by 1 Tbsp of water. Briefly pulse dough until it begins to hold together. If it’s too sticky, add more flour; if it’s too dry, add water 1 Tbsp at a time.
2. Tip dough onto a piece of plastic wrap and form into a disc. Wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, up to 1 day.
3. Bring the dough out of the refrigerator and rest at room temperature until still cool but you are able to roll, about 20 to 30 minutes.
4. Sprinkle a large clean surface and rolling pin with additional flour. Unwrap dough and roll into a large, 1/4-inch-high round. Using a 4- to 5-inch cookie cutter or drinking glass, cut circles of dough, re-rolling as needed, for 10 to 12 circles. Fit circles into a 12-count muffin tin, removing any air pockets from the bottom. The pastry should be almost or just touching the top of the muffin rim.
5. Refrigerate formed pastry cups for at least 1 hour, or until completely chilled. Meanwhile, prepare the filling and coconut whipped cream.

Pumpkin Pie Filling:
1. In a large bowl, whisk to combine pumpkin and sugar. Sift over coconut flour, pumpkin spice and salt, and then whisk again until smooth. Slowly whisk in coconut milk until fully incorporated.

Coconut Whip:
1. Remove coconut milk can from refrigerator (don’t shake) and open. Spoon only the thick creamy top into a bowl and reserve watery liquid below for another use (in baking, smoothies, soups or sipping).
2. With electric beaters, whip coconut cream until it begins to get fluffy with soft peaks, 2 to 3 minutes. Once desired texture has been reached, beat in maple syrup and vanilla. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve, up to 1 day.

Baking and Assembly:
1. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Fill chilled pastry cups to the top with filling, smoothing slightly to flatten.
2. Bake for 15 minutes, rotate pan and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes until filling is dry to the touch and both the filling and pastry are beginning to brown. Cool in the pan for 20 minutes. Run a knife around the outside of each cup to loosen, and transfer to a wire cooling rack to cool completely, about 5 hours.
3. To serve, dollop cooled pumpkin cups with coconut whip and sprinkle with crystalized ginger and/or additional pumpkin spice, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Looking for more vegan pumpkin recipes? Try these Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Maple Glaze or Vegan and Paleo Pumpkin Blondies.

Persians-roll

The Sumptuous History of the Thunder Bay Persian Roll

If ever in you’re in Thunder Bay, Ont. there’s one thing you absolutely must do: treat yourself to a Persian.

No, it has absolutely nothing to do with the Middle East. In Thunder Bay, a “Persian” is an oval-shaped pastry that’s fried and frosted with pink berry icing. It’s a local delicacy with deep roots in this Northern Ontario town.

“It’s similar to a cinnamon bun,” says Danny Nucci, owner of the legendary Bennett’s Bakery and The Persian Man in Thunder Bay. “What makes it different from anything else is the icing on top. It’s not overly sweet. But it gives you a good feeling.”

Thunder Bay Persian

This prized pastry was first created in the 1940s by Art Bennett, the original founder of Bennett’s Bakery (formerly called “Art Bennett’s”). As the story goes, he named the sweet treat after John Joseph “Black Jack” Pershing, an American World War I General who allegedly visited his bakery while he was making the dough. As a result of this memorable meeting, Bennett dubbed his now-famed pastry a “Persian.”

“General Black Jack Pershing happened to make his way to Thunder Bay and pull into Bennett’s Bakery,” says Nucci. “He and Art Bennett were talking, while Art was producing a newly formed product. They hit it off and he named it after him.”

Since then, Thunder Bay locals have been raised on these Persian doughnuts, even hosting eating competitions and selling them for community fundraisers. They’ll tell you that it’s a “must-eat” dish if you’re in town. Today, Bennett’s Bakery sells the dessert at their popular coffee shop, The Persian Man, as well as in packs of four at local grocery stores.

“The formula hasn’t changed, the recipe hasn’t changed,” says Nucci. “So it’s still the same goodness that you used to get since its conception in the mid-1940s.”

Thunder Bay Persian

Credit: The Persian Man
https://www.facebook.com/399721353422346/photos/a.399722726755542.90459.399721353422346/1041271555933986/?type=3&theater

But what exactly makes a Persian so special? The original recipe remains under wraps, so we can only speculate about its irresistible ingredients. But some claim the signature pink icing is the clincher.

“It’s a berry icing,” says Nucci. “A lot of people pick up Persians with icing on the side. What they do is put ‘em in the freezer and then put the icing in the fridge, and then have one as needed.”

There’s also an old school “toasted” version of the Persian. Back in the day, some Thunder Bay restaurants would toast the doughnut, adding butter and icing on top, and a lot of locals still adhere to this tradition in the kitchen.

“You take a Persian in half,” says Nucci. “Toast the cut halves in the frying pan until they’re golden, and put a little icing on top halves and flip over to caramelize the icing. There may be some toasted Persians still being sold in Thunder Bay restaurants.”

Regrettably, since Art Bennett’s original recipe remains a secret to this day, we’ll never know what exactly makes the Thunder Persian so dang delicious. Today, it’s been inherited by the Persian Man in Thunder Bay, who continues to use this classic recipe to make their cherished pastries.

“I got the recipe from working at the shop,” says Nucci. “Juliet Bennet ended up selling the bakery to my dad and his two cousins in 1962. It’s a secret, especially the dough product itself. There’s no set ingredients in the listing on the bag product.”

But don’t despair: instead, try your hand at making the doughnut in your home kitchen with this recipe for Thunder Bay Persians. Biting into the light-as-air fry bread and creamy icing, you can salute General Pershing and baker Art Bennett for gifting this doughy delicacy to the world.

How to Make Vegan Apple Spice Cake with Maple Buttercream

Fill your home with the warm, delicious smell of cinnamon by making this heavenly double-layered vegan apple spice cake!

It’s easy to make and combines fresh apple, cinnamon, all-spice, ginger, molasses, and brown sugar with a fluffy and sweet maple buttercream frosting. You’ll feel quite proud of yourself after making this and your sweet reward is eating it!

Easy Vegan Apple Spice Cake Recipe

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 8-10 servings

Ingredients:
Apple Spice Cake:
1 ¼ cup soy milk, room temperature
2 tsp apple cider vinegar
2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp all-spice
½ tsp ginger
½ tsp sea salt
1 cup shredded apple
1/3 cup coconut oil (soft at room temperature)
1 cup packed brown sugar
½ Tbsp unsulphured blackstrap molasses
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup pecans, roughly chopped

Maple Buttercream Frosting:
3 cups powdered sugar
8 Tbsp vegan butter or margarine, room temperature
6 tablespoons maple syrup

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°
  2. In a small mixing bowl whisk together the soy milk and apple cider vinegar and set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, all-spice, ginger, and sea salt.
  4. In a third bowl beat together coconut oil and brown sugar with a hand mixer until fluffy. Then beat in molasses, vanilla extract, and soymilk and vinegar mixture until smooth.
  5. Add the liquid ingredients and shredded apple to the dry ingredients. Fold the batter until it’s just combined, ensuring not to over mix it.
  6. Lightly oil 2 x 7 ¼” cake pans with a little bit of coconut oil. You can also bake one at a time if you only have 1 pan.
  7. Divide the batter evenly between the cake pans. Spread out the batter so it’s even and to the edge of the pan.
  8. Bake for 18-20 minutes on the centre rack. The cake is done when a toothpick comes out of the centre of the cake clean.
  9. Transfer cakes out of the pans onto wire racks and allow to cool completely before frosting.
  10. To make the frosting beat together vegan butter, powdered sugar, and maple syrup until fluffy and smooth.
  11. Place one cake bottom side down on your serving plate and spread frosting evenly with a spatula across the entire top of the cake. Place the other cake, bottom side down, on top of the frosting. Use remaining frosting to cover the entire cake.
  12. Using the palm of your hands gently press small handfuls of roughly chopped pecans along the entire side of the cake until well coated.

Looking for more sweet seasonal desserts? Try our Best Apple Recipes.