Spaghetti Squash Fritters

3 Delicious New Ways to Eat Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is known for being the healthy alternative to carb-heavy pasta, but it can take on more than its traditional garnish of tomato sauce and meatballs. Spaghetti squash also happens to be a rockstar ingredient that can be used in a variety of fresh, inventive ways. From a sweet slice to a salad topper to a snack-sized fritter, check out these three creative recipes that champion spaghetti squash as the hero, all without a meatball in sight.

Cooking Tip: Microwave, steam or bake spaghetti squash until tender before you start the following recipes.

 

Squash-Salad Topper

Middle Eastern Spaghetti Squash Salad or Sandwich Topper
Mix 1 cup cooked squash with 1/4 cup almond meal, 1 tsp ground cumin and a few pinches of salt. Use to top a salad or layer onto your favourite sandwich for a healthy, nutrient-packed vegetarian meal. Serve warm or chilled. Serves 1 to 2.

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Spaghetti Squash Fritters
Mix 1 cup cooked spaghetti squash with 1 large egg and 1/4 all-purpose flour. Stir in 2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese and 2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley. In a non-stick skillet over medium, heat a knob of butter. Cook batter in batches, like pancakes, until browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side. Serve warm with Greek yogurt and fresh lime. Serves 1 to 2.

Spaghetti Squash Quick Bread
Give zucchini bread a break and whip up this cozy, spiced loaf for a subtly sweet breakfast or teatime treat.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 1 hour
Cooling Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes
Makes: 1 loaf

Ingredients:
1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened, more for pan
1 cup brown sugar
1 tsp orange zest
2 large eggs
2 cups cooked spaghetti squash
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1 tsp baking soda
2 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup whole or chopped pecans

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Grease a standard loaf pan with a bit of butter.
2. In a large bowl, cream butter, sugar and orange zest together until light and fluffy. Add eggs and continue to beat until mixture is combined.
3. In a separate large bowl, mix together squash, yogurt and baking soda. Stir squash mixture into butter mixture.
4. In a medium bowl, mix to combine flour, cinnamon and salt. Stir flour mixture into butter and squash mixture until just until combined. Transfer batter to prepared loaf pan and evenly top with pecans. Bake for 55 minutes to 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Cool in pan for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Slice and serve.

From breakfast to dinner, discover a dozen more ways to use magical, healthy spaghetti squash in your favourite meals. 

honey-lime-chicken

Make This Super-Juicy BBQ Chicken Before Summer Turns to Fall

Chicken on the barbecue is hands down one of the easiest and tastiest meals grilling season brings. But as summer nears its end, it can be hard to make this staple shine with fresh, new flavours. Luckily, this recipe gives a bright and refreshing twist to the standard chicken dinner. Finish off your chicken on the grill with a honey-lime glaze and then get even more into the groove of summer by serving it with one of these seasonal, fruity and fresh salsas.

honey-lime-grilled-chicken

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: about 30 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
4 chicken breast or 6 chicken thighs (skin on or off, boneless or bone-in)
Salt and pepper
Olive oil
1/2 cup honey
Zest of 1 lime
Juice of 1 lime
1 Tbsp soy sauce
Fresh lime and cilantro for garnish

Directions:
1. Preheat grill to medium high.
2. Season chicken with salt, pepper and olive oil
3. In a small bowl mix honey, lime zest, lime juice and soy sauce.
4. Place chicken on the grill, skin side down if using skin-on pieces.
5. Once chicken is golden, flip and continue to grill on the other side until chicken is almost cooked through, about 10-15 minutes depending on cut and whether bone is in.
6. Brush grilled side with honey-lime mixture. Close cover. Continue to brush every 2 minutes until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the chicken reads 160°
7. Serve chicken with lime wedges, cilantro and fresh fruit salsa.

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Pineapple, Orange and Cumin salsa
Heat 1 tablespoon of cumin in a dry pan set over medium-high heat. Once fragrant and toasted, add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1/4 cup of thinly sliced red onion. When onions are soft, add 2 tablespoons of orange marmalade and stir. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and add 2 cups of chopped fresh pineapple. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper. Makes about 2 cups.

Mango Salsa
Combine 1 diced mango with 1/2 cup each of diced red pepper and cucumber. Add in 2 finely sliced scallions, the juice and zest of 1 lime and then season with salt and pepper. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with fresh cilantro. Makes about 2 cups.

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Peach and Avocado Salsa
Dice 2 peaches, 1 avocado and 1 small tomato. Mix together with fresh lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of fresh basil. Season with salt and pepper. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Looking for more ideas? Try our 12 Tantalizing Grilled Chicken Thigh Recipes.

Pesto

5 Pesto Recipes to Preserve That Garden-Fresh Flavour

It’s the end of summer, and gardens around the country are overflowing with beautiful, aromatic herbs. While this bountiful news is very welcome for flavour-craving home cooks, it can also be a little daunting. One can only garnish so many pizzas with fresh basil, and there’s a limit to the amount of tacos one can top with cilantro. But don’t let those gorgeous greens go to waste; instead, make pesto.

From classic basil-pine nut to a more modern kale-walnut creation, there are countless pesto possibilities and combinations to inspire new dishes and brighten up old favourites.

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Classic Basil Pesto
In a food processor, blend 2 cups packed fresh basil, 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese, 1/3 cup toasted pine nuts, 2 minced garlic cloves, 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil and salt, to taste. Continue to blend until a thick, green paste forms.

 Parsley and Pistachio Pesto
In a food processor, blend 1 1/2 cups packed fresh parsley leaves, 1/2 cup chopped fresh chives, 1/3 cup pistachios, 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese, 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil and salt, to taste. Continue to blend until a thick, green paste forms.

Cilantro, Mint and Pumpkin Seed Pesto
In a food processor, blend 1 cup packed fresh cilantro (including tender stems), 1 cup packed fresh mint leaves, 1/2 cup toasted unsalted pumpkin seeds, 1/3 sliced green onion, the zest and juice of 1 lime, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil and salt, to taste. Continue to blend until a thick, green paste forms.

Arugula and Almond Pesto
In a food processor, blend 2 cups packed baby arugula, 1/2 cup toasted almonds, zest and juice of 1 lemon, 1 minced garlic clove, 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil and salt, to taste. Continue to blend until a thick, green paste forms.

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Kale and Walnut Pesto
In a food processor, blend 11/2 cups packed green kale leaves including ribs, tough ends discarded, 1/2 cup packed fresh parsley leaves, 1/2 cup Asiago cheese, 1/3 cup toasted walnuts, 1 minced garlic clove, 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil and salt, to taste. Continue to blend until a thick, green paste forms.

How To Store Pesto
Store pesto airtight in the refrigerator with a thin layer of olive oil over top to avoid oxidation and preserve that vibrant green colour. Or, spoon into an ice cube tray and freeze; pop out pesto “ice cubes” and store in a zip-top bag for portioned use throughout the fall and winter.

How To Enjoy Your Resh Pesto
– Mix pesto with your favourite vinegar to create an herbaceous salad dressing
– Mix pesto with mayonnaise to create a herby dipping sauce for kebabs, vegetables and chips
– Spread pesto onto sandwiches, burger buns or avocado toast
– Dress warm or cold pasta with pesto for a vibrant pasta dinner or lunchtime pasta salad
– Add a pop of freshness to soups and stews with a dollop of pesto on top
– Mix pesto with cream cheese for a fresh bagel topper
– Mix pesto into quiches, frittatas or spoon into omelettes

While you have the food processor out, try your hand at a few more pesto variations.

Chickpea-Fritters-Tzatziki-feature

The Crispy Chickpea Recipe You’ll Make Again and Again

Golden, crunchy chickpea fritters are a perfect match with a bright and tangy tzatziki. Pair them together as a dainty, dippable appetizer or turn the fritters into a salad topper that beats any crouton. Change it up by nestling the fritters and tzatziki in a large, soft flatbread with slices of fresh tomato and lettuce for a Greek twist on a falafel wrap, or make them into sliders using mini pita pockets or baby burger buns.

Chickpea Fritters and Tzatziki

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Soaking and Chilling Time: 12 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Makes: 12 Chickpea Fritters, 2 cups Creamy Cucumber Tzatziki

Ingredients:
Chickpea Fritters:
1 cup dry chickpeas
1 clove garlic
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp salt
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup refined avocado oil or grapeseed oil, for frying
½ cup cooked chickpeas, for garnish, optional
1 Tbsp tender fresh herb leaves (oregano, parsley, mint, etc.), for serving

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Tzatziki:
1 English cucumber
2 cups plain Greek yogurt
½ clove garlic, minced
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, more for serving
1 Tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp salt
⅛ tsp ground black pepper
⅛ tsp red pepper flakes, more for serving
1 Tbsp tender fresh herb leaves (oregano, parsley, mint, etc.), for serving

Tzatziki

Directions:

Chickpea Fritters:
1. Add chickpeas to a large bowl and cover with at least 4 inches of water. Allow to sit at room temperature at least 12 hours or overnight. After soaking, drain and rinse well.
2. In a food processor, pulse garlic, cilantro, flour, baking powder, cumin and salt until minced. Pulse in lemon juice and olive oil. Add soaked and drained chickpeas to the food processor and pulse until finely minced and mixture is just combined.
3. Line a large rimmed baking sheet. Scoop chickpea mixture into portions of approximately 3 tablespoons, placing them on the baking sheet and gently forming into 1/2-inch-tall discs. Freeze for 30 minutes for mixture to absorb flour and firm up.
4. Preheat oven to 200ºF. In a large cast-iron or high-sided skillet, add avocado or grapeseed oil and heat over medium-high.
5. To test oil temperature, drop a small fritter crumb into oil – it should sizzle. Using a metal spatula, very gently add fritters to hot oil in two batches, cooking for about 5 to 6 minutes per side, until golden brown and cooked through. If browning too quickly, lower the element temperature. Transfer pan-fried fritters to a wire cooling rack set over a large rimmed baking sheet. When all fritters are cooked, keep warm in oven while preparing tzatziki.

Chickpea Fritters

Tzatziki:
1. Grate cucumber, add to a fine-mesh sieve and press to extract as much liquid as possible. Add to a large bowl with remaining tzatziki ingredients – except red pepper flakes and herbs – and mix to combine. Transfer to a serving bowl, drizzle with additional olive oil, sprinkle with red pepper flakes and scatter over herbs.

Assembly:
Transfer fritters to a serving plate, sprinkle with additional chickpeas, if desired, and garnish with fresh herbs. Serve fritters warm with tzatziki.

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Looking for more recipes? Try these Chickpea Recipes to Keep Your Heart Happy.

Cocktail-Popsicles-feature-image

Chill Out with Delicious DIY Cocktail Popsicles

Your summertime cocktail hour just got a lot more fun – and refreshing – thanks to these cool adults-only boozy pops. From Strawberry-Aperol, made with summertime berries, to an herbaceous Cucumber-Gin and a marmalade-infused Orange-Negroni, you’re bound to find your preferred tipple in one of these flavours. While it is tempting to add more alcohol, resist the urge; these won’t fully freeze if you’re overly generous.

Cocktail-Popsicles-holiding-summer

Strawberry-Aperol Cocktail Popsicles

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Freeze Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 8 hours 10 minutes
Makes: 4 cocktail popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup water
6 medium fresh strawberries, hulled
1½ oz Aperol or Campari
1½ oz ice wine
2 Tbsp granulated sugar

Directions:
1. Add all ingredients to a blender and puree until smooth. Tap blender container to remove air bubbles. Fill popsicle mould, place in sticks and freeze until completely frozen, at least 8 hours. Remove from mould and enjoy.

Cocktail-Popsicles

Cucumber-Gin Cocktail Popsicles

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Freeze Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 8 hours 10 minutes
Makes: 4 cocktail popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup water
½ cup roughly chopped English cucumber
2 oz gin
¼ cup sugar
½ tsp lime juice

Directions:
1. Add all ingredients to a blender and puree until smooth. Tap blender container to remove air bubbles. Fill popsicle mould, place in sticks and freeze until completely frozen, at least 8 hours. Remove from mould and enjoy.

Orange-Negroni-pops

Orange-Negroni Cocktail Popsicles

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Freeze Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 8 hours 10 minutes
Makes: 4 cocktail popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup water
2 oz Campari or Aperol
2 oz sweet vermouth
1½ oz gin
4 Tbsp high-quality orange marmalade

Directions:
1. Add all ingredients to a blender and puree until smooth. Tap blender container to remove air bubbles. Fill popsicle mould, place in sticks and freeze until completely frozen, at least 8 hours. Remove from mould and enjoy.

Cocktail Popsicles - Birdseye

Looking for more delightful summer drinks? Try one of our 30 Cocktails to Keep You Cool This Summer.

Fruit Bruschetta

Fresh, Fruity Bruschetta to Sweeten Your Summer

Bruschetta is a crunchy Italian appetizer that celebrates summertime tomatoes, fresh basil, garlic and olive oil, all of which is spooned over crispy, toasted bread. With all of that goodness packed into one bite, it’s no wonder it’s so popular!

While tomatoes are lovely, the concept of bruschetta is open to interpretation. Instead of the standard tomatoes, we put some of summer’s best stone fruit in the spotlight, creating three scrumptious, tomato-free bruschetta using peaches, cherries and apricots. Enjoy one, two or all three of these sweet-meets-savoury creations for a bright, stunningly beautiful alternative to typical tomatoes.

peach-bruschetta

Peach and Radish Bruschetta
Thinly slice 2 ripe peaches and place in a medium bowl with 2 thinly sliced radishes, 1 Tbsp thinly sliced green onion and 2 Tbsp fresh cilantro leaves. Toss in 1 Tbsp olive oil and 2 Tbsp fresh lime juice. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Mix and let peach mixture stand for 10 minutes. Garnish toasted crostini with peach mixture and serve immediately. Makes 8 to 10.

cherry-bruschetta

Cherry and Chive Bruschetta
Pit and slice 2 cups cherries and place in a medium bowl with 1/4 cup minced fresh chives, 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar and 1 Tbsp olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Mix and let cherry mixture stand for 10 minutes. Smear extra-smooth ricotta on toasted crostini and top with cherry mixture, spooning over residual cherry juices. Serve immediately. Makes 8 to 10.

Apricot-Basil

Apricot and Basil Bruschetta
Slice 2 cups ripe apricots and place in a medium bowl with 1/4 cup sliced red onion and 1/4 cup finely chopped basil. In a small bowl whisk 1 Tbsp white wine vinegar with 2 Tbsp apricot jam and microwave for 30 seconds. Toss apricot mixture with jam mixture and let stand for 10 minutes. Top toasted crostini with apricot mixture and garnish with crumbled feta. Serve immediately. Makes 8 to 10.

Don’t get us wrong, we still love tomatoes! Here are our finest fresh tomato recipes for summertime and beyond.

natural wines

What is Natural Wine and Where to Find It in Canada

Natural wine is the drink du jour. The trendy, funky new kid is popping up in small and exclusive quantities in wine stores and on restaurant menus throughout the country.

This exciting frontier in viniculture, with its old-school, hands-off approach, produces some of the most beautiful bottles out there – if you can score some. But, like the term “natural” itself, natural wine is not a regulated phrase, so you best do some research before purchasing to ensure they’re getting what they asked for. If you’re looking to try this trend, bring this cheat sheet along so you know what you’re tasting.

What Is Natural Wine?
Natural wine is a different kind of grape-growing approach, one where the winemaker keeps pesticides and chemicals out of the equation, letting the grapes breathe and come into their own before harvest. Seasonal whether patterns play a big factor in the wine’s flavour.

Wine grapes

Wine grapes
Allison Day

If the weather is hotter, the grapes will have more sugar, producing more alcohol upon fermentation. If the season is cooler, the grapes will be dry (less sweet), producing less alcohol upon fermentation, and possibly fermenting slower. Unlike some mainstream wines that are built on repetition and familiar taste, natural wines go with the flow, making a dynamic and exciting range of flavours each year. Most natural wine should be sulfur-free, a big risk for oxidation, so it’s to be enjoyed fresh, not aged. Some wineries which incorporate natural processes and wild fermentation, opt to add sulphites to preserve it for shipping and storage.

How Is It Made?
Natural wineries make a point to differentiate themselves from large-scale productions, which often ferment the grapes in temperature-controlled rooms. Natural wines are made by taking what comes to them. This can include spontaneous fermentation, where wild yeasts existing in the air ferment the wine.
Using wild yeast is an unpredictable method, making this process a true challenge. With each type of yeast, comes a different flavour. Yeasts can affect the mouth feel and aroma of wine, making natural wine making a gamble. But when it turns out right, it’s outstanding.

Pearce Predhomme Chenin Blanc -- a natural wine.

Pearce Predhomme Chenin Blanc — a natural wine.
Allison Day

What Does Natural Wine Taste Like?
Because of their spontaneous nature, tastes can range from tropical to floral, skunky to sour or ultra-funky. Some bottles are clear, some are cloudy; it depends on whether the wine is filtered or not.
Red, white, orange, rosé and sparkling wine – all of which begin with their own specific flavour – are transformed into something different based on terroir (the growing region and land), climate, grape varietal and when they are picked. The best thing you can do is sample your way to a favourite.

Where Can You Find Natural Wine in Canada?
Specialty retailers, wine bars and mail-order services are your best bet for getting a taste of natural wine.
Restaurants with sommelier-run wine programs are another great place to try. For instance, The Black Hoof in Toronto has a knowledgeable staff of enthusiastic, on-trend wine aficionados who can help you find a natural wine to enjoy by the glass or bottle. In Montreal, Hôtel Herman’s lengthy, yet focused, wine list carries natural wines from around the world. Burdock and Co. in Vancouver offers a selection of natural wines served by a knowledgeable staff who can answer your toughest natural wine questions.

It’s not just found at restaurants. Pearl Morissette, a winery in Niagara’s famous winemaking region headed by a former Burgundian winemaker, is creating alluring natural wines with mystique, charm and sophistication, taking this from bohemian hipster trend to world-class treat. Their wines are available at their vineyard, online and in restaurants.
And, no matter where you are in Canada, you can order through Nicholas Pearce Wines, which carries one of my favourite natural wines, the Pearce Predhomme Chenin Blanc (South Africa). Grab a friend, order a case and split it – you won’t be disappointed.
Ask questions, request and seek out natural wine in your area. It’s worth the effort, not only for the thrill of the hunt, but the true difference in taste.

semifreddo

How to Make Semifreddo, Italy’s Dreamy No-Churn Ice Cream

If you’ve yet to make ice cream’s cooler Italian cousin, semifreddo (roughly translated from Italian to mean “half cold”), before, now is the time to whip up a batch. Not only is this dessert delicious with its dreamy, frozen mousse-like texture, it’s easy to make (no ice cream maker required!) and even easier to customize.

Traditionally poured into a loaf pan, frozen and then served sliced like an ice cream cake all grown up, you can also portion the semifreddo mixture into individual bowls, or even simply freeze a batch in a large container and scoop it out, ice cream-style. Starting with a simple vanilla base, the world is your oyster when it comes to flavours you can swirl into the mix.

semifreddo_freshfruit_complete01

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Chill Time: 5 hours
Total Time: 5 hours 30 minutes
Serves: 6 to 8

Ingredients:
5 large eggs, yolks and whites separated
1¼ cups granulated sugar, divided
2¼ cups heavy cream (35%), divided
1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

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1. In a large heat-safe bowl, whisk to combine egg yolks, 1 cup of sugar,  ¼ cup of cream and vanilla.

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2. Fill a medium saucepan with approximately 2-inches of water and bring to a simmer. Place bowl containing yolk mixture on top and whisk regularly for 6 to 7 minutes, until thickened. Check consistency by dipping the back of a spoon in mixture and run your finger through it; the mixture should form a clean line. If it’s still too runny, continue to cook for another minute or so. Once thickened, remove from heat and let cool, about 1 hour.

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3. Line a standard loaf tin or small baking pan with plastic wrap, leaving overhang.
4. Using a stand mixer, whip egg whites on high speed until frothy. Continue to whip on high speed while slowly adding ¼ cup remaining sugar. Stop whipping once stiff, glossy peaks form. Transfer whipped egg white mixture to a large mixing bowl.

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5. In the same stand mixer bowl, whip remaining 2 cups cream to stiff peaks. Transfer whipped cream to whipped egg white mixture.

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6. Pour cooked and cooled egg yolk mixture into the bowl of the egg white mixture and whipped cream, and fold with a spatula until all three components are combined. Pour mixture into prepared pan, cover top with overhanging plastic wrap and place in the freezer to set, about 4 hours.

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7. To serve, remove from pan, unwrap plastic and slice into thick slabs. Or use a scoop and serve mounded in bowls.

Peanut Butter and Banana Semifreddo

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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Chill Time: 5 hours
Total Time: 5 hours 30 minutes
Serves: 6 to 8

Ingredients:
1 recipe plain semifreddo, prepared prior to freezing (steps 1 through 6, above)
1 cup chunky natural peanut butter (no sugar added)
¼ cup heavy cream (35%)
2 bananas, peeled and thinly sliced or mashed

Directions:
1. In a small saucepan over low heat, melt peanut butter. Transfer peanut butter to a small bowl and stir to combine with cream and bananas.

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3. Line a standard loaf tin or small baking pan with plastic wrap, leaving overhang. Working in alternating layers, pouring one-third of the semifreddo followed by dollops of one-third of the peanut butter mixture; repeat with remaining semifreddo and peanut butter mixture. Cover top with plastic wrap and place in the freezer to set, about 4 hours.
4. To serve, remove from pan, unwrap plastic and slice into thick slabs. Or use a scoop and serve mounded in bowls.

More Semifreddo Flavour Options:

– Salted caramel and diced green apple
– Honey-roasted apricots and dark chocolate shavings
– Macerated berries and mint
– Sautéed plums and crushed hazelnuts
– Lemon zest and crumbled shortbread
– Cocoa powder and chopped roasted almonds

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Don’t touch that oven! Here are even more no-bake desserts to satisfy your sweet tooth.

10 Reasons You’ll Love to Watch Food Network Canada this Fall

Indulge your sweet and savoury side with Food Network Canada’s fall schedule stocked with down-home comfort, sugar highs, thrilling competitions and the best recipes for winning breakfast, lunch and dinner. Here are ten delicious reasons you’ll love to watch us this fall:

1. The Great Food Truck Race, Y’all!
The-Great-Food-Truck-Race-Tyler-Florence
Tyler Florence heads to the American South – the land of po’ boys, decadent seafood and of course, southern fried chicken. The race kicks off in New Orleans with seven teams of food truck novices vying to make it to the finale in Savannah, Georgia and win the $50,000 grand prize.

The Great Food Truck Race premieres Sunday, August 20 at 9 E/P.

2. Family, Food and Fun on Guy’s Family Road Trip
Guys-Family-Road-Trip
Guy is packing up the RV and taking his wife, Lori,  and two sons, Ryder and Hunter, on the road from California to Florida with stops along the way for off-the-hook delicious eats and family fun at iconic locations and roadside attractions.

Guy’s Family Road Trip premieres Friday, September 1 at 9 E/P.
Want more Guy? Catch him in Guy’s Grocery Games: Superstars Tournament beginning August 27.

3. Hannah Hart in I Hart Food
Hannah-Hart
You might know her from her YouTube series Drunk Kitchen. (She does have over 2 million followers).  Now Hannah is taking her love of food and puns on the road, finding the most incredible eats from Maine to New Mexico to North Carolina.  Tune in and get to know Hannah. You’re going to heart her.

I Hart Food premieres Friday, September 1 at 11 E/P.

4. Food Network All-Stars Step Into the Ring to Beat Bobby Flay
Beat-Bobby-Flay-All-Star-Takeover
It’s an All Star takeover on Beat Bobby Flay! Alton Brown, Michael Symon and Ted Allen judge which culinary stars like Marcus Samuelsson, Alex Guarnaschelli, Anne Burrell and Damaris Phillips could beat Bobby at his own culinary game.

Beat Bobby Flay: All Star Takeover premieres Thursday, August 31 at 10 E/P.

5. Learn to Cook Like a Pro with the Barefoot Contessa
Barefoot-Contessa-Cook-like-a-Pro
Ina Garten is known for her easy, elegant recipes and sage hosting advice. In this new season, she shares her best cooking secrets and techniques along with her foolproof recipes so you can make your best meals ever.

Barefoot Contessa: Cook Like a Pro premieres Sunday, September 10 at 10am ET. You’ll be able to find all of Ina’s signature recipes from the series on her recipes page.

6.  Celebrity Dish-asters Become Kitchen Masters on Worst Cooks in America
Worst-Cooks-in-America-Celebrity-Edition-S11
Fellow kitchen disasters SNL alum Nora Dunn, gossip blogger Perez Hilton, style expert Carson Kressley and actress Vivica A. Fox go through an intense culinary bootcamp led by Anne Burrell and Rachael Ray. After eight weeks of spills and thrills, one of them will rise to be a kitchen master and earn $25,000 for the charity of their choice.

Worst Cooks in America: Celebrity Edition premieres Wednesday, August 30 at 10 E/P.

7. The Most Amazing Cakes on Texas Cake House
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Texan cake artist Natalie Sideserf creates some of the most-intricate cake sculptures in the world. Her husband, Dave, quit his day job to help her realize her delicious dreams. Watch these two sweethearts create some of the most amazing cakes you’ll ever see.

Texas Cake House premieres Monday, August 28 at 10 E/P.

8. Ninja Tips and Deliciously Healthy Recipes so You (and Your Kids) Can Love Your Lunch!
Love-Your-Lunch
Ceri Marsh and Laura Keogh (the culinary duo behind Sweet Potato Chronicles) are not your average lunch ladies. They’re Love Your Lunch ladies! From genius tips on getting more veggies in your mid-day meal to fun ways to snack pack your lunch, Ceri and Laura will share their tips and recipes for tasty, healthy lunches you and your kids will love to eat.

Love Your Lunch videos and recipes will be available here on August 25.

9. No One Does Easy, Down Home Cooking Like The Pioneer Woman
The-Pioneer-Woman
Ree Drummond is back with more recipes your family will love. In each new episode, she’ll share her best meal short cuts, how to work ahead and of course, deliciously easy recipes – all from her gorgeous ranch kitchen.

The Pioneer Woman premieres Saturday, September 9 at 12pm ET. You’ll be able to find all of Ree’s new recipes from the series on her recipes page.

10. Dessert Games: a Sweeter Take on Guy’s Grocery Games
Dessert-Games-Duff-Goldman-Guy-Fieri

Guy Fieri hands over the keys to Flavortown Market to dessert master Duff Goldman. In Duff’s newly dubbed “Sweet City,” four dessert chefs will shop for and create amazing confections, vying for the sweetest finish – a shopping spree worth up to $10,000 for the last chef standing.

Dessert Games premieres Monday, August 28 at 9 E/P.

For complete listings, check out our schedule page here.

Braided Pie

3 Pretty Ways to Top Your Pie

As we move away from fruit-filled summer pies and head into fall, it’s time to conquer a classic pie crust and add some decorative designs to our baking bag of tricks. From skinny, wide and braided lattice tops to fluted edges and free-from cut outs, the combinations are just as endless and creative as the fillings inside.

In general, the cooler you keep the dough and the less it’s handled, the better it’ll be to work with. However, this is easier said than done. When rolling out dough or making decorative pieces, limit the amount of kneading as well as the use of additional flour. If the dough becomes too tacky or warm, just pop it back in the refrigerator for a bit. When gathering scraps to re-roll, try to layer them on top of each other to keep the baked crust flaky. Got leftovers? Wrap them well in plastic, and store in the freezer for up to a few months.

Whether you weave an intricate, plaid design or go with a more traditional, rustic top crust, one thing is for sure: you’re going to have one delicious pie.

Braided Pie

Braided Pie
This contemporary design gives great coverage to the top of a pie, but with some extra whimsy. Braid lengths of pie dough together and fit them over the top of the filling. Try varying the widths of the braids and the space in between for different looks!

You’ll Need:
Double-crusted pie dough
Filling of choice
Egg-wash (optional)
Turbinado sugar (optional)

Directions:
1. Prepare bottom crust and fill the pie. Chill for 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, roll out top crust to about 1/4-inch into a large rectangular shape.
3. Using a ruler and pastry wheel or sharp paring knife, cut dough into long, 3/4-inch strips. You’ll need about 15 to 21 strips, depending on desired thickness and spacing in between.

Braided Pie
4. Gather strips into sets of 3. Pinch tops of each set together.
5. Keeping strips flat, begin a classic 3-strand braid. Trying not to stretch dough, braid the length of each set of strands. The longest braid should be slightly longer than the diameter of pie pan.
6. Lay braids over pie filling, parallel to each other.

Braided Pie
7. Trim braids so they overhang the edge of the pie by 1/2 to 3/4-inch on each side.
8. Fold excess dough from bottom crust up and over edges of the braids and press together.

Braided Pie
9. To create a fluted edge, pinch the dough between the thumb of your dominant hand the thumb and index finger of the opposite hand. Continue around the entire edge of the pie.
10. Refrigerate pie for 15 to 30 minutes as the oven pre-heats.
Brush with an egg-wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar (if desired), and bake according to your recipe or until golden brown.

Lattice-Pie

Classic Lattice Pie
Think fresh apple pie chilling on a windowsill. This basic design weaves strips of pie dough together to create a classic top crust. The over-under technique is not difficult to master, and once you’ve got it down, the designs are endless! Try weaving skinny pieces or wide pieces, or a combination to create a fun plaid. You could even sneak in a few braided pieces, too.

You’ll Need:
Double-crusted pie dough
Filling of choice
Egg-wash (optional)
Turbinado sugar (optional)

Directions:
1. Prepare bottom crust and fill the pie. Chill for 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, roll out top crust to about 1/4 to 1/8 inch into a large, oval shape.
3. Using a ruler and pastry wheel or sharp paring knife, cut dough into 1 to 2-inch wide strips. The centre strips should be slightly longer than the diameter of the pie pan. You’ll need about 6 to 10 strips to create the lattice top, depending on desired width and spacing in between.

Lattice Pie
4. Lay 1/2 of strips over top of filling, all in the same direction.
5. Gently pull back and fold over every-other strip about halfway.
6. Lay 1 strip perpendicular to first set, next to folded edges, then replace folded strips over top of the newest strip to start the weave.
7. From the first set, gently pull back strips that did not get folded during the last round.

Lattice Pie
8. Repeat step 6 with another strip.
9. Continue this over-under motion with the remaining strips until the weave covers the entire top of the pie.
10. Trim strips so they overhang the edge of pie pan by about 1 inch.
11. Gently tuck both the overhanging pieces from top lattice and bottom crust under and press together all the way around the pie.

Lattice Pie
12. Crimp pieces together and press into the edge of the pie pan firmly with tines of a fork. Make sure each piece is secure. Refrigerate pie for 15 to 30 minutes as the oven pre-heats.
13. Brush with an egg-wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar (if desired) and bake according to your recipe or until golden brown.

 

fishtail lattice pie

Fishtail Cut-Out Pie
Once you’ve got your lattice and braids down, try combining both techniques together in this show-stopping pie. A tight lattice covers the centre while a double, five-strand fishtail braid creates the border. A few free-form leaves add extra flair and even hide the seams of the braids.

You’ll Need:
2 to 3 single crust pie dough
Flling of choice
Egg-wash (optional)
Turbinado sugar (optional)

Directions:
1. Prepare the bottom crust and fill the pie. Chill for 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, roll out half of the remaining dough about 1/4 to 1/8-inch thick.
3. Using a ruler and a pastry wheel or sharp paring knife, cut very thin strips, about 1/2 inch wide and 7 to 8 inches long. You’ll need about 16 to 20 strips.
4. Following the directions of classic lattice design, weave together thin strips on top of the filled pie, leaving a 1 to 2 inch boarder around the edges. Fold over or trim any overhanging pieces of bottom crust. Place back in refrigerator.

fishtail pie braid
5. Roll out the remaining dough to about 1/4-inch thick. Using a ruler and pastry wheel or sharp paring knife, cut dough into long, thin strips.
6. Gather the strips into sets of 5. Pinch tops of each set together.
7. Keeping strips flat, begin a 5-strand, fishtail braid. Fan out all 5 strips. Taking the furthest strip from the right, cross it over the 2 strands closest to it and place it in the centre of the other 4.
8. Next, take the furthest strip from the left and cross it over 2 strands closest to it and place in the new centre.
9. Continue to braid the length of the braid, bringing the outmost strip over and into the centre.
10. Use braid to create a double-boarder around the pie, from the edge of the pan to the lattice centre.

fishtail pie crust
11. You’ll need several braids per ring. Braid ends of braids together or trim and press to seal. Use bit of egg wash to secure in place, if necessary.
12. With any remaining dough, roll out to about 1/4 to 1/8-inch thick.
13. Use a sharp paring knife to cut a free-form leaves.
14. Use back of a paring knife to score leaf patterns on each leaf.
15. Arrange leaves on top of the pie, or where the braids meet to cover the seams.

fishtail pie leaves
16. Refrigerate pie for 15 to 30 minutes as oven pre-heats.
17. Brush with egg-wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar (if desired) and bake according to your recipe or until golden brown.

fishtail pie finish

Looking for more pie-spiration? Check out these 10 Tips from Bakers for Perfect Pastry Art.

Red Rover Summer Cider

Great Canadian Ciders You Must Try This Summer

Cider has become an art form in Canada, with cider houses popping up across the country. Not only are they elevating this simple apple sipper to a  whole new level, Canadian cideries are winning international awards and showing off their best beverages on the global stage.

Whether it’s dry or sweet, hopped or barrel-aged, spiced or fruit infused, there is a cider to please every palate. From coast-to-coast, here are some of Canada’s finest ciders that you should be sampling this summer.

British Columbia

Lonetree Ginger Apple Cider

Ginger Apple Cider, Lonetree Cider Co. (Vancouver, BC)

Lonetree is a small cidery that uses apples from old-growth orchards in the Okanagan Valley to make its classic dry ciders. Their Ginger Apple is refreshing with a hint of spice, and is an excellent choice if you enjoy a Moscow Mule.

Salt Spring Wild Hopped Apricot

Hopped Apricot, Salt Spring Wild Cider House (Salt Spring Island, BC)

This cidery makes use of the wild apples that grow on Salt Spring Island and blends them with fruit from 100-year-old heritage trees and organic orchards. Made with Cascade hops, apricots, and organic apples, their Hopped Apricot will please both beer and cider fans with its Hefeweizen-esque flavour.

Blue Moon Asian Pear

Raven’s Moon Asian Pear Apple Cider, Blue Moon Winery and Ciderworx (Courtenay, BC)

The hand-crafted sparkling ciders at Blue Moon feature organic fruits from Vancouver Island, and are created with an adventurous streak of fermenting fruits to see what happens. Their off dry, bubbly Asian Pear Apple Cider pairs well with curry or a pasta in cream sauce.

Alberta

Rock Creek Strawberry Rhubarb Cider

Rock Creek Strawberry Rhubarb Cider, Big Rock Brewing (Calgary, AB)

Alberta brewery Big Rock is known for its beers, but their Rock Creek ciders are definitely worth trying. The Strawberry Rhubarb cider pours a deep red hue, and is a perfect balance of dry and sweet.

Saskatchewan
Crossmount Cider Company Citri Hopped

Citri Hopped, Crossmount Cider Company (Saskatoon, SK)

Crossmount has its own orchard of 1,500 trees featuring a selection of Prairie varietals, including the the Norkent apple. Their hop-infused Citri Hopped is like a sparkling wine, IPA or radler with notes of peach, pink grapefruit and passionfruit. It’s refreshing when paired with seafood or Mexican fare.

Manitoba

fort-garry-lucky-cherry

Lucky Cherry BC Black Cherry Cider, Fort Garry Brewing Company (Winnipeg, MB)

Made with BC black cherries and just a hint of pear, Fort Garry’s Lucky Cherry cider is for the red wine or sangria fans. The juice is fermented with lager yeast, yielding a libation that is tart and sweet.

Ontario
Collective Arts Brewing Apple & Cherry Cider

Apple & Cherry Cider, Collective Arts Brewing (Hamilton, ON)

Collective Arts takes their Local Press cider and adds Ontario Montmorency cherry juice from the Niagara Escarpment to create this easy drinking cider. It’s a fresh, juicy and well-balanced beverage that makes it perfect for warm summer days.

Tawse Sparkling Apple Cider

Sparkling Apple Cider, Tawse Winery (Vineland, ON)

Tawse Winery has taken 100 per cent Ontario apples and turned them into their delicious Spark-Apple Cider. Bottle fermented and much like a Prosecco, this is a cider made for brunches or a rich meal.

West Avenue Catalyst Mark II

Catalyst Mark II, West Avenue Cider House (Freelton, ON)

West Avenue has a great selection of ciders that they offer year-round, but they are also innovators with their barrel-aged and cask-conditioned concoctions. This summer, their Catalyst Mark II is a dry-hopped, barrel-fermented farmhouse cider with cherries that would definitely satisfy the sour beer aficionados.

Quebec
st-nicolas-rose

Rosé Crackling Cider, Cidrerie & Vergers St-Nicolas (Saint-Nicolas, QC)

The Rosé Crackling Cider from St-Nicolas was made for summer sipping. Created with apples and strawberries, it’s crisp, slightly sweet and aromatic. Serve it instead of a sparkling wine, or pair it with fruit-based dishes.

Ice Cider, Domaine Leduc-Piedimonte (Rougemont, QC)

Canada is known for its ice wine, but Quebec has perfected the ice cider. Leduc-Piedimonte’s golden ice cider is ranked one of the best in the world, with hints of orange zest, butter, honey, and vanilla. Smooth, refreshing and well-balanced, you’ll want to enjoy this after a long meal.

New Brunswick
Red Rover Summer Cider

Summer Cider, Red Rover Craft Cider (Fredericton, NB)

Red Rover is leading the cider scene in New Brunswick, and you just have to add its award-winning Summer Cider to your “must try” list. It is light, crisp and dry with a tart finish that will quench your thirst on those sultry summer days.

Scow Craft Cider,  Verger Belliveau Orchard (Memramcrook, NB)

This is a clear, slightly sharp cider made from four varieties of heritage apples grown on the Belliveau orchard. Named to honour the memory of boat crews and builders from the region, it’s a simple, traditionally crafted beverage.

Nova Scotia
No Boats on Sunday Premium Craft Cider

Apple Cider, No Boats on Sunday (Truro, NS)

No Boats on Sunday makes only one cider, but they make it well. Light-bodied with notes of apple and citrus, you’ll want to serve this at barbecues, picnics or backyard bashes. Fun fact — the version available in the Maritimes is made with Nova Scotia apples, but there’s also a version made in Ontario with locally-sourced fruit.

Bulwark Gold

Bulwark Gold, Bulwark Cider (New Ross, NS)

Apples straight from the Annapolis Valley go into Bulwark’s selection of slowly fermented craft ciders. Their smooth-tasting, award-winning Bulwark Gold is infused with honey and can be served on its own or on ice. This is a cider to enjoy while sitting outside on a warm, sunny day.

Looking for more cider? Try our Cider Can Chicken recipe.

Szechuan Peppercorn

4 Quick and Easy Pairing Combos to Win Summer

This summer we’re keeping it simple, quick and easy – without compromising flavour or quality! Whether you’re hosting cocktails or a backyard party, we’ve got four tasty pairing combinations that are packed with complementary flavours and requires no prep, which means less cleanup and you can get right to your summer fete.

Ginger Teriyaki Charcuterie Board and Pairings

Complement the sweet flavours of toasted teriyaki and floral ginger with nutty cheeses and a refreshing extra pale ale to elongate the overall flavour profile.

You’ll Need: Raclette cheese, grilled pineapple, almonds, and lightly toasted bread with olive oil.

Korean BBQ Beef Charcuterie Board and Pairings

The trick to smoothing out the charred soy flavours of Korean BBQ beef is by indulging in a rich, creamy, sharp cheese, like Morbier, and a light bodied, low-tannin red wine like Shiraz.

You’ll Need: Morbier cheese, sesame seed crackers, bell peppers, and assorted nuts.

Szechuan Peppercorn Charcuterie Board and Pairings

It’s all about contrast with this pairing! Temper the sharp, rich flavours of the Szechuan peppercorns with a creamy but bold Gouda. Enjoy these with a light bodied ale, like a Pilsner, that won’t mask the sweet and sharp flavours.

You’ll Need: Gouda cheese, water crackers, olives and sundried tomatoes.

Sweet Chili Pork Charcuterie Board and Pairings

When it comes to a sweet and spicy pork, it’s best to pair with a light and creamy cheese that will complement the earthy sweet flavour and lighten the chili kick. To quench your thirst, try a sparkling semi-dry white wine to help cut through the richness.

You’ll Need: Brie cheese, roasted peppers, sundried tomatoes, and lightly toasted bread.

Anna Olson’s Summer Fruit Flan

The minute the weather starts warming up, I start dreaming about the fresh fruits to come: First rhubarb, then strawberries, then cherries, and finally, apricots, raspberries, blueberries and peaches all at once.

To get you ready for summer baking, I thought an elegant, classic fruit tart would be ideal. This fruit flan uses a cookie-like tart base with a sweet vanilla pastry cream filling, and you get to be creative with the fruit on top — any summer fruit would make this a truly showstopping dessert.

summer-fruit-flan-recipe

Makes: 1 9-inch tart
Serves: 8 to 10

Ingredients:

Pastry:
½ cup unsalted butter at room temperature
¼ cup sugar
2 egg yolks
½ tsp vanilla extract
1 cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp salt
2 oz white chocolate, chopped

Pastry Cream:
1 cup milk
2 eggs
¼ cup sugar
2 1/2 Tbsp cornstarch
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 Tbsp unsalted butter

For Assembly:
4 cups seasonal summer fruits such as strawberries, raspberries, Blueberries, apricots or peaches, in any combination
3 Tbsp apple jelly

Directions:
1. Beat the butter and sugar together until fluffy. Stir in the egg yolks and vanilla. Stir in the flour and salt until the dough comes together. Shape the dough into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours, until firm.
2. Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Knead the pastry dough on a lightly floured surface to soften enough that it can be easily rolled. Dust the pastry a little and roll it out to just over 11-inches in diameter and just under a ¼-inch thick. Line a 9-inch removable-bottom fluted tart pan and trim the edges. Chill the pastry for 20 minutes in the fridge or 10 minutes in the freezer.
3. Dock the bottom of the pastry shell with a fork and bake it for 16 to 20 minutes, until just the edges are golden brown and the centre of the shell is dry looking. Cool completely before filling.
4. Keep the baked tart shell in its pan. Melt the white chocolate in a bowl placed over a pot of barely simmering water, stirring until melted. Brush the bottom and sides of the cooled tart shell to coat and chill the shell while preparing the pastry cream.
5. Heat the milk in a heavy-bottomed saucepot until just below a simmer. Whisk the eggs, sugar and cornstarch in a small bowl. Whisk half of the hot milk into the egg mixture, then pour this entire mixture back into the pot with the remaining milk. Whisk the custard constantly over medium heat until it thickens and just begins to bubble, about 3 to 4 minutes. Strain the custard into a bowl, stir in the vanilla and butter until melted and cover the bowl with plastic wrap so the wrap directly covers the surface of the custard. Cool the custard to room temperature, then chill for at least 2 hours.
6. To assemble the tart, spoon the custard into the tart shell and spread it evenly. Top the custard with the fresh fruit, creating an appealing design.  Melt the apple jelly over low heat, and then brush it over the fruit.  Chill the tart until you are ready to serve.

Note: The tart can be stored chilled for up to a day.

fnc-stars-summer

Food Network Canada Stars’ Favourite Vacation Eats

Sure, sure—it may be summer and some of our favourite chefs are taking a bit of a breather during these supposed “dog days.” But that doesn’t mean these foodies aren’t whipping up inspiring dishes and eating at some pretty incredible places during their hiatuses. In fact, summer seems to be a time for food creativity to develop and palates to blossom.

From Ree Drummond and Eden Grinshpan to Michael Smith and Alton Brown, here’s what our culinary superstars have been enjoying this summer. Bon appetit!

Anna Olson
When in Montreal, Anna Olson tends to stop by Patrice Patissier for some mouthwatering (and eye-catching) desserts. Just check out this rhubarb concoction she enjoyed recently. This artful offering might actually be the definition of summer on a plate.

Eden Grinshpan
While travelling in Tel Aviv this summer with her family, Eden Grinshpan seemed to be all about the Mediterranean food. And why not? Between the pitas, hummus, fresh veggies, fish and garlicky dips, it’s nice, light and perfect for summer. Mmm, pita.

https://instagram.com/p/BWFZtvjnRVk/

Alton Brown
Who says you can’t have rice for breakfast? When one is searching for a hearty meal in Los Angeles to kick off the day, Sqirlla seems to be a top choice for Alton Brown. We wonder how long it took him to polish off this crispy rice with the works… Probably not long at all.

Giada DeLaurentiis
Speaking of hearty breakfasts, it looks like Giada is getting her energy this summer from this riff on eggs Benedict–which is also a riff on classic crab cakes. Introducing Salmon Cake Benedict, a brunch item at DeLaurentiis’s Nevada eatery, Vegas. The salmon cakes are elevated with wilted spinach, piquillo peppers and prosecco hollandaise sauce, and are served with some classic toast and poached eggs. Sign us up.

Salmon cake benny! @giadavegas #vegasuncorkd

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Michael Smith
Some people stop and smell the summer flowers, other people devour them as culinary masterpieces. Michael Smith definitely falls into the latter category if this beautiful skillet he recently enjoyed is any indication. These mulled strawberries in haskap berry syrup with nutmeg biscuits and flower petal confetti are basically summer in a pan, and we just want to dive right in.

Ree Drummond
Ree Drummond has been busy pioneering her new cookbook this summer, and judging by some of the recipes she’s sharing it’s going to be epic. Fall, winter, spring or summer, we’re always down for bread and cheese. And when you pack melty cheese into a wheel of bread and serve it with some marinara sauce for dipping? Well that’s a recipe that just inspired us to host an end-of-summer potluck.

Mark McEwan
Sure, you could go for a pint and a platter of nachos after work, but that seems a little heavy on the tummy during these warmer summer months. That’s why we want to go the Mark McEwan route, and munch on these crispy rice cup crackers topped with tuna tartare, yuzu kosho and lime coconut instead. This Bymark appie isn’t just light and summery, but you also feel super artsy just eating it.

Chuck Hughes
There are rice bowls, and then there are rice bowls a la Chuck Hughes. We knew the chef was obsessed with fresh seafood, but this dish he showcased recently at his Le Bremner restaurant in Montreal is basically any lobster-lover’s dream. Huge chunks of lobster, fresh pops of peas and a buttery sauce on rice? Um, yes please.

RiceBowL☑

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Bobby Flay
Speaking of lobster, the delicacy may just be the seafood of the summer. Bobby Flay also enjoyed it recently at his Bobby Flay Steak restaurant in Atlantic City, via this elevated take on surf-and-turf. Grilled to perfection and topped with honey mustard horseradish and mint, these skewers make barbecues everywhere jealous.

Nigella Lawson
Simpler is always better, at least when it comes to wholesome cooking. Nigella Lawson continually proves this, especially with this summery take on old-fashioned tomato salad with homemade dressing. Now how refreshing does this look?

Geoffrey Zakarian
What do Chopped judges do for lunch when they have a break from filming during the lazy summer months? If they’re Geoffrey Zakarian they go for a chopped salad, of course. This one comes loaded with all of our faves, from blanched green beans to avocado, and it’s making our veggie-loving tummies grumble. Please excuse us while we go and chop one up ourselves.

Lunchtime. A different meaning for #chopped @foodnetwork

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gremolita-pasta

Savour Summer with Garlic Scape Gremolata ‘Pasta’

It’s officially garlic scape season! Garlic scapes are the gorgeous, winding green stalks that twirl above garlic bulbs buried beneath the soil. They have a milder, less pungent garlic taste and can be stir-fried, stewed, grilled, minced, blended, turned into pesto, pickled and fermented. You can find garlic scapes at many grocery stores, farmers’ markets or for lucky gardeners, your own backyard.

Garlic scapes are a vibrant addition to classic gremolata, a zippy, chopped herb condiment that pairs well with sweet potato and zucchini “noodles,” juicy grilled shrimp and plump cherry tomatoes. This healthy dish is so fresh and zesty, it’s basically summertime in a bowl.

garlic scape shrimp 3

Garlic Scape Gremolata Grilled Shrimp over Sweet Potato and Zucchini Noodle Pasta

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 13 minutes
Total Time: 33 minutes
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients:
Gremolata:
6 (6-inch) garlic scapes or 6 peeled cloves garlic
1 bunch curly parsley, tough ends discarded
Zest of 1 lemon (about 1 Tbsp)
Juice of 1 lemon (about 1/4 cup)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Noodles:
1 large zucchini
1 large sweet potato, peeled
2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Shrimp:
Olive oil, as needed
15 raw, peeled and deveined shrimp, tails intact
3 to 4 Tbsp Gremolata (recipe above)

Assembly:
5 cherry tomatoes, halved
Hulled hemp seeds, to taste

Directions:
Gremolata:
1. Add garlic scapes or garlic and parsley to a food processor and pulse until finely minced. Add lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper and pulse until fully combined, leaving some rustic texture. If you don’t have a food processor, mince ingredients finely by hand and stir together in a bowl.

garlic scape shrimp 2

Noodles:
1. Using a spiralizer, spiralize zucchini and sweet potato into spaghetti-style pasta. Or use a vegetable peeler to make thin, long strips. Or use prepared spiralized vegetable noodles, which can be found at most grocery stores.

garlic scape shrimp 1

2. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add oil, followed by noodles. Sauté for 5 to 7 minutes, until tender but not falling apart. (You can skip cooking and eat raw, if you prefer.) Season with salt and pepper. Remove noodles from heat.

Shrimp:
1. Heat grill or grill pan to medium-high and lightly brush with enough oil to coat grates.
2. In a large bowl, mix to coat shrimp with 3 to 4 Tbsp gremolata.
3. Grill shrimp for 3 minutes per side, or until bright pink and firm.

Assembly:
1. Place noodles in a large bowl and top with cherry tomatoes and shrimp. Spoon 1/4 to 1/3 cup of additional gremolata overtop bowl and gently mix everything to coat. Divide between serving bowls, sprinkle with hemp seeds, to taste and serve. Store any extra gremolata airtight in refrigerator up to 1 week.

Garlic lovers, rejoice! Here are 20 more zesty recipes featuring the flavour-packed bulb. 

Doubles

5 Must-Try Snacks at the Toronto Caribbean Carnival

Caribana weekend is around the corner! As we get ready to come together in Toronto to jump and wave at one of the largest street festivals in North America, it’s only right we fuel ourselves with flavour-packed Caribbean foods! We’ve rounded up some of the best Caribbean street foods and treats that make for the perfect Caribana snack.

Doubles

Doubles
Doubles are a delicious, filling snack that are oozing with curried chickpea goodness! This snack is a common street food in Trinidad and Tobago but luckily for us, it is readily available in Toronto. It consists of channa (curried chickpeas) surrounded by two round pieces of bara (fried dough). It’s then wrapped up tightly in wax paper and ready to enjoy. It’s often topped with a tangy cucumber chutney and tamarind sauce. The tart sauce, spicy chutney and hot channa blend perfectly together to create a unique burst of flavor with every bite. If you like your snacks with an extra kick then be sure to add a touch of Caribbean hot sauce on top. Grab doubles while you watch the Grande Parade from one of the many vendors nearby. Just be sure to save your dance moves for after you eat because this tasty snack can get messy!

Jamaican Patty

Jamaican Patties
Jamaican patties are flaky, golden pockets that make a perfect snack on the go. It’s no surprise that these hand-held snacks are available at almost every corner store and major subway stop in the city. Patties can be filled with anything from spicy beef to jerk chicken or curried vegetables. If you want an exceptionally flaky patty then head on over to Randy’s Take Out on Eglinton Avenue West. If you’ve graduated from the spicy beef patty and want to try something new, seek out ComeNyam’s unique patties. Their patties are filled with everything from oxtail to pumpkin. You can find their patties at specialty food stores throughout the city.

Fishcakes and Bakes

Fish Cakes and Bakes
You can never go wrong with saltfish fritters. They are easy to carry on the road at Caribana and extra filling too. Although there are many variations of fried dough packed with flavor and saltfish across the islands, I suggest the Bajan fish cakes and bakes. Bakes are a sweet fried dough that go perfectly with any treat. Street Shak Caribbean Kitchen offers their own spin on these Bajan snacks that are sure to please.

Corn Soup

Corn Soup
You may be wondering why soup made the list. It isn’t what you typically think of as a snack, but this hearty Caribbean soup can be found across the city outside of the major Caribana parties. Served extra hot and filled with ingredients like pumpkin, sweet potato, onion, scallion, coconut milk and thyme, you’ll find several vendors at the parade with a big pot of this delicious dish. You can also grab the corn soup late night outside of the many fetes. After a fun filled day of carnival parade and parties, a nice big bowl of corn soup will help you re-charge.

Eden Hagos is a food lover and personality whose taste is as diverse as her roots. Influenced by her food-centered upbringing and her move to Toronto, she started experimenting with traditional African and Caribbean flavors. She founded Black Foodie, a platform and series that explores food through a Black lens and offers critical and culturally relevant perspectives on the food world.

Cherry Galettes That Are Easier (And Prettier) Than Pie

Galettes are great. They’re not fussy. They don’t care if they’re imperfect on the outside because they know it’s what’s on the inside that counts.  And they don’t require the usual over-the-top latticework and crust crimping that makes you regret baking. Galettes are open-faced pies that ooze fruit juices and rustic charm – and they’re the easiest desserts to bake with fresh summer fruit.

Galettes are a perfectly portable dessert for summer picnics, afternoon teatime, birthdays… any occasion, really. And, they’re even more perfect when served warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. These freeform cherry galettes are a bite into summer’s best-kept baking secret.

Cherry Galette

Individual Cherry Galettes

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Chill Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 15 minutes
Makes: 5, 4-inch galettes

Ingredients:
Pastry:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, more for rolling
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 tsp salt
1 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 cup cold water
4 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 cup ice

Filling:
3 cups cherries, pitted and halved
1/4 cup granulated sugar (see note below)
3 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp lemon juice
Pinch, salt
1/4 cup apricot jelly

Egg Wash and Sanding Sugar: 
1 large egg
1 to 2 Tbsp coarse sanding sugar, as needed

Directions:
Pastry:
1. In a large bowl, stir together flour, sugar and salt. Add butter and coat with the flour mixture using a bench scraper or spatula.
2. With a pastry blender or two forks, cut butter into flour mixture, working quickly until mostly pea-size pieces of butter remain (a few larger pieces are okay).
3. Combine water, vinegar and ice in a small bowl. Add 2 Tbsp of the water mixture over the flour mixture, mixing or cutting with a bench scraper or spatula until fully incorporated. Continue to mix in water mixture, 1 to 2 Tbsp at a time, until dough just comes together in a ball, without being soggy (you will likely not use all of the water).
4. Shape dough into 5 flat discs, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, until chilled.
5. Lightly dust a clean surface with additional flour and roll chilled dough into a circle of approximately 5- to 6-inches in diameter.

CherryGalette-8

Filling and Assembly:
1. In a large bowl, toss gently to combine cherries, sugar, flour, lemon juice and salt. Let cherry mixture stand for 15 minutes.

CherryGalette-12

2. Spread a spoonful of apricot jelly (about 2 tsp per galette) on each rolled-out pastry disc. Using a slotted spoon, divide the fruit evenly between the discs, leaving liquid behind and allowing a 1-inch border around the edges. Discard liquid or save for another use (e.g. boil to cook out flour and thicken for use as an ice cream topping or cocktail syrup).
3. Fold the edges of the pastry over the filling to create a rustic pleated pattern.

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Egg Wash, Sanding Sugar and Baking:
1. Beat egg until uniform in colour. Gently brush egg wash over the folds to seal and sprinkle with coarse sanding sugar. Chill formed tarts until dough is firm, about 1 hour.

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2. While tarts are chilling, preheat oven to 400ºF. Remove galettes from refrigerator and immediately transfer to the oven. Bake until fruit juices bubble over and pastry is a deep golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes.

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Serving:
1. Serve galettes warm with ice cream, if desired.

Note: When adding sugar to the galette filling, add it in increments and taste as you go. Riper, in-season fruits may require less sugar in the filling, while under ripe fruits may require 1 to 2 Tbsp more sugar.

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Craving more ice cream-topped pies? Here are 45 seasonal favourites to make the most of summer’s sweet bounty.