12 Great Greasy Spoons to Try Across Canada

Some places may not love the term “greasy spoon,” but to me, using that expression isn’t always a bad thing. As much as we all love our plates of confit this, and sous-vide that, at the end of the day, sometimes you just want a greasy burger or a simple sandwich loaded with deli cuts and a proportionate amount of mustard.

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Blackfoot Truckstop Diner/Facebook

That, my friends, is where these satisfying and delicious greasy spoons come in.

Blackfoot Truckstop Diner (Calgary, AB)

Normally I wouldn’t put a restaurant on a list after it was mentioned only a couple of weeks ago, but for Calgary, Blackfoot fits the bill too perfectly for being both a great late-night food spot (open 24 hours), as well as a top notch greasy spoon.

Try the grilled hamburger steak drowned in gravy, with a healthy portion of poutine on the side — you will love (and hate) yourself for it.

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Broadway Cafe/Facebook

Broadway Cafe (Saskatoon, SK)

Anywhere that proudly proclaims they serve Campbells’ soup has clearly read the definition of greasy spoon in the dictionary. Keep things classic at this Saskatoon institution with a grilled cheese sandwich and tomato soup for dipping. Don’t forget the milkshakes either — I mean, how else could you wash all of that cheesy goodness down? And, with most menu prices not exceeding the $10 mark, your wallet will feel just as content as you do after sitting down for a diner-style meal here.

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Spoons Diner/Facebook

The Commodore (Edmonton, AB)

In business for 73 years and counting, this casual downtown eatery on Jasper Avenue just might be the longest-running restaurant in the city’s history. Commodore is still owned by the original family that opened its doors back in 1942, passed down through the generations. Talk about a family business!

The food may be simple and the interior no-frills, but you’ll definitely soak up a little bit of Edmonton history anytime you visit this joint.

Cosmos Snack Bar (Montreal, QC)

French toast, crispy bacon, tall breakfast sandwiches with a sunny side egg, sliced in half and dripping down your hands as you pick it up… There’s not much to complain about at one of Montreal’s go-to greasy spoons. For a city that embraces foie gras so much, I’m almost a little surprised you can’t find it served diner-style here.

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Dangerous Dan’s Diner/Facebook

Dangerous Dan’s Diner (Toronto, ON)

If a gigantic burger topped with cheddar, bacon and a fried egg sounds good to you, then Dangerous Dan’s demands your presence. The Queen Street East diner is definitely a hot spot for many Torontonians, and Dan’s delicious deep-fried perogies alone are a good enough reason to check it out.

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Galaxie Diner/Facebook

Galaxie Diner (Calgary, AB)

Calgarians looking for a hangover cure are always willing to brave long line-ups (and cold weather, come November) to get a seat inside this little restaurant that dishes out eggs by the hundreds and hashbrowns by the ton (my estimation), every day of the week. The “Calgary Sandwich” is Galaxie’s popular spin on a Denver and is loaded with everything from eggs, sausage and bacon, to peppers, onions, mushrooms and possibly a kitchen sink too!

Park Cafe (Saskatoon, SK)

What’s a guy gotta do to find some decent shock food in Saskatoon? Well, he has to go to Park Cafe. If you’re unsure what shock food is, just picture some of the more crazy items that Guy Fieri consumes on Diners, Drive-ins and Dives and that pretty much sums it up. The “Death by Cheese Sandwich” is not for the faint of heart and is as greasy as it gets. Basically, it’s a nice, thick grilled cheese sandwich that’s battered, breaded and deep-fried. Everything in moderation, my friends.

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Save On Meats/Facebook

Save On Meats (Vancouver, BC)

Lumping Save On Meats into a line-up of greasy spoons may not be the most accurate thing to do. Sure, they cook up simple, comforting dishes like patty melts and Salisbury steaks, but beneath their simple offerings, this restaurant is so much more. The diner is community focused through-and-through, offering a token program where people (you and me) can purchase meals for $2.25 and hand them out to less fortunate individuals that you might encounter in an area of town that is slowly being restored.

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Spoons Diner/Facebook

Spoons Diner (Victoria, BC)

Whether you’re craving an early morning bite, quick lunch or simple dinner, Spoons is here for you. Pancakes, eggs Benny, clubhouse sandwiches… Whatever diner dish you’re craving, you’ll probably find it on the menu.

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The Templeton/Facebook

The Templeton (Vancouver, BC)

Located on Granville Street in the heart of Vancouver, this old diner is charmingly worn and slightly rough-around-the-edges, not unlike the street you find it on. If reasonably priced BLT sandwiches or mini Kellogg’s cereal box breakfasts are your jam, this is the place for you.

The Westcliffe (Halifax, NS)

When Halifax-based food writer Kathy Jollimore told me you can get a cheeseburger and fries for under $5 at this east coast eatery, I almost didn’t believe her. Turns out, almost everything on the menu is $5 or less. Since we’re all the way out on the east coast, you can also find fried clams and fish and chips for one heck of a deal too.

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Zak’s Diner/Facebook

Zak’s Diner (Ottawa, ON)

Ottawa’s ByWard Market has no shortage of shops, restaurants and bars, but when the sun goes down and the street crowds dwindle, whose neon sign shines brightest? Zak’s. Established the same year as Lindsay Lohan (1986, obviously), this 24-hour diner keeps things nice and greasy around the clock with menu items like chili cheese dogs, deep-fried macaroni and so much more.

The Best Beach-Themed Party Cake for Summer

Take a day at the beach home to your table with this chic and playful cake. Combining a contemporary ombré effect with whimsical cake toppers, it’s the perfect design for a summer birthday celebration.

The cake itself is extremely moist and is bursting with flavours of zesty key lime and the sweet spiciness of fresh ginger. The buttercream is flecked with real vanilla bean and is silky smooth with a mild, creamy coconut taste. A simple wave pattern is achieved with the help of a rotating cake turntable, while a sprinkling of brown sugar adds texture and rounds out the sandy beach theme.

Beach Party Cake

Active Time: 80 minutes
Bake Time: 28 minutes
Cake Toppers: 30 minutes
Serves: 12 to 16

Ingredients:

Key Lime Ginger Cake:
3 1/4 cup cake flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
1 cup unsalted butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
1 Tbsp key lime zest
2 Tbsp key lime juice (4 to 5 key limes)
3/4 tsp fresh grated ginger
6 egg whites, lightly whisked
1 cup full-fat coconut milk

Coconut Vanilla Buttercream:
6 large egg whites
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out
1/3 cup coconut cream or full-fat coconut milk
Gel food coloring in blue
1/4 cup brown sugar

Beach Party Cake

Directions:

Key Lime Ginger Cake:
1. Pre-heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour 3, 8-inch round cake pans and set aside.
2. Sift the dry ingredients together and set aside.
3. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or a hand mixer, whip the butter until smooth. Add the sugar, lime zest, and ginger. Mix on medium until light and fluffy, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the lime juice and mix until combined. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.
4. In a separate bowl, mix the egg whites and coconut milk. Set aside.
5. With the mixer on low, add in half of the flour mixture. Add in the egg white mixture and mix until combined. Stop the mixer and scrape down the bowl. Add the remaining flour and mix until combined.
6. Evenly distribute the batter between the 3 pans and bake for about 28 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes before removing the cakes from their pans.

Beach Party Cake

Coconut Vanilla Buttercream:
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, lightly whisk together the egg whites and sugar. Fill a saucepan with a few inches of water and bring to a simmer. Place the mixer bowl on top of the saucepan to create a double-boiler.
2. Stirring intermittently, heat the egg white mixture until it registers about 155-160°F on a candy thermometer. Once hot, carefully transfer the mixer bowl back to the stand mixer.
3. Using the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks, or until the outside of the mixer bowl returns to room temperature, about 8 minutes. Stop the mixer and swap the whisk for the paddle attachment.
4. With the mixer on medium-low, add in the vanilla bean seeds and butter, a few Tbsp at a time. Turn the mixer up to medium-high and mix until silky smooth. At any point does the buttercream appear curdled, just keep mixing. If the buttercream appears soupy, try placing it in the refrigerator for about 10 to 15 minutes then mixing again. Gradually add in the coconut cream and mix until combined.

Assembly:
1. Once the cakes have cooled, trim the tops to make them level, if necessary. Place one layer on a cake board or serving dish and top with about 3/4 cup of the buttercream. Spread with an offset spatula. Top with the next layer of cake and repeat. Crumb coat the cake with the buttercream and chill in the refrigerator for 10 to 15 minutes.
2. Of the remaining buttercream, tint about 1/3 blue with gel food colouring and set aside. After the crumb coat sets, place a large dollop of the plain buttercream on top of the cake and smooth out.
3. Starting with the bottom half, add the blue buttercream all the way around the sides of the cake. Mix the remaining blue buttercream with the remaining white buttercream to create light blue. Fill in the sides with the light blue buttercream. Begin smoothing out the buttercream to create an ombre effect. Smooth out the top of the cake as best as possible. To create the wave pattern, place the cake on top of a cake turntable. Touch the end of a metal spatula to the bottom of the cake. As you spin the cake around, create a wave motion around the cake with the spatula as you gradually bring the spatula up the side of the cake until you reach the top.
4. Top the cake with brown sugar to resemble sand and add cake toppers.

Beach Party Cake Topper

DIY Beach Cake Toppers

Materials:
About 5 ounces fondant, white plus various colours.
Gel food coloring
Paring knife
Rolling pin
Ruler
Clean paint brush
Cardstock
Piping tip
Small flower cookie cutter
Popsicle stick

Beach Party Toppers

Directions:
1. Create a template for the surfboard out of cardstock and set aside.
2. Roll out white fondant to about 1/4-inch thick and use the template to cut out the shape.
3. Roll colored fondant to about 1/4 to 1/8-inch thick and use the ruler and paring knife to cut various strips. Adhere the strips to the surfboard using a touch of water and a clean paintbrush. Set aside to dry.

Beach Party Toppers
4. For the inner-tube, roll out a piece of yellow fondant to about 1/2-inch thick. Use a round cookie cutter to cut out the shape. Use the round end of a piping tip to cut out the center.
5. Using your fingertips, gently smooth and round out all of the edges to make the tube-shape. Roll out a different color of fondant to about 1/4 to 1/8-inch thick and cut out small flowers with cutter. Adhere the flowers to the inner-tube with a touch of water and a clean paint brush. Set aside to dry.
6. To assemble, insert the popsicle stick 1/4 of the way into the cake. Insert just the very end of the dried surfboard into the top of the cake (directly in front of the popsicle stick) and prop up the back with the popsicle. Gently lean the dried inner-tube against the surfboard.

How to Make Blushing Cherry-Berry Sangria

Gorgeous red fruit gives this bubbly sangria a mild blush, delivering a pop of flavour and colour to any budget-friendly bottle of sparkling wine.

Chock-full of strawberries, raspberries and cherries, and hit with muddled fresh mint, this fun and fruity cocktail is sure to become your go-to summertime sipper.

blushing-bubbly-sangria-recipe

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Standing Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 6 to 8

Ingredients:
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
1/2 lemon, zest
1 lemon, juiced
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup water
3 cups ice cubes
1 bottle (750 ml) dry sparkling wine, chilled
1 1/2 cups each frozen sliced strawberries and raspberries
1 cup frozen pitted sweet cherries

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Directions:
1. In large pitcher, combine mint, lemon zest, lemon juice, sugar, and water. Stir, bruising mint slightly, with wooden spoon.
2. Let stand for 15 minutes.
3. Top with ice and sparkling wine; stir to combine. Stir in raspberries, strawberries and cherries.
4. Pour into chilled glasses to serve.

Looking for more cocktail recipes? Check out: 30 Cocktails to Keep You Cool This Summer.

Quick and Easy Greek Pita Pizzas

These bright, flavourful and healthy Greek-inspired pita pizzas are a great meatless meal. Whole wheat pitas are topped with a zippy whipped feta made with Greek yogurt, and a refreshing cucumber-tomato salad.

The perfect size for a light lunch or dinner, these healthy pizza rounds could also be served as a tasty appetizer; instead of making individual pizzas, serve the whipped feta topped with cucumber salad in a bowl for dipping. There’s no wrong way to enjoy this fresh bite!

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Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
Pitas:
4 whole-wheat pitas
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Whipped Feta:
4 oz. feta, roughly crumbled
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
2 tsp lemon juice or white wine

Tomato Cucumber Salad:
1 English cucumber, diced
2 roma or plum tomatoes, seeded and diced
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp chili flakes
1/4 tsp salt

Serving:
1 Tbsp chopped fresh oregano
2 Tbsp toasted pine nuts or chopped toasted walnuts

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Directions:

Cucumber Salad:
Toss all Tomato Cucumber Salad ingredients in a large bowl. Set aside.

Whipped Feta:
1. Add feta, yogurt and lemon juice (or wine) to a food processor or high-speed blender. Puree until smooth and creamy.
2. Transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Pitas:
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.
2. Place pitas on a large baking sheet. Brush with olive oil.
3. Bake in oven for 10 minutes, until crispy.

Assembly:
1. Spread each pita with a thick layer of whipped feta and top with cucumber salad, pine nuts or walnuts and oregano.
2. Slice into wedges and serve immediately.

4-Ingredient Key Lime Pie Pops

If you enjoy a good key lime pie, you’re going to love these pie-inspired pops. Lime Greek yogurt is mixed with lime juice and zest, then layered between crunchy graham cracker crumbs.

Healthy, refreshing and delicious, satisfy your pie cravings with this sweet and tart summertime treat.

key lime pie pops

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 4 hours
Serves: 8

Ingredients:
3 cups Lime Greek Yogurt
2 Tbsp lime juice
1 tsp lime zest
½ cup graham cracker crumbs

key lime pie pops

Directions:
1. In a bowl stir together Greek yogurt, lime juice and lime zest.
2. Fill each popsicle mold halfway with yogurt mixture. Add a spoonful of graham cracker crumbs and continue to fill popsicle molds. Finish with another thin layer of graham cracker crumbs then insert popsicle stick and freeze.
3. To serve, run the bottom of the popsicle mold under warm water for 10 seconds and pull gently on the stick to release the popsicle.

Beet Hummus

Bright and Beautiful Beet Hummus

Brighten up your summer nights with this vibrant hummus. The punchy dip gets a natural fuchsia face-lift with the help of a sweet summertime staple: beets!

If you’ve been to the farmer’s market lately, you’ve likely seen the deep garnet beauties piled high, ready for roasting, sauteing and spiralizing. But before you pop those colourful gems into the oven, consider this tasty snack. The beets require no pre-cooking, but can be roasted if you prefer. Enjoyed with pita wedges, on toast, with vegetables and so much more, you’ll keep finding a home for this addictive dip in your kitchen.

Beet Hummus

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:

Hummus:
1 raw beet, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 cup cooked black beans, drained and rinsed if using canned
¼ cup tahini
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar (preferably aged)
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp salt

Serving:
Whole wheat pita bread
Thinly sliced radishes
Sesame seeds
Fresh herbs of choice

Directions:

Hummus:
1. Pulse beet and garlic in a food processor until finely minced. Add remaining hummus ingredients and puree until smooth.
2. Transfer to a serving bowl.

Assembly:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Place pitas on a baking tray and warm for approximately 7 minutes, or until desired temperature.
3. Remove from oven and slice into wedges.
4. Serve with hummus, garnished with radishes, sesame seeds and herbs.

8-Minute Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

This dish embodies the spirit and heart of Italian cuisine; fresh, simple ingredients with a few key flavours like garlic and oregano. Pan-frying the shrimp with lots of Parmesan gives this dish wonderful contrasting texture.

Perfect for a light summer lunch, finish with a squeeze of lemon juice and serve with chunk of toasted ciabatta bread slightly dipped in a good quality olive oil.

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Garlic and Parmesan Pan-Fried Shrimp

Prep Time: 4 minutes
Cook Time: 4 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
2 dozen shrimp, deveined, head removed and tail on
1/4 cup olive oil
4 large cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/8 tsp ground pepper
Handful finely chopped basil leaves
Zest of one lemon + juice
1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan, divided

Directions:
1. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk olive oil, salt, pepper, oregano, garlic, lemon zest and chopped basil to combine.
2. Add shrimp and 1/2 Parmesan, and toss well with hands to coat.
3. Heat pan on maximum heat, add shrimp and cook each side until pink, about 3 to 4 minutes total.
4. Remove from heat and squeeze lemon juice on top; cover with the rest of the Parmesan and serve immediately with slices of toasted ciabatta or baguette.

Easy Homemade Blueberry Pop Tarts

One of the best parts about being a kid is eating copious amounts of sugar-filled breakfast foods. Chowing down on six bowls of cereal used to be a perfectly acceptable option.

Nowadays, we opt for healthier morning meals, but once in awhile we get nostalgic for the early morning sugar rush from our childhood.

So I’ve decided sugar is totally OK in the morning if you just take a little time to bake something from scratch. Enter: homemade pop tarts. Mini pies with icing that you can eat with one hand. These easy-to-make blueberry-filled, lemon-iced pastries are a perfect treat in the AM. The best part is that you can feel like a kid again, without actually being one!

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Blueberry Pop Tarts with Lemon Glaze

Makes: 12 pop tarts

 

Ingredients:

Dough:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp granulated sugar
2 cups cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 egg (plus 1 egg to seal tarts)
2 Tbsp ice water

 

Filling:
3/4 cup blueberry jam
1/2 cup blueberries

 

Icing:
1 1/2 cups icing sugar
2 Tbsp lemon juice
Lemon zest for garnish

homemade-pop-tarts-5

 

Directions:
1. Begin by making the dough. In a food processor combine flour, salt and sugar. If you don’t have a food processor you can do this by hand. Add the cold butter cubes and pulse until mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Add egg and water and pulse until dough starts to come together. Be careful not to over work the dough.
2. Remove from processor and shape dough into two rounds. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in fridge for 30 minutes.
3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
4. Remove one disc of dough from the fridge and roll into a large rectangle that is roughly 6 inches by 12 inches. Cut the dough into 8 equal-sized pieces.

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5. Place 6 squares on one of the prepared baking sheets. Place 1 Tbsp of blueberry jam on the center of each square. Top with 3 or 4 blueberries. Roll out other piece of dough and cut into 8 equal-sized squares as above.
6. Beat 1 egg in a bowl and using a pastry brush, brush around sides of each square. Place another square on top to form your pop tart. Use a fork to seal the edges. Poke a few holes in the top of the dough to let steam escape. brush egg wash on top of tarts.
7. Place the baking sheets in the fridge for 30 minutes before baking. 8. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove pop tarts to a cooling rack, let cool completely before icing.
9. To make icing, whisk lemon juice with icing sugar. If you want a thinner icing add a bit more lemon juice. Place a dollop of icing on each pop tart and sprinkle with lemon zest.

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*Substitute any kind of jam or fruit inside your pop tarts to make different variations.

Blueberry Grunt

Easy East Coast Blueberry Grunt

The best summer desserts are simple, satisfying and bring out the best in the season’s bounty. That’s why this easy, steamed East Coast treat is the ultimate summer indulgence. Beautiful Canadian blueberries are topped with dumplings steamed in sweet berry juice. This stove-top dish is thought to be an early adaptation of an English steamed pudding recipe. Some say the ‘grunt’ comes from the sound the dumplings make while being steamed, others say it’s the bubbling berries. But one thing’s for sure; once you serve this delectable dessert, the only sound will be guests gobbling this classic summer confection.

Blueberry Grunt

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:
4 cups (600g) frozen blueberries
½ cup sugar
1 Tbsp lemon zest
1 Tbsp lemon juice

For the Dumplings:
1 ¾ cup flour
3 Tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
¼ cup shortening
1 cup milk

For the Maple Whipped Cream:
1 cup 35% whipping cream
3 Tbsp maple syrup

1 mint sprig for garnish

Blueberry Grunt

Directions:
1. In a large skillet or wide saucepan, combine and stir blueberries, sugar, lemon juice and zest. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until berries soften, about 3 minutes.
2. Make dumplings by whisking together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in large bowl. Add shortening and rub in with fingers or a pastry cutter until the mixture looks like fine meal. Add milk and stir just until combined.
3. Drop 1/4 cup spoonfuls of dumpling batter on top of blueberry mixture in pan. Cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer until dumplings have steamed and are firm to the touch, 10 to 15 minutes.
4. While dumplings are steaming, make maple cream. Combine cream and maple syrup in a large bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat until cream is stiff.
5. Scoop blueberry grunt into bowls and serve topped with maple cream.

Looking for more delicious recipes? Try our 10 Great Canadian Desserts.

Pinata Cake

Make Your Own Candy-Filled Piñata Cake

This unassuming party cake has a secret.  With its frilly buttercream finish and modest sprinkle topping, it looks like any other delicious cake.  However, the real party is inside!  One cut into the cake reveals its pastel rainbow layers, before an assortment of candies comes tumbling out.  Like a piñata, this cake is filled to the brim with chocolate, gummies, and sprinkles. As if the velvety buttermilk cake and buttercream icing wasn’t a treat on its own, this cake is packed full of sweets for the ultimate party dessert. What a fun, whimsical surprise!

This festive piñata cake is fairly simple to put together and is extremely adaptable for any celebration. Try using either pink or blue candies for a gender reveal cake at a baby shower, a variety of chocolates, all fruit candies, or just stick with the cake recipient’s favorites.  The combinations are truly endless.

Also check out our recipe for Piñata Cupcakes.

Pinata Cake

Active Time: 60 minutes
Bake Time: 24 minutes
Serves: 14-16

Ingredients:

Pastel Buttermilk Cake:
3-1/2 cups cake flour
2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup unsalted butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
4 large eggs
2 tsp vanilla extract
1-3/4 cups buttermilk
Gel food coloring

Cake Batter Buttercream:
1 cup unsalted butter, softened
6 Tbsp cream cheese, softened
5 to 5-1/2 cups confectioner’s sugar
2 tsp vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract
1/2 tsp almond extract
2 to 4 Tbsp cream or milk

Assembly:
3-inch round cutter
1 to 1 1/2 cups assorted candy
Sprinkles (optional)

Pinata Cake

Directions:

Pastel Buttermilk Cake:
1. Pre-heat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour four 8-inch round cake pans and set aside.
2. Sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Set aside.
3. In the bowl of an electric mixer, mix the butter on medium until smooth. Add in the sugar and mix on medium-high until fluffy and pale in color (3 to 5 minutes). Stop the mixer and scrape down the bowl.
4. With the mixer on low, add in the vanilla and eggs, 1 at a time. Mix until combined and smooth.
5. With the mixer on low, add the dry ingredients and buttermilk in alternating batches, starting and ending with the dry ingredients. Mix just until the batter is incorporated. Do not over-mix.
6. Evenly divide the batter into 4 bowls. Tint each with gel food coloring of your choice and mix to combine. Place each different color of batter into the prepared pans and bake for 20 to 24 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the cakes comes out clean. Let cool on a wire rack from 10 minutes before removing the cakes from their pans.

Pinata Cake

Cake Batter Buttercream:
1. Using an electric mixer, beat the butter and cream cheese together on medium until smooth. With the mixer on low, gradually add in the remaining ingredients. Once the sugar begins to incorporate, turn the mixer up to medium-high and mix until light and fluffy (3 to 5 minutes). Adjust the sugar and cream quantities until desired consistency is achieved.
2. To decorate an 8-inch cake with the ruffle pattern (as photographed), the icing recipe will need to be multiplied by 1. For a smooth or rustic finish, use the recipe as is.

Pinata Cake

Assembly:
1. Carefully trim the tops of each cake layer until even. Discard the scraps or save for another use.
2. Using a round cookie cutter, biscuit cutter, or the rim of a drinking glass, cut out the centres of two of the cake layers. The openings should be about 3 inches in diameter. These two layers will become the middle layers of cake. Set aside.
3. Place the bottom layer of cake on a cake board or serving dish. 4. Spread on about 3/4 cup of buttercream with an offset spatula. Top with one of the centre layers of cake and repeat. Place the second middle layer of cake next, then frost the inside of the rings with buttercream.

Pinata Cake
4. Fill in the centre with a variety of candies and/or sprinkles. Top with the final layer of cake. Crumb coat then frost the cake with the remaining buttercream.
5. To create the ruffle design, frost the top of the cake as normal but leave only a thin layer of buttercream on the sides. Fill a piping bag fitted with a medium star tip with buttercream. Starting at the bottom of the cake, use a zigzag motion to pipe ruffles up the side of the cake. The zigzag pattern should be about 1-inch wide and as straight as possible. Continue to pipe vertical rows of ruffles until all of the sides are covered. Top with sprinkles, if desired.

Looking for more delicious recipe? Try our 25 Best Birthday Cakes.

Mouth-Watering Watermelon and Strawberry Icebergs

Get your fill of sweet and juicy watermelon this summer with these simple strawberry-watermelon icebergs; they’re the perfect way to quench your thirst and cool you down on these unbearably hot days. You can make the kid-friendly version as listed below, or feel free to spike them for a grown-up twist.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Makes: 4 x 16 oz drinks

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Ingredients:
2 cups watermelon chunks/cubes
2 cups whole frozen strawberries
2 ½ cups ice cubes
1 ½ L sparkling water (or lemon lime soda), chilled
2 limes
Fresh mint sprigs

Directions:
1. In each glass muddle the juice of half a lime and 3-4 torn mint leaves.
2. In a blender combine ice cubes, watermelon and frozen strawberries until a thick slush is made. To assist when blending, you may need to use a spoon or spatula to push the contents of the blender closer to the blade between pulses.
3. Pour approximately 1 1/2 cups of sparkling water into each glass. (Use lemon lime soda if you prefer a sweeter drink).
4. Scoop slush into each glass until it is full to the brim. Serve immediately!

Optional: if you prefer a spiked drink, add 1 -1.5 oz of vodka or rum to the glass when muddling the lime and mint.

See more from hot for food on their YouTube channel.

11 Tasty Ways to Eat More Broccoli

We’re always on the lookout for quick and easy recipes that pack a punch when it comes to both flavour and nutrients, so it’s no surprise that broccoli landed on our list of must-eats. Here are some of our favourite ways to add more of this vibrant green veggie to your diet.

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1. Broccoli with Bow Ties and Peas

2. Mean Green Broccoli Soup with Cheddar Recipe

3. Broccoli Frittata Recipe

4. Beef with Broccoli

5. Mini Chicken and Broccoli Pot Pies

6. Broccoli Dust Recipe

7. Broccoli Orecchiette, Courgette & Bocconcini Salad, Prosciutto & Melon Salad

8. Fresh Broccoli Salad

9. Chinese Crispy Beef & Broccoli Noodles with Kung Pao Chili Oil

10. Mae’s Broccoli Cheddar Salad Recipe

11. Chinese Broccoli Recipe

Shareable Sushi Pizza with Wasabi Aioli

There’s only one thing better than pizza or sushi: sushi pizza. Using a crispy yet chewy rice patty  base and topped with traditional sushi roll fillings, this Japanese-Canadian creation is a delicious way to enjoy two classic foods.

Sushi rice is quite starchy and becomes sticky while it cooks, making it the ideal rice for a pizza base. As for the toppings, feel free to mix it up and top with your favourite proteins, veggies, and sauces.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Makes: 16 pieces

mini-sushi-pizza2

Ingredients:

Wasabi Aioli:
1 egg yolk
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 cup canola oil
2 tsp wasabi powder
2 tbsp rice vinegar

Rice Patty:
2 cups sushi rice
2 cups cold water
½ cup rice vinegar
2 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 Tbsp salt
4 tsp canola oil

Toppings:
½ avocado, sliced
½ lb sushi grade salmon, thinly sliced
¼ cup sliced English cucumber
2 Tbsp sliced green onion
½ Tbsp kelp caviar
½ tsp black sesame seeds

mini-sushi-pizza1

Directions:

Wasabi Aioli:
1. In a medium bowl, whisk egg yolk with mustard.
2. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in oil until mixture is emulsified.
3. Whisk in wasabi powder and rice vinegar.

Rice Patty:
1. In fine sieve, rinse rice in 3 changes of cold water, stirring vigorously until water runs clear. Drain well.
2. In a medium saucepan, bring rice and water to a boil over high heat.
3. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
4. Remove from heat and let stand covered for 10 minutes.
5. In a large bowl, combine rice vinegar, salt and sugar. Stir until sugar and salt have dissolved.
6. Add to warm rice and mix gently to coat. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Assembly:
1. Divide rice mixture into 4 balls.
2 On a piece of parchment paper, flatten each ball into a 5-inch round.
3, Heat 4 tsp of oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat.
4. Cook one sushi crust, turning once, until crisp and lightly golden, about 2 minutes per side.
5. Repeat with remaining sushi crusts.
6. Transfer to cutting board and cut each crust into quarters.
7. Top with avocado, cucumber, salmon and green onions. Top with kelp caviar, sprinkle with sesame seeds, and drizzle with wasabi aioli.

Upside-Down Cherry Cheesecake Jars

Picnic Perfect Upside-Down Cherry Cheesecake Jars

Sour cherries have a short season beginning in June and ending in August. The plump ruby red gems are a delicious way to celebrate summer. The pucker-inducing stone fruit are more tart than their more common counterpart, but add the perfect balance to this creamy no-bake cheesecake.

In this recipe, a sweet-tart topping made of sour cherries is layered with a smooth and creamy cheesecake mixture with a hint of almond. To top it off, crunchy graham crumb streusel is sprinkled over top. Close the lids and bring these jar cakes along to your next picnic, and enjoy all the layers of red and white deliciousness with shear Canadian flavour.

Upside-Down Cherry Cheesecake Jars

Prep Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 30 min
Makes: 6, 8-oz Jar Cakes

Ingredients:

Graham Crumb Streusel:
1/3 cup graham cracker crumb
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup all purpose flour
1/4 tsp cinnamon
¼ cup butter, at room temperature

Sour Cherry Sauce:
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 Tbsp. lemon juice
1 Tbsp.cornstarch
2 cups sour cherries
2 tsp lemon zest

Cheesecake Filling:
½ cup sour cream
1 250 g brick cream cheese
3 Tbsp honey
1 tsp almond extract

Upside-Down Cherry Cheesecake Jars

Directions:

Graham Crumb Streusel:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Prepare a baking sheet lined with parchment.
2. In a bowl, combine graham cracker crumb, brown sugar, flour and cinnamon. Work the butter into the dry ingredients using your fingers until pea size clumps being to form, about 1 minute.
3. Pour the mixture onto prepared baking sheet and spread into a single layer.
4. Bake until mixture is golden brown and fragrant, about 15 minutes. Once cooled, break any big clumps into crumbs.

Sour Cherry Sauce:
1. Combine 1/3 cup sugar and lemon juice in a small saucepan heated over medium.
2. Add in cherries and cook until tender and sauce has thickened, about 5 minutes. Add in corn starch and cook until dissolved, about 1 minute.
3. Remove from heat and stir in lemon zest. Let cool.

Cheesecake Filling:
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, or using a hand mixer, beat sour cream with cream cheese, honey and almond extract on high until smooth and fluffy.
2. Cool in fridge for about 1 hour. Transfer mixture into a piping bag.

Assembly:
1. Pipe one layer of cheesecake mixture into the bottom of each jar. Spoon a layer of sour cherry sauce over the cheesecake mixture. Continue this pattern leaving a 1/2 –inch of space at the top of each jar.
2. You can finish with a cheesecake layer or a cherry sauce layer. Sprinkle graham streusel over top layer of each jar cake.

Tip: If you cannot find fresh sour cherries, they can be replaced with frozen.

The Ultimate Summer Condiment (and 5 Ways to Use It)

Summer is made for spontaneous cooking; grilling what you bring home from the farmer’s market, tossing enormous salads with what you have on hand and building sky-high sandwiches to take on a picnic.

While there are lots of sauces, dressings and toppings, all you really need is one super summer condiment to finish your creations with big flavour. And we’ve got just the thing: Salsa Verde. Not the Mexican version, which packs tomatillos and heat (although that one’s good, too) — the Italian kind, loaded with fresh garden herbs, nuanced with briny capers, garlic, umami-rich anchovies and enlivened with a touch of piquant mustard. It adds a deep, savoury, herbal, rich flavour perfect for all impromptu summer eating adventures.

Salsa Verde

Salsa Verde
Active Time: 5 minutes
Makes: ¾ cup

Ingredients:
¼ cup capers
6 anchovies
2 medium garlic cloves
1 tsp grainy mustard
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
½ cup finely chopped parsley
¼ cup finely chopped basil
¼ cup finely chopped mint
Salt, to taste

Directions:
1. Combine capers, anchovies, garlic and mustard in a small food processor and process to a coarse paste (or do it by hand with a mortar and pestle).
2. Transfer to a medium bowl and whisk in olive oil, then stir in herbs. Season with a good pinch of salt, taste, and add more if desired.
3. Store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Salsa Verde

Here are 5 delicious ways to use up your jar of green gold:

1. Use it as a marinade for beef, lamb, chicken or halloumi cheese. Simply toss a big spoonful into a freezer bag with your protein of choice and marinate for 30 minutes to 24 hours.

2. Stir it into thick Greek yogurt with a squeeze of lemon and serve alongside salmon, toss with boiled potatoes for a vibrant, herb-filled potato salad, or use as a green goddess dip for garden-fresh crudités.

3. Swirl it into mayo for an herb aioli, and then use it to spread on sandwiches; chicken, lamb or beef burgers; and as a dressing for veggie-packed pasta salads.

4. Mash it into softened butter as a flavour-loaded finish for grilled steaks, lamb chops and corn on the cob. Just dab it onto piping hot food to melt before serving.

5. Thin it out with a bit more olive oil and drizzle over grilled vegetables, or use as a dressing for salads. Add a squeeze of lemon for brightness.

Must-Make Nanaimo Ice Cream Cake

Nanaimo bars are a timeless and popular addition to any dessert platter. In fact, the popular treats, which hail from Nanaimo, B.C., are usually the first to disappear at a party.

Turn the classic sweet tray favourite into a decadent frozen True North dessert by layering the traditional base and custard filling with ice cream, then topping it off with a layer of chocolate. Slice and serve at your next get together for a new twist on a winning dessert that’s sure to disappear before it even starts to melt.

nanaimo-ice-cream-cake2

Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Cool Time: 9 hours (minimum)
Total Time: 10 hours
Makes: 8 servings

Ingredients:
4 cups premium quality vanilla ice cream

Base:
½ cup butter, softened
¼ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup cocoa powder
1 egg
1 cup sweetened flaked coconut
1 ¾ cups graham cracker crumbs

Custard Filling:
1 cup butter, softened
5 Tbsp custard powder
6 Tbsp 35% cream
3 ¾ cups icing sugar

Topping:
1 oz semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tsp butter

nanaimo-ice-cream-cake1

Directions:

Base:
1. In top of a double boiler or metal bowl set over saucepan of simmering water, melt butter, sugar, and cocoa powder until smooth, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
2. In a large bowl, beat egg. Slowly whisk in stovetop mixture (to temper egg) until smooth. Stir in coconut and graham cracker crumbs; set aside.

Custard Filling:
1. In large bowl and using an electric mixer, beat butter, custard powder, and 35% cream until light and fluffy. Beat in icing sugar in 2 additions until combined.
2. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Topping:
1. In a microwave safe bowl, melt chocolate and butter on low, for about 1 minute, stirring once or until melted.

Assembly:
1. Let ice cream stand at room temperature until spreadable, about 10 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, line an 8-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap, leaving a 3-inch overhang on all sides. Press base into bottom of pan. Spoon half of the ice cream on top of base; spread evenly. Freeze along with remaining ice cream for 15 minutes.
3. Spread custard filling over ice cream. Freeze for 15 minutes. Spread with remaining ice cream. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze until firm, about 3 hours.
4. Spread chocolate topping over ice cream. Return to freezer until firm, about 15 minutes.
5. To serve log, using plastic wrap overhang as handles, remove from loaf pan. Remove plastic wrap and place on serving platter. Cut into 1-inch thick slices using a hot knife. Serve.

Looking for more delicious recipes? Try our oh-so-tasty Nanaimo S’mores.

How to Keep Fruit Fresh

How to Keep Summer Fruit Fresh Longer

As summer stretches into long, balmy afternoons and ripens to a peak, so does the fruit in the fields and orchards. Suddenly the market is brimming with sweet, juicy nectarines, ruby red strawberries, and plump indigo blueberries. And then, poof! As quickly as they appeared, they’ll be gone. If this brief, dizzying moment of plenty sends you into a buying frenzy, you’re not alone. Once you’ve carried home your weight in peak-ripeness apricots and raspberries, how do you keep them from turning to mush before you can devour every last one? Here’s how to extend the life of your precious summer bounty.

How to make fruit last longer

Keep it cool.
Refrigerate all berries and ripe stone fruits as soon as you bring them home.  Once they’ve reached their peak, the heat (even room temperature) will cause spoilage, quickly. Perfect strawberries can go bad in a single afternoon on the counter.

Keep it dry.
Humidity is the enemy. Don’t wash your fruit until ready to eat, and store on paper towels or a clean dish towel to absorb any excess moisture. Keep it on a shelf in your fridge, not in the crisper drawer — unless you have one you can program. The standard fridge drawers offer a higher-humidity environment suited to vegetables, but unfriendly to fruit.

Give it space.
Ripe fruit is soft and injures easily. Don’t leave raspberries piled into the box they came in to be mushed under their own weight, and don’t cram juicy nectarines into a produce bag where they bash and bruise each other senseless every time you rustle them. Whenever you damage the flesh, you create an opportunity for mould.

How to Keep Fruit Fresh

Give it air.
If fruit is packed tightly, there is little air circulation, which means more humidity and faster rot. Store ripe stone fruit like peaches, plums and cherries in a shallow bowl in the fridge. Gently transfer fragile berries to a wide container lined with paper towels, keeping them in a single layer or close to it. Leave the container lid slightly ajar to let excess moisture escape.

Wash in acid.
If you’ve brought home apricots or strawberries that are still slightly under-ripe, try giving them an acid bath. Swish any whole (never cut), firm fruit in one part vinegar to 10 parts water. The solution kills off any mould spores already on the fruit, potentially increasing its longevity.

Looking for more tasty recipes? Try one of our 36 Strawberry Desserts to Celebrate Summer.

The Joy of Cooking for Strangers

If a friend called to offer you juicy leftovers from Cory Vitiello’s restaurant, Flock, you’d eat them, right? What if that “friend” was actually a mutual member of a Facebook group — and a stranger?

This is not a hypothetical question, but a real-life scenario that played out on Toronto’s swapping site, Bunz Trading Zone earlier this month:

bunz-meal-strangers

 

“Hungry buns!,” read the post. “We ordered FLOCK takeout for production night at work and can’t eat all this sumptuous hipster chicken. Come take these three juicy drumsticks (and fancy sauces) from us! ISO: a high-five, good joke, feeding a fellow bun in need…”

The Flock leftovers are just the latest in a slew of Bunz trades, edible and otherwise. Founder Emily Bitze started the sharing community when she was short a can of tomato sauce for her planned pasta dinner and created a group dedicated to swapping resources. The Bunz Trading Zone has one rule: no cash exchanges. Members, known as ‘buns,’ credit the community for saving money, preventing environmental waste (by finding use for items that would otherwise be discarded) and for building a community, one post at a time.

Leftovers are often offered in exchange for subway tokens and tall cans of beer, and while most completed trades are remembered only by their Facebook threads, at least one has turned into a regular cooking gig.

Meet Nadya Khoja and Sarah Lee. Khoja is a marketer by day, and Lee works for Via Rail. But on Saturday nights, the roommates open their home to strangers, who bring booze in exchange for gourmet, home-cooked meals and shared conversation. The friends’ home-based dinner service is called Chez Lisgar: prospective guests sign up for a spot on Lee and Khoja’s waiting list, and the pair vets guests online before accepting them. It’s a smooth operation now, but like many a Bunz trade, it started with leftovers.

“We had come home one night from working out and decided that we wanted a quick meal, with whatever leftovers we had, and we ended up having leftovers from that,” explains Lee. “And we were living in a really small apartment at the time, so we thought it would be fun to just see what would happen if we posted the food on Bunz.” So that’s what they did, asking prospective takers to bring alcohol in exchange.

“It ended up getting really popular overnight, and we decided to just run with it.”

Although guests now arrive through the Chez Lisgar website, and not solely through Bunz, the entrepreneurial, DIY and community spirit that defines the Facebook group still shines through.  Khoja and Lee will work around dietary restrictions, but they mainly base menus on what they feel like eating. In return, they ask guests to bring one bottle of red and one bottle of white wine. “People usually pick something they like themselves,” says Khoja. “You get a taste for their personality and choices,” adds Lee. It’s not always wine, either — one upcoming guest has offered to bring dessert instead, and the pair agreed.

 

French onion soup stuffed mushroom cups topped with Gruyere, a Chez Lisgar specialty.Image credit: Nadya Khoja and Sarah Lee

French onion soup stuffed mushroom cups topped with Gruyere, a Chez Lisgar specialty. Image credit: Nadya Khoja and Sarah Lee

Alyssa Bouranova is a graduate student living in Toronto. She visited Chez Lisgar with her boyfriend earlier this year, dining on a “delicious” meal of bourbon and maple-glazed pulled turkey, guacamole-stuffed onion rings and a green salad.

“It’s kind of a shot in the dark when you’re going with strangers, but it was wonderful,” says Bouranova. “They were very friendly.” The foursome got along so well that Bouranova and her boyfriend stayed past dinner to watch 90s music videos, and she stays in touch with the roommates on Facebook.

“The takeaway is that you don’t have to pay big bucks for gourmet food in Toronto,” says Bouranova. “It was a delicious and easy way to get a really nice meal in a way less pretentious and expensive environment [than a restaurant], and we got to meet cool people as well.”

Bouranova’s isn’t the ongoing friendship to be nurtured by a meal at Chez Lisgar. At a recent dinner, Khoja and Lee liked their guests so much they ended up attending a party together after the meal, and Khoja says she’ll likely be dog sitting for her new friends in the near future.

Like sushi burritos or ice-cream tacos, Chez Lisgar is a typically millennial mashup: at once an Internet-phenomenon, a cash-saver and a community-builder, as well as a constructive protest against a fraught economy that bears little love for young adults. “The fact is most of my friends are struggling finding work,” says Lee, “and a lot of them have had to turn to more unconventional ways of being able to pay bills and afford being a person in a big city. A lot of millennials have an entrepreneurial mindset.”

Chez Lisgar's cheesy garlic pull-apart bread. Image credit: Nadya Khoja and Sarah Lee

Chez Lisgar’s cheesy garlic pull-apart bread. Image credit: Nadya Khoja and Sarah Lee

Sharing a meal is arguable the oldest and most culturally widespread way of bringing people together, but platforms like Chez Lisgar, or similar service EatWith, are new.

With thousands of apps and internet platforms helping them share, connect and express, Lee and Khoja believe that trendy trades, like those happening via Bunz and in the so-called sharing economy, are here to stay. “Whether it’s a dinner or someone’s music or writing, I think millennials have come to realize that we can’t follow the conventional routes that our parents or teachers have taught us,” says Lee. “We take responsibility on ourselves, and we do it in the most unconventional ways, to consolidate the resources that we do have. We realize that we’ve reached the maximum of what we can consume and it’s time to share with the people around us.”

Linguine-with-mussels-feature-image

Quick Canadian Dinner: Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

This savoury, creamy pasta is a symphony of Canadian flavours. The beer adds a crispness to the rich sauce — we recommend a light, refreshing microbrew ale or lager. Thanks to the way PEI mussels are grown and harvested, they rarely have beards or grit inside them, so cleaning them just means giving them a good rinse.

Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
2 lb (900 g) mussels
1 Tbsp olive oil
4 slices bacon, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1 rib celery, diced
1 cup ale or lager
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup whipping cream (35%)
1 Tbsp chopped fresh tarragon
1/4 tsp pepper
Pinch salt
12 oz (375 g) linguine
3 Tbsp minced flat-leaf parsley

Linguine with Bacon, Beer and PEI Mussels

Directions:
1. Rinse the mussels. Discard any that don’t close when you tap them firmly on the counter; set aside.
2. In a Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Fry the chopped bacon until crisp, about 5 minutes. With a slotted spoon, remove the bacon from the pan to a paper towel and let drain.
3. Add the onion and celery to the fat in the pan. Cook stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes. Add the beer and bring to a boil.
4. Add the mussels then reduce heat. Cover and simmer until the mussels open, about 6 minutes. Discard any that do not open. With the slotted spoon, remove the mussels to a bowl. Add the cream, tarragon, salt and pepper to the pan. Boil until the liquid is reduced by half, about 5 minutes.
5. Meanwhile, cook the linguine according to the package directions until al dente; drain. Add pasta and mussels to the pan, and toss to coat. Sprinkle with parsley and bacon.

Guy and Hunter’s European Vacation: How to Eat Like a Brit

Guy and Hunter’s epic adventure winds down in London, England where the father-son duo visit the oldest fish & chips shop in town. If you haven’t already caught the episode, you can watch it online here.

Rock & Soul Plaice, established back in 1871, is a year-long hotspot among locals and tourists alike. While the French invented “pomme frites” (French fries), it was the Brits who invented “chips.” The humble restaurant owner reveals the best ingredient for a traditional fish & chips dish is cod loin. They’re coated in a thin, crisp batter, leaving just a light crush on the fish. Nothing on the plate is greasy.

“It’s flaky and light but still has a nice crunch on the batter,” Guy says upon his first bite.

After touring the city on a double-decker bus, it was time for the two to indulge in some “real deal Indian food,” as Guy likes to call it. “This is an important part of the culture of food in London.”

At Punjab, the oldest the oldest North Indian restaurant in the UK, the duo took turns making their own naan bread. A typical naan recipe involves mixing white flour with salt, yeast and yogurt to make a smooth, stretchy dough. It’s cooked in a cylindrical clay oven also known as a tandoor. After passing around plates homemade chutney, seekh kebab, chicken korma and papadum, the food coma sets in and it’s time to call it a day.

Take a trip to England just like Guy and Hunter and eat like a Brit with this London-inspired menu.

Appetizers:

Naan Wedges

Chicken Cornish Pasties

Salt Cured Cod and Roasted Garlic Spread Crouton

Fish Sticks with Dill Caper Aoili

Main Dishes:

Fish and Chips

Bangers and Green Mash with Onion Gravy

Chicken Tikka

Jhal Muri

Desserts:

Classic English Trifle

Yorkshire Pudding

Rhubarb and Rosewater Eton Mess

Blueberry Scones with Lemon Glaze