And The Giveaway Winners Are…

What a ride the 13 Day Giveaway has been! Thank you all so much for taking the time to participate, I know they weren’t all easy questions, but I hope you had fun figuring them out. Hopefully you came across a few new delicious recipes, chatted with some new friends in the forums, and learned about new foodie destinations.

Winners

And now, the good stuff, the winners. A huge congratulations goes out to:

 

  1. Maxine L.
  2. Beatrice T.
  3. Sylvie L.
  4. Darryl J.
  5. Ivana J.
  6. Chelsea D.
  7. Kristy K.
  8. Doreann M.
  9. Holly H.
  10. Wayne S.
  11. Sasha D.
  12. Carley W.
  13. Eri A.

 

Enjoy your foodie prize packs!

Related:
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 13
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 12

  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 11

  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 10
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 9
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 8
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 7
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 6
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 5
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 4
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 3
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 2
  • Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 1
  • Scavenger Hunt: FNC’s 13 Days of Giveaways 

Top Chef Texas: Episode 13 Recap

I have precious few memories of having watched Pee Wee Herman as a kid. I’m pretty sure I was smack dab in the middle of the target demographic for Pee Wee’s Playhouse, and I definitely recall it having been on television. I just don’t think I watched it. Ditto for the Tim Burton film, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. I was aware it existed, but never actually saw it.

 

Top Chef Texas

 

Which is all to say that, for the time being, anyway, the peculiar bow-tied man-child holds a small place in my heart primarily for his role in the most difficult challenge of this Top Chef season.

Paul Ruebens, in character as Pee-Wee, initially appeared for the quickfire, where he tasked the chefs with preparing pancakes, apparently his favourite food. Unsurprisingly, considering the judge, the offerings were mostly of the whimsical variety. Edward emerged victorious with his sweet-and-salty pancake “tidbits.”

Like Pee-Wee, I too love pancakes; in my book each chef’s effort seemed pretty mouth-watering. It’s hard to say exactly what put Edward’s over the top. Perhaps Pee Wee prefers not to need a knife.

As is Top Chef custom, the chefs had precious little time to reflect on the success or failure of their flapjacks. Padma and Pee-Wee immediately introduced the main event. It would prove to be an arduous one. Our contestants were given bikes (another Pee-Wee signature, I gather) and told to ride around the Alamo in San Antonio. Not only did they have to rustle up $100 worth of ingredients for a family-style lunch, they also had to find their own cooking space—in someone else’s restaurant.

I’m not entirely certain I’d have the moxie to waltz into another chef’s kitchen and just ask to start cooking. I suppose being part of an internationally televised reality show gave the chefs an extra bit of sway, but nevertheless, kudos to them for talking themselves into strangers’ kitchens. Also nice to see that chefs, previously unknown to each other, could have such easy camaraderie. There must be some sort of secret restaurant society—you know, a special handshake, golden spatula lapel pin, that sort of thing. Right?

When it was all said and done, each of the contestants managed to garner some strong notices from the judges. Clearly the remaining chefs—Paul, Edward, Sarah, Lindsay and Grayson—have proven their skills at this stage in the game. Unfortunately, one of them still had to go home. In this case it was Grayson. The judges liked the individual elements of her egg yolk, spinach and gorgonzola–stuffed chicken, but they didn’t add up to a winning plate. Too bad. It was pretty badass (though not strictly safe) of her to carry her hot pan in one hand while riding back to the dining site.

This episode was also notable for its distinct lack of Paul dominance. He wasn’t pleased with his Thai-style chicken salad, and while it was apparently good enough, the judges preferred Lindsay’s beef cheek–stuffed zucchinis. She made the most out of a difficult situation; it seemed her temporary kitchen was the smallest and least well equipped of the bunch. A tasty effort for her first solo-elimination victory!

Then, on the last Last Chance Kitchen:
Grayson had one final opportunity to get back in the fray. All she had to do was defeat Beverly with a dish—any kind of dish—worthy of returning to the big show. Both chefs turned to the sea for their inspiration. Grayson went for it with bacon seared scallops with a cherry and grape gastrique, while Beverly sought to silence her critics with red snapper in a Thai-style coconut broth, with a fennel and mango salad. Whose offering impressed Tom more? We have to turn the television back on to find out!

Craig MoyCraig Moy is an editor at a Toronto-based city magazine. He also writes about all manner of cultural topics, including food culture.

Fresh and Easy Spring Recipe Ideas

When the weather begins to warm up, we tend to want to eat lighter, fresher foods. But there’s more to a fresh spring salad than lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers. Use your imagination, a little planning, and our great ideas below to turn a spring salad into a complete and satisfying meal.

 

Try a Warm Salad for a Change

Warm salads are easy and satisfying, the trick is in finding quick combinations. Potatoes and Canadian cheese are always great bedfellows. Cook an extra serving of baby potatoes for dinner one night, and then simply re-heat the next day. Toss in some protein (tuna fish, shredded crab, or even diced ham) then top with shredded Canadian Swiss cheese—and voila, you’ve got yourself a warm salad for lunch.

 

Warm Potato Salad with Crab and Swiss Cheese

 

Spring Is Maple Syrup Time

When the days become warmer but the nights are still cold, you know it’s maple syrup season. Mother Nature knew what she was doing when she made this sweet nectar the harbinger of Spring. Keep your salad hearty but fresh by pairing the sweet flavour of maple syrup with the mellow richness of Canadian brie. Adding pork loin to a salad is an easy way to make a one-plate meal while still keeping things light.

 

 Salad with Maple Pork and Brie Dessing 

 

Spring Into Action with Easy, Quick Meals

Give yourself a break in the kitchen and plan meals that combine leftovers, such as this barley and wild rice salad, by using leftovers from the meals earlier in the week. Cook garlic or Polish sausages for dinner one night with a side dish of wild rice, then use the leftovers for this delicious blend of flavours in only 15 minutes. Enhance your meal with a Canadian parmesan cheese and pre-grate and store in an air-tight container in the fridge. This way it’s ready for topping all of your meals throughout the week and it’s so much tastier than the commercially-prepared version.

 

Barley and Wild Rice Salad with Parmesan

 

Cool and Light Is the Ticket

After months of preparing hot and hearty meals, Spring allows us to lighten our diet and reduce the time we spend in the kitchen. Think of meals that require little or no cooking. Again, plan ahead by preparing lots of leftovers when making a pasta dinner, then use the pasta for quick and easy lighter meals the next day, such as this Canadian ricotta and ham salad that requires no cooking.

 

 Pasta Salad with Ricotta and Ham 

 

Go for Hearty and Flavour-Packed Ingredients

Make a meal out of an easy spring salad by adding legumes and Canadian cheese. Lentils contain protein and fibre, both of which are essential to a healthy diet. Crumbling some Canadian gouda over the salad not only adds a serving of dairy, but also provides a quick hit of extra flavour—it’s one of the stronger-tasting cheeses meaning a little will go a long way! Easy to cook and prepare, this salad is a satisfying meal all on its own.

 

 Lentil Salad with Salmon and Gouda 

 

 

 

 

Food on Film: Anna Olson on Mostly Martha and Romance in the Restaurant Biz

Anna Olson knows a thing or two about the hot and steamy romances that can ensue from working in a kitchen together.

The wife of her former executive chef Michael Olson, she was asked by colleague chef Jason Bangerter, to speak at a Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) presentation of Mostly Martha, as part of their Food on Film series.

In an interview before the presentation, Olson said the German film (subtitled in English), which she has on DVD at home, is meaningful to her on several levels.

“There’s a lot of little things in the kitchen you can relate to,” she said.

For instance, when main character Martha, played by Martina Geddeck lets her emotions take over, she often finds refuge in the walk-in refrigerator. “When you can’t leave and you need to physically and emotionally cool down, that’s where you go,” said Olson, with a laugh.

And the incidence of peer relationships is a fact of life in the industry, added Olson. “It’s such an adrenaline-charged industry, and your social life doesn’t fit within the norm,” she said. “You end up socializing with your own.”

However, her own romance didn’t follow the same path as the two main characters who start off as rivals in the film. Olson never felt her husband was her competitor.
“We worked together first and had a mutual respect for each other,” she said. “The relationship came later.”

Bangerter, the executive chef for the onsite O&B Canteen and Luma, explains the cast’s excellent portrayal of life in the kitchen when he introduced the film last Tuesday evening at the Bell Lightbox. Chef and Food Designer Rocco Dressel put the cast through their paces teaching them everything from knife-handling skills to fish-gutting. The actors prepared full three to four-course meals daily and the director joined them to eat their day’s work as they acquired the skills to make themselves appear true professionals in the film.

Olson found herself relating to Martha’s uptight character, while the love interest, Mario (a chef played by Sergio Castellitto), was much more like her husband Michael.
“I’m the straight-line,” she said. “He’s the wavy line.” Olson admitted that she tends to be a little more rigid, whereas Michael is a little more carefree, and more likely to have the music blaring in the kitchen à la Mario.

Kitchen politics can make working together difficult, and Olson said her husband had to be mindful of not appearing to play favourites with the staff at Inn on the Twenty. Soon enough the small inn expanded and decided to start creating their own breads on-site and Olson who had dreamed of pursuing baking took on the role as pastry chef, making things run a little smoother.

The now Food Network host of such television shows, including Sugar and Fresh with Anna Olson, said that it was career opportunities, and not friction in the kitchen that pushed her and her husband along different paths. The two often collaborate together, whether it be with their bakery in the Niagara Region, or the iPad app recently created by the pair and the producers of Olson’s upcoming television show, Bake.

And just as Martha and Mario managed to make things work by incorporating family life and their love of food, the Olson’s also use food as an expression of love.

Olson explained that she sometimes come home to a “week’s worth of suppers,” when she’s away for the week filming her television show. “I love it, and eat all I possibly can,” she said of one incident when her husband set up five different pizza stations for her on a Friday night.

She hopes everyone can appreciate the film for its romance and amazing food.

You don’t need Reese Witherspoon smiling until her cheeks hurt to make a romance movie,” she said. “We often overlook German cuisine but there are several parallels between fine-dining in Germany and in Canada. Twenty years ago, the whole ‘fresh-local’ thing, they were already deep into it.”

Moviegoers were given recipe cards for Olson’s Veal Schnitzel, which was also served at Luma after the movie showing.

For more details on TIFF’s Food on Film series visit http://tiff.net/filmsandschedules/tiffbelllightbox/2012/4400001101

 

At the Movies: Reel Eats Combines Great Films with Great Food

Food, friends and film. A holy trinity. And the concept behind Reel Eats, a monthly event inviting you to engage all of your senses which debuted last month in Toronto. A gastronomic film and story-telling event Reel Eats brings together Toronto’s finest chefs, raconteurs (think CBC Radio’s DNTO live) and food lovers in one gloriously delicious evening. A famous culinary film lies at the heart of every event and dictates the menu for the evening.

 

A concept developed (over dim sum, no less) by Mary Luz Mejia and Mario Stojanac of Sizzling Communications, Chef Vanessa Yeung and Domenic Ubaldino of Aphrodite Cooks and Sang Kim – restaurateur, writer and cook behind Sushi Making for the Soul, Reel Eats is an opportunity to hear, smell, taste,touch and watch what you eat. In honour of Chinese New Year and The Year of the Dragon, the inaugural Reel Eats event paid homage to Asia through the food lover’s film “Eat Drink Man Woman” directed by Ang Lee. The film centers around Master Chef Chu and the elaborate Sunday dinners he painstakingly creates for his three beautiful daughters – one father’s way of getting his family to slow down and communicate in Taipei’s fast-forward, modern society. Inspired by Chef Chu, the evening’s multiple courses were prepared and introduced by Chef Vanessa Yeung and were served (apart from the soup and dessert), family-style.

   Reel Eats 2

 

On the menu?

 

Winter Melon Soup

Chicken and Cucumber Salad

Braised Pork Belly with Choi Sum

Ginger Chicken Potstickers

Snow Pea Shoots Sautéed with Garlic
Taiwanese Clams

Steamed Rice

Deep Fried Bananas with Ginger Ice Cream

 

Reel Eats 3

 

With the movie playing in the background (I had seen it before but many, many years ago but wished I had paid attention to the instruction to watch the film before coming!) guests chatted, shared food and wine at two long tables in Chef Vanessa’s wonderful open-concept kitchen/ teaching studio. It felt like a family get-together, only without the arguments 😉

 

 Reel Eats 1

 

In between courses, guests at Reel Eats events are entertained by storytellers. For the inaugural edition, we enjoyed stories by Diana Tso (a playwright), Carol Devine (author of “The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning”) and Grace Lynn Kung (a Gemini-nominated actress) – each of whom shared a story involving food, relating it to the evening’s theme. Storytelling is an art many of us are unaccustomed to, however after this delightful evening, I can’t wait to experience more. Such a huge part of many other cultures, storytelling offers a different perspective, a different window of experience and is truly universal in that wherever you live, whoever you are, whatever you do, you have a story to tell. Hearing Diana, Carol and Grace speak gave the guests even more to talk about than just the delectable plates of food we were sharing, and added a very special element to the evening.

 

If you love food and film, these evenings are for you. With Italy coming up for March (already sold out)  and France next on the horizon, this is the perfect chance to travel the world through food and stories without leaving Toronto.

 

These events cost $75 per person including taxes for food, film and fun! For more information visit: http://www.facebook.com/ReelEats

Mardi Michels is a full-time French teacher and part-time food blogger based in Toronto. Her blog, eat.live.travel.write focuses on culinary adventures both near and far because she travels as often as she can!

The Start and Finish Cocktail Inspired by the Nominated Film, The Artist

This is our final movie-inspired cocktail of the week, and this time we’re taking our cue from the highly-praised black and white flick, The Artist. The film tells the tale of a movie star during the early age of cinema, who must grapple with the threat of the oncoming “talking pictures.”

 

The Artist

For this cocktail, mixologist Frankie Solarik of Barchef gives us the in-your-face boldness of Canadian Rye, but then tempers it with the sweet aromatics of cinnamon syrup. The syrup is not along: it gets an assist from the Fernet Branca—a spirit that includes different spices and herbs. A very bittersweet cocktail for a bittersweet moment in the history of cinema.

 

“The Start and Finish” cocktail inspired by the nominated film, The Artist

 

1.75oz standard rail Canadian rye
.25oz Fernet Branca
.75oz cinnamon syrup
To make cinnamon syrup, in pot place 1 litre of water with 500mls of granulated white sugar, next add 3 medium sized sticks of cinnamon (not ground), let simmer until sugar is dissolved, remove from heat, strain and set aside until room temperature is achieved, serve.

 

To build cocktail: Place all ingredients into shaker tin, add ice and shake, strain into chilled and absinthe rinsed rock glass, garnish with flamed orange zest.
The Artist Collage

 

Visit the Awards Night site for more great coverage. 

At the Movies

 

What Do Your Favourite Movie Stars Love to Eat?

They have access to the best restaurants in the world, at-home chefs at their beck and call, and personal assistants who will fetch them whatever their hunger desires–so what do movie stars like to chow down on when they’re not basking in the lights and cameras? See our top 10 list below!

 

 Jennifer Aniston

1. Jennifer Aniston

The star of the new comedy “Wanderlust” says she lives and dies for Mexican food. Aniston recently admitted to the British magazine Stylist that she loves Mexican food so much that she’d want a smorgasbord of it for her last meal. “It’d be chips and guacamole, quesadillas, enchiladas, a big tostada salad and nachos,” Aniston said.

2. Antonio Banderas

The voice of “Puss in Boots” is a big fan of paella, the classic seafood and rice dish popular in his home town of Malaga, Spain. Although it’s been reported that Banderas enjoys the paella at La Pepica in Valencia, the century old restaurant that’s also served the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Ava Gardner, he recently told Good Housekeeping that he likes to make the dish himself. “The one thing I always do around the house is cook. It’s one of my passions. I usually make paella for the family on Sundays,” Banderas said.

3. Tom Cruise

It’s no big secret that Tom Cruise is a huge fan of Italian Food and will go to great lengths to eat his favorite meals. For his 43rd birthday he flew the chefs from his favorite restaurant in Rome, Dal Bolognese to prepare a feast of tagliatelle ragu, veal Milanese and chocolate tiramisu aboard a borrowed yacht moored off the Dutch Antilles. When he doesn’t have jet setting chefs at his disposal, Cruise is said to enjoy his favorites: linguine in zesty red clam sauce or spaghetti carbonara which he claims he enjoys making himself.

4. George Clooney

The Oscar winning actor is said to enjoy the Chaya steak from Chaya Brasserie in Beverly Hills. The popular LA restaurant’s signature 10oz rib-eye steak is served with a side of papas arrugadas and three peppercorn sauce. As for a favorite beverage to wash things down, Clooney loves beer. He loves beer so much that he does voice-overs for Budweiser commercials and had a beer keg installed in his dressing room while filming Ocean’s 11 in 2001.

5. Charlize Theron

Sometimes home is where the stomach is. This is definitely the case with Oscar winning, South African beauty, Theron. Her favorite meal is a traditional African braai, featuring lamb chops and spicy sausages cooked over a wood fire with baked potatoes. She’s also been known to indulge in her sweet tooth and can often be spotted savoring the Pain Perdu, a traditional custardy French toast, at LA French bistro Comme Ça.

6. Penelope Cruz

The stunning actress loves the Mediterranean diet typical of her native Spain that includes a lot of vegetable soup, paella and wine. When it comes to her favorite meal, she enjoys potato omelets and says “Give me a piece of bread, a few drops of olive oil and salt, and I am happy. But you cannot eat like that all the time.”

7. Samuel L. Jackson

Samuel L. Jackson is very passionate about food in general which makes it hard for him to nail down a favorite meal. Jackson says he loves the Southern US cooking of his childhood, Asian fusion cuisine – in particular from Hakkasan in London, as well as the Dover sole with courgette purée and root vegetables from Wareing at the Berkeley, also in London. He can’t resist a burger from In and Out Burger whenever he’s in LA and told The Observer, “My last meal would have to be a T-bone steak with chargrilled onions, roasted carrots and a baked sweet potato.”

8. Madonna

Madonna loves the chic, exclusive New York restaurant Nobu and her favorite dish is said to be the toro tartar – a scoop of raw tuna which is topped with Ostreta caviar. She’ll then finish her meal with some green tea ice cream. The star also loves ginger tea and yerba – a South American wonder herb said to boost energy. Lucky for Madonna, her Japanese favorites and fondness for tea are a perfect fit for the macrobiotic diet she follows.

9. Cameron Diaz

Diaz says that resistance is futile when it comes to her favorite food, French fries. The actress says, “French fries. I love them. Some people are chocolate and sweets people. I love French fries. That and caviar.” One of her favorite meals is said to be a juicy cheeseburger with perfectly golden frites on the side.

10. Halle Berry

Although her favorite foods are butter pecan ice cream and salt and vinegar chips, since being diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes, Halle Berry likes to keep her meals healthy. She favours simple dishes such as grilled tuna with garlic mashed potato.

 

Written by Simone Paget

 

For more great Oscar coverage, visit the Awards Night site now.
Related:

At the Movies

You Gotta Eat Here: What Are Some of the Cool Neighbourhood Eateries in Your Town?

You Gotta Eat Here ventured into its first Toronto restaurant the other evening. Naturally, as a resident of Hogtown, I was interested; even more so because the eatery in question, Uncle Betty’s, is in my neighbourhood.

 

You Gotta Eat Here - Food Network Canada

 

Despite such proximity, however, I’ll admit that I haven’t had the chance to check it out. After all, there are hundreds and hundreds of restaurants in the city, I’m living on a writer’s salary, and the place has only been open since last spring. But after seeing John Catucci enjoy the local diner’s grilled meatloaf and mac ‘n’ cheese sandwich, eggs benedict on donuts, and chocolate twinkies, it might be worth the walk.

 

Something else I took away from seeing Uncle Betty’s on the show was the reminder that, at least in Toronto, so many of the best “neighbourhood” restaurants are actually rather new. Sure, long-running mom-and-pop operations are still to be found, but many of the most popular contemporary establishments are also finding great success offering up superior-quality, moderately priced cuisine in welcoming atmospheres. Comfort food was trendy back when the recession struck; now it’s firmly entrenched and being offered by highly credentialed chefs.

 

This doesn’t mean just “Canadian” comfort fare, either. If burgers and omelettes aren’t your thing, there’s always that hip joint for modern Mexican staples, or one of many wood-oven pizzerias, or an izakaya for Japanese pub food. The affordable eating opportunities are endless. And they’re not limited to Toronto, either.

 

Whether you live in Vancouver or Calgary or Montreal or Halifax, I bet you’ve seen your share of cool neighbourhood eateries open up within the past year or two. Why not tell us about some of them?

 

Watch You Gotta Eat Here tonight at 9pm et/6pm pt

 

Craig Moy Craig Moy is an editor at a Toronto-based city magazine. He also writes about all manner of cultural topics, including food culture.

The London Wine and Food Show

With many diverse restaurants, markets, and specialty food shops–and close proximity to Ontario’s agriculture heartland–London, Ontario, cuisine is becoming more local and sustainable.

The seventh annual London Wine and Food show at the Western Fair District in January was a taste of what London has to offer as a culinary destination. Although there were plenty of food options, the main attraction seemed to be the various Ontario wineries and craft breweries, with samples priced at only a few dollars per glass. The show was a chance for Londoners to have a fun night out trying local food, attending seminars, watching culinary demonstrations–and did I mention drinking wine?

My focus was on the food, so I was thrilled to start by sampling from one of London’s newest restaurants, Che Restobar (http://cherestobar.ca/). The chic, downtown restaurant serves up Latin American classics like ceviche, empanadas, and pork adobo. Having traveled to South America recently, I was curious to see how their ceviche measured up and I was pleasantly surprised. The white fish was tossed in a classic leche de tigre sauce and served over a salad with crispy fried onions.

After a refreshing appetizer, I went straight for comfort food with a Yorkshire pudding filled with lamb, beef, pork, stewed vegetables and gravy from The Blackshire Pub (http://www.blackshire.ca/). The Blackshire prides itself on its locally farmed and “from scratch” pub-style menu. Two other restaurants had popular meat options as well: Braise Food and Wine (http://www.braise.ca/) offered a meat Tourtiere and the Top of Fair Restaurant (http://www.westernfairdistrict.com/dining/top_of_the_fair) served a mashed potato “martini” with Yorkshire pudding and roast beef.

The coveted event of the evening was the “All You Need Is Cheese” tasting seminar from the Dairy Farmers of Canada. I was greeted by a plate of six pieces of Canadian cheese, a few chunks of bread and some educational cheese reading. Before we could dive in, our cheese connoisseur told us the correct way to taste cheese: look, feel, smell, and then taste by letting it melt on your tongue. Don’t smack a big piece of cheese onto bread and chow down like I did. We tried Brie (Damafro), Lotbiniere, St. Paulin (Damafro), Creamy Cheddar from Cow’s (the infamous P.E.I ice cream spot also produces delicious extra-old cheddar), sundried tomato Havarti and salsa-flavoured Ivanhoe. I’m a fan of buttery, creamy cheeses, so the Brie from Damafro–one of the largest manufacturers of specialty cheeses in Canada–was my favourite. I learned that Brie is ideally eaten with mild wines, unsalted crackers, or melted with pepper jelly.

Not wanting to overindulge after so much cheese, I browsed the dessert options for a little something sweet. Although the butter tarts from Killer Desserts and Café (http://www.killerdesserts.com/), in flavours such as maple walnut and salted caramel, looked exceptionally hearty, the carrot cake from Petit Paris Patisserie (http://www.petit-paris.ca/) stole my heart. The piece of cake wasn’t exactly a “little something,” but the gooey cream cheese icing, moist cake, and abundance of dried fruit and nuts was a perfect ending to the comfort food-themed night.

 

Laura Downs is a writer, editor and blogger (www.lauradowns.net) currently based in London and Toronto, Ontario.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Floral Absinthe Punch Inspired by the Nominated Film, Midnight in Paris

Our latest movie-inspired cocktail is the Floral Absinthe Punch inspired by the Woody Allen movie, Midnight in Paris. As some of you may know, absinthe is an anise-flavoured spirit that was once banned in France and other European countries for it’s perceived mind-altering qualities. Pretty scandalous!

In this punch, mixologist Frankie Solarik mixes the storied liquor with Campari (an aperitif) and blood oranges, which makes the punch sophisticated in taste and seductive in colour. Drink at midnight… or whenever the mood should strike…

 Floral Absinthe Punch

Floral Absinthe Punch inspired by the nominated film, Midnight in Paris

 

4oz St Germain Elderflower liqueur
2oz Campari
4oz absinthe
750ml grocery purchased fizzy blood orange soda
In punch bowl, place all ingredients, 3 sprigs of rosemary and the wheels from 1 blood orange. Stir, add ice, and serve with four glasses each garnished with 1 sprig of rosemary.

 Floral Absinthe Punch Collage

For more great Oscar coverage, visit the Awards Night site now.
Related:

At the Movies

Top 10 Movie Star Restaurateurs

Did you know that many celebrities also own eateries? Here’s our top 10 list movie star restaurateur.

 

Robert DeNiro

 

1. Robert DeNiro – Nobu, New York City. In an act of pure culinary serendipity, Robert DeNiro teamed up with Japanese chef Nubuyuki Matsuhisa in 1994 to create the modern Japanese eatery Nobu. Although the restaurant now counts 21 locations around the globe, the flagship New York City location remains the top ranked, offering an innovative take on Japanese favorites. We’ve heard their black cod with miso is to die for.

2. Mark Wahlberg – Walburgers, Boston. Actor Mark Wahlberg has teamed up with his brothers Donnie and Paul to open a burger joint appropriately named “Wahlburgers.” The eatery is located across the street from their first restaurant Alma Nove in their hometown of Boston. Wahlburgers is said to offer a creative spin on childhood comfort food for a “Boston-meets-Hollywood” burger experience.

3. Francis Ford Coppola – Cafe Zoetrope, San Francisco. When Hollywood royalty meets Southern Italian cuisine you get this intimate North Beach bistro. The cafe is lined with this Oscar winning director’s personal collection of movie memorabilia and offers an extensive wine list including favorites from the Francis Ford Coppola Winery. Try Italian specialties like their buffalo mozarella pizza designed to make even Don Vito Corleone’s mouth water.

 

Justin Timberlake

 

4. Justin Timberlake – Southern Hospitality, New York City. Timberlake brings a taste of his native Memphis to Manhattan with his latest restaurant venture Southern Hospitality. The Memphis-style BBQ joint which now boasts two locations – The Upper East Side and Hell’s Kitchen- brings a sexy twist to Southern fare like shrimp po’ boys, crawfish hush puppies and dry rubbed BBQ ribs that you’d likely find at a neighborhood restaurant in Memphis.

5. Sandra Bullock – Bess Bistro, Austin. What does this Oscar winning actress love even more than tattooed bad boys?! Cajun food. Bullock opened this Cajun bistro in Austin, Texas, in 2006. The hip eatery serves a mouthwatering selection of Cajun specialities like fried green tomatoes, bacon & shrimp grits and grilled duck sausage served with Ziegenbock Ale braised chillies and caramelized onions.

 

Ryan Gosling

 

6. Ryan Gosling – Tagine, Beverly Hills. This Canadian Oscar nominee teamed up with chef Abdessamad “Ben” Benameur and wine sommelier Chris Angulo, to open Tagine in 2006. Noted as being “Beverly Hills best kept secret”, this intimate restaurant offers refined Moroccan and North African cuisine in a romantic, candle-lit setting.

7. Robert Redford – Zoom, Park City, Utah. Award winning actor, director and founder of the prestigious Sundance Film Festival, Robert Redford’s Zoom offers elegant American cuisine in a warm, casual environment. Located in the heart of Park City, Utah, Zoom whips up sophisticated, locally inspired dishes like cumin pepita encrusted Utah rainbow trout and slow braised shank of Utah lamb.

8. Don Johnson and Cheech Marin – Ana Mandera, San Francisco.  Film stars Johnson and Marin opened this successful Bay Area eatery while filming the TV show Nash Bridges. Ana Mandera cooks up modern Vietnamese cuisine inspired by Chef Khai Doung’s native village of Nha Trang. The menu features exotic delicacies like cashew and pine-nut encrusted Mekong basa and seared rare Ahi tuna in jicama salsa and wasabi mouse.

9. Cathy Moriarty – Mulberry Street Pizza, Los Angeles. Longing for the New York Style pizza of her native Queens, Oscar winner Cathy Moriarty opened this modest pizzeria to satisfy her craving for “good pizza” in LA. The red checkered table clothed pizza parlour serves up Italian American favorites like pizza, spaghetti and meatballs in a casual setting. Unlike many celebrity owned spots, Moriarty can be spotted working in the restaurant, serving customers and preparing food.

10. Timothy Hutton- PJ Clarke’s, New York City. For 125 years this New York institution has entertained the famous, the infamous and everyone who appreciates the food and ambiance of a real saloon. Now co-owned by actor Timothy Hutton, PJ Clarke’s is known for it’s outstanding hamburgers, oysters and people watching.

 

Written by Simone Paget

At the Movies

 

Unsung Heroes: Richard Bastien

Today, We continue our coverage “unsung heroes” in the culinary world -in other words, chefs you should know, but probably don’t. In our last installment we introduced you to Chef Anthony Rose from The Drake Hotel, next up: Richard Bastien.

 

Richard Bastien

 

What is your favourite dish?         
Tomato salad in season.
What is your favourite kitchen utensil or gadget?      
Thermomix.

 

What would we find in your fridge on a typical day?
Yogurt, eggs and mayonnaise.

 

Where does your love of cooking come from?
From my childhood. I grew up on a farm with a kitchen garden, rabbits, pigs and hens.
What is your guilty food pleasure?           
Chips and ice cream.

 

Any food aversions?           
Brain and fiddlehead.

Where were you when you first knew you would make food your career and how did you know?       
The reaction and the enthusiasm of my friends when I make a dinner for them. I was around 20 years old.

Has food evolved since you started cooking?         
Yes, more exceptional product (cheese, vegetable, meat).

 

What qualities are the new generation of cooks lacking?    
Patience.

Does it bother you that so many young cooks are opening their own little boites and calling themselves chefs?            
No. There’s a lot of competition.

Is food an art or a trade?      
First it’s a trade, and after for some people is come an art.

If not cooking, then what else would you like to do or be?            
Actor.

What is your idea of a perfect meal? 
Freshness, harmony of taste (maximum 3 flavours) and texture.

Which is more rewarding if you had to choose? Being a chef or being an owner?      

Chef, with no hesitation.

My friend brought me here on my last visit and I was particularly impressed by the diverse nature of your clientele. Any idea why?      
It could be the open windows and our street-side patio, the diversity of the menu and the products we use, our menu for all budgets (especially the after 10pm menu), professional service or all of the above.

Which restaurants do you frequent in Montreal besides your own?            
Decca 77, Le filet, La Bottega, L’Express, and Juni.

Which person, living or dead, would you like to cook for, what would you make, and why?
Maguerite Yourcenar – famed French literary figure and the first woman to occupy Seat of the Acadamie Francaise- a meal with fresh wild mushroom or something come from the nature. She was a vegetarian.

What would you like someone to say about your cuisine after you are gone?     
A cuisine that is user-friendly around which people enjoy being together.
Related:

John Lee is founder and proprietor of Chippy’s Fish & Chips Inc., as
well as a food/beverage consultant, caterer, instructor at George Brown
College and a freelance writer.

The Gin Blossom Cocktail Inspired by the Nominated Film, The Iron Lady

We’re bringing you another great movie-inspired cocktail, this time based on the Meryl Streep film, The Iron Lady. In the flick, the esteemed actress portrays former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

 

 Gin Blossom Cocktail

 

This cocktail features one of those stalworths of British drinks, dry gin. Now, there isn’t anything wrong with a good old fashioned Gin and Tonic (or G and T as it’s also known) but our cocktail brings in some French vermouth and the delicate flavour of elderflower. Finish the whole thing off with a bit of “zest” and flair by lighting an orange peel over the cocktail to release just a touch of citrus oil. Bloody good!

The “Gin Blossom” cocktail inspired by the nominated film, The Iron Lady
1.25oz London dry gin
.75oz Lillet Blanc
.5oz St Germain Elderflower liqueur

First add ice and water to chill classic champagne coup, next add all components into shaker tin, add ice and stir to chill.  Discard ice and water in glass, garnish glass with two “spritz” of orange blossom water, next strain contents of shaker tin into chilled glass, garnish with flamed orange zest.

Gin Blossom Cocktail Collage

For more great Oscar coverage, visit the Awards Night site now.
Related:

At the Movies

Video: 5 Finger Foods for Your Fabulous Party

We’re on to day three of our movie week here on foodnetwork.ca in celebration of the 84th Academy Awards and today we’re all about the Oscar party. Oscar after parties are notorious for being big, splash, swanky affairs where the stars indulge in gourmet eats and pricey bubbly. Let’s say you’re on more of a modest budget though, can you throw a fun fete for your friends while watching the big show this weekend? Of course you can!

Celebrity Party

Monique Lahey is here to show you how to whip up five finger foods for your fabulous party. These are all super easy to make and you can even make some of them in advance to save yourself some time (and focus on your Oscar pool selections!). And, you can find all of the recipes at the links below on our site.

 

 

Recipes featured in this video:

Anna Olson’s Chorizo Cheese Potato Wraps
Christine Cushing’s Flavoured Popcorn
Ricardo Larriveé’s Mini Chicken Skewers with Smoked Paprika
Ricardo Larriveé’s Crispy Tomatoes Provencal
Anna Olson’s Chocolate Drizzled Peanut Brittle

Related:

 At the Movies

 

Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 13

Get pot out of cupboard. Put stuff in pot. Cook with pot. Empty pot. Wash pot. Store pot. Repeat, repeat, repeat! Is it any surprise that over time our pots and pans succumb to wear and tear in the kitchen? A robust, “healthy” pot or pan can make all the difference when it comes to cook time and performance. Maybe you’ve got a magma-forged, magic-infused, never-scrub set of pots and pans that can take on everything and anything. If so, this giveaway isn’t for you!

For the rest of us, today’s giveaway is a chance to update the old and start cooking in the kitchen again with a brand new set of pots and pans! I could list all the specs, but how about we just call it even and say they’re really shiny?

One last thing, today is the last day of our giveaway! Yes that means this is day 13, and there are 13 foodie packages to give out, so I hope you’ve been paying attention.

Day 13
Theme Thirteen: Pot Set Makeover

Question:
How old will Food Network Canada be this October?

How This Giveaway Works:
This is the last day! Over the past 13 business days (the giveaway started on February 6th,) 13 questions have been posted in daily blogs. You must send in one email containing all of the answers. Be sure to follow the directions, some questions require a forum post, others scavenging around! I’ll announce the winner on February 27, 2012 so you still have a chance to collect your answers and send in your email.

The to-do list:
  • Send your email to giveaways@foodnetwork.ca
  • The subject title should read “Community Scavenger Hunt”
Provide all 13 answers ex. Day 1 answer is…
• Include your full name, phone number, address and your foodnetwork.ca username
• You can request the theme package you’re interested in, I’ll do my best to accommodate
• Please see giveaway rules (below)

Related:
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 12
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 11
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 10
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 9
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 8 
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 7
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 6 
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 5 
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 4
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 3
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 2
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 1
• Scavenger Hunt: FNC’s 13 Days of Giveaways

—–

Scavenger Hunt: Day 13 Giveaway Rules
The following are the giveaway rules (“Rules”) for the Scavenger Hunt: Day 13 giveaway (the “Giveaway”) being administered by Shaw Media (“Shaw”).
RULE 1. HOW TO ENTER
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. To enter, entrants must answer all 13 scavenger hunt questions and send one email with all correct answers as determined by a Shaw representative to giveaways@foodnetwork.ca.  The Giveaway shall run from February 6, 2012 to February 26, 2012 after which time no answers will be considered.
RULE 2. SELECTION OF WINNER
Upon completion of the Giveaway, a Shaw representative shall review the answers submitted by each entrant to determine which entrant answered the all questions correctly. From the entrants that correctly answered the questions, Shaw will randomly select the prize winner (“Winner”) and provide the prize to the winner.  For the purposes of this Giveaway and the awarding of prize, these Rules shall govern in all respects and the decision of any Shaw representatives shall be final.
RULE 3. PRIZE
There is one Day 13 prize available to be won, which consists of one KitchenAid 9-Piece Non-Stick Cookset, one E-Towel, one Fruits & Passion Hand Cream Gift Set with Recipe Box, one cookbook Everyday to Entertaining (“Prize”). The approximate value of the Prize is three hundred and sixty five Canadian dollars (CDN $365).
RULE 4. GENERAL
By participating in this Giveaway, you agree to abide by these Rules and the decisions of Shaw in awarding the Prize, which decisions shall be final and binding upon all entrants. Entrants who have not complied with these Rules are subject to disqualification. Shaw reserves the right to modify the Rules, before or during the Giveaway, in its sole discretion, in any way at any time it deems necessary or appropriate without materially affecting the terms and conditions of this Giveaway. Interpretation of these Giveaway rules by Shaw shall be final.
Personal information collected during the course of this Giveaway shall be used by Shaw and its authorized representatives solely for the purposes of conducting the Giveaway and awarding prizes, and will not be used or disclosed for any other purpose unless required by law. The Prize is not transferable and not redeemable for cash, will not be extended under any circumstances and must be accepted as offered without substitution. Employees of Shaw and its affiliates, subsidiaries, related companies, advertising and promotional agencies and the household members of any of the above, are not eligible to participate in this Giveaway.

By participating in this Giveaway, the Winner agrees that his/her name may be used in any and all forms of media, without any further compensation by Shaw and waives all rights (including moral rights) with respect to printed, broadcast and other forms of publicity.
In the event of a dispute as to who submitted an electronic entry, the entry will be deemed to have been submitted by the authorized account holder of the e-mail address submitted at the time of entry. “Authorized account holder” is defined as the natural person who is assigned to an e-mail address by an Internet access provider, on-line service provider or other organization (e.g., business, educational institution, etc.) that is responsible for assigning e-mail addresses for the domain associated with the submitted e-mail address. Notwithstanding the defined Contest Period, Shaw reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to terminate the Giveaway, in whole or part, and/or modify, amend or suspend the Giveaway, and/or these Rules in any way, at any time, for any reason without prior notice.  Interpretation of these Giveaway Rules by Shaw shall be final.

The Giveaway is subject to all applicable laws of the province of Ontario and the laws of Canada applicable therein.

Irish Food Terms

Ever wondered what a Barmbrack or a Singin’ Hinnies was? We’ve broken it down for you with some of the most popular terms for classic Irish eats!

Balnamoon Skink: A soup made of trussed fowls and seasoned with herbs and onions.
Barmbrack: Traditional yeast bread with dried fruits or raisins, served with butter and tea.
Bath Chaps: The lower half of the pig’s cheeks which are cured and eaten like bacon.
Belfast Bap: Century-old yeast bread that originated in Belfast; often used as sandwich bread.
Black Pudding: A thick sausage made from by cooking blood with filler such as meat, fat or oatmeal.
Black and Tan: A beverage prepared with equal parts of stout and pale ale.
Boxty Bread: A rural Irish dish made using grated and mashed potatoes with flour as a binding agent. Pan-fried or griddled, the result is similar to a potato pancake.
Brotchan Roy: Traditional leak and oatmeal soup. Brotchan means “broth fit for a king”.
Cais: The Irish word for cheese.
Caveach: Fried fillets of fish, stored in a jar of vinegar.
Champ: Hot mashed potatoes served with a pool of melted butter for dipping.
Chicken Broody: Oven-roasted chicken, cut up and served with a cheese sauce and potatoes.
Colcannon: A traditional dish mainly consisting of mashed potatoes with kale or cabbage.
Corned Beef and Cabbage: Stew made from brisket and cabbage. The meat and cabbage is removed from the broth to be served hot while the stock is saved for an Irish stew or soup base.
Crubeens: Lightly brined pig’s feet.
Dublin Coddle: Stew of rashers (thinly sliced back bacon), pork sausages, onions and potatoes served with hot soda bread.
Farl: Flat breads prepared in a pan and cut into four equal pieces.

pan bread
Flummery: Sweet pudding made from stewed fruit and thickened with cornstarch
Gammon: The Irish word for ham.
Griskins: The lean parts of pork loin.
Oaten Biscuits: Cookies made from oat bran, oats, sugar, flour and baking soda.
Scrooch: Thick soup of beef, mutton and vegetables.
Singin’ Hinnies: Hot griddle cakes scented with cinnamon and studded with currants.
Skirlie-Mirlie: A mixture of potatoes and turnips whisked with boiling milk and butter until light and fluffy. Served with Irish flatbread.
Skirts and Bodices: Pork trimmings and pickled spare ribs cooked with water, salt, pepper, and onions.
Slainte: A toast meaning “good health” to be said before a drink.
Sloke: A type of algae that is stewed either alone or with veggies.
Spotted Dog: Irish bread pudding containing dried fruit.

bread pudding
Stirabout: Oatmeal porridge that is made by stirring the water about then slowly adding fine oatmeal in a continuous stream.
White Puddings: A type of thick sausage made from well-seasoned oatmeal and lard boiled in sausage skins.
Willicks or Willocks: Species of small edible sea snail. They are boiled in seawater then eaten out of their shells with a pin.
Yellowman: An Irish treat made from melting sugar till it browns then pouring quickly into a buttered pan or baking sheet to cool. Served like peanut brittle, the finished product is broken into smaller bit-sized pieces.

 

The Bourbon and Chamomile Julep Inspired by the Nominated Film, The Help

Movie week continues and today we bring you the “Bourbon and Chamomile Julep” a nod to the movie, The Help, set in 1960s Mississippi during the civil rights movement.

 

Bourbon is an American whiskey and is used in one of The South’s most famous cocktails, The Mint Julep. If you loved The Help (or the book it’s based on) then put on your best southern accent and retire to the parlour while you watch the Oscar ceremonies unfold this weekend.

Bourbon and Chamomoile Julep Cocktail

 

The “Bourbon and Chamomile Julep” inspired by the nominated film, The Help
2oz bourbon
1.5oz chamomile syrup
.25oz green Chartreuse
In shaker tin, place all ingredients, and stir, in separate cup (preferably made of pewter) fill with crushed ice, next strain all components over crushed ice, garnish with a generous portion of fresh mint.

 

 Bourbon and Chamomoile Julep Cocktail Collage

For more great Oscar coverage, visit the Awards Night site now.
Related:

At the Movies

Recipe; Tourtiere by Derek’s Kitchen

As a proud Quebecer, born and raised, I love Quebecois cuisine. It’s mostly hearty, farmer style food, which I love eating. There’s is also a lot of game used in Quebecois cooking, which I love. Very soon it’s going to be maple syrup season and to me the food found at a cabane á sucre is the epitome of  Quebecois cooking. That’s why I thought this would be a good time to post a recipe for that sugar shack staple: tourtière.

 

A while back a reader wrote in to ask me if I could do a recipe for six-pâtes (also know as “cipaille.”) Six-pâtes is another traditional Quebecois meat pie, made from up to 6 different varieties of game meat, each separate by a layer of pastry.  Unlike tourtière, in a six-pâtes the meat is cubed instead of ground and so must be slow cooked for hours. I do love cooking with game meats, like duck and venison and rabbit, so the idea of six different varieties in one meat pie does sound pretty amazing. I knew that I had to take on the challenge and make a six-pâtes, but I knew it was going to be a daunting endeavor. So as a sort of practice run, I decided to make a good old, simple tourtière.

 

For my tourtière I used three different types of ground meat – pork, veal & beef, but you can use just one if you like. You can also add mushroom, celery and potatoes to filling, but here I am just using onions and garlic. The key to a good tourtière is in the seasoning. I like it with a good strong hint of cloves, as well as some cinnamon & savory. For the dough, you can use the pie crust recipe from my rabbit pot pie or you can save some time and go with the store bought variety.

 

Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 1 1/2 hours

Ingredients:

300g (2/3 lbs) ground pork
300g (2/3 lbs) ground veal
300g (2/3 lbs) ground beef
50g (1 3/4 oz) butter
300ml chicken stock
2 onions, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon dried savory
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
3/4 teaspoon salt

10″ double pastry

1 egg yolk
120ml (1/2 cup) cream or milk for brushing the crust.

 

Preheat the oven to 375F

1. Melt the butter in a large pot and then add the onions and garlic. Sautée on medium-high heat until the onions are translucent and then add the ground meat. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the meat is completely browned. Add the spices and chicken stock and let simmer for 20 minutes, until most of the liquid has evaporated.

2. Roll out the bottom crust and then line a 9″ baking pan. Spoon in the filling and the spread it evenly

3. Roll out the top crust and then cut 5 vents to allow the steam to escape. Take the pieces of pastry that you cut out and use them to make decorative leaves to place on top of the crust.

4. Lay the top crust down and then use a fork to seal the edges. Trim of excess dough. Combine the egg yolk and cream or milk and then brush the surface of the crust. Add the decorative leaves and then brush with the egg wash. Bake in the oven at 375F un

 

Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 12

Ever wanted to make cheesy garlic toast, but found it somewhat impractical to turn on your oven for a couple of pieces? Well, if you’ve never had the luxury of owning a convection oven here’s your chance. These little ovens are super, you can bake, broil and toast your way to your food (just watch Sonja Morgan on The Real Housewives of New York, she lives by it!) Plus they’re perfect for students living on residence, as they are compact.

Day 12
Theme Twelve: Convection Delight

Question:
Can you find all 10 kitchen items in the photograph below? Name them!

*Hint: You’ve seen all of the items during our giveaway posts over the past 11 days. 
Please don’t post your responses in the comment area below!

Scavenger Pic

How This Giveaway Works:

Over the course of the next business day (Wednesday), a new blog post will appear on our site with a question. You must answer all 13 questions (the giveaway started on February 6th) and send in one email containing all of the answers. I’ll announce the winner on February 27, 2012 so you have a chance to collect your answers and send in your email.

The to-do list:
  • Identify all 10 items in the kitchen image above
• Send your email to giveaways@foodnetwork.ca
• The subject title should read “Community Scavenger Hunt”
• Provide all 13 answers ex. Day 1 answer is…
• Include your full name, phone number and address
• Include your foodnetwork.ca username
• You can request the theme package you’re interested in, I’ll do my best to accommodate
• Please see giveaway rules (below)

Related:
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 11
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 10
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 9
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 8
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 7
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 6
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 5
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 4
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 3
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 2
• Scavenger Hunt Giveaway: Day 1
• Scavenger Hunt: FNC’s 13 Days of Giveaways

—–

Scavenger
Hunt: Day 12 Giveaway Rules
The following are the giveaway rules (“Rules”) for the Scavenger Hunt: Day 12
giveaway (the “Giveaway”) being administered by Shaw Media (“Shaw”).
RULE 1. HOW TO ENTER
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. To enter, entrants must answer all 13 scavenger hunt
questions and send one email with all correct answers as determined by a Shaw
representative to giveaways@foodnetwork.ca.  The Giveaway shall run from
February 6, 2012 to February 26, 2012 after which time no answers will be
considered.
RULE 2. SELECTION OF WINNER
Upon completion of the Giveaway, a Shaw representative shall review the answers
submitted by each entrant to determine which entrant answered the all questions
correctly. From the entrants that correctly answered the questions, Shaw will
randomly select the prize winner (“Winner”) and provide the prize to the
winner.  For the purposes of this Giveaway and the awarding of prize,
these Rules shall govern in all respects and the decision of any Shaw
representatives shall be final.
RULE 3. PRIZE
There is one Day 1 prize available to be won, which consists of one Black & Decker
Stainless Steel Convection Oven, 4 Slice, one KSP June Ceramic Entertaining
Set, one Fruits & Passion Decorative Diffuser Set, one cookbook The Convection Oven Bible (“Prize”). The approximate value of the Prize
is one hundred and seventy Canadian dollars (CDN $170).
RULE 4. GENERAL
By participating in this Giveaway, you agree to abide by these Rules and the
decisions of Shaw in awarding the Prize, which decisions shall be final and
binding upon all entrants. Entrants who have not complied with these Rules are
subject to disqualification. Shaw reserves the right to modify the Rules,
before or during the Giveaway, in its sole discretion, in any way at any time
it deems necessary or appropriate without materially affecting the terms and
conditions of this Giveaway. Interpretation of these Giveaway rules by Shaw shall
be final.
Personal information collected during the course of this Giveaway shall be used
by Shaw and its authorized representatives solely for the purposes of
conducting the Giveaway and awarding prizes, and will not be used or disclosed
for any other purpose unless required by law.
The Prize is not transferable and not redeemable for cash, will not be extended
under any circumstances and must be accepted as offered without substitution.

Employees of Shaw and its affiliates, subsidiaries, related companies,
advertising and promotional agencies and the household members of any of the
above, are not eligible to participate in this Giveaway.
By participating in this Giveaway, the Winner agrees that his/her name may be
used in any and all forms of media, without any further compensation by Shaw
and waives all rights (including moral rights) with respect to printed,
broadcast and other forms of publicity. 

In the event of a dispute as to who submitted an electronic entry, the entry
will be deemed to have been submitted by the authorized account holder of the
e-mail address submitted at the time of entry. “Authorized account holder” is
defined as the natural person who is assigned to an e-mail address by an
Internet access provider, on-line service provider or other organization (e.g.,
business, educational institution, etc.) that is responsible for assigning
e-mail addresses for the domain associated with the submitted e-mail address.
Notwithstanding the defined Contest Period, Shaw reserves the right, in its
sole discretion, to terminate the Giveaway, in whole or part, and/or modify,
amend or suspend the Giveaway, and/or these Rules in any way, at any time, for
any reason without prior notice.  Interpretation of these Giveaway Rules
by Shaw shall be final.

The Giveaway is subject to all applicable laws of the province of Ontario and
the laws of Canada applicable therein.

At the Movies: Test Your Knowledge of Food on Film

Put your popcorn where your mouth is and test your appetite for food on film with our trivia challenge.
 

Food on Film

 

1. In the animated film classic, Lady and the Tramp, two dogs fall in love when they kiss unexpectedly while eating ________.

2. In Julie & Julia, Amy Adams plays a character that blogs about her attempt to cook every recipe in the first cook book written by ___________.

3. An unhappy housewife bonds with an old woman in a nursing home over stories about her life at the Whistle Stop Café. The restaurant serves this southern dish, which is also the name of this Oscar nominated movie: ____________.

4. A family copes with the death of its matriarch by revitalizing its Sunday dinner tradition that includes fried chicken, collard greens, and corn bread. Name that movie: _________.

5. Julia Roberts plays a character that indulges in the cuisine of this country, while on her journey of self-discovery in Eat Pray Love. Name that country: ___________.

6. In the 1971 fantasy film, Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory, Violet Beauregarde ignores Wonka’s warning, and chews an experimental gum that makes her turn blue, and swell into a _________.

7. This movie isn’t about a group of people that get together for a morning meal as the title may suggest, but rather it is an 80s teen angst classic about a group of high school kids that spend a Saturday in detention. Name that movie: __________.

8. In this recent Disney movie and winner of the 2007 Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, Remy the Rat moves to Paris to live his culinary dreams through a restaurant garbage boy named Linguini. Name that movie: _____________.

9. Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp star in this romantic movie about a woman who opens a chocolate shop in a small French village. Name that movie: _____________.

Check below the “At the Movies” banner for answers to our trivia questions.

 

Glenn Calderon is a Toronto-based writer and self-proclaimed
“bachelor foodie.” He enjoys trying new restaurants and writing about
it. Currently, he is attempting to teach himself how to cook but always
has a fire extinguisher nearby, just in case. 

 

Visit the Awards Night site for more great Oscar coverage.

 

 At the Movies

Answers:
Spaghetti
Julia Child
Fried Green Tomatoes
Soul Food
Italy
Blueberry
The Breakfast Club
Ratatouille
ChocolatHow did you score?
1-3 correct
Watching people eat isn’t fun for you. You shouldn’t watch movies when you’re hungry. It makes it hard to concentrate.

4-6 correct
Eating and listening at the same time may be difficult for you. You must have been pre-occupied with the popcorn in your lap.

7-10 correct
You’re a foodie film fanatic! For you, food is art, and you like to enjoy it on film as much as you like to eat it.

Hit the comments below to share your score with the Food Network community.