Host Kristin Chenoweth, as seen on Candyland, Season 1.

5 New Releases to Watch on STACKTV with Amazon Prime This December

The holidays are one of the most delicious times of the year – and while 2020 is making us reimagine typical festive traditions, you can always count on Food Network Canada as a source of inspiration, no matter what you’re craving. Here, we’ve rounded up an all-new selection of holiday shows featuring your favourite faces and enough delectable recipes to fill your stockings twice, plus classic shows that you’ll love watching any time of the year! Watch Food Network Canada on STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels all December long.

Buddy vs Christmas

Who Should Watch: The family whose Christmas tree has been up and decorated since November

Team Buddy featuring Buddy Valastro, as seen on Buddy vs Christmas, Season 1.

Fan favourite Buddy Valastro returns for a brand new competition, this one decidedly more nice than naughty. It’s a completely new side of Buddy, as he’s pushed outside of his cake-creating comfort zone to compete against talented artists and design magical, holiday-inspired creations.

Related: Cakes, Cookies or Pies? Buddy Valastro Reveals His Ultimate Holiday Treat

Feasting With the Stars

Who Should Watch: Anyone missing big holiday get-togethers with family and friends

Geoffrey Zakarian, along with his family and celebrity friends, is sharing his treasured traditions and festive recipes with you in this one-hour special that’s the perfect way to get into the holiday spirit.

Restaurant Impossible: Revisited

Who Should Watch: Restaurant renovation aficionados

Robert speaks with Jennifer Kerzie outside of the restaurant, as seen on Season 17 of Restaurant Impossible

In these special episodes, host Robert Irvine heads back to previously visited failing restaurants to check in with the owners and discover their progress since the initial visit and see how things have changed.

See More: 20 Canadian Food Causes That Need Your Help This Holiday Season

Candyland

Who Should Watch: Nostalgic board game lovers

Host Kristin Chenoweth, as seen on Candyland, Season 1.

The classic board game is brought to life in Candyland, hosted by Kristen Chenoweth! Competitors travel around the board, plucking ingredients straight out of the game and building their sweet masterpieces along the way. You’ll be transported directly into a childhood fantasy with this sweet new series.

Christmas Cookie Challenge

Who Should Watch: Santa’s cookie bakers

Wide view of Host Ree Drummond and Host Eddie Jackson, as seen on Christmas Cookie Challenge, Season 4.

Eddie Jackson and Ree Drummond are back hosting a new season of this sweet competition. In each episode, five bakers compete to find out if their holiday cookie-making skills are worthy of Santa’s nice list (plus a cool $10,000 prize).

Related: From Bakers to Grill Masters, Holiday Gifts Perfect for the Food Lover in Your Life

Ina Garten’s Fresh Whiskey Sours Will Be Your Go-To Cocktail

Although the holiday season might feel a little less celebratory this year, there’s no reason we still can’t raise a glass of Ina Garten’s refreshing and tangy whiskey sour concoction. This five-ingredient indulgence from the Barefoot Contessa is ready in 10 minutes – just don’t forget to top it all off with a Maraschino cherry!

Related: Ina Garten’s Classic Cocktail Recipes, From Margaritas to Mojitos

Ina Garten’s Fresh Whiskey Sours

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Yield: 4 cocktails

Ingredients:

3/4 cup Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (3 lemons)
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (4 limes)
2/3 cup sugar syrup (see below)
Maraschino cherries

See More: Dinner Etiquette Tips That Would Make Ina Garten Proud

Directions:

1. Combine the whiskey, lemon juice, lime juice and syrup. Fill a cocktail shaker halfway with ice and fill two-thirds full with the cocktail mixture. Shake for 30 seconds and pour into glasses. Add a maraschino cherry and serve ice cold.

2. Sugar syrup: Put 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Chill thoroughly before using.

Watch Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Sfenj doughnuts on colourful tablecloth

Sfenj AKA Moroccan Doughnuts: Your New Fave Hanukkah Dessert Using Just 5 Ingredients!

Sfenj, derived from the Arabic word for “sponge,” are crispy and chewy doughnuts made with unsweetened, sticky yeast dough that is risen until light and fluffy, pulled into rings and fried until golden. They’re a breakfast staple in Morocco and other Maghrebi countries and often eaten by Sephardic Jews during Hanukkah, symbolizing the oil that fuelled the holiday miracle. Sfenj should be served piping hot and can be enjoyed plain, drizzled with honey or dusted with sugar. They’re simple to make at home, only require the most basic ingredients and don’t contain any eggs or milk — so you can add them to your list of best vegan recipes too.

Sfenj dougnuts on colourful tablecloth

Sfenj Moroccan Doughnuts With Honey and Sugar

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Rest Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours, 50 minutes
Servings: 12 to 15 doughnuts

Ingredients:

Doughnuts
3 tsp dry active yeast
1 Tbsp sugar
1 ¾ cups lukewarm water, divided
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ tsp sea salt
Vegetable oil for frying

Topping
Honey (optional)
Ground cinnamon (optional)
Granulated or icing sugar (optional)

Sfenj doughnut ingredients on kitchen counter

Directions:

1. Dissolve the yeast and sugar in ½ cup of lukewarm water and set aside to bloom for 10 minutes.

2. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the yeast mixture with flour and gradually add 1 ¼ cups of lukewarm water until it forms a sticky dough. Then add the salt and continue to knead for about 10 minutes, which will make the dough springy and elastic. A stand mixer with a hook attachment is ideal for this, but you can also mix by hand, working the dough vigorously. The dough should still end up very sticky and loose.

Related: You’ve Been Making Couscous All Wrong. Here’s the Right Way to Prepare It

3. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let the dough rise for 2 to 3 hours, until light, airy — and they double or triple in size. (To speed up the rising time, put dough in the oven with the light turned on).

4. In a high-sided pan or pot, heat 1 to 2 inches of vegetable oil on medium heat until hot, measured on a candy or deep-fry thermometer between 360°F to 370°F. (A Dutch oven works great for this because it maintains a consistent temperature and its heavy weight anchors it to the burner, reducing the risk of accidents when deep frying). If you don’t have a thermometer, you can test the temperature of the oil with the handle end of a wooden spoon. If you see lots of little bubbles form around the wood, your oil is ready to fry in.

Related: Cozy Jewish Comfort Food Recipes

5. Keep a small bowl of cold water handy for wetting your hands before you shape each doughnut. Lightly punch down the dough to deflate it. Pull off a piece of batter about the size of an egg. Use your thumb to make a hole in the centre of the dough and then pull gently to form a doughnut shape. (Don’t worry about getting them perfect, they will puff up nicely in the oil).

Woman shaping sfenj doughnut dough

6. Carefully put the doughnuts one at a time into the pot of hot oil and don’t overcrowd them. (A good rule of thumb is 3 to 4 doughnuts at a time). Fry the doughnuts for 1 to 2 minutes until golden brown on the bottom and puffed on top. Then flip carefully with a slotted spoon or metal tongs and cook on the other side for another 1 to 2 minutes, until even in colour and golden brown all over.

Sfenj doughnuts frying in oil

7. Remove the finished doughnuts onto a cooling rack lined with paper towels to drain the excess oil. Serve piping hot or warm, either plain, drizzled with hot honey or dusted with cinnamon or sugar — and preferably accompanied by a glass of Moroccan mint tea.

Sfenj doughnuts being dusted with sugar

Like Claire’s sfenj recipe? Try her upside-down apple cake or comforting mujadara recipe.

Anna Olson smiles while icing a cupcake with her Anna Olson Kitchen Disposable Icing Bags

Anna Olson’s Top 10 Baking Tools for the Holidays

Holiday baking season is here and having the right tools on hand will help lead you to success. These are my top gadgets to make this holiday season less stressful. Remember, “stressed” spelled backwards is “desserts!”

Related: Anna Olson’s 50 Ultimate Holiday Desserts

1. Offset spatula

This tool becomes an extension of your hand as you use it to lift cookies off of hot trays, loosen cakes delicately from their pans and frost cakes with precision and panache. The spatula I use in Bake is my own. I’ve had it for about 10 years and I’d be lost without it!

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Anna Olson Kitchen Long Offset Spatula,  HBC, $10.

Hands mixing a batter with a black silicone spatula with various baking tools and ingredients laid on the table around the bowl

2. Silicone spatula

I prefer the curved spatulas for effective folding and stirring and for getting every last bit of batter out of a bowl. Silicone is heatproof so it can be used to stir pastry creams and sauces on the stove.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Allwin Housewares Silicone Spatula 3-Piece Set, Amazon, $12.

3. Oven thermometer

This may sound trivial but a thermometer placed inside your oven is a valuable and inexpensive tool that can save you frustration and prevent spoiled baked treats. You’d be amazed how many ovens don’t sit at the correct temperature the entire time your goods bake. Just because your oven “dings” or displays the temperature doesn’t necessarily mean it is accurate. If you discover your oven temperature is far out of range by 10 °C or more, a repair person can recalibrate it.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Pecula Oven Thermometre, Amazon, $12.

Related: Anna Olson’s Top 5 Vegan Baking Substitutes

Anna Olson poses in her kitchen while icing a cupcake

4. Disposable piping bags

Gone are the days of fabric piping bags that never quite come clean or that only fit your largest piping tip. Most cake supply and even craft shops will carry disposable piping bags in an assortment of sizes. They can be reused if you wish and are fully recyclable. You can even buy really small ones, which are perfect if you’re hosting a cookie decorating party.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Anna Olson Kitchen 100-Pack Disposable Icing Bags, HBC, $18.

5. Ice cream scoops

I rely on an assortment of sizes, not just for scooping ice cream. They are great for portioning perfectly consistent cookies and dropping muffin or cupcake batter into tins with less mess.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Chee Mong Ice Cream Scooper Set, Amazon, $29.

6. Candy thermometer

The world of confectionery and chocolate work requires a precision that only a candy thermometer can offer. The difference between the thread stage and the soft ball stage of boiling sugar is only a few degrees and a candy thermometer takes the guesswork out of it. There are traditional models and also digital probe thermometers – both work equally well. If you have an induction cooktop I recommend the traditional model because the magnetic energy of the induction can interfere with the digital reads.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Taylor Classic Candy Thermometer, Amazon, $17.

Related: From Easy to Advanced: Anna Olson’s Chocolate Recipes For Every Skill Level

7. Fine rasp

Savoury kitchens use this fine grater for garlic and Parmesan but I value it for finely grated citrus zest, mincing ginger without any fibres, grating nutmeg and for chocolate. Now there are models with larger grates, so you get chocolate curls, not just shavings.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Starfrit Zester/Grater with Protective Cover, Amazon, $10.

Yellow Citrus Juicer on a marble table with freshly squeezed juice and lemons

 

8. Bar citrus juicer

Lemon, lime and orange juice figure prominently in desserts and I always use freshly squeezed juice. A bar juicer is and fast and convenient way to extract the most juice and it’s easy to clean.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Chef’n FreshForce Citrus Juicer, Amazon, $33.

9. Measuring tape

This may seem trivial but a fabric measuring tape is immensely handy in a baker’s kitchen. I can verify how thick my dough is as I roll it and I can measure the circumference of a piece of fondant before I lift it to cover a cake. Plus, I can ensure that my squares are all cut to the same size.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Edtape Measuring Tape, Amazon, $6.

10. Cake wheel

If you are getting serious about baking this will be a tool you’ll want to invest in. A cake wheel spins on its base, making seamless frosting simple and detailed piping less. Professional cast-iron cake wheels can be pricey but there are other more affordable options. You can even purchase a lazy Susan that can function as a cake wheel.

Food Network Canada Editor Pick: Anna Olson Kitchen Glass Top Cake Turntable, HBC, $44.

For more festive recipes from Anna Olson, try her Triple Gingerbread Bundt Cake and Hot Chocolate Nanaimo Bars.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy through links in this article, we earn an affiliate commission.

Homemade marshmallows with hot chocolate

Cozy up With a Cup of Hot Chocolate Topped With Homemade Peppermint Vanilla Marshmallows

These Baking Therapy homemade peppermint vanilla marshmallows are soft, fluffy and they melt into the perfectly gooey topping on your hot cup of cocoa. Try different flavours like coconut or almond and make a big batch to gift over the holidays. Once you try homemade marshmallows, there’s no going back to store-bought!

Homemade marshmallows with hot chocolate

Peppermint Vanilla Marshmallows With Hot Chocolate

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Rest Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours, 20 minutes
Servings: 16 marshmallows

Ingredients:

Marshmallows
¾ cup cool water, divided
6 tsp gelatin
2 cups granulated sugar
⅔ cup light corn syrup
½ tsp salt
½ tsp peppermint extract
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
¾ cup icing sugar

Hot Chocolate
2 cups coconut milk
2 cups almond milk
¼ cup maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla extract
¼ tsp salt
4 oz semi-sweet chocolate, chopped

Homemade marshmallows ingredients on kitchen counter

Directions:

1. Line a 9×9 square pan with parchment paper and grease generously with neutral oil or spray. Set aside.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, add ½ cup water, sprinkle over gelatin and let sit for 5 minutes.

Related: Coffee and Hot Chocolate Recipes to Warm Your Belly This Fall

3. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, bring to a boil sugar, corn syrup, ¼ cup water and salt. Once the mixture starts to boil, let bubble for 1 minute. Remove from stove and transfer to a bowl with a spout.

4. With the mixer on medium-low, slowly stream in the hot sugar liquid. Once the liquid is in, turn the mixer to high and whisk for 10 minutes until the mixture is nice and fluffy. Whisk in the peppermint and vanilla extract.

Homemade marshmallows gelatin in mixing bowl

5. Transfer the marshmallows to the square pan, making sure to brush any tools you use with oil to avoid sticking. Smooth out the top using an offset spatula. Finally top the marshmallows with another sheet of greased parchment paper and let set for at least 2 hours at room temperature.

Homemade marshmallows batter

6. Remove the marshmallows from the pan. Brush a sharp knife with oil and slice the marshmallows into 16 squares, making sure to brush the knife with oil after every cut. Dust the marshmallows generously with icing sugar, making sure to cover every surface.

Homemade marshmallows cut on table

7. For the hot chocolate, in a medium saucepan on medium-high heat, whisk together coconut milk, almond milk, maple syrup, vanilla and salt. Once the mixture is hot, add the chopped chocolate and whisk until melted. Continue to heat, whisking constantly until the mixture thickens.

Homemade marshmallows with hot chocolate

Like Sabrina’s peppermint vanilla marshmallows recipe? Try her gingerbread doughnuts or her chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies.

This Bold 5-Ingredient Sheet Pan Steak Supper From The Pioneer Woman Will Brighten Your Table

When it comes to quick and easy five-ingredient meals, you can rely on The Pioneer Woman for a healthy and scrumptious weeknight option. With fresh cherry tomatoes, crunchy bell peppers and juicy cuts of boneless ribeye steaks, this bright and bold sheet pan wonder from Ree Drummond is everything you need in a well-balanced meat and veggie dish. *chef’s kiss*

Related: Simple and Satisfying Recipes That Use 5 Ingredients or Less

Steak Sheet Pan Supper

Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients:

2 red bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
2 yellow bell peppers, cut into thick rounds
1 large yellow onion, cut into thick rounds (large rings only)
2 cups whole cherry tomatoes
Two 12-ounce boneless rib-eye steaks, about 1 1/2 inches thick
4 tsp Montreal steak seasoning
4 Tbsp olive oil
4 Tbsp salted butter
1 loaf crusty, artisan-style French bread, for serving

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Directions:

1. Position an oven rack on the highest level in the oven. Preheat the broiler on high.

2. Arrange the peppers on a sheet pan in a single layer. Do the same with the onions and cherry tomatoes. This will create a bed of vegetables for the steaks to sit on.

3. Lay the steaks directly on the vegetables with an inch or two between the steaks so they aren’t touching. Season the top of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle the top of each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Top each steak with 1 tablespoon butter.

4. Broil until the tops of the steaks are nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and use a set of tongs to flip the steaks over. Sprinkle the other side of each steak with 1 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning. Drizzle each steak with 1 tablespoon olive oil and top each with 1 tablespoon butter. Slide the pan back into the oven and broil the other side for 3 minutes.

5. Plate each steak with half of the veggies from the pan. Serve with a chunk of crusty French bread.

Watch the How-To Video for Steak Sheet Pan Supper


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

a Kilne knife on a cutting board with a raw cut of steak and assorted herbs

5 Must-Have Kitchen Essentials to Buy Before Black Friday Ends

These days, everyone is a home cook as we spend more time than ever whipping up delicious dinners and mastering satisfying lunches. In fact, our kitchen utensils and kitchen accessories have never been more in-demand. But with Black Friday deals upon us, now is the time to finally invest in those chef-inspired kitchen essentials you’ve been eyeing. There’s a wide world of options designed to elevate any dish, but here are the top five essentials that all home chefs need in their kitchens to cook like a true pro.

Instant Pot

All chefs know that “low and slow” is the name of the game when it comes to maxing out on flavour, but busy home cooks don’t always have time for that. Enter this programmable pressure and multi cooker, which churns out quick dinners without sacrificing complex flavours. There’s an array of Instant Pot recipes out there to choose from, from Instant Pot spaghetti and pot roast to Instant Pot chili, chicken and everything in between. These machines typically go on sale come Black Friday, and investing in one means you’ll always be able to plan high-quality meals without investing any extra cooking or prep time.

Related: Our Very Best Instant Pot Recipes for Quick and Easy Dinners

Instant pot filled with rice and veggies

Quality Knives

Ask any chef and they will tell you the most important tool in a kitchen is a decent knife. Good, sharp knives reduce accidents and offer more control, so investing in quality knives is a must for any home cook – no matter your skill level. Kilne Cookware’s new six-piece knife set is tested by famous chefs like Claudio Aprile and Suzanne Barr (pictured below), but designed (in Canada!) with the home cook in mind. With quality knives, you’ll be chopping ingredients for your hearty winter stew or easy weeknight dinner in no time. For a limited time you can get the best knives for the home cook by taking advantage of Kilne’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday deal of the $190 set for an extra $25 off with the code SLICE25 – it comes with a 60-day home trial and lifetime guarantee.

Related: Chef Suzanne Barr Will Make You Think About Your Dinner Plate Differently

Chef Suzanne Barr standing in kitchen with knife and cutting board

Cast-Iron Skillet and/or Pot

Nothing against regular cookware, but if you want a reliable skillet, pan or pot, then cast-iron cookware is truly the way to go. Cast iron distributes heat evenly, and the metal stays hot even after you take it off the cooking surface, which means you no longer have to worry about wonky hot spots or keeping your food warm once you take it off the burner or out of the oven. Sure, iron skillets and other cast-iron products are a bit more costly than other cookware, but that’s why Black Friday exists! Plus, if you season yours properly and take good care of it, it should basically last you a lifetime.

Related: Here’s How to Season Your Cast-Iron Pans Like a Pro

Seven burgers being cooked in cast iron pan

Dutch Oven

When you’re spending a lot of time making a dish, like when you’re braising or stewing up something, a Dutch oven pot is your best friend. But it’s also so much more than that. It’s a catch-all for your weeknight pasta, the perfect vessel for Dutch oven bread, the unifier of soups and the best place to brown meat, period. Because it’s so heavy, it retains and distributes heat evenly — and if you invest in a good cast-iron one, it should last you a lifetime. The best part? If you want to whip up some Dutch oven recipes, you don’t even need to drop serious coin, now that Black Friday deals are here.

Related: The Best Winter Recipes You Can Make in a Dutch Oven

Whole chicken and veggies in Instant Pot

Microplane Grater or Zester

When’s the last time you used your cheese grater as a lemon zester? Or struggled to grate fresh spices, like nutmeg, with the same thing you just used to make nachos? A microplane is the perfect tool for zesting fresh citrus in salads and marinades, for easily shredding hard Asiago or Parmesan over fresh pasta or chicken parm or for curating perfect ribbons of garlic, ginger, chocolate or other toppings and aromatics. Add in the fact that they’re easy to store and reasonably priced to begin with — and you can tuck one away in your utensil drawer for a steal this Black Friday.

Related: Deliciously Bright Citrus Recipes for Cold Winter Days

Cranberries in white bowl with zester tool and oranges next to it


Suzanne Barr photo and feature image courtesy of Kilne Cookware; other photos courtesy of Getty Images

Team Buddy featuring Buddy Valastro, as seen on Buddy vs Christmas, Season 1.

Cakes, Cookies or Pies? Buddy Valastro Reveals His Ultimate Holiday Treat

Christmas is kind of a big deal at the Valastro residence. Sure, this holiday season may look a little bit different than Christmases past as a result of the pandemic, but in a typical year Buddy and his wife Lisa go all-out when it comes to their holiday dinners. Would you expect anything less from the Buddy vs. Christmas personality?

In previous years the couple has hosted all of their extended family, which adds up to more than 100 festive people. Typically Lisa cooks (prime rib, eggplant parm, lasagna, shrimp, lobster and more), while of course, Buddy does the desserts. But don’t let him fool you — he doesn’t necessarily whip up 100 mini pastries or elaborate cakes at home for the occasion.

Related: Buddy vs. Duff: See Buddy Valastro and Duff Goldman’s Most Epic Cakes

“Well, I’m not gonna lie. I don’t want to take credit,” he tells us. “I just bring like a slew of stuff from the bakery. We bring cakes and pies and cookies and lobster tails and pastries. And you know, we still love cake. After all these years and all these holidays and all these desserts, we still love cake.”

 

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A post shared by Buddy Valastro (@buddyvalastro)

While cake may be a year-round hit, Buddy adds that Christmas feels like an especially great time to indulge in pasties. He and his family specifically dive into Italian classics like cannoli and lobster tails (AKA sfogliatelle) because, let’s face it: when else do you have as much room for dessert as you do come the holidays?

“As big as the meal is that my wife makes, I swear it is just as important when we eat dessert,” he laughs. “No matter how stuffed everyone is — ‘oh, I can’t get up, I’m so full’ — they wind up all eating dessert. Every single one of them.”

Related: Ina Garten’s Best Desserts for the Holidays

For those fellow dessert-lovers out there, the host adds that around the holidays Carlo’s Bakery typically offers a red-and-white sponge cake that’s festive and crowd-pleasing — and they have a few other goodies in store for December too. This year that’s extra exciting for Canadians since the shop has expanded into Canada. In fact, Buddy says his Oh Canada Baby! cake would be the perfect thing for Christmas dessert this year.

“That would be a great Christmas cake on anyone’s table because it’s pretty and it’s delicious,” he says. “It’s also made with love. I want the Canadian people to know this is only the beginning of the plans for Canada because every time I come there fans are just so receptive and great. I’ve always felt so loved there and now it’s time for me to do some more in Canada.”

Related: Buddy Valastro’s Coolest Celebrity Cake Creations

For now Canadians can catch Buddy in his latest holiday-themed series, Buddy vs. Christmas. In each of the four episodes the baker and his team come together to face off against highly specialized artists (Broadway set designers, expert glassblowers and more) to see who can create the best life-sized Christmas displays to be presented at high-profile events.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Buddy Valastro (@buddyvalastro)

“These four creations are some of the best work — I was so blown away by what we did,” Buddy reveals. “When you see what we made, it’s just to another level. This was less about a competition because we’re all artists. Whether you’re a glassblower or whether you’re a brick artist and you make Legos or you’re a Broadway set designer or you’re someone who does animatronics in the windows, we’re all using different art forms to express our medium,” he continues.

“I love Christmas. My house is like the Griswolds at home with the decorations and stuff. And I gotta tell you, we just turned it on for this. It’s really cool.”

Watch Buddy vs. Christmas Mondays at 10EP and stream all your favourite Food Network Canada shows through STACKTV with Amazon Prime Video Channels, or with the new Global TV app, live and on-demand when you sign-in with your cable subscription.

Baked brie with nuts and dried fruit

This Baked Brie With Nuts and Dried Fruit is the Perfect Holiday Appetizer (or Easy Dinner Idea!)

With five minutes of prep time, this incredibly easy appetizer is a favourite around the holidays — or any day for that matter. You don’t even need to splurge on a fancy brie, a budget choice is just as delicious with every sweet and savoury bite. And while this holiday recipe calls for walnuts or hazelnuts, as well as cranberries or cherries, feel free to add in whatever nuts and dried fruit you prefer. Almond and pecans are always tasty, alongside apricots or figs. You can also swap out the herbs for a strip of orange or lemon zest too.

Baked brie with nuts and dried fruit

Baked Brie With Nuts and Dried Fruit

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

200 g double cream brie
3 Tbsp packed brown sugar
3 Tbsp maple syrup
1 Tbsp butter
2 sprigs thyme or rosemary
½ cup toasted walnuts or hazelnuts
¼ cup dried cranberries or dried cherries

Baked brie with nuts and dried fruit ingredients on table

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Place the brie in a small oven-safe skillet or a parchment paper-lined baking tray. Score the top with a paring knife for the cheese to quickly warm. Bake until softened and slightly puffed all around about 15 minutes.

Related: Best Edible Gifts Under $20 That’ll Make Anyone’s Holiday Sweeter

2. While the brie is in the oven, make the topping: combine the brown sugar, maple syrup, butter and thyme in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a low boil; cook, stirring until brown sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute. Stir in nuts and dried cranberries.

Making baked brie with nuts and dried fruit

3. Immediately top warm brie with hot pecan cranberry mixture and serve with crackers and fresh fruit if desired.

Tip: If using a heat-safe small skillet or ceramic dish, the brie will stay warm for up to 15 minutes. It can also be reheated in the microwave until warm, about 30 seconds. If you’re a fan of toasted nuts, feel free to toast them before adding to the brown sugar mixture. Do so over medium heat, stirring until lightly browned, 3-5 minutes.

Serving of baked brie with nuts and dried fruit

Like Soo’s baked brie recipe? Try her Chinese scallion pancakes or pan-fried pork chops with roast cabbage wedges.

An overhead show of sliced marbled banana bread

Why We’re Drawn to Comfort Baking in Times of Stress, According to a Psychologist

If we could sum up our collective baking experience in 2020, it would boil down to two words: banana bread.

When the global pandemic first upended our everyday lives back in March, many of us turned to baking. It didn’t matter whether or not we were seasoned pros, we all seemed to crave the baked goods we cherished as kids. (Think: cookies, muffins, bread and pies). There was something comforting about the familiar smells and tastes — and it had many of us resorting to a form of culinary therapy in a time of uncertainty. You couldn’t scroll through your Instagram feed without coming across dozens of bread loaves conjured up by even the unlikeliest bakers in your friend group.

Get the recipe for Healthy Marbled Banana Bread

So, what gives? Why now, in the midst of the second wave of COVID-19,  have we once again turned to baking — albeit with a distinct holiday sparkle this time around. As it turns out, our desire to bake when the going gets tough actually has deep psychological roots that can be traced back to our childhood.

Dr. Brent Macdonald, of the Macdonald Psychology Group in Calgary, has more than 20 years of experience in the field — and is more than familiar with the various intricacies of the human brain when it comes to food associations.

Related: Our Fave Food Trends to Come Out of Quarantine, From Pancake Cereal to Bread Art

“[Baking or cooking] can remind you of the positive experience of sharing it with family, of being cared for and comforted as children — and that same emotional transference happens in adults,” he explains. “The smell, the taste, the texture, the experience of eating something that brought you pleasure as a child brings up all those positive emotions of comfort and warmth.”

As Macdonald notes, it’s no mere coincidence that we seek out these familiar foods in times of strife. For many, it’s a form of mindfulness — even if we don’t realize it. “We tend not to have [comfort food] when we’re doing well — we typically have it when we’re feeling stressed. That’s our medicine, in a sense,” he says. “The good thing about it is that it works — comfort food and comfort baking makes us feel better. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing — we shouldn’t feel shame or embarrassment that we have comfort foods we enjoy. It kind of gets a bad rap because of its association with sugars and carbohydrates — and fair enough. But once in awhile, treats are treats for a reason.”

Get the recipe for Fudgiest Sweet Potato Brownies

But given this whirlwind year where many have faced significant social and professional upheavals, Macdonald says it’s still important to take note of how consuming these baked goods makes you feel — aside from sentimental reminders of Grandma’s kitchen.

“Does [comfort baking] make you feel good and just feel good? Or does it make you feel good temporarily, masking some really unpleasant emotions that come back immediately once you stop eating? Because that’s an unhealthy pattern,” Macdonald says.

So, what’s the actual science behind this feel-good attachment we have to baking? Over the years, researchers have shown evidence that the act of baking triggers various parts of our brain, including the amygdala (the part of our brain where emotions are given meaning) and the hippocampal cortex (memory retrieval) which can ultimately help us reduce stress and anxiety. Therefore, a simple scent — vanilla or melted butter — can take us back to the relative safety and comfort of our childhood, thus inspiring in us the desire to recreate the recipes we indulged in during our “stress-free” younger years.

Get the recipe for Perfect Fermented Sourdough Bread

And with certain scents you can almost feel the power of those neuroreceptors firing off, Macdonald says. “We start to drool, to salivate, as our body prepares to ingest the food. It’s similar to people who have nicotine cravings. All of those things set off an anticipatory response that is waiting for that intake.”

So, with the holiday season upon us and no sign of COVID-19 abating before the end of this strange year, indulge in a little feel-good baking — whether you’re a novice or pro. After all, it’s one of the most budget-friendly therapeutic activities you can engage in — and the end result tastes delicious. Happy baking!

Try your hand at these classic Christmas cookies that will spread holiday cheer or these bountiful bread pudding recipes you’ll make over and over.

Kardea Brown's Gullah Red Rice

Kardea Brown’s Smoky West African-Inspired Gullah Red Rice

As Kardea Brown shows us time and time again on Delicious Miss Brown, truly crave-worthy comfort food features a few common characteristics: it’s inspired by tradition, it’s simple to prepare and it’s packed with distinctive flavour — just like her colourful, devourable Gullah red rice.

Kardea’s red rice takes a flavourful staple of West African cuisine — jollof rice — and gives it an intensely delicious, sure-fire spin that’s influenced by her Gullah culture and her contemporary cooking style.

At its base, any red rice dish is just as it sounds — it’s rice cooked in some form of tomato, typically with an element of smoked meat added. To help keep her rice from getting soggy, Kardea uses parboiled rice (which has been dried and steamed in its husk). The result? Rich, fluffy red rice that’s so good, there won’t be any leftovers.

Related: Kardea Brown’s Pan Fried Collard Greens Are the Garlicky, Bacon-y Vegetable Side Dish of Your Dreams

Gullah Red Rice

Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 8 to 10

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked parboiled rice
¼ cup vegetable oil
8 oz smoked pork sausage, finely diced
1 large onion, finely diced
1 bell pepper, finely diced
Two 6-oz cans tomato paste
4 tsp granulated sugar
1 Tbsp garlic powder
1 Tbsp kosher salt
1 Tbsp fresh cracked black pepper

Related: The Best Rice Recipes for Dinner, and Even Dessert

Directions:

1. Rinse the rice until the water becomes slightly clear. (This removes the starch).

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the sausage, onion and pepper and cook, stirring, until the vegetables soften and start to brown at the edges, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, sugar, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Stir rice into the tomato mixture and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

Related: Skip the Drive-Thru With Kardea Brown’s 30-Minute Fish Fillet Sandwich

3. Transfer to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish and spread into an even layer. Add just enough water to cover the rice (about 2 cups). Tightly cover with a lid or foil and bake for 30 minutes without uncovering the baking dish. Turn off the oven, remove the rice, fluff the rice, then cover and return to the oven for 10 minutes more.

Craving a main course that has enough flavour to pair with Kardea’s red rice? Her warm, hearty beef and okra stew is up to the challenge.

Watch Delicious Miss Brown by streaming Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App, and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.


Gingerbread doughnuts on white plate

These Gingerbread Doughnuts With a Cinnamon Glaze Can Be Made in Under 30 Minutes

I love nothing more than a quick, easy dessert you can whip together in under 30 minutes. And these Baking Therapy gingerbread doughnuts are just the ticket. They will be sure to get you in the festive spirit, as they have all the flavours and spices of a classic gingerbread cookie — but in doughnut form! All you need are a few essential tools you probably already have in your kitchen and these doughnut pans. Topped with a cinnamon glaze for a hint of sweetness, because let’s be real: who doesn’t love a glazed doughnut?

Gingerbread donuts on white plate

Gingerbread Doughnuts With a Cinnamon Glaze

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 8 to 10 minutes
Total Time: 23 to 25 minutes
Servings: 16 doughnuts

Ingredients:

Doughnuts
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 ¼ tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
¾ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground ginger
⅛ tsp ground cloves
⅛ tsp ground nutmeg
¼ tsp salt
½ cup brown sugar
¼ cup grapeseed oil or any neutral oil
½ cup buttermilk
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 Tbsp molasses

Cinnamon Glaze
1 ¼ cups icing sugar
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
⅛ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp vanilla extract
5-6 Tbsp heavy cream

Gingerbread doughnuts ingredients on kitchen counter

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Grease 2 doughnut pans with oil or butter. Set aside. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, nutmeg and salt. Whisk in the brown sugar until evenly distributed.

2. In a measuring cup, measure out the grapeseed oil and buttermilk. Whisk in the egg, vanilla extract and and molasses.

Related: Party-Worthy Doughnut Recipes

3. Create a well in the centre of the dry mix and pour in the wet ingredients. With a spatula, stir the ingredients together until just combined, don’t over-mix. Transfer the batter to a piping bag or simply spoon the mixture into the doughnut pan until just below the fill line.

doughnut batter in doughnut pan

4. Bake in the oven for 8-10 minutes until a toothpick, when inserted, comes out clean. While the doughnuts are still hot, invert the pan and gently tap on the counter to remove the doughnuts. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

doughnuts cooling on wire rack

5. For the cinnamon glaze, in a small bowl, whisk together the icing sugar, cinnamon, ginger and vanilla extract. Begin with 4 Tbsp of heavy cream, whisking until well combined. Add 1 Tbsp at a time until the mixture has reached your desired consistency for dipping.

6. Dip the doughnuts, one at a time, into the glaze until the tops are fully coated. Add holiday sprinkles if you’re feeling festive!

doughnuts being dipped in cinnamon glaze

doughnuts with glaze in doughnut pan

Like Sabrina’s doughnut recipe? Try her chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies,  sticky toffee pudding and pumpkin pie squares with candied pecans.

All products featured on Food Network Canada are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy through links in this article, we may earn an affiliate commission.

cardamom teff muffins on green plate

These Cardamom Teff Apple Muffins Will Be Your New Go-To Breakfast Recipe

These cardamom-spiced teff muffins make for a delicious fall breakfast or midday snack. Baking with teff flour, a nutrient-rich, gluten-free Ethiopian grain can be tricky as gluten-free grains can be drying. However, the addition of fresh apples and applesauce make for a delicious and moist muffin. Teff should be combined with other flours when baking — and for this recipe, I’ve added oat and all-purpose flour. The oat teff crumble on top adds a tasty crunch and touch of sweetness. The addition of cardamom, cinnamon and pecans pair perfectly with teff’s nutty flavour. Serve this up with sliced apples and a spicy Ethiopian chai tea for a delicious start to your day.

Cardamom teff apple muffins on plate

Cardamom Teff Apple Muffins

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 to 40 minutes
Servings: 12 muffins

Ingredients:

Muffins
1 cup flour
½ cup teff flour (teff grains are incredibly small and can easily be mistaken for teff flour when shopping — be sure to buy teff flour and not the whole grains for this recipe)
½ cup oat flour
½ tsp salt
1 Tbsp baking powder
1 tsp cardamom
½ tsp cinnamon
2 large eggs
½ cup brown sugar
1 cup milk
¼ cup vegetable oil
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
2 Tbsp applesauce
1 Granny Smith apple diced

Crumble
¼ cup butter softened
¼ cup pecans
¼ cup oats
⅓ cup brown sugar
¼ cup flour
2 Tbsp teff flour
Dash of cinnamon
Dash of cardamom

Ingredients for Cardamom teff apple muffins

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, teff flour, oat flour, salt, baking powder, cardamom and cinnamon.

2. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, brown sugar, milk, oil, vanilla and applesauce.

Related:  Our Best Healthy Muffin Recipes for Busy On-The-Go Mornings

3. Dice the apple into small pieces and set aside.

4. Combine the wet ingredients with the dry ingredients without over mixing. Then fold in the apple pieces.

Cardamom teff apple muffins batter

5. In a separate bowl, combine the ingredients for the crumble topping with your hands until you achieve several small clumps.

Cardamom teff apple muffins crumble topping

6. Fill a muffin tin with muffin liners or grease the muffin tin. Fill with batter and top each with crumble topping. Bake for 20-25 minutes.

Cardamom teff apple muffins in tray

Love Eden’s muffins? Try your hand at her hearty teff breakfast bowl or comforting sweet potato blondies.

Anthony Auciello Jr., the founder and co-owner of TerraCello winery

Meet the Youngest Self-Funded Winery Owner in Ontario’s History

There are a few reasons multiple reviews refer to TerraCello as a “hidden jewel” in the heart of Prince Edward County wine region. TerraCello is a non-commercialized, artisan, farm winery. The vibe is in a laid-back bucolic setting. Outside is a rustic patio, fire pit and outdoor wood oven and kitchen. Inside boasts a wood fireplace, lounge, tasting rooms, barrel room and a second clay pizza oven imported from Naples, Italy.

Anthony Auciello Jr., the founder and co-owner of TerraCello Winery, employs traditional, old-fashioned Italian methods to make certified natural wine and authentic Neapolitan pizza. He is also the youngest self-funded winery owner in Ontario’s history. Tony is the personification of hospitality: charming, warm, generous, and radiating passion and appreciation for his trade.

Anthony Auciello Jr., the founder and co-owner of TerraCello winery

The winery is a
tribute to Tony’s late father

“People know me for my wine and my pizza, but the real story is about a son paying tribute to his dad who passed away at a young age,” Tony explained. In 2004, Anthony paid a visit to his father’s home town of Anzano Di Puglia, Italy, which the locals referred to as Il Paradiso – The Paradise. The land was in bad shape. War and famine had pushed his uncle and grandfather out of Italy, and they were forced to abandon it. Overgrown bush and dirt mounds stood where plentiful fruit trees should have been. “It was an epiphany,” Tony said. When he returned to Canada, he would create the paradise his family was meant to have.

Related: How Food Injustice Inspired This 23-Year-Old to Start Her Own Farm, Plus Her Advice for You

At the time living in Toronto, Tony and his girlfriend (now wife) Danielle moved to Prince Edward County. “My wife got dragged along for this long, bumpy, crazy ride. She was a city girl. She wanted to stay and be a teacher in Toronto. But I had this gnawing void.” After years of working on the winery, Tony’s health began to deteriorate because of the long hours of work he was putting in. He and Danielle were deep in debt and struggling to get by.

Danielle had never had the chance to meet Tony’s dad, but one night she had a dream about him. She said he was dressed up in a suit, looking handsome and immaculate. (Tony later explained that his father always dressed up, despite having no money or status to merit it). Danielle also said that in the dream that Tony’s father was driving an orange convertible. (Tony explained that his father’s first car in Canada in 1969 was an orange convertible Camaro). Danielle said Tony’s father gave her a hug and, with an arm around her, told her: “Please don’t worry about Anthony – he knows what he’s doing.”

Related: The Most Delicious Ways to Use Leftover Wine

With the $30 they had, Danielle went to Home Hardware and picked up a flag. She put it up at the road. Fifteen minutes later, two women walked in and bought the first bottle of wine they ever sold. “When they bought that wine, I swear to god it felt like they gave me fifty thousand dollars cash. It was like I had won the lottery,” Tony said. This first purchase washed away all the self-doubt that had been building up over the last five years of work. “I never looked back,” he said. “After that first bottle of wine, I said ‘we’re going to kill it. I’m not just going to do good pizza and wine; I’m going to become one of the best in Prince Edward County.’”

Outside TerraCello winery

They searched for a new property in the County. Where TerraCello now rests, there sits a giant well that separates the patio space from the vineyard. “When the owner showed me the well, I was sold,” Tony said. “The guys [who were here] were old, old school and I could relate because my dad was so old-fashioned.”

For five years, they worked 18 hours a day to restore and build the property into the gorgeous Italian farmhouse-style winery it is today. “Little by little, we built a reputation – one pizza at a time, one bottle of wine at a time. One customer at a time,” Tony said. On July 23, 2013, at 27 years old, Tony became the youngest self-funded winery owner in Ontario.

Outside TerraCello winery

Strict traditional methods

Tony executes a purist method. He is one of the few agriturismos in the County — the Italian tradition of farm to table. Tony fondly describes himself as “fanatical.” He is not only the owner, founder and financier, he is also the head winemaker and he makes all of the pizza dough, every single day, by hand.

The clay oven that they make most of their pizzas in is from Naples, Italy. Tony explained that making pizzas at scale in front a thousand-degree clay oven is very physically demanding, and not many can handle it. Apparently, it takes ten thousand hours to achieve the status of pizzaiolo. That’s a lot of flaming hot pizza.

Pizza oven inside TerraCello winery

COVID-19 has forced Tony to pull back on some expenses — such as, his membership to an official Canadian pizza organization — so that he could continue to spend on top quality ingredients. True to form, Tony gets all of his ingredients from Italy. The flour he uses costs about $50 per bag, and is approved by the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana (The Pizza Association of Naples). The tomatoes he uses are also Italy-approved. Everything, down to the handmade olive oil can from Naples, comes from age-old traditions. “If you ever have a pizza, even a margherita, and it’s got no oil, it’s not classified as a pizza. Period,” Tony warned. Italians are serious about their pizza. And after tasting it prepared in this way, so am I.

Pizza inside TerraCello winery

Natural winemaker

To classify as a natural wine, the grapes must be grown without pesticides, the wine must be stabilized naturally, it cannot be filtered and it cannot have any chemical additives. Most wines are processed by heavy filtering – “which is how 94% of the world’s wine is made,” Tony says. “I don’t believe in that.”
Woman holding glass of wine outside of TerraCello winery

Most of the time, natural wines are quite cloudy. By Canadian standards, we are legally allowed to put certain products in the wine to remove the cloudiness, but it goes against natural winemaking. The cloudiness is due to crystals in the wine that need to be precipitated out. In a modern setting, you’d use a tank with a chilling system. But as we know, Tony is a naturalist, so he does it the old-fashioned way. He opens the door in the wintertime and he allows the room to dip to -2 degrees for a week.

Related: The Most Expensive Wine and Spirits Ever Sold

The Boca Nera is his signature wine. An unfiltered, three-year in French oak aged, Barolo-style wine. Often called “The King of Wines,” Barolos are produced in the northern Italian region of Piedmont. It is made from the nebbiolo grape and is often described as one of Italy’s greatest wines. Tony’s Boca Nera has notes of caramel, toffee and French vanilla. If you could bottle the feeling of abbiocco, this would be it.

Bottle of wine at TerraCello winery

“Wine is like paint by numbers these days,” Tony said. Society wants uniformity and homogenization because they want the wine to taste the same every year. According to an expose on Bloomberg, there are such a thing as wine “fixers.” These are white glove chemists, often employed by billionaires and large corporations, who fix wines that have gone awry to ensure they taste consistent across batches. “I don’t want to over-control the product. I want it to taste different,” Tony said.

All you need is the right environment

Tony doesn’t have Wi-Fi at the winery, and he is unapologetic about it. He wants people to talk to the person next to them. “And they’re liberated,” he says. “After two hours of sitting outside they say, ‘we just had the best time of our life.’ And I didn’t do nothing. I just took them away from the distractions.”

Bottle of wine and charcuterie plate outside of TerraCello winery

“I didn’t want it to be a commercial, cookie-cutter winery where you go in and you do the formal tasting, and it’s all a premeditated spiel,” said Tony, “I wanted to take TerraCello back to the way my dad and us grew up — very old school, very warm, less transactional.”

Photos courtesy of Sabrina Stavenjord @sabrinastavenjord

The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili Will Become a Weeknight Staple

When it comes to quick and easy meals, you can rely on Ree Drummond for an instant classic family staple. With a plethora of diverse palate-pleasing spices and hearty beans and cheeses, this one-pot wonder from The Pioneer Woman is everything you need from an easy chicken-forward chili recipe. Bon appetit!

Related: Ree Drummond’s Best Holiday Desserts (From Cookies to Cheesecake)

The Pioneer Woman’s Fast White Chicken Chili

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Yields: 6 servings

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp ground coriander
1 Tbsp ground cumin
2 tsp dried oregano
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp kosher salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp olive oil
4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts (1 ½ to 2 pounds total)
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
½ cup heavy cream
2 Tbsp masa harina
Two 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
Two 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, drained
One 10-ounce bag frozen corn
2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese
1 avocado, diced
4 to 6 lime wedges

Related: 100 Popular Chicken Breast Recipes You Need to Try

Special Equipment: Pressure cooker

Directions:

1. Mix the coriander, cumin, oregano, paprika, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper together in a small bowl.

2. Add olive oil to a pressure cooker, set to saute and add the chicken. Sprinkle the spice mix over the chicken and toss. Cook until the chicken has started to sear on the outside, then add the broth.

3. Place the lid on the pressure cooker, set the valve to sealing, and cook on manual for 6 minutes. Release the steam using the quick-release cycle. Remove the chicken to a board and shred with two forks.

4. Put the heavy cream and masa harina in a small bowl and mix until smooth with a whisk or fork.

5. Switch the pressure cooker to saute and return the chicken to the pressure cooker along with the masa and heavy cream mixture, cannellini beans, green chiles and corn. Let cook, stirring occasionally, until the chili has thickened and the corn is warmed through, about 10 minutes.

6. Ladle the chili into 6 bowls. Top with cheese and avocado. Serve with lime wedges.

Related: The Pioneer Woman’s Cheesiest, Most Comforting Recipes Ever

Watch the How-To Video:


Want to spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family? The Pioneer Woman’s top cooking tips for easier weeknight dinners will help you get started.

Watch The Pioneer Woman via stream Live and On Demand on the new Global TV App and on STACKTV. Food Network Canada is also available through all major TV service providers.

Glass of milk next to pile of chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies

These Chocolate Eggnog Sandwich Cookies Will Surely Get You in the Holiday Spirit

I can’t help but get excited when I start to see the store aisles fully stocked with sweet eggnog, as it signals the most magical time of year! And what better way to get in the holiday spirit than whipping up a batch of these Baking Therapy chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies? They’re chocolatey, soft and filled with a creamy eggnog frosting. Put on your favourite holiday playlist and get baking.

Glass of milk and stack of chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies

Chocolate Eggnog Sandwich Cookies

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Bake Time: 8 to 10 minutes
Total Time: 33 to 35 minutes
Servings: 15 cookies

Ingredients:

Chocolate Cookies
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
½ cup cocoa powder
¼ tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 ½ sticks butter, room temperature
1 ½ cups dark brown sugar
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk

Eggnog Filling
1 ½ sticks butter, room temperature
2 cups icing sugar
3 Tbsp eggnog
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp vanilla extract

Ingredients for chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies on kitchen counter

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and brown sugar for about 1 minute. Add the egg and egg yolk, one at a time, and beat together until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.

Related: 20 Best Edible Gifts Under $20 That’ll Make Anyone’s Holiday Sweeter

3. Add the dry ingredients and mix until just combined, scrape down the bowl again and mix for another 10 seconds. Using a 1-inch cookie scoop, scoop balls on the lined cookie sheet. Round out the cookie balls by rolling them between the palms of your hands. Place in the freezer for 15 minutes to chill.

Chocolate eggnog sandwich cookie dough rolled into balls on baking sheet

4. Place the cookies 2 inches apart and bake for 8-10 minutes until the cookies have spread and tops begin to crack. Let cool on sheet for 2-3 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Chocolate cookies cooling on baking tray

5. While the cookies are cooling, whip up the frosting: in the bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, whisk the butter until airy, about 2 minutes. On low speed, gradually add the icing sugar. Add the eggnog, nutmeg and vanilla extract and whisk on high for 1 minute until light and fluffy.

6. Transfer filling to a piping bag with a star or round tip. Pipe the filling on the bottoms of half the cookies, place another cookie on top to create sandwiches.

Glass of milk next to a pile of chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies on wire cooling rack

Like Sabrina’s chocolate eggnog sandwich cookies? Try her sticky toffee pudding and pumpkin pie squares with candied pecans.

Canadians Now Ordering Food Online in Record Numbers, Survey Reveals

It’s been an unusual year, to say the least. From adjusting to our makeshift home offices to recalibrating our kitchen routines, our work-life balance has never looked more different. One of the biggest changes in 2020? The eating habits of Canadians.

This week, the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University in Halifax released their report on the impact of COVID-19 on the food industry and e-commerce. For the study, researchers surveyed 7,290 Canadians about their eating habits in the last six months.

Related: Meatball Fans Rejoice! IKEA Canada Restaurant Now Offers Takeout

The findings reveal that a total of 31.3 per cent of Canadians have used curbside pickup or home delivery services from grocery stores in recent months, while 28.6 per cent used an online service to get food delivered from a restaurant. Another 26.3 per cent specifically used a phone application to order food (think: UberEats and Skip the Dishes) with 12.8 per cent opting for make-it-yourself meal kits. In summary, 63.8 per cent of Canadians have ordered food online in some form in the preceding six months.

A quick breakdown of the most popular food types ordered by Canucks, according to the survey, reveals the following:

— fast food (33.1 per cent)
— fruits and vegetables (22 per cent)
— dairy products (21.5 per cent)
— baked goods (20.6 per cent)
— alcoholic beverages (8.7 per cent)

Related: Famous Recipes We’re Making at Home, From McD’s Hash Browns to IKEA Meatballs

When asked the reasoning behind their scrumptious purchases, respondents revealed that convenience by and large was the most popular reason, coming in at 33.8 per cent. Second place were concerns about the virus and leaving the house at 13.8 per cent. For 6.9 per cent of Canadians, mandatory self-isolation was the driving factor behind ordering food online or via app.

Related: We Tested 4 Popular Canadian Meal Delivery Kits. Here’s How They Compared

Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, 29.6 per cent of Canadians averaged food orders (grocery or takeout) at least once a week. In the last six months, however, that percentage has skyrocketed to 45.4 per cent.

In conclusion, the Agri-Food Analytics Lab estimates that 4.2 million more Canadians are ordering food online at least once a week than the pre-pandemic average.

Other than takeout, wonder what we’ve all been purchasing since March? Spoiler alert: it’s not just toilet paper! Here’s what Canadians have been buying since COVID started, according to Statistics Canada.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

Triple Gingerbread Bundt Cake on dark blue cake platter drizzled with brown butter glaze

Anna Olson’s Triple Gingerbread Bundt Cake Will Give You All the Holiday Feels

Gingerbread comes in more forms than just cookies! With a triple dose of ginger, this bundt cake recipe from Anna Olson will fill your house with a sweet and warming scent that screams holiday-time. Enjoy the recipe from Anna’s newest cookbook, Baking Day With Anna Olson.

Anna Olson's triple gingerbread bundt cake on a blue cake stand with a brown butter glaze dripping temptingly down

Buy Baking Day with Anna Olson, Amazon, $31

Triple Gingerbread Bundt Cake With Brown Butter Glaze

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour and 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour and 40 minutes
Yields: 16 to 20 (Makes one 10 cup/2.5 L Bundt cake)

This decadent cake is meant to feed a crowd, and it is perfect for autumn baking when you want to fill the house with the smell of wonderful spices. The “triple” in the title refers to fresh, ground and candied ginger, which means the ginger flavour is woven throughout the cake.

Related: Anna Olson’s Best Cookie Recipes

Ingredients:

Cake
1 ½ cups (300 g) packed dark brown sugar
1 cup (250 ml) buttermilk
½ cup (130 g) fancy molasses
4 large eggs
2 Tbsp (12 g) finely grated fresh ginger
2 ½ cups (375 g)  all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp (6 g) ground ginger
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
½ tsp ground nutmeg
½ tsp fine salt
1  cup (225 g) unsalted butter, melted (still warm is OK)
¼ cup (40 g) chopped candied ginger

Brown Butter Glaze
6 Tbsp (90 g) unsalted butter
1 cup (130 g) icing sugar
2 Tbsp (30 ml) 1% or 2% milk

Directions:

1. For the cake, preheat the oven to 325°F (160°C). Grease a  10-cup (2.5 L) Bundt pan and dust it with flour, tapping out any excess.

2. In a large bowl, whisk the brown sugar, buttermilk, molasses, eggs and fresh ginger until smooth. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, ground ginger, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg and salt. Add the dry ingredients all at once to the batter and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the melted butter and then the candied ginger. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for about 75 minutes, until a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean.

Anna Olson in a light blue and white striped shirt and light blue apron smiling on the cover of Baking Day With Anna Olson

Related: Anna Olson’s Best Gingerbread Recipes to Bake This Winter

3. Cool the cake in its pan on a cooling rack for about 20 minutes and then turn it out onto the rack to cool completely before glazing.

4. For the glaze, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat until it froths and then subsides and the liquid turns a golden brown, about 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and strain the butter through a fine-mesh sieve. Let it cool for 5 minutes and then whisk in the icing sugar and milk until smooth. Pour over the cake, letting the glaze slowly drip down.

5. Let the glaze set for an hour before serving or for 3 hours before covering to serve later. The cake will keep, well wrapped, at room temperature for up to 3 days.

For more of Anna Olson’s delicious dessert recipes, check out her ultimate holiday desserts or Anna Olson’s best-ever cake recipes.

bowl of stew with sourdough toast

One Humble Can of Tomatoes, Six Different Meals to Remember

As the weather turns cooler and we spend more time cozied up indoors, we often turn to our pantry to see what simple recipe we can whip up for a weeknight dinner. From pureed to chopped to strained, tomatoes are something I always have on hand as they can be used in endless ways. Here are six recipes you can make with a humble can of tomatoes.

Shakshuka

Shakshuka is a tomato-based dish that consists of poaching eggs in a spicy sauce. You can make it in 30 minutes with just a few simple ingredients. Start by sautéing garlic, diced onion and sliced red bell pepper in olive oil. Add your chopped tomatoes, paprika, cumin and chili powder. Let simmer for 10 minutes before cracking in the eggs. Cover with lid and poach the eggs until the whites are cooked, but yolk is soft. Garnish with crumbled feta cheese and fresh parsley.
shakshuka in a cast iron pan

Sloppy Joes

Have a can of tomatoes and ground meat in the freezer? Grab yourself some fresh buns and make sloppy Joes! A childhood favourite of mine, sloppy Joes consist of simmering together ground meat — beef, pork, chicken or turkey — as well as tomato sauce, onion, garlic, brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce. You can sneak in a few extra veggies if you’d like too. Serve the mixture on a bun.

bun with sloppy Joe mixture on black plate

White Bean and Tomato Stew

This stew consists of simmering white beans in tomato sauce, along with chicken stock, garlic, onion, celery, thyme and red pepper flakes. It is loaded with flavour and can be served a number of ways: over steamed rice, on sourdough toast or with pasta simmered right into the stew. Serve with lots of freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

bowl of stew with toast

Pizza Sauce

One of the most popular uses for canned tomatoes is homemade pizza sauce. We make a lot of pizza at home — and I prefer homemade sauce to the store-bought option, as you can control the flavours. It is so easy to make and requires no heating. Just stir together the tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper. You’ll be wondering why you didn’t always make your own sauce.

two slices of square pizza on a black plate

Salsa

Almost as easy as pizza sauce, you can turn a can of tomatoes into fresh restaurant style salsa. To a food processor: add tomatoes, green pepper (optional), fresh cilantro, onion, jalapeno, lime juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Pulse until the salsa is as smooth or chunky as you prefer. Open a bag of tortilla chips and dip, dip, dip away!

grey plate with tortilla chips and bowl of homemade salsa

Chili

The perfect hearty meal on a brisk fall or snowy winter day is — hands down — chili! You can add pretty much anything you like, be it lots of vegetables or just beans, ground meat, tomatoes and spices (chili powder, paprika, cumin and coriander). I like to include onions, celery, carrots and red and green peppers in my classic chili recipe.

chili in a white bowl

Want to cook with more pantry staples? Here is one humble can of chickpeas, six different ways and one can of black beans, six ways.

IKEA meatballs on serving tray inside restaurant

Meatball Fans Rejoice! IKEA Canada Restaurant Now Offers Takeout

Raise your hand if you’ve ever experienced a sudden, overwhelming hankering for IKEA meatballs. (*waves both hands*) If this describes you to a T, we’ve got some great news for you: as of today – November 9 – IKEA Canada is offering restaurant takeout so you can gorge on those iconic Swedish meatballs (and some new budget-friendly family meals) from the comfort of your own home. We don’t know about you, but this is the type of feel-good foodie news we need more of in 2020.

IKEA meatballs on serving tray

Related: Famous Recipes We’re Making at Home, From McD’s Hash Browns to IKEA Meatballs

Due to provincial COVID-19 restrictions, many IKEA locations across the nation have had to shutter their dine-in spaces, leaving bereft customers out of luck when it came to enjoying fan-favourites such as the veggie balls, butter chicken and the fish and chips duo.

Thankfully, the new takeout process is easy as 1-2-3: simply place your order at an IKEA kiosk in the designated bistro area and you’re all set to pick it up once it’s ready.

Related: We Tried Popeyes’ Famous Chicken Sandwich That Finally Came to Canada – Is it Worth the Hype?

IKEA has also introduced new affordable family meals, which includes a Swedish meatball family meal ($30) and a Swedish veggie ball family meal ($20). Each order contains 24 meatballs (or veggie balls) with a choice of two sides, plus additional sauces and a family-sized chocolate DAIM cake for dessert.

Related: We Tested 4 Popular Canadian Meal Delivery Kits. Here’s How They Compared

Takeout is now available at all IKEA Canada stores nationwide, including those which have temporarily closed dine-in areas due to provincial regulations.

Find more information on IKEA’s takeout policy here.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images.

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